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25 April 2022 - NW1023

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Deputy President

Whether, as the Patron of the Moral Regeneration Movement, he has any plans to intervene in instances of violence and substance abuse in our schools in order to restore values and morals among our youth; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Moral Regeneration Movement notes the incidents of violence and substance abuse in schools which involves, amongst others, sexual abuse, allegations of racism, bullying, drugs and alcohol abuse amongst learners. The apex of these being murders amongst learners.

The Moral Regeneration Movement continues to intervene to address these ills in our schools and communities. The Moral Regeneration Movement has engaged and encouraged public, private, religious, Traditional and Inter-Faith Leaders, civil society formations, and other stakeholders to partner in adopting prioritised school project. It has further engaged and partnered with the Department of Basic Education in incorporating the Moral Regeneration Movement’s Charter of Positive Values, and other moral renewal programmes as part of the curriculum.

In this regard, the Moral Regeneration Movement is committed to:

  • Develop programmes which are inclusive of ethical, and values driven leadership in schools and communities
  • Promoting school safety in partnership with Department of Basic Education and South African Police Service.
  • Empowering community leaders and structures to address social issues facing school and communities, in particular, to eradicate racism and xenophobia in schools and communities.

In promoting the Charter of Positive Values and the Bill of Rights in places of learning, workplaces and communities, the Moral Regeneration Movement view morals as societal, and transcend community confines, hence it has developed a programme to promote ethical leadership across society. This programme has footprints in workplaces and institutions of higher learning to:

  • Develop ethical and values driven leadership in institutions of higher learning and communities
  • Have each university to adopt the charter of positive values
  • Develop and nurture ethical leadership in student leaders
  • Address social ills facing institutions of higher learning
  • Create platforms for ongoing conversation on the values and ethics that student leaders should aspire towards.

The Ethical Leadership Project further seeks to support leaders, educators and communities to set up mechanisms, and systems that will promote ethical leadership, re-instate discipline in our schools, and foster a sense of accountability towards a moral and ethical society for the common good, and to address the abuse children in our schools in order to restore values and morals among the youth.

- END -

19 April 2022 - NW1249

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Deputy President

Whether the Human Resources Development Council has any strategies that are aimed at improving the scarcity of technical and/or other skills in order to promote the relevance of the South African education system in line with the international standards as well as the sustainability of our economy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Human Resource Development Council has developed a Human Resource Development Strategy which is in line with the National Development Plan. The Human Resource Development strategy outlines the vision for the development of human resources in South Africa, and the role that it will play in meeting the country’s economic, development and social needs.

Among others, the Human Resource Development strategy outlines the South African Human Resource Development commitments on the need to: increase the supply of priority skills to achieve accelerated economic growth, and to increase the number of appropriately skilled people to meet the country’s economic and social development priorities.

The Human Resource Development Strategy towards 2030 has five programme priorities to address key technical skills to promote the relevance of the South African education system. The programmes are as follows:

  • Programme 1: Strengthening basic education and foundation programmes in Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths, languages, and Life Orientation/skills.
  • Programme 2: Expanding access to quality post-schooling education and training.
  • Programme 3: Improving research and technological innovation outcomes.
  • Programme 4: Production of appropriately skilled people for the economy.
  • Programme 5: A developmental/capable State.

The Council is currently reviewing the Human Resource Development Strategy to incorporate the recommendations of a ten-year review work of the Human Resource Development Council, and the outcomes of the HRDC 2021-2024 strategic planning. Furthermore, in order to sustain the economy of the country which has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Department of Higher Education and Training has developed a Skills Strategy to respond to the Economic Recovery and Reconstruction Plan.

-END-

24 March 2022 - NW436

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Deputy President

What measures have been initiated by the Human Resources Development Council of South Africa since its launch in 2010 to ensure bridging the gap between the (a) Republic’s economic needs and (b) programmes for the skilling of (i) relevant and/or (ii) adequate human resources in order to meet the objectives of vision 2030 regarding skills?

Reply:

The Human Resource Development Council established ten (10) Technical Task Teams based on the Five-Point Implementation Plan and focused on the following: Foundational Learning, TVET, Worker Education, Production of Academics and Stronger Partnerships between Industry and Higher Education and Training Institutions, Production of Professionals, Entrepreneurship and Education, Skills System Review, and Artisan Development as well as the Maritime Sector Skills. Broadly, the Technical Task Teams played a catalytic role towards the achievements of the Council.

Artisan Development

The Human Resource Development Council established a Technical Task Team on Artisan Development which assisted in ramping up the artisan development. Between 2014 and 2019, the number of competent artisans have steadily increased from 14 389 in 2014/15 to 24050 in 2019/20. Should this trajectory indeed be sustained, the country will be able to meet the National Development Plan target of producing 30 000 artisans per annum by 2030.

University Sector

The Department of Higher Education, Science and Technology has advised us that University enrolment at public institutions has increased from 495 356 in 1994 to 1 036 984 in 2017, indicating that the country is on course to reach the National Development Plan target of 1,6 million enrolments by 2030. The enrolments in Science, Engineering and Technology have increased with an average annual growth rate of 4,3% in 2017. The number of students graduating in technical fields in both Universities and Universities of Technology has also been increasing over the years.

 

TVET College Sector

Through the recommendations of the Human Resource Development Council, measures were put in place to reposition TVET as an important skills development sector to incrementally produce the required numbers of artisans. The TVET sector has expanded and enrolments amongst the youth. The TVET enrolment has increased from 358 393 in 2010 to 673 490 in 2019. This was made possible by mobilising government to make funding available to improve access, which has resulted in increased allocation for the National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

Maritime Skills

The Human Resource Development Council SA established the Maritime Sector Skills Technical Task Team in September 2013 to investigate blockages within the maritime skills development pipeline, and to propose measures that can be implemented to address those. The consequence of this intervention, amongst others, was the establishment of the South African International Maritime Institute which was funded by the National Skills Fund.

A considerable number of young people have benefited from the South African International Maritime Institute, as a result, some have been awarded bursaries, and scholarship to pursue maritime studies abroad.

 

In conclusion, the Human Resource Development Council has assumed the role of Human Resource Development pillar of the National Development Plan 2030 with an emphasis on “building the human resources required for an improved and competitive economy”. The location of Human Resource Development within the National Development Plan is intractably linked to achieving the broader socio-economic goals, including poverty alleviation, equity and social inclusion as central goals.

-END-

24 March 2022 - NW440

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Deputy President

(1)Whether the Government has any programmes in place to address the high rate of unemployment and specifically youth unemployment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether such programmes involve engagement with the private sector in order to ensure a targeted approach to the recruitment of young persons to entry-level jobs, as well as ensuring that there are other programmes to empower the youth with the necessary skill set required to be successful in the workplace; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

One of the key interventions under the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan is the Presidential Employment Stimulus, with over 850,000 opportunities created through job creation, job retention and livelihoods support programmes since October 2020. Eighty-five percent (85%) of jobs created by the Presidential Employment Stimulus have gone to youth. This includes over half a million young people placed as school assistants since the inception of the stimulus.

In addition, the National Youth Development Agency continues to focus on the development of startup and scale up youth micro enterprises. Over the last five years the National Youth Development Agency has supported more than 100 000 young people through non-financial interventions such as entrepreneurship training and business development services.

For example, over 7 000 young entrepreneurs have been supported with development finance support through grant funding. In the 2022 / 2023 financial year, the National Youth Development Agency will support 25 000 young people with non-financial interventions, and 3 000 youth entrepreneurs with financial interventions in their entrepreneurship initiatives.

The Department of Higher Education and Training is also working closely with different bodies within the private sector across key sectors of the economy to unlock skills support for young people. This work will look at accelerating the skills intervention component of respective sector Master Plans, and unlocking latent demand in key labour intensive growth sectors. In this regard, Government’s initial focus will be on digital and technology, agriculture, automotive, social and renewable sectors.

Government is working directly with the private sector through the Youth Employment Services, which is an initiative of the private sector to address the ever-increasing challenge of youth unemployment in South Africa. The outcome of this initiative is to place the graduates to the private sector for learnerships, and internship programmes.

-END-

24 March 2022 - NW437

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Deputy President

In light of his responsibility to assist the President in the implementation of rapid response interventions on service delivery and trouble-shooting in service delivery hotspots, what steps have been implemented to improve the municipalities that are currently under administration?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative of Governance has identified, through the 2021 State of Local Government Report, 64 municipalities as dysfunctional and needing urgent support. These high-risk municipalities are characterised by, among other things, political infighting, poor and weak decision-making, poor governance and financial management, lack of consequence management, poor collection of revenue, and poor response to service delivery complaints.

As at 24 August 2021, out of the 64 dysfunctional Municipalities, the following 26 were placed under administration:

KZN PROVINCE

Abaqulusi

 

Emadlangeni

 

iNkosi Langalibalele

 

Mpofana

 

Msunduzi

 

Mtubatuba

 

Umkhanyakude

 

Umzinyathi

 

Nquthu

 

Uthukela

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

Kannaland

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

Mogalakwena

FREE STATE PROVINCE

Mangaung

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

Amathole

 

Enoch Mgijima

 

OR Tambo

NORTHEN CAPE PROVINCE

Phokwane

GAUTENG PROVINCE

Emfuleni

 

West Rand

NORTH WEST PROVINCE

JB Marks

 

Madibeng

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

Emalahleni

 

Govan Mbeki

 

Lekwa

 

Msukaligwa

 

Thaba Chweu

Both National and Provincial Teams have already engaged all 64 dysfunctional municipalities, including the 29 which were placed under administration, to develop Municipal Support and Intervention Plans. Upon engagements with all dysfunctional Municipalities, the following short and medium-term interventions were developed, and are currently being implemented:

Short-term interventions as adopted by Cabinet

  • Fast-track repairs and maintenance of water infrastructure, sanitation, repair potholes, energise streetlights, attend to sewer spillages;
  • All municipalities to upscale their efforts relating to community participation and citizen engagement;
  • Fight vandalism and theft of public transport infrastructure in collaboration with sector departments;
  • Fight gangsterism and criminal activities in collaboration with SAPS and other departments;
  • Operationalisation of the Structures and Systems Acts which coincides with the commencement of the next term of local government;
  • Conduct an in-depth assessment of municipalities that are already under section 139 of the Constitution, and deal with areas that need urgent attention by amongst others deploying technical support teams, District Development Model Political Champions to unblock persistent challenges etc.

Medium-term interventions:

  • Support municipalities to develop Asset Management Plans using 5% of MIG;
  • Restrict land invasion and facilitate housing development; 
  • Seek land and housing development opportunities closer to work opportunities;
  • Provide equitable, consistent and accessible transport for the low-income groups;
  • Support municipalities to ensure that all Senior Managers meet the minimum competency requirements as provided for in the Regulations;
  • Appoint and deploy the Rapid Response Team to prioritize the 64 municipalities with high-risk indicators;
  • Provinces to intensify support on MPACs to municipalities;
  • Facilitate settlement arrangements with ESKOM & Water Boards on debt owed;
  • Support municipalities with the improvement of their customer data management, records management and Information and Communications;
  • Reduce debt owed to municipalities through “Pay for Services Campaign”.

24 March 2022 - NW438

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Deputy President

Whether the Government has quantified the amounts that are owed as a result of the intergovernmental debt and/or amounts that are owed between (a) government departments, (b) entities and/or (c) institutions in the three spheres of government; if not, why not; if so, what are the (i) reasons for the failure in each case and (ii) full, relevant details in each case?

Reply:

According to the National Treasury, amounts owed by Organs of State to municipalities have been quantified. The quantification is derived from the consolidated quarterly reports as provided for by section 71 of the Municipal Finance Management Act.

According to the report for the second quarter ending December 2021, Municipalities are owed R19.5 billion by Organs of State. This is broken down into R8.2 billion owed by National Departments, R9.2 billion owed by Provincial Organs of State, and R2.1 billion owed in the category “Other” which consists of State Owned Institutions, Municipalities owing other municipalities, and in some cases Traditional Councils owing Municipalities. The following are the reasons for the continued escalation of inter-governmental debt:

  • Provinces are struggling to keep up to date with increases imposed by Municipalities for services and property taxes;
  • Allocations to Provincial Departments of Public Works and Infrastructure are not subjected to the same increases that Municipalities impose for services and property taxes. Municipal increases weigh much higher than the increases in the budget allocations to Departments;
  • There are a large number of properties that still have the incorrect naming configuration. These properties are supposed to be in the name of Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, yet they still appear on the Deeds Registry as having names such as “RSA”, and other names from the old categorisation.  As a result of this challenge, Municipalities are not billing the correct custodian of the property, due to incorrect names in their municipal books.
  • Another area of concern is that the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure disputes many of the invoices issued by Municipalities, and questions the credibility thereof.
  • The last area relates to properties that have no contractual arrangements in place. Most of these properties belong to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, yet there are other user Departments utilising the premises. In light of no contractual arrangements between the two parties, the bill remains unpaid to the Municipality, and accumulating arrears.
  • END -

24 March 2022 - NW915

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Deputy President

In light of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the increase of automation and robotics, as the Chairperson of the Human Resources Development Council, what is the Government doing to ensure that the relevant departments align with the 4IR?

Reply:

Government has established the Presidential Commission on Fourth Industrial Revolution which has produced a report with proposals on the development of the country's overarching strategy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and made recommendations regarding the institutional frameworks, and roles of various sectors of society within the broader plan.

Amongst other things, the implementation plan which is monitored by the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation is focusing on the following Cluster-Based Programmes:

Economic Sectors, Investment, Employment & Infrastructure Development (ESIEID)

  • Government Infrastructure Investment Smart Tender System: Digitisation of the tender process and adopt smart contracts (blockchain) to ensure transparency and public-private partnership initiatives to improve validation and verification.
  • Advance public procurement model: In supporting 40% of all public procurement in South Africa being allocated to women-owned businesses, build an algorithm that will verify businesses and allocate government business accordingly.

Governance, State Capacity & Institutional Development (GSCID)

  • Anti-fraud and corruption system: which will provide transparency in supply chain, and appointment of human resources. Develop and deploy mechanisms to be used to verify the processes; use blockchain to provide transparency and immutability.
  • Public Sector Annual Performance Plan and Medium Term Strategic Framework system: Digitisation of the Annual Performance Plans for proper planning and ensure accountability on the MTSF. Develop a dashboard that will be used across the public administration to monitor performance and align the plans and projects to the NDP goals.

Social Protection, Community & Human Development (SPCHD)

  • Advance the National Integrated Social Protection Information System (NISPIS): Integrate social development systems to ensure that the services are offered to the deserving beneficiaries, thorough verification, and validation is required. Align with the child protection act, where the sex offenders’ database is integrated with the NISPIS to ensure that children are not under the care of people in this database.
  • Digital Identity: deploy the use of all features of the Smart ID, using convergent of technologies in institutions to safely and efficiently render services.

Justice, Crime Prevention & Security (JCPS)

  • Use of vernacular languages in technologies: To promote and include the use of South African languages in economic activities. This will preserve local languages and allow vernacular communication with the global village.
  • Establish a drone unit in the police force: For cost-effective surveillance, tracking and intelligence gathering. Drones are an alternative to using expensive helicopters.
  • Digital court solutions: To improve the efficiency of court proceedings and secure data critical for prosecution.

International Cooperation, Trade & Security (ICTS)

  • Digital visa integrated platforms to facilitate the movement of people in the continent.
  • ACFTA integrated cross border systems for e-documents processing to facilitate the movement of goods, and to combat corruption in borders.
  • Implement the application of satellite technology for remote sensing on ocean trade routes in combination with other platforms to ensure maritime safety and security, to fight piracy and improve harbours’ efficiency.
  • END -

24 February 2022 - NW149

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Deputy President

Whether he and/or his Office ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his Office in this regard?

Reply:

The Office of the Deputy President did not receive the correspondence referred hereto. There was nothing to be brought to the attention of the Deputy President, as the correspondence is non-existent

24 February 2022 - NW31

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Deputy President

What measures have been initiated by the Human Resources Development Council of South Africa since its launch in 2010 to ensure bridging the gap between the (a) Republic’s economic needs and (b) programmes for the skilling of (i) relevant and/or (ii) adequate human resources in order to meet the objectives of vision 2030 regarding skills?

Reply:

The Human Resource Development Council established ten (10) Technical Task Teams based on the Five-Point Implementation Plan and focused on the following: Foundational Learning, TVET, Worker Education, Production of Academics and Stronger Partnerships between Industry and Higher Education and Training Institutions, Production of Professionals, Entrepreneurship and Education, Skills System Review, and Artisan Development as well as the Maritime Sector Skills. Broadly, the Technical Task Teams played a catalytic role towards the achievements of the Council.

Artisan Development

The Human Resource Development Council established a Technical Task Team on Artisan Development which assisted in ramping up the artisan development. Between 2014 and 2019, the number of competent artisans have steadily increased from 14 389 in 2014/15 to 24050 in 2019/20. Should this trajectory indeed be sustained, the country will be able to meet the National Development Plan target of producing 30 000 artisans per annum by 2030.

University Sector

The Department of Higher Education, Science and Technology has advised us that University enrolment at public institutions has increased from 495 356 in 1994 to 1 036 984 in 2017, indicating that the country is on course to reach the National Development Plan target of 1,6 million enrolments by 2030. The enrolments in Science, Engineering and Technology have increased with an average annual growth rate of 4,3% in 2017. The number of students graduating in technical fields in both Universities and Universities of Technology has also been increasing over the years.

TVET College Sector

Through the recommendations of the Human Resource Development Council, measures were put in place to reposition TVET as an important skills development sector to incrementally produce the required numbers of artisans. The TVET sector has expanded and enrolments amongst the youth. The TVET enrolment has increased from 358 393 in 2010 to 673 490 in 2019. This was made possible by mobilising government to make funding available to improve access, which has resulted in increased allocation for the National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

Maritime Skills

The Human Resource Development Council SA established the Maritime Sector Skills Technical Task Team in September 2013 to investigate blockages within the maritime skills development pipeline, and to propose measures that can be implemented to address those. The consequence of this intervention, amongst others, was the establishment of the South African International Maritime Institute which was funded by the National Skills Fund.

A considerable number of young people have benefited from the South African International Maritime Institute, as a result, some have been awarded bursaries, and scholarship to pursue maritime studies abroad.

In conclusion, the Human Resource Development Council has assumed the role of Human Resource Development pillar of the National Development Plan 2030 with an emphasis on “building the human resources required for an improved and competitive economy”. The location of Human Resource Development within the National Development Plan is intractably linked to achieving the broader socio-economic goals, including poverty alleviation, equity and social inclusion as central goals.

24 February 2022 - NW30

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Deputy President

Whether, as the co-ordinator of anti-poverty initiatives, he has commissioned any short-term interventions to mitigate the effects of the increase in petrol prices in light of the persisting high levels of unemployment, poverty and deepening inequality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Deputy President has not commissioned any short term interventions to mitigate the effects of the increase in petrol prices. The Basic Fuel Price consists of factors outside of South Africa’s control, hence international fuel prices fluctuate from day to day. South Africa is a net importer of Petroleum Products, and has no control over crude oil prices, exchange rates, and any factors informed by geo-politics.

The calculation of fuel prices is done by the Central Energy Fund on behalf of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy. In this regard, the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy announces the adjustments of fuel prices based on current local and international factors, and in terms of the amended regulations of the Petroleum Products Act, 1977 (Act 120 of 1977).

10 September 2021 - NW1874

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Deputy President

With reference to his most recent trip to the Russian Federation to receive medical treatment, what are the details of the (a) transport he used to travel (i) to the Russian Federation in June 2021 and (ii) back to the Republic in August 2021, (b) number of person(s) who accompanied him on the trip, (c) accommodation (i) he and (ii) any person(s) who accompanied him used during the trip and (d) transport he and any person accompanying him used while in the Russian Federation on the trip?

Reply:

In his oral reply to similar question posed by Mr Steenhuisen of the DA on 03 September 2021 in the National Assembly, President Ramaphosa outlined matters of principle with regard to the security and travel arrangements of the President and Deputy President.

The President said: Deputy President, is entitled to security wherever he is, including that of the President. This is not a personal choice. The Deputy President do not choose to be continuously shadowed by security people, but it is a requirement because it is taken that when the President, and the Deputy President are in positions that are in, they almost become state property, this is what comes with the job. Therefore, wherever the Deputy President and the President goes, they have to have security. They have security whether they are awake or asleep. The other issue is that whenever the President or the Deputy President goes, at any given time, their transportation is the responsibility of the government. When they fly it is the responsibility of the Air Force and as they travel on the ground it is the responsibility of the police, the Presidential Protection Unit. This is what comes with the job.

In this specific matter, the Deputy President flew commercial at his personal cost, and the supporting official was the Private Secretary. The Presidency was only responsible for costs that were incurred on behalf of the Private Secretary to the Deputy President in terms of flights, accommodation and S&T with the total budget allocation of R158, 542.54.

END

10 September 2021 - NW1912

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Deputy President

(1)Whether the Surgeon-General of the SA National Defence Force referred him for any form of medical treatment to the Russian Federation since 27 February 2018; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on which date(s) did the Surgeon-General refer him for medical treatment in the Russian Federation, (b) why was the Surgeon-General and the SA Military Health Service not able to provide the medical treatment that he required in each case and (c) what costs were incurred by the Government in each case for referring him to the Russian Federation; (2) whether, in light of his numerous postponements and cancellations of question sessions in the National Assembly, the Surgeon-General has found that in his current state of health he is fit to hold his current Office and perform the various duties as required by his Office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Deputy President like any other South African is entitled to choose his or her preferred medical practitioner. In recent past in Parliament, the Deputy President took South Africans into confidence about him taking ill and how he ended-up receiving lifesaving treatment from doctors in the Russian Federation.

It would thus be medically imprudent for anyone to abruptly abandon medical treatment by medical practitioners who are intimately au fait with one’s medical profile. Further details regarding the Deputy President’s consultations with the Surgeon-General can be obtained from the Office of the Surgeon-General, and the SA Military Health Service.

In instances where the Deputy President has had to postpone sessions for oral reply, such was communicated to the Presiding Officers of Parliament in accordance with Rule 144 (1) read together with Rule 11 (2). The Deputy President is fully competent to execute his responsibilities as delegated by the President.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW1911

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Deputy President

(1)With reference to his most recent trip to the Russian Federation to receive medical treatment, what are the details of the (a) total cost and (b) itemised breakdown of the specified total cost incurred by the Government in terms of (i) transportation, (ii) accommodation, (iii) medical treatment and (iv) any other related costs for (aa) him and (bb) any other person accompanying him on the trip; (2) whether he covered any of the costs related to the trip from his own pocket; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As indicated under question 1874 from the same Honourable member, the Deputy President paid for his flight costs to and from the Russian Federation as well as medical expenses.

The breakdown for the costs incurred for the support staff are hereby attached as Annexure A.

ANNEXURE 

  • END -

29 August 2020 - NO10

Profile picture: Mpumza, Mr GG

Mpumza, Mr GG to ask the Deputy President

Given that good relations between national, provincial and local government are essential in order to ensure successful service delivery, what steps has the Government taken to iron out any misunderstanding and/or misinterpretation so that the collaboration and coordination between the three spheres of government is underpinned by the attitudes and values of the developmental approach?

Reply:

A salient feature of our constitutional democracy’s developmental agenda has been adding value to our people’s lives through the effective and efficient delivery of services and development to communities, coordinated across the three spheres of government with the view of maximising impact and creating cohesive and sustainable communities.

Since 1994, there have been several attempts to achieve this through the refinement of legislation, policies and implementation. Despite these attempts, in certain areas misalignment and patterns of working in silos have persisted, often resulting in inefficient patterns of infrastructure investment and blurred lines of accountability, making it difficult for monitoring and oversight of government programmes.

Simply relying on each sphere to align their plans to the others, has not adequately served its purpose in respect to strategic infrastructure investment and planning.

Following several years of implementing programmes aimed at improving service delivery and of maximising the impact of interventions on communities, we can say there are sufficient lessons we have learned that point to a need for more deliberate efforts at collaborating and coordinating across the three spheres of government.

In 2019, President Cyril Ramaphosa launched the District Development Model, which is a practical realisation of our constitutional and legislative obligation to promote a cooperative government as well as provide support and oversight. The District Development Model aims to accelerate, align and integrate service delivery under a single development plan that is developed jointly by national, provincial and local government, as well as, business, labour and communities in each district.

The 44 districts and 8 metropolitan municipalities are meant to serve as development spaces, where the three spheres of government converge through targeted budgeting and a single plan. This would enable municipalities, communities and other key stakeholders to articulate the strategic support required from national and provincial government to improve prioritisation, spatial alignment of investment, and implementation. This signifies a shift from isolated planning and budgeting by the spheres to a practical intergovernmental relations mechanism for all three spheres of government to work jointly and act in unison, whilst creating a conducive environment for other development partners.

The rollout of this model has been informed and grounded by a comprehensive analysis of context, as well as, current and previous initiatives in order to adequately respond to the needs of the districts. Through the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, much of the focus thus far has been on concluding the process of profiling the 52 district and metropolitan municipalities to aid in crafting of the “One-Plan”, drawing in multi-stakeholders.

This process has now been concluded and in the short-term, will allow for the reprioritisation of budgets to address the gaps identified.

Intergovernmental collaboration and coordination has been a central feature of our response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This period of pandemic response, has effectively necessitated that we urgently rollout the District Development Model. To this end, budgets have had to be reprioritised and members of the Executive who are also District Champions, were dispatched to embark on oversight visits to monitor provincial COVID-19 response plans.

Government is also making use of various other inter-governmental structures and fora to achieve policy coherence across all spheres of government. The President’s Coordinating Council comprising Ministers, Premiers, Executive Mayors, and the leadership of the South African Local Government Association, is one of these intergovernmental structures advancing the culture of co-operative governance and of addressing the lack of synergy between national, provincial and local government by presiding over and setting a mutual agenda for planning, policy making and law- making across the three spheres.

Further, in our delegated responsibilities as the Executive, we are engaged in a number of programmes to assist the President in his efforts to bring about inclusive economic growth and development to our people. These programmes are focused on addressing the multi-dimensions of poverty, and are aimed at ensuring the realization of an improved quality of life of all the citizens.

One such programme is our leadership of the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Service Delivery, which is tasked with providing political oversight and leadership to ensure that key service delivery and development priorities are developed and implemented within the framework of the District Development Model.

Further work is being done through the Eskom Political Task Team to foster co- operation across the spheres in the recovery of municipal debt to Eskom and the recovery of debt owed to municipalities by government departments and organs of state to enable Eskom and municipalities to provide services continuously and sustainably.

These are just some of the deliberate steps taken by government to ensure collaborative and coordinated efforts in the delivery of efficient and impactful services and development to our people.

-End-

20 August 2020 - NO11

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Deputy President

Whether, the 70% of government spend on established white owned businesses to the exclusion of black youth, particularly young black women who only get 30%, (a) is in line with the Government’s vision of stimulating and supporting rural and township economy through the implementation of empowerment models in building a capable State and (b) he has found that this lack of will to govern perpetuates this disparity which entrenches the existing inequality?

Reply:

Whereas it is not evident from where the statistics cited in the question is derived from, whenever we have responded to questions in Parliament on the revitalisation of rural and township economies, we have emphasised the objective of ensuring that we transform townships and villages from labour and consumption reserves into thriving productive investment hubs that contribute to broader economic transformation of previously marginalised communities.

To achieve this, government policy seeks to bring Historically Disadvantaged Individuals and their businesses into the main stream economy. According to the National Treasury, it is not correct that 70 percent of government spend is allocated to established white owned businesses. The opposite is in fact true, where government spend has been used to transform the economy by sourcing from black-owned enterprises.

Further details on procurement by the state from these enterprises can be sourced from the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer in the National Treasury.

Failure to adequately empower women and capacitate youth compromises efforts and campaigns dedicated towards social cohesion and nation-building. In our effort to empower women and the youth, government’s approach is centred on promoting and supporting local businesses, whilst we emphasise the involvement of local communities.

The National Treasury will release statistics on these categories of business in terms of Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA) Objectives at the end of September 2020 for the 2019/2020 financial year, and up to August 2020 for the current financial year. The National Treasury has commenced a process to modernise and automate public procurement system as part of strengthening the system.

This is to enhance oversight and reporting including addressing of fragmented procurement systems in the different spheres of government and entities running separate systems and insufficient standardised transactional data being centrally collected. It is intended that procurement will be better reported on including all spend across all of government by designated groups according to the PPPFA objectives frequently and regularly.

This will assist us in examining the spread of the procurement spend and categories of goods and services rendered and where possible, identify gaps and areas of the economy that requires further intervention. These interventions are critical if we are to promote inclusive economic growth and equitable employment opportunities.

This government remains steadfast in its commitment to implement legislation, policies, regulations and programmes which seek to redress the legacy of apartheid with a particular focus on black women and youth. Inequalities are indeed deeply entrenched and will require continued, purposeful action by all.

 

-End-

20 August 2020 - NO7

Profile picture: Mofokeng, Ms JM

Mofokeng, Ms JM to ask the Deputy President

With reference to the theme Silencing the Guns: Creating Conducive Conditions for Africa’s Development and upon the Republic’s assumption of the Chair of the African Union (AU), the Government committed to promote women’s economic inclusion and strengthening the fight against gender-based violence, which are challenges faced by women in Africa that have all been exacerbated by the novel coronavirus, what therefore are the details of his role in assisting the President in efforts towards building a better Africa as the Envoy to South Sudan in silencing the guns on the continent, with particular reference to (a) protecting women and children and (b) fighting gender- based violence?

Reply:

South Africa continues to be at the frontline of championing the implementation of the African Union theme for the year, of “Silencing the Guns: Creating Conducive Conditions for Africa’s Development”. The flagship initiative of Silencing the Guns is at the core of activities led by the African Union, towards ensuring that Africa is a more peaceful and stable continent.

Amidst various challenges encountered such as the unprecedented global COVID-19 pandemic, we are forging ahead with this work, towards laying a foundation for achieving the objectives linked to Agenda 2063. At the centre of this agenda, is prioritising mechanisms that promote a dialogue-centred approach to conflict prevention, mediation and resolution of conflicts to ensure that peace and a culture of tolerance is entrenched.

 

Alongside leading these African Union efforts, South Africa continues to play a role of assisting in the implementation of the Revitalised Agreement on the Resolution of Conflict in South Sudan. Our role is to ensure that the Revitalised Government of National Unity achieves all elements they have set out, to attain national reconciliation, national healing and that permanent and sustainable peace is restored to enable South Sudan to prosper and where its people realise their full human potential.

 

Evidence across all conflict spots, demonstrates that at the receiving end of conflict is always the ordinary people, mostly women and children who bear the brunt of immeasurable pain and disruption to their lives. In conflict, women and children often face the daunting task of keeping families together after displacement by providing food, clothing and shelter. With our humanitarian intervention in South Sudan, women are the majority of beneficiaries. The same is true for the Central African Republic, where the conflict of over the past two decades has had a dramatic impact on women and children.

 

To date, South Africa has been championing interventions in the region, which are focused on facilitating high level national dialogues, reconciliation support, offering high level advisory services and the necessary technical support required for building and strengthening the political and economic infrastructure required for sustainable democracy. We do this, for we believe that conflict is not good for our continent as it stunts growth and development. It breeds discontent and it is a recipe for disaster.

 

In our engagements with leaders on the continent, we have always advocated for international, regional and national strategies which are gender responsive, and focused on the advancement of the rights of women and girls.

This year the world also marks 25 years since the Beijing Declaration: Platform for Action that was adopted by the United Nations, which advocated strongly for the rights of women and gender equality to be prioritised. As we mark the historic Beijing Declaration, we also need to guard against regressing on the gains made in the global fight against all forms of violence against women and other forms of gender-based violence and femicide.

 

According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS for instance, nearly one in three women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner, non-partner sexual violence or both in their lifetime.

 

The United Nations Security Council Resolution 1820 further highlights that, sexual violence is “a tactic of war to humiliate, dominate, instil fear in, disperse and/or forcibly relocate civilian members of a community or an ethnic group.” In such instances, rape is used to demoralise and destabilise entire communities. Women and children are often the most vulnerable to this war tactic during times of conflict.

 

As we have said, these challenges have been exacerbated by the global COVID-19 pandemic, which is heavily affecting the livelihoods, socio-economic stability and security of many families and communities in Africa. This pandemic has shown that women and girls are disproportionally affected, often finding themselves at the forefront of fighting the disease.

 

We can all agree that more needs to be done at individual country level as well as globally to eradicate such violations. We have always advocated for strategies that would commit Member States of the African Union to ensure access to justice for victims and survivors of gender-based violence, protecting women and girls in humanitarian situations across Africa, and establishing of humanitarian corridors for accessing aid.

We are encouraged that the African Union recognises gender equality as a fundamental human right, and an integral part of regional integration, economic growth and social development. To this end, the African Union has developed a strategy for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment, to ensure the inclusion of women in Africa’s development agenda. This Gender Empowerment strategy is a timely intervention to address imbalances and gender inequities.

 

We are confident that all parties and stakeholders in South Sudan, will ensure that peace holds and that women are not hindered in playing a leading role in the rebuilding of the country and all its institutions.

 

South Africa shall continue to support such efforts, as we do with the capacity training programme that supports peace-building efforts. The training focuses on increasing existing mediation capacity of women.

 

The Capacity Training Programme in Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Mediation attracts international women, the majority of which are from African Member States to the African Union. This programme has trained 26 women leaders, including those from the Republic of South Sudan in the current year.

 

In conclusion, we have always sought to ensure that our commitment to the promotion, protection and fulfilment of human rights is among the guiding principles that inform South Africa’s engagement with South Sudan, and the rest of Africa.

 

-En

20 August 2020 - NO8

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Deputy President

With reference to the Moral Regeneration Movement’s fervent support for the Government’s Covid-19 pandemic lockdown (details furnished), what are the relevant details of its vision that (a) the nation’s moral fiber, which is an essential component of the social cohesion, needs to be authentically and wholesomely reconstructed and

Reply:

The Moral Regeneration Movement came into existence as a result of former President Nelson Mandela’s resolve, that while the new dispensation needed to meet tangible material needs of previously dehumanised black majority, it was also necessary that there be a commensurate programme that would focus on rekindling the very basic moral fibre of the South African society that had almost been destroyed by years of colonialism and apartheid oppression.

Colonialism, racialism and apartheid were at their very core immoral and extremely violent, and the negative impact they have made on communities is abysmal. Therefore, from the very beginning, it was envisaged that there would be a national programme on moral regeneration led by civil society and supported by government and other key sectors of society, including business and the religious fraternity.

 

In appreciating this historical context and the lived social reality of being an integral part of the continent, the moral regeneration vision draws sustenance from the African moral ethic of Ubuntu, which appeals to humanity’s interdependence and interconnectedness.

 

As this question relates to the statement issued by the Moral Regeneration Movement in April this year following the introduction of the Nationwide Lockdown, it is important to reiterate that the Moral Regeneration Movement is an independent civil society formation that takes its own position on a variety of issues, some of which we may agree with, while others we may not necessarily agree with.

 

It is to be noted that the very same statement makes reference to minimising corruption. Our position is contrary. As government of the African National Congress, we seek to eliminate corruption in all its forms and manifestations. That is why we have said on numerous occasions that where any acts of corruption are proven, we are determined to act without any fear or favour against those involved.

 

To this end, as Government, we have developed an overarching National Anti- Corruption Strategy which is aimed at:

 

  • Rejuvenating a national dialogue and direct energy towards practical mechanisms to reduce corruption and improve ethical practice across sectors and amongst citizens in South Africa.

 

  • Providing a robust conceptual framework and strategic pillars to guide anti- corruption approaches across relevant sectors in the country, and
  • Support coordination between government, business and civil society efforts to reduce corruption and improve accountability and ethical practice, while providing tools for monitoring progress towards a less corrupt society.

 

For us as a nation, in order to achieve these goals, we should all work together and appreciate that moral regeneration is a fundamental pillar of building a cohesive and caring society that is grounded on ethical values.

 

As a Patron of the Moral Regeneration Movement, we therefore support those programmes of the Moral Regeneration Movement that seek to build the nation and enhance social cohesion in line with the vision of a new society, as articulated in our National Development Plan – a society that is non-racial, non-sexist and democratic.

 

We wish to emphasise that the various programmes of the Moral Regeneration Movement must go deeper into interrogating the root causes of social ills that continue to plague our society. These programmes must also seek to address the deep inequalities that exist in our society. Such inequalities further manifest in acts of sexism, patriarchal tendencies and economic exclusion of women. Until these inequalities are addressed, we will not achieve our dream of a cohesive and united society.

 

The Moral Regeneration Movement seeks to address some of these challenges that are inherent to issues of inequality in our society. In its work and articulation of the vision for a better South Africa, the Moral Regeneration Movement advocates for the Charter of Positive Values as an expression and interpretation of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights from a perspective of ordinary people. This is the key tool it has adopted and advocates for, in order to rebuild South Africa’s moral fibre. At the heart of this programme are values of responsibility and accountability, honesty and integrity, equity and equality among others.

There have been some disturbing reports during the nationwide lockdown period that related to increased levels of gender based violence, human rights abuses, and the destruction of schools in certain areas. Government and many civil society formations strongly condemned these incidents which clearly sought to undermine the rule of law. Such incidents are manifestations of deep societal problems that need condemnation by all of us, and for stronger partnerships across society as a response as well as immediate action.

 

That is why the Movement is currently implementing an action plan that contains tangible strategic interventions in rekindling basic morality and ethics. It has for its part, continued sponsoring community dialogues on gender based violence and femicide as a way to engender positive behavioural change. These public engagements are currently being rolled out mainly through virtual platforms.

 

The Movement is also collaborating with the South African Local Government Association on the programme to promote ethical leadership. Through this initiative, Councillors are taken through orientation on the fundamentals of ethical leadership thus ensuring that we reduce the propensity or inclination for corrupt activities. This programme needs to be supported so that it reaches all other levels of leadership in society.

 

The violent service delivery protests and anarchy that we observe in some communities from time to time, and which undermine the rule of law, are in many instances as a result of lack of ethical leadership and corruption associated with service delivery.

 

Nation building is not an event, but a social engineering process that needs to fester across society over time. We are all called upon to act in ways that counter social attitudes and practices that are at odds with the society we seek to build, as envisioned in our Constitution.

 

-End-

20 August 2020 - NO9

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Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the Deputy President

Whether, in view of COVID-19 infections which are increasing at an alarming rate in the Republic, the Government and/or the National Coronavirus Command Council intends to investigate claims of a certain doctor (name and details furnished) of a 100 percent success rate in the treatment of all COVID-19 patients since March 2020, whose remedy had also drawn the attention of a United States senator and presidential advisors; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the specified investigation be launched?

Reply:

We note the very important question raised which relates to a doctor who is based in Texas, in the United States of America.

 

We are all focused on flattening the curve of coronavirus infections in our country, hence government has led a robust country response under the auspices of the National Coronavirus Command Council. Much progress has been made in this regard. We have substantively reduced the number of new infections and increased the number of recoveries now at 88.6 percent.

We also are looking forward to the development of potential treatments, and a vaccine for the COVID-19 pandemic, hence the Minister of Health has followed up on these claims in earnest. The President is working with other global leaders to ensure that once the vaccine is found, it is equitably accessible to all countries including South Africa.

 

The Department of Health has advised us that the drug in question has not been approved to treat people infected with the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. To this end, the Department of Health will continue to issue guidelines for the use of government approved drugs in all our health facilities for COVID-19 patients.

 

As a nation, we see value in participating in clinical trials that comply with the highest ethical standards. Our participation will ensure that we contribute to the body of knowledge, and secure our access to therapeutics when they are ready for clinical application.

 

We welcome all well-founded, and lawful scientific trials for the development of government approved drugs including vaccine trials that will assist our country to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. However, we must caution against rushing to embrace unproven, and unscrupulous claims of COVID-19 drugs, treatments and vaccines that may derail our government’s efforts to deal with this pandemic.

 

-End-

20 August 2020 - NO12

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Luzipo, Mr S to ask the Deputy President

In light of the current challenges of energy supply and efficiency as well as the Government’s commitment to an integrated energy mix, what capacity demands can other alternative sources of energy, such as independent power producers, provide to mitigate Eskom’s shortfall on electricity demand?

Reply:

South Africa is a country endowed with abundant energy resources. Coal, nuclear, solar power, and wind power all play a central role in the socio-economic development of our country, while simultaneously providing the necessary infrastructure and economic base for the country to become an attractive host for foreign investments in the energy sector. Successful and sustainable utilisation of all possible energy carriers in our country is vital for energy security, sustainable economic growth and development.

Cabinet approved the Integrated Resource Plan 2019 which is our blueprint, spelling out our energy mix objectives to meet electricity demand between now and the year 2030. Eskom generation capacity forms a significant part of our energy supply into the future and hence our attention to resolve its plant performance and financial challenges. As in all sectors of the economy, the state does not have sufficient resources to go it alone. The energy sector is therefore not an exception.

During the 2020 State of the Nation Address, President Cyril Ramaphosa committed to the following, amongst others:

  • A Section 34 Ministerial Determination will be issued to give effect to the Integrated Resource Plan 2019, enabling the development of additional grid capacity from renewable energy, natural gas, hydro power, battery storage and coal.
  • The procurement of emergency power from projects that can deliver electricity into the grid within 3 to 12 months from approval, will be initiated.
  • Measures to be introduced to enable municipalities in good financial standing to procure their own power from Independent Power Producers will be put in place.

    The Eskom Political Task Team was appointed and has been seized with ensuring that we accelerate processes to provide additional energy capacity through the implementation of the Emergency Energy Procurement Programme. Concurrence has been received from the National Energy Regulator of South Africa to the Section 34 determination by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy to procure an additional 2 000 MW as pronounced by President Ramaphosa. This will in total enable the development of additional 11 813MW of power from 2022 which is in addition to the 2000MW under emergency procurement. It will further be in addition to the Bid Window 4 contribution to the grid.

    We are concerned about the disruptive nature and negative impact power interruptions have on the economy. To mitigate against current load shedding and load reduction, Government has also initiated a number of initiatives that include:
  • Eskom procurement of power from private companies through short term power contracts under the Short Term Power Purchase Programme. It is expected that the final contract will be awarded by no later than the end of September 2020. Further, measures to expedite this process are being explored.
  • The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy procurement programme of 2000 MW with Eskom as the buyer.
  • The Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy enabling generation for own use through inclusion of distributed capacity in the IRP 2019, as well as amendments to Schedule 2 of the Electricity Act.
  • Financially sustainable municipalities being enabled to procure own power generation as off-takers from Independent Power Producers or through public, private partnerships.

Therefore, private power generation by consumers or Independent Power Producers will play a significant role in helping close the demand and supply role as a result of the lower than expected Eskom generation plant Energy Availability Factor.

In summary, a combination of generation for own use, municipal generation and Independent Power Producers can play a significant role in helping close the supply and demand gap due to Eskom plant challenges.

Partnership with Independent Power Producers is in alignment with the National Development Plan goals of job creation, skills development and improving the livelihoods of people. We are optimistic that this will provide the necessary capital investment in the sector and will further contribute to the diversification of both the supply and nature of energy production.

We remain optimistic that the Independent Power Producers, in partnership with Eskom will provide a sustainable and complementary solution to our electricity generation challenges.

As we continue to sharpen our resolve towards the realisation of the National Development Plan, we need to find innovative and affordable funding mechanisms for the participation of black entrepreneurs in the energy space, which will allow the development of black industrialists, as well as ensuring participation of black entrepreneurs in the main stream economy.

It is government’s position that South Africa cannot address inequality, poverty and unemployment without economic empowerment of historically disadvantaged groups such as black people, women, youth and people with disabilities without the support of the private sector. As we move forward, we need to accelerate the participation of youth and women in the energy sector in particular.

 

-End-

22 July 2020 - NW1593

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Deputy President

1. Whether the Eskom Task Team has considered the plight of the communities of Bethal and eMzinoni in the Govan Mbeki Local Municipality in Mpumalanga who have had to endure daily power interruptions of up to 12 hours at a time since the end of March 2020; if not, will the task team consider the plight of these communities at its next meeting; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) discussions it held and (b) solutions it proposed; 2. whether he has been informed that this part of the Govan Mbeki Local Municipality has a lower maximum demand limit imposed on it by Eskom in comparison to the rest of the municipality; 3. whether he has been informed that Eskom refuses to lift the lower maximum demand limit imposed on this part of the local municipality due to the municipality’s failure to honour a debt repayment arrangement with Eskom; ​4. whether he and/or any other member of the Eskom Task Team will meet with Eskom, the Mpumalanga Provincial Government and/or the local municipality as a matter of urgency in order to relieve the social and economic plight of the residents of Bethal and eMzinoni? NW1976E

Reply:

As the Eskom Task Team, we have committed to ensuring that we expedite the payment of outstanding debts owed to Eskom while also directing all national and provincial organs of state to settle all outstanding debts to municipalities.

More importantly, we have a responsibility to improve a culture of payment for services such as electricity and water by our communities to avoid unnecessary disruptions in the provision of these services. We also call on all our communities to pay for electricity to enable Eskom and municipalities to provide services continuously and sustainably.

In this regard, government is planning to implement a comprehensive campaign to raise awareness, and encourage communities to pay for electricity and other services they consume.

In addressing the plight of the communities and businesses of Bethal and Emzinoni in the Govan Mbeki Municipality in Mpumalanga, we would like to assure the member that the Eskom Task Team is looking into all municipalities that are exceeding the contracted demand and the resultant impact on communities.

Eskom is providing the maximum demand in line with the contract it has with Govan Mbeki Municipality. This is primarily to protect the upstream infrastructure. Govan Mbeki Municipality ensures that the load utilised is in line with this contracted notified demand. In doing so the municipality decides which areas are switched off, and for how long, to ensure that the load is managed within limits.

The municipality has three bulk accounts with Eskom viz. Secunda, Evander and Kinross. The Secunda account has four bulk supply points linked to it, which are Embalenhle, Secunda, Emzinoni and Bethal.

Eskom has enforced contractual Notified Maximum Demand (NMD) on Bethal, Emzinoni and Evander. The municipality initially requested for an interim NMD increase for Bethal, Emzinoni and Evander on 8 April 2020. Eskom did not accede to this request due to the status of the account.

The municipality applied again on 1 June 2020 for an NMD increase for the Bethal and Emzinoni supply points. Eskom responded on

4 June 2020 outlining the conditions for any increase in NMD. The conditions clearly stipulated that the municipality has to sign a Pre- payment / Upfront Payment Agreement, as well as a Repayment Agreement Plan for the arrear debt. The municipality did not respond to the above conditions.

For Eskom to increase the maximum demand limit, assurance must be provided that the payment conditions will be met for such increased electricity provision. As at 13 July 2020, Govan Mbeki Municipality owed Eskom R1.99 billion, the municipality is battling to settle its current accounts, and has also failed to conclude a payment plan for the arrear debt.

Eskom received a letter dated 24 June 2020 from Gert Sibande District Municipality, stating that Council took a special resolution to assist the Govan Mbeki Municipality with electricity challenges at both Bethal and Emzinoni. Eskom has since welcomed the decision by the Gert Sibande District Municipality to assist the Govan Mbeki Municipality.

Eskom clearly stipulated the conditions to be met by the municipality before any increase in NMD for the two supply points which were, signing the Prepayment Agreement and the Repayment Plan for the arrear debt.

In line with this, Eskom has provided the Gert Sibande District Municipality with the cost estimate letter for the increase in NMD for Bethal and Emzinoni with the understanding that this would proceed once all conditions are met.

To this end, the Eskom Task Team has been apprised that on 10 July 2020, the Gert Sibande District Municipality responded to Eskom and has accepted in principle the prepayment for Bethal and Emzinoni. The District Municipality also indicated that a repayment plan for arrear debt by Govan Mbeki Local Municipality will be taken to council which is sitting on the 30th of July 2020. Eskom awaits the outcome of the council resolution and the conclusion of the Prepayment Agreement.

In conclusion, we are pleased to report to the Honourable member that Eskom has been in discussions with the provincial government regarding electricity supply problems, and payment of accounts by municipalities and has undertaken to finalise discussions with the Govan Mbeki Local Municipality as well as the Gert Sibande District Municipality in respect of specific upgrades of the supply points to Bethal and Emzinoni.

Thank you very much.

05 June 2018 - NW1264

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Deputy President

(1) (a) What is the annual budget of the SA National Aids Council (SANAC), (b) what amount of the budget comes from (i) international organisations and (ii) the private sector in South Africa and (c) how (i) is the budget spent and (ii) does the SANAC audit its books; (2) to what extent has (a) SANAC engaged mining companies to implement social labour plans to ease poverty, unemployed and determinants on health and (b) SANAC helped District Aids Councils and Local Aids Councils to be effective; (3) what innovative programmes is SANAC contemplating for reducing unplanned teenage pregnancies and HIV incidents amongst teenagers; (4) whether SANAC will intervene with regard to the poor attendance by the health representatives to Aids meetings at District Aids Councils and Local Aids Councils; (5) how is SANAC tracking its performance on planned activities and what measures are in place to achieve the implementation of its National Strategic Plan 2017-22?

Reply:

(1) (a) What is the annual budget of the SA National Aids Council (SANAC),

The Annual budget of SANAC for the period 2017/18 was R66, 275,268

(b) what amount of the budget comes from

(i) international organisations?

Funding from International donors for the period 2017/18 was R22,324,975

(ii) the private sector in South Africa and

 

SANAC did not receive any funding from the private sector in South Africa for the year 2017/18

(c) (i) How is the budget spent

Budget is spent on programmes developed in line with the National Strategic Plan (NSP) for HIV, TB and STI’s  

      

(ii) does the SANAC audit its books;

SANAC books are audited by independent internal and external auditors appointed by the SANAC Board of Trustees.

(2) to what extent has (a) SANAC engaged mining companies to implement social labour plans to ease poverty, unemployed and determinants on health

The Chamber of Mines is represented on the Global Fund Country Co- ordinating Mechanism and the Plenary and their participation facilitates the alignment of their social labour plans with other investments in the country, from government and external donors.

The new Global Fund Request for Funding that is currently being developed aims to include an organisation that works with private sector companies to align their investments with the National Strategic Plan for HIV, TB and STIs, maximising the efficiency and effectiveness of their investment.   

The SANAC has developed a private sector strategy that includes building a platform for engagement with mining companies but this has not yet been implemented due to funding shortages.

and (b) SANAC helped District Aids Councils and Local Aids Councils to be effective;

In July 2015, SANAC Secretariat commissioned an assessment to look at the functionality of the Provincial Councils on AIDS and their sub-level structures (District and Local AIDS Councils). Overall, the assessment showed secretariats exists and are able to conduct most of the support functions related to day to day Council activities. The assessment further showed that the levels of functionality of the PCAs and that of their respective sub-levels were found to be variable.

Provincial Premiers’ leadership of the PCAs was found to be more visible than perceived. However, at district and local level the assessment found that in many instances the councils were non-existent and where they existed the functionality levels were low. There were however provinces where some districts and local level AIDS councils are functional.

Based on the findings and recommendations SANAC Secretariat put together an AIDS Councils Capacity Development initiative to strengthen the Provincial, Districts and Local AIDS Councils. This initiative has seen the development of a Capacity Development Strategy to guide the implementation of the Capacity Building initiative for the AIDS Councils. A toolkit for AIDS Councils Capacity Development has also been developed and to this end 4 Provinces and their districts have been trained (Gauteng, North West, Mpumalanga and Free State). The remaining 5 provinces will be trained during this financial year. The capacity building will be followed by a mentorship programme to continually support the AIDS Councils to function optimally at all times.

SANAC through its Secretariat is also supporting the AIDS Councils to develop their Implementation Plans to reach the goals of the National Strategic Plan 2017-2018. To this end all the 9 provinces have their Provincial Implementation Plans being finalized while all the 44 Districts and 8 Metros have their Multi-Sectoral District Implementation Plans. However, successful implementation of these instruments will require that the Premiers and the Mayors take overall leadership of their AIDS Councils.

SANAC is also working with the United Nations Joint AIDS Program (UNAIDS) on a Fast Track Cities initiative to assist municipalities and cities with a high burden of HIV, TB and STI’s. This process seeks to support these Municipalities and Cities to fast track their HIV response to achieve the 90-90-90 targets by 2020 and their NSP targets by 2022.

(3) what innovative programmes is SANAC contemplating for reducing unplanned teenage pregnancies and HIV incidents amongst teenagers;

The SANAC secretariat co-ordinates the implementation of programmes targeting young women and girls under the umbrella of the She Conquers campaign launched by the previous SANAC chair. This includes programmes implemented by government, GIZ, the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and the DREAMS programme of PEPFAR. The Global Fund programme is also piloting a cash plus care programme in KZN and WC where conditional cash grants are provided together with a package of services that aims to empower women aged 19-24 years. All these programmes aim to reduce teenage pregnancies and HIV incidence.

(4) whether SANAC will intervene with regard to the poor attendance by the health representatives to Aids meetings at District Aids Councils and Local Aids Councils;

While it is SANAC’s mandate to coordinate the HIV, TB and STI’s response in the country, it however remains the role of the individual AIDS Councils leadership to encourage every stakeholder to be always represented and participate actively during the AIDS Councils meetings. Therefore, the Premiers and Mayors are encouraged to make sure that their AIDS Councils are well established, multi-sectoral, meet on a regular basis and report on their work.

SANAC is also developing a National Accountability Framework and scorecard as recommended in the National Strategic Plan 2017-2022. It is envisaged that once completed the Accountability Framework will improve accountability across all sectors on the implementation of the National Strategic Plan. This process will result in the Premiers and Mayors understanding their performance progress towards achieving the 8 goals of the National Strategic Plan.

(5) how is SANAC tracking its performance on planned activities and what measures are in place to achieve the implementation of its National Strategic Plan 2017-22?

SANAC has an Annual Performance Plan (APP) which tracks its performance on planned activities on a quarterly basis. The APP is reviewed on a quarterly basis and audited to track progress.

Through its provincial representation and broad multi-stakeholder consultation, on an annual basis SANAC compiles M&E progress reports on the implementation of the National Strategic Plan (NSP). 

The NSP 2017-22 implementation is also tracked through the compilation of provincial quarterly progress reports on key indicators. 

Going forward, quarterly factsheets will be compiled to depict progress in the implementation of the NSP will be develop. The intention of this will be to widely communicate progress. 

A Mid-Term Review is also planned to track progress to document progress and address identified implementation challenges. 

06 December 2017 - NW3290

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Deputy President

What are the relevant details of the total (a) annual salary of and (b) performance bonus amounts paid to each of his four advisors (names and details furnished) in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) The total annual salary paid to each of the Deputy President’s three advisors in the 2016-17 financial year was:

  1. Mr SE Speed R1,912,911.15
  2. Dr NP Simelela R1,698,106.59
  3. Adv N Jele R1,698,107.40

Note that Dr G Koornhof is not a Special Adviser to the Deputy President and his salary is not paid by The Presidency. He remains in the employ of Parliament.

(b) The total performance bonus amounts paid to each of the Deputy President’s advisors in the 2016-17 financial year is:

  1. Mr S Speed R0.00
  2. Dr P Simelela R0.00
  3. Adv N Jele R0.00

06 December 2017 - NW3289

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Deputy President

With reference to the Presidency’s 2016-17 Annual Report, what was the (a) total cost and (b) detailed breakdown of the costs of the 10 international trips that he undertook from 6 April 2016 to 10 February 2017?

Reply:

The Presidency does not make direct payments for the Deputy President’s international trips, save for instances where use is made of commercial flights (economy class locally and business class internationally). The Deputy President is flown by the SA Air Force through arrangements that are coordinated by the South African Police Service and the Department of International Relations and Cooperation.

Further details on the cost of travel and accommodation are available in the annual report of the year in question.

05 September 2016 - NW1471

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Deputy President

(1)Whether he is monitoring the impact and effects of the recent drought on Government’s War on Poverty Programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified programme has put any measures in place to ensure that there is no drastic increase in the number of citizens without access to food due to the recent drought; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the measures that have been put in place in this regard?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) is monitoring the impact and effect of the recent drought throughout the country. The Department is a lead institution for the National Agro-meteorological Committee (NAC) which provides monthly advisory and early warning information on the rainfall season and impact on agricultural production for the whole country.

The drought is causing higher food prices in South Africa. Food inflation rose to 11% in April 2016. The Department continues to monitor retail food prices and likely impact on the poorest people through the National Agricultural Marketing Council (NAMC). The cost of the basic food basket expressed as a share of the average monthly income of the poorest 30% of the population (mostly residing in War on Poverty sites) increased from 48.3% in April 2015 to 56.2% in April 2016.

The department is also a lead institution for the South African Vulnerability Assessment Committee (SAVAC), which conducts vulnerability and food and nutrition security assessments. The 2016 assessment is underway and is focusing mainly on the impact of the drought on livelihoods. The severity and magnitude of the impact of the drought on agricultural and non-agricultural livelihoods will have to be understood for better targeting of programmes and quantifying the support required.

DAFF is a lead institution for a Multi-sectoral Food Security Drought Response Team that includes line function departments that are implementing different programmes aimed at addressing the impact of drought on food and nutrition security.

The Department has reprioritised funds from the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme and Ilima/Letsema campaign to provide for immediate responses to the agricultural sector. Provision of animal feed and water resources for affected livestock farmers, especially smallholder and subsistence farmers, has been prioritised. The department has also invested in programmes such as equipping and drilling of boreholes. Furthermore, programmes to combat land degradation (including veld rehabilitation, control of declared alien weeds and invader species and promotion of conservation agriculture) are being implemented.

A Food and Nutrition Security Drought Response Plan has been developed and costed. The plan includes interventions such as social relief measures, households food production support, enhancing access to drought-tolerant seeds, expansion of the National School Nutrition Programme, health and nutrition responses to drought and a water sector response to drought in the affected areas.

20 November 2015 - NW3722

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Deputy President

(a) How many trip(s) has he taken to (i) Brazil, (ii) the Russian Federation, (iii) the Republic of India and (iv) the People’s Republic of China since 1 April 2015, (b) on what date were the specified trips taken, (c) what was the purpose of the trip(s) in each case and (d) which government (i) officials and/or (ii) presidential staff accompanied him on each specified trip?

Reply:

The Deputy President visited the People’s Republic of China from 13-17 July 2015.

The purpose of the visit was to discuss economic and trade matters, including how state-owned enterprises can be used to promote economic growth and address the challenges of poverty and unemployment in South Africa.

The Deputy President led a delegation comprising the Ministers of Public Enterprises and Higher Education, and the Deputy Ministers of International Relations and Cooperation, Energy, Finance and Trade and Industry.

Presidency support staff and the relevant departmental officials accompanied the Deputy President.

12 October 2015 - NW2729

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Deputy President

(1)How many government functions has he held at the (a) Oliver Tambo residence in Pretoria, (b) Highstead residence in Cape Town and (c) Dr John L Dube residence in Durban since his inauguration in May 2014; 2) how many visits by official (a) foreign and/or (b) local delegations has he hosted at each of the specified residences?

Reply:

The Deputy President holds several meetings at the two official residences in Pretoria and Cape Town as and when required. To date, over a dozen official meetings have been held at these residences, in addition to meetings held at the Offices.

2776. Adv H C Schmidt (DA) to ask the Deputy President:

Whether (a) he and (b) any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit? NW3210E

REPLY

Neither the Deputy President nor any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year.

12 October 2015 - NW2776

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Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Deputy President

Whether (a) he and (b) any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

Neither the Deputy President nor any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year.

12 October 2015 - NW3152

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Deputy President

With reference to his responsibilities as the patron of the Moral Regeneration Movement, what tangible interventions is his office implementing in terms of (a) eradicating corruption and (b) ending corrupt practices within (i) the Executive, (ii) his office and (iii) the greater public service?

Reply:

It should be noted the Moral Regeneration Movement (MRM) is a Section 21 company that operates independently from the Office of the Deputy President and government.

As patron of the MRM, the Deputy President supports the work of the MRM in government and in society more broadly.

Recently the Moral Regeneration Movement developed the Ethical and Values-driven Leadership initiative. It is envisaged that this will eventually form part of government’s induction programme for officials and those in leadership positions. The programme is also targeted at business, religious and traditional leaders and at civil society organisations.

The MRM is engaging with Corruption Watch and Ethics SA to develop a programme that will assist leaders to develop a Code of Ethics in their institutions, departments and community organisations.

The year from July 2015 to July 2016 has been designated by the MRM as the year of moral regeneration under the theme “My Ideal SA: Ethics and Values”. As part of the activities to rally communities around this theme, the MRM will be going out to engage communities in various provinces, district and local municipalities on the role community members can play in building ideal communities based on agreed ethics and values.

Already, two such dialogues have been conducted, in Sedibeng District Municipality on the 3 July 2015 and in KwaZulu-Natal on 31 July 2015.

The proposals from communities during these interactions will be consolidated into a report that will assist in the development of a framework for the Ethical and Values-driven Programme led by the MRM.

The Moral Regeneration Movement is currently engaging the South African Local Government Association and the Department of Cooperative Governance to explore the possible inclusion of the MRM in local government structures and in the Integrated Development Plan (IDPs) to promote the Ethical and Values-driven Leadership Programme.

The Honourable Member should note that these initiatives are building on the successful implementation of the Charter of Positive Values developed by MRM and adopted in schools.

We hope that these and many other initiatives by various social partners across the country will contribute to deepening corporate citizenship and in sustaining a national conversation on the importance of balancing citizens’ rights and responsibilities.

Working with our social partners we will continue to strive to build a united nation with the aim of creating a more just, corruption-free and inclusive society.

22 July 2015 - NW2154

The Leader of the Opposition to ask the Deputy President

(1)With regard to his constitutionally mandated duties to oversee the Government's Anti-Poverty and Short-Term Job Creation Programmes, (a) what progress has been made in respect of skills development initiatives and (b) how many further education and training colleges have been recapitalised in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years as part of the specified programme;

Reply:

The responsibilities of the Deputy President with respect to anti-poverty programmes and short-term job creation programmes are not constitutionally mandated. They are responsibilities assigned by the President.

In terms of the Constitution, the role of the Deputy President is to assist the President in the execution of the functions of government, as stated in section 91(5), and he is responsible for the powers and functions assigned to him by the President, in terms of section 92(1).

The role of the Deputy President with respect to anti-poverty programmes and short-term job creation programmes, working with the Inter-Ministrial Committee, includes:

  • Providing strategic oversight to enable rapid scaling up of short-term job creation while managing associated risks.
  • Coordinating multiple stakeholders and addressing institutional and other obstacles.
  • Building accords with partners outside government, especially labour, business and communities.
  • Ensuring that the programmes reach the most marginalised people and communities in our country.

  • Supporting innovative approaches to creating employment, and creating opportunities for cross-cutting learning.

The initiatives that form part of these programmes are implemented through the relevant departments.

  • National Skills Fund

The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) has been advancing the strategic objectives of the National Skills Development Strategy III through the Discretionary Funding Window for skills development of the National Skills Fund (NSF). This is done by providing financial support to projects that contribute towards improvement of human capacity. The acquisition of skills and knowledge by beneficiaries is meant to enhance their participation in the economy.

To date, the NSF has provided funding for state-owned companies, namely Denel and South African Airways Technical (SAAT), Eskom and Transnet, which has together amounted to R430 679 128. The total number of beneficiaries is 2 583 evenly spread across all nine provinces of South Africa.

Eskom will train 1 250, Transnet 1 000, Denel 197 and SAAT 136 artisans. Eskom and Transnet will train artisans in various trades, such as welders, electricians, fitters, tool makers, and mechanics, whereas Denel and SAAT will train artisans in aircraft related trades such avionics, aircraft structures and aircraft electricians.

The apprenticeship training is in progress and at various completion phases. The majority of learners at Denel and Transnet will be preparing for trade tests in 2015.

  • Maritime Skills Development

Furthermore, the NSF made a grant for maritime skills development, which commenced on 21 August 2012. The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) project seeks to unlock the potential opportunities lying in the maritime sector.

The total funding for SAMSA amounts to R93 610 300 targeting 420 beneficiaries across various programmes, which include the following:

  • National Cadetship Programme for 150 learners;
  • Conversion of unemployed mechanical engineers, targeting 100 learners;
  • Training on board the SA Agulhas for 120 learners;
  • Subvention for 30 lecturers;
  • Assisting 20 learners with disabilities across the programme.
  • TVET College Infrastructure

The TVET Infrastructure Programme entails the building of 12 new campuses and refurbishment of 2 existing campuses. The new campuses are evenly spread across the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and Mpumalanga. The total funding of the programme is R2.5 billion.

Ingwe TVET College campuses in the rural part of the Eastern Cape are also receiving new and refurbished workshops and trade testing centres. Funding for infrastructure and capacity building is R187 000 000.

No funding for recapitalisation was allocated to TVET colleges in the 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15 financial years. The Recapitalisation Project started in 2005 with the planning phase and an allocation of R50 million. Over the 2006 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), R1.860 billion was allocated to fund and recapitalise 50 TVET colleges:

Strategic Objectives

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

Total

R’000

  1. Human Resources Development

23 025

23 323

25 676

70 724

  1. Development of Systems and Procedures

27 905

28 020

36 345

92 270

  1. Upgrading of Infrastructure

174 312

174 622

195 368

544 302

  1. Upgrading of College Sites

25 603

38 118

16 836

80 557

  1. Buying or building of infrastructure

59 406

136 364

283 862

479 632

  1. Purchase of Equipment

118 739

153 913

183840

456 492

  1. Develop programme/curriculum material

41 011

40 640

53 242

134 893

Total

470 001

595 000

795 169

1 860 170

Of the total budget allocation (R1.860 billion) indicated in the table above, 98 percent had been spent by the end of the project (2008/09). The unspent committed funds at the end of the project were rolled over and transferred to TVET colleges in the following financial year (2009/10) to complete these projects.

  • National Rural Youth Service Corps Programmes (NARYSEC)

The National Rural Youth Service Corps (NARYSEC) project aims to recruit and develop youth aged 18-35 years to be trained as para-professionals in the rural areas. The specific objectives of the programme are:

  • Skills development of the rural youth through the TVET colleges which will result in the youth obtaining a National Qualifications Framework (NQF) level certificate;
  • Practical work experience for 6 months at the workplace;
  • Ensuring that participants obtain NQF credits after completion of each training phase; and,
  • Exit strategy linked to further study, increased employment opportunities, deployment opportunities, cooperatives or business opportunities.
  • Expanded Public Works Programme

One of the most notable initiatives undertaken is the implementation of the third phase of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP), which began on 1 April 2014, and which aims to create 6 million work opportunities by 31 March 2019.

The EPWP created 1,103,983 work opportunities in the 2014/2015 financial year. Of these, 563,031 were taken up by the youth. To intensify efforts for the participation of youth in the EPWP, the Non-State Sector (NPO Programme) has collaborated with the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) to bring 2 000 young people to participate in the programme for a duration of three years starting from the 2014/2015 financial year.

The training provided by EPWP targets skills that the economy demands. It is envisaged that the youth from the Supervision of Construction Processes Learnership Programmes and Artisan Development Programmes will be absorbed into the formal economy.

  • Small Business Development

The Department of Small Business Development has undertaken the following initiatives as measures to reduce poverty and to create opportunities for poor and marginalised individuals to begin to earn decent incomes through jobs or self-employment:

  • The establishment of Centres for Entrepreneurship at further education and training institutions and higher education institutions funded by DHET to educate students in entrepreneurship. The department is in collaboration with five institutions of higher learning: Ekurhuleni West College in Gauteng, False Bay Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in Western Cape, Gert Sibande TVET in Mpumalanga, Orbit College in North West and the Durban University of Technology in KwaZulu-Natal to host and implement the Centres for Entrepreneurship. The colleges are rolling out awareness campaigns to students on self-employment and entrepreneurship as career options.
  • The National Informal Businesses Upliftment Strategy, which was launched in 2014, supports local chambers, business associations and municipal local economic development offices to deliver and facilitate access to upliftment programmes that will provide business skills and infrastructure support to informal businesses.
  • The Department of Small Business Development collaborated with the Department of Energy to undertake the Renewable Energy Youth Cooperatives initiative, which focused on establishing youth cooperatives in the rural Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. Eight youth cooperatives were trained at the Engcobo, Mbashe, Ubuhlebezwe and Ingwe local municipalities in technical skills to install, repair and maintain solar water heating equipment, as well as business skills to run a cooperative enterprise.
  • The department developed the Mass Youth Enterprise Creation programme (MYECP) and the Youth Business Support Development (YBSD) initiatives designed to provide non-financial and financial business support to youth enterprises.
  • Jobs Fund

The Jobs Fund leverages on existing capacity in the public and private sector through co-financing projects with the potential to contribute significantly to sustainable job creation. Through this collaboration, the Fund aims to improve the employment prospects of young people and foster innovative approaches to job creation. The Jobs Fund complements rather than displaces other public funding programmes. The Fund offers once-off grants in the areas of enterprise development, infrastructure, support for work seekers and institutional capacity building.

About 40 259 permanent jobs were created by Jobs Fund supported projects in 2014/15. Of these, 18 567 went to youth and 24 522 went to women. About 46,348 persons received training over this period. Of these 26,561 were youth and 29,825 were women.

  • Entrepreneurship

The Economic Development Department worked with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and its subsidiaries to provide funding for young entrepreneurs, with R144 million approved by the IDC for youth-led investment projects in the past 12 months. In the same period, the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA) disbursed R310 million to youth-owned businesses.

The Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC) is now tracking jobs on about 40 infrastructure projects, which currently employ an estimated 95 000 young workers.

While the youth unemployment rate has not decreased in this period, the number of new jobs created for young people rose by 240 000 in the past 12 months. However, 500 000 young people entered the labour market, so while jobs are being created for young people, they are not yet on the scale required.

The collective measurable impact of the initiatives that have been undertaken as part of the anti-poverty programme in lowering youth unemployment is yet to be determined with the assistance of Statistics South Africa.