Questions and Replies

14 December 2018 - NW3285

Profile picture: Dlamini, Ms L

Dlamini, Ms L to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

DPE Response

The Department of Public Enterprises has not awarded any contracts to the mentioned companies.

According to the information received from Eskom

(b)

Of the list of companies provided, Eskom awarded contracts to DCD Group and Vox Telecommunications.

Eskom did not award contracts to Afrit; Elgin Brown and Hamer; Elgin Dock; Diesel and Turbo Service Centre; Afrit prop Co; Vox Holdings; Interpair Services; Siminglo (RF); Cancerian Investments; Hulisani Consortium and Phuma Finance

(b)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(iii)(iv)

Annexure A provides details of services provided, value of the contracts, and length of the contract, the committee that approved the contact and whether the contract is in line with National Treasury.

Although Eskom did not award contracts to Hulisani Consortium, there were dealings with Hulisani Consulting and 52 payments totaling to R4.4 million were made since 2016. All the payments to the supplier were made against once off purchase orders except for two payments valued at R18 000 which were condonation.

Alexkor, Denel, Safcol, SAA, SAX and Transnet responses not received.

14 December 2018 - NW3242

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

DPE RESPONSE

The Department of Public Enterprises did not borrow any money from any entity in the People’s Republic of China in the past three financial years to date.

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)(i)

The Department of Public Enterprises did not borrow any money from any entity in the People’s Republic of China in the past three financial years to date.

(a)(ii)

Annexure A provides amount borrowed from China Development Loan (CDB) in each of the past three financial years and since 1 April 2018; the name of the lender of each loan, conditions attached to each loan and the repayment periods for each loan.

Eskom wishes not to disclose full terms and conditions of the loans as this information is commercially sensitive and would constitute breach of confidence.

Response is according to information received from South African Airways:

South African Airways has no loan agreements from any entity in the People’s Republic of China.

Response is according to information received from South African Express:

South African Express has not raised any loans with the People’s Republic of China in the past three years.

Alexkor, Denel, Safcol and Transnet responses not received.

14 December 2018 - NW158

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What number of (a) charges have been laid against Eskom employees by the new Eskom Board of Directors and (b) the specified cases have been finalised? No 3365E

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)

As at September 2018 there have been 1067 disciplinary cases initiated since the tenure of the new Eskom Board of Directors.

(b)

Of the 1067 disciplinary cases, 977 have been finalised.

The outcome of the finalised disciplinary cases is as follows: 64 Dismissals; 288 Suspension without pay; 233 Final warning; 321 written warning; 69 not guilty and 2 Counselling.

14 December 2018 - NW3520

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the total number of convictions secured in each province for the (a) possession, (b) sale, (c) manufacture and (d) use of drugs (i) in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16, (cc) 2016-17 and (dd) 2017-18 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development informed me that, according to the Integrated Case Management System (ICMS), the only reported matters are when a guilty verdict was imposed. The information is tabulated below according to each financial year.

A. 2014/15:

Region

Dealing with Drugs

Possession of Drugs

Total

Eastern Cape

932

5 709

6 641

Free State

368

1 983

2 351

Gauteng

978

7 216

8 194

Kwa-Zulu Natal

377

16 329

16 706

Limpopo

76

802

878

Mpumalanga

442

1 151

1 593

North West

123

450

573

Northern Cape

175

769

944

Western Cape

1 397

22 552

23 949

Grand Total

4 868

56 961

61 829

B. 2015/16:

Region

Allowing sale; use or possession of drugs on premises in contravention of any law

Dealing in Drugs

Possession or using a dependence-producing drug or plant

Possession/Use of Drugs

Total

Eastern Cape

30

654

8

5 169

5 861

Free State

1

179

3

2 204

2 387

Gauteng

4

540

 

5 546

6 090

Kwa-Zulu Natal

26

212

43

15 395

15 676

Limpopo

 

46

2

793

841

Mpumalanga

1

481

9

1 679

2 170

North West

2

72

2

440

516

Northern Cape

 

133

1

927

1 061

Western Cape

2

870

2

21 714

22 588

Grand Total

66

3 187

70

53 867

57 190

C. 2016/17:

Region

Dealing with Drugs

Possession or using a dependence-producing drug or plant

Possession/Use of Drugs

Total

Eastern Cape

287

1

3 092

3 380

Free State

201

 

1 040

1241

Gauteng

574

2

5 847

6 423

Kwa-Zulu Natal

526

9

11 018

11 553

Limpopo

67

1

786

854

Mpumalanga

442

1

1 568

2 011

North West

147

 

847

994

Northern Cape

118

 

386

504

Western Cape

530

7

13 406

13 943

Grand Total

2 892

21

37 990

40 903

D. 2017/18:

Region

Dealing in Drugs

Possession or Use of Drugs

Possession or using a dependence-producing drug or plant

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

395

3 952

8

4 355

Free State

235

1717

2

1 954

Gauteng

611

6 030

7

6 648

Kwa-Zulu Natal

515

13 067

54

13 636

Limpopo

45

721

1

767

Mpumalanga

522

1 558

3

2 083

North West

115

947

 

1 062

Northern Cape

141

737

 

878

Western Cape

567

16 954

31

17 552

Grand Total

3 146

45 683

106

48 935

E. 1 April 2018 – September 2018:

Region

Dealing with Drugs

Possession or Use of Drugs

Possession or using a dependence-producing drug or plant

Total

Eastern Cape

120

1 411

2

1 533

Free State

84

724

 

808

Gauteng

179

2 848

2

3 029

Kwa-Zulu Natal

92

4 924

46

5 062

Limpopo

21

216

 

237

Mpumalanga

164

560

1

725

North West

28

339

 

367

Northern Cape

33

295

1

329

Western Cape

209

5 970

28

6 207

Grand Total

930

17 287

80

18 297

14 December 2018 - NW3610

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What (a) number of forensic service providers did the Competition Commission appoint to assist with dawn raids since 1 April 2015, (b) is the name of each forensic service provider, (c) number of dawn raids did each service provider conduct and (d) was the cost to the Competition Commission in each case?

Reply:

The Competition Act provides for the Competition Commission to enter and search premises of persons who may have information relating to an investigation in terms of the Act. These enter and search actions by the Commission are a vital part of the gathering of information on prohibited actions, including participation in cartel activities, price fixing and tender rigging and they constitute a highly specialised activity and hence trust in a service provider is essential.

The Commission therefore relies on proven expertise as the results of such actions in the form of the evidence gathered that are subject to challenge and scrutiny by the courts. I have been advised that the Commission has been trying to increase the number of potential providers and has been bringing in other service providers to ensure that there is adequate expertise.

Of the 12 enter and search actions that have been undertaken since 1 April 2015, three have been referred to the Tribunal for prosecution. Nine of the 12 are still under investigation by the Commission. In the case against the Furniture Removals Companies, 25 of the 30 respondents have already settled with the Commission for a total of R15 069 172.

Since 2008, enter and search actions have contributed to successful cartel investigations which have resulted in R463 million in settlements and penalties imposed by the Competition Tribunal.

Since 1 April 2015, there are five (5) forensic service providers that have been utilised, namely:

  1. Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd,
  2. Exactech (Pty) Ltd,
  3. Matlama Consulting (Pty) Ltd,
  4. eCybersystems (Pty) Ltd, and
  5. Itsamaya Consulting.

Prior to 1 April 2015, the Commission had used the services of Exactech (Pty) Ltd, Matlama Consulting (Pty) Ltd, Cyanre, Computer LAB and Forensic Investigation Recovery Management (Pty) Ltd. Currently Century Technical and Exactect are still the preferred providers, given their expertise, but the other service providers are building their capacity.

A total of 12 enter and search actions have been undertaken since 1 April 2015.

Of these 12, each service provider participated in the following:

  1. Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd - 12 of the 12 enter and search actions
  2. Exactech (Pty) Ltd - 11 of the 12 enter and search actions
  3. Matlama Consulting (Pty) Ltd - 4 of the 12 enter and search actions
  4. eCybersystems (Pty) Ltd - 3 of the 12 enter and search actions, and
  5. Itsamaya Consulting - 1 of the 12 enter and search actions.

(d) The costs per enter and search action are as follows:

No.

Enter and search actions

Date of action

Service Provider/s

Cost to CC

Total per Raid

1

CC v Human Communications and Others

23 September 2015

Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

R275 700,00

R275 700.00

           

2

CC v Furniture Removal Companies

30 September 2015

Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

R3 693 086,00

R5 131 767.04

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R1 309 295,70

 
     

Matlama Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R129 385,44

 
           

3

CC v Totalgaz and Others

14 October 2015

Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

R397 176,00

R933 417.83

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R10 486,83

 
     

Matlama Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R525 755,00

 
           

4

CC v Glassfit and Others

23 March 2016

Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

R2 690 273,01

R4 747 743.30

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R1 016 679,60

 
     

Matlama Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R1 040 790,69

 
           

5

CC v PG Bison and Sonae

31 March 2016

Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

R2 225 250,00

R3 326 335.06

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R1 101 085,60

 
           

6

CC v Mpact and Others

26 May 2016

Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

R1 005 700,00

R1 583 149.93

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R341 114,20

 
     

Matlama Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R236 335,73

 
           

7

CC v Maersk and Others

28 September 2016

Century Technical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

R1 917 956,00

R4 130 992.54

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R2 213 036,54

 
           

8

CC v Wilmar Continental Edible Oils and Fats (Pty) Ltd & Others

08 December 2016

Century Technical Solutions (Pty Ltd

R1 619 004,00

R3 017 837.08

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R1 398 833,08

 
           

9

CC v Fresh Produce Market Agents

23 March 2017

Century Technical Solutions (Pty Ltd

R3 496 379,78

R8 966 439.38

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R5 470 059,60

 
           

10

CC v Feedlots Association of South Africa and its Members

14 June 2017

Century Technical Solutions (Pty Ltd

R4 504 140,00

R11 574 533.60

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R3 693 011,60

 
     

eCybersystems (Pty) Ltd

R3 377 382,00

 
           

11

CC v Automatic Sprinkler Inspection Bureau and its Members

03 August 2017

Century Technical Solutions (Pty Ltd

R5 487 504,00

R12 374 792.49

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R1 975 524,00

 
     

eCybersystems (Pty) Ltd

R4 777 680,00

 
     

Itsamaya Consulting

R134 084,49

 
           

12

CC v Altech UEC South Africa (Pty) Ltd and Others

16 November 2017

Century Technical Solutions (Pty Ltd

R 659 893.96

R1 710 768.34

     

Exactech (Pty) Ltd

R 536 603,68

 
     

eCybersystems (Pty) Ltd

R514 270,70

 
 

Grant Total

R57 773 476.59

-END-

14 December 2018 - NW3899

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 141 for oral reply on 7 September 2018, his department and the entities reporting to him implemented the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council resolution that all persons employed in the Public Service as Assistant Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 9 to level 10, and that all Deputy Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 11 to level 12; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development implemented Resolution 3 of 2009. In implementing the Resolution, the Department confined itself to the condition set in paragraph 3.6.3 which deals with accelerated grade progression for salary levels 9-10 and 11-12 respectively. To this end, all employees from salary levels 9-10 and 11-12 who meet the below mentioned qualifying criteria are accordingly progressed/upgraded:

a) Twelve (12) years continuous service and should have at least obtained above satisfactory rating on his performance assessment; and

b) Fifteen (15) years of continuous service and should have at least obtained above satisfactory rating on his performance assessment

2. The National Prosecuting Authority implemented PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2012 in conjunction with the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) Circular 16/P dated 25 February 2013. All posts that were filled on salary levels 9 and 11 after the implementation of PSCBC, Resolution 3 of 2009 were re-graded according to the DPSA’s Implementation Directive. All employees who occupied those posts were thus upgraded into the salary levels 10 and 12 respectively.

3. Employees of Legal Aid South Africa are not appointed under the Public Service Act, 1994 but are employed in terms of Legal Aid SA Act 39 of 2014. Persons who are employed at salary level 9 and those employed at salary level 11 can be progressed to salary level 10 and salary level 12 respectively subject to the scope of pay progression of the job grading of a position and on condition that an employee’s annual performance review is good and scored at 80% and above.

4. Neither PSCBC Resolution 3 of 2009 nor Resolution 1 of 2012 has been implemented in the Special Investigating Unit (SIU). The pay progression model being referred to is not in use in the SIU as the SIU has its own grading system in place.

14 December 2018 - NW3902

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 141 for oral reply on 7 September 2018, her department and the entities reporting to her implemented the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council resolution that all persons employed in the Public Service as Assistant Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 9 to level 10, and that all Deputy Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 11 to level 12; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education has implemented the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council resolution for the upgrading of Assistant Directors from salary level 9 to salary level 10 and the upgrading of Deputy Directors from salary level 11 to salary level 12. The implementation was effected in August 2014 and backdated to 1 August 2012.

14 December 2018 - NW3745

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With regard to Limpopo Department of Education Contract No. EDDP 182/142, Lebaka B Primary School in Mohlabaneng, was the school built within the contract period of 3 November 2010 to 3 October 2011; if not, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what was the total monetary cost of the building project, (b) who was the contractor and (c) was the contractor paid in full; (3) (a) what are the full details of the (i) total cost of the furniture and (ii) furnishings delivered and dates of delivery of all furnishings, (b) why has this school been abandoned, (c) on what date was a security company appointed, (d) what is the cost of the security contract and (e) what is the name of the security company; (4) has any litigation process been instituted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The school was not completed within the envisioned construction period of 11 months. The contract period started on 3 November 2010 as scheduled, but unfortunately the contractor fell behind schedule. The delays led to the situation whereby the contractor subsequently abandoned site. The project was re-activated in 2016 and Practical Completion was achieved on 11 September 2017.

2. The initial contract amount was R 15 956 400.00. During the period when the contractor abandoned site the school was vandalised. Accordingly, when the project was re-activated, re-measurements were done to determine the cost to complete the project and a Variation Order was approved on 7 November 2016 increasing the contract amount to R 17 721 946.21. MPPJ Property Development was the Contractor. The contractor has not yet been paid in full as Final Completion has not yet been achieved.

3. (a) Total cost of Furniture is R930 491.000 and the furniture was delivered in 2012 and in 2018.

(b) Lebaka B was built as an offshoot of Lebaka A where the school buildings were dilapidated and no longer hospitable. Security was engaged and the repairs were effected. There are plans afoot to bring in Gr R –Gr 3 to the school in January 2019.

(c) The security company was appointed for Lebaka B School on 01 June 2018.

(d) The security service provider was initially appointed by the Limpopo Department of Education to do security services at Mamaila Circuit Office. A variation order was prepared and approved for the inclusion of Lebaka B School for an amount of R33 524.30 per month.

(e) Mathara Investment CC.

4. Yes, there is a litigation claim for the alleged exhumation of graves on the school site during the construction process. The matter is currently being handled by the state attorney.

14 December 2018 - NW3201

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of mega farm schools (a) have been built in each province in the past three financial years and (b) are envisaged to be completed in the 2018-19 financial year; (2) what number of non-viable schools (a) have been closed in the past three financial years in each province and (b) are envisaged to be closed in the 2018-19 financial year; (3) what number of teachers were trained on pedagogical content knowledge and facilitation skills in mathematics and science in each province in the (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17 financial years; (4) what amount that was made available to improve mathematics, science and technology teaching in each province in the (a) 2015-16, and (b) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Sector has not built any Mega Farm Schools for the past three financial years but has a number of Non-Viable farm schools in lieu of two Boarding Schools in Mpumalanga Province which are Steve Tshwete Boarding School in Nkangala and Thaba Tshweu Boarding school in Ehlanzeni district.

(b) There are no Mega farm Schools envisaged to be completed in the 2018/2019 financial year.

(2) 2018-19 financial year:

Province

No. of schools closed to date

2018/19 projections

 

(a) @

(b)

EC

725

2 182*

FS

33

90

GP

521

14

KZN

248

1 405^

LP

1 783

61

MP

1 063

34

NC

142

8*

NW

948

0

WC

1 466

0

Source (a) National EMIS (b) PEDs

The above mentioned data indicate the number of schools closed to date except for the FS.

* Schools currently subjected to rationalisation but not necessarily to be effected in 2018/19

^ Schools rationalisation plan ranging from 2018 to 2023

(3) The number of teachers who were trained on Mathematics and Science content and pedagogy through DBE-led programmes are:

DBE TRAINING WORKSHOPS:

2015/16 YEAR

PROVINCE

TRAINED MST HODS 2015/16

Grade 8 & 9

 

MATHS

N.SC

TECHN

TOTAL

Free State

294

255

236

785

Gauteng

53

51

51

155

North West

415

439

642

1 496

Eastern Cape

1 520

1 636

1 536

4 674

Northern Cape

116

75

81

272

Limpopo

749

313

595

1 657

Mpumalanga

552

465

473

1 490

TOTAL

3 862

3 331

3 508

10 529

2016/17: NSC SUPPORT ON MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE

PROVINCE

MATHS

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

489

288

777

Free State

136

129

265

KwaZulu-Natal

520

417

937

Limpopo

535

606

1 141

Mpumalanga

234

199

433

Northern Cape

56

72

128

North West

232

196

428

TOTAL

2 202

1 907

4 109

(4)

  1. 2015-16 Budget available to Improve MST Teaching in each Province:

Total allocated budget for MST Conditional Grant in 2015/16 was R 347 185 million. R 104 156 million (30% of the total budget) was used for teaching in each province (15% - Training of Teachers and Subject Advisors in preparation for the implementation of CAPS for Technical Schools and 15% - Targeted Teacher Training in Pedagogic Content Knowledge for MST Subjects).

(SEE TABLE BELOW)

  1. 2016-17 Budget available to Improve MST Teaching in each Province:

Total allocated budget for MST Conditional Grant in 2016/17 was R 362 444 million. R 108 734 million (30% of total budget) was used for teaching in each province (15% - Training of Teachers and Subject Advisors in preparation for the Implementation of CAPS for Technical Schools and 15% - Targeted Teacher Training in Pedagogic Content Knowledge for MST Subjects).

(SEE TABLE BELOW)

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2015/16

Province

Budget Allocation

ICT Resource to improve Teaching and Learning 20%

Technical School Workshop ,Equipment and Tools 15%

School Laboratories and Workshop Apparatus and Consumables 15%

Direct Learner Support 10%

Technical Schools Teachers and Subject Advisors Training and CAPS Orientation 15%

Targeted Teacher Training in Teaching Methodologies and Subject content 15%

Training and Support in ICT Integration for end-users 10%

Total

100%

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

EC

45 059

9 012

6 759

6 759

4 506

6 759

6 759

4 506

45 059

FS

32 145

6 429

4 822

4 822

3 215

4 822

4 822

3 215

32 145

GP

47 842

9 568

7 176

7 176

4 784

7 176

7 176

4 784

47 842

KZN

59 998

12 000

9 000

9 000

6 000

9 000

9 000

6 000

59 998

LP

40 979

8 196

6 147

6 147

4 098

6 147

6 147

4 098

40 979

MP

39 136

7 827

5 870

5 870

3 914

5 870

5 870

3 914

39 136

NC

22 113

4 423

3 317

3 317

2 211

3 317

3 317

2 211

22 113

NW

33 378

6 676

5 007

5 007

3 338

5 007

5 007

3 338

33 378

WC

26 535

5 307

3 980

3 980

2 654

3 980

3 980

2 654

26 535

Total

347 185

69 437

52 078

52 078

34 719

52 078

52 078

34 719

347 185

FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE AS AT 31 MARCH 2016

EXPENDITURE DURING THE 2015-16 FINANCIAL YEAR AS AT 31 MARCH 2016

Province

2015-16

Budget Allocation

Actual Funds Transferred at

31 March 16

Actual Expenditure against Allocation

Budget Available as at 31 March 2016

%

Spent Against Budget Allocation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

%

EC

45 059

45 059

26 350

10 236

72,02%

FS

32 145

33 466

21 524

10 165

67,92%

GP

47 842

47 842

47 842

- 678

101,44%

KZN

59 998

59 998

59 259

739

98,77%

LP

40 979

40 979

35 673

- 6 649

122,91%

MP

39 136

39 136

42 408

- 10 923

134,69%

NC

22 113

22 113

23 466

- 1 783

108,22%

NW

33 378

33 378

32 225

553

98,31%

WC

26 535

26 535

27 668

- 1 133

104,27%

TOTAL

347 185

347 185

316 415

527

99, 83%

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2016/17

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2016/17

Province

Budget

Allocation

ICT Resource to improve Teaching and Learning 20%

Technical School Workshop ,Equipment and Tools 15%

School Laboratories and Workshop Apparatus and Consumables 15%

Direct Learner Support 10%

Technical Schools Teachers and Subject Advisors Training and CAPS Orientation 15%

Targeted Teacher Training in Teaching Methodologies and Subject content 15%

Training and Support in ICT Integration for end-users 10%

Total 100%

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

EC

46 898

9 380

7 035

7 035

4 690

7 035

7 035

4 690

46 898

FS

33 466

6 693

5 020

5 020

3 347

5 020

5 020

3 347

33 466

GP

49 810

9 962

7 472

7 472

4 981

7 472

7 472

4 981

49 810

KZN

62 453

12 491

9 368

9 368

6 245

9 368

9 368

6 245

62 453

LP

42 553

8 511

6 383

6 383

4 255

6 383

6 383

4 255

42 553

MP

41 639

8 328

6 246

6 246

4 164

6 246

6 246

4 164

41 639

NC

23 030

4 606

3 455

3 455

2 303

3 455

3 455

2 303

23 030

NW

34 754

6 951

5 213

5 213

3 475

5 213

5 213

3 475

34 754

WC

27 841

5 568

4 176

4 176

2 784

4 176

4 176

2 784

27 841

Total

362 444

72 489

54 367

54 367

36 244

54 367

54 367

36 244

362 444

FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE AS AT 31 MARCH 2017

EXPENDITURE DURING THE 2016/17 FINANCIAL YEAR

Province

2016-17

Budget Allocation

Actual Funds Transferred at

31 March 17

Actual Expenditure

Against Allocation

Budget Available as at

31 March 2017

%

Spent Against Budget Allocation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

%

EC

46 898

46 898

58 241

-11 343

124%

FS

33 466

33 466

39 167

-5 701

117%

GP

49 810

49 810

49 810

0

100%

KZN

62 453

62 453

63 402

-949

102%

LP

42 553

42 553

34544

8 009

81%

MP

41 639

41 639

41 376

263

99%

NC

23 030

23 030

23 214

-184

101%

NW

34 754

34 754

36 176

-1 422

104%

WC

27 841

27 841

27 841

0

100%

TOTAL

362 444

362 444

373 771

-11 327

103%

14 December 2018 - NW3895

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to his reply to question 3135 on 15 November 2018, (a) who are the interested parties that his department may further consult and (b) will further research be conducted; (2) will his department consult other government departments regarding the regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Various Constitutional Court cases have confirmed the principle that it is a constitutional imperative to facilitate public involvement in the legislative processes, which by implication includes the making of delegated legislation. If this important principle (which is sometimes referred to as participatory democracy), is not adhered to, the laws or regulations in question may be unconstitutional. Any proposed legislative proposal that gives effect to the South African Law Reform Commission Report on Adult Prostitution (Project 107) (the Report), will be subjected to a comprehensive and open public consultation process. By implication, all interested parties, who among others, will include organizations and establishments that represent persons involved in sex work as well as sex workers themselves, will be given an opportunity to raise their views. A public consultation process, because of its open and public character, ensures that everybody is given an equal opportunity to raise their views and acts as a counterweight to secret lobbying and influence-peddling.

(b) As indicated in the Reply to Question 3135, the Department is in the process of further researching aspects relevant to the Report in order to make legislative proposals that are best suited to our country.

2. The public consultation process discussed under paragraph (1)(a) above, will involve consultation with other Departments in the national, provincial and local sphere of Government due to the cross-cutting nature and implications of sex work. Any regulatory measure that deals with sex work and which may impact on the functions, resources or mandates of any other Department, will be drafted in consultation with the Department involved.

14 December 2018 - NW3876

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

What (a) number of (i) local music and (ii) art festivals have received funding from (aa) his department and/or (bb) entities reporting to him in each of the past five years, (b) was the name of each music and/or art festival and (c) amount did each receive in each case?

Reply:

In the past five years, my department has supported thirty five (35) Flagship Festivals and two hundred and thirty-eight (238) open call festivals.

The Entities reporting to my department, namely the National Arts Council supported fourteen (14) local music and art festivals.

The information below is a reflection of how we financially supported art festivals as well as amounts granted to each specified art festival.

1-a) Flagships

 

Name of festival

Amount from 2014-2017

1

Marula Festival

R8 000 000

2

Cape Town Carnival

R10 000 000

3

Cape Town International Jazz Festival

R40 259 000

4

Diamonds and Dorings Festival

R8 000 000

5

Mine Dance Festival

R3 000 000

6

Suiderooste fees

R6 000 000

7

Sama Awards

R 8 000 000

8

National Arts Festival

R27 000 000

9

Ladysmith isicathamiya Festival

R2 000 000

10

Okhahlamba

R4 000 000

11

Ilembe Lifestyle Festival

R6 000 000

12

Moretele Tribute Concert

R7 000 000

13

Joy of Jazz

R16, 500 000

14

Kalahari Desert Festival

R6 000 000

15

Mpumalange Comes Alive

R5 500 000

16

National Book Week

R12 000 000

17

Taung Calabash

R6 000 000

18

Indoni Youth Empowerment

R38 000 000

19

Macufe Arts Festival

R12 000 000

20

Buyel ekhaya

R8 000 000

21

Gauteng Carnival ( Pale Ya Rona)

R10 000 000

22

Mahika Mahikeng

R7 000 000

23

Mapungubwe Arts Festival

R10 000 000

24

Innibos

R4 000 000

25

Moshito

R15 500 000

26

Miami Winter Festival

R11 540 000

27

Mbokodo Awards

R15 000 000

28

SALA Awards

R3 200 000

29

Tweede Nuwe Jaar

R1 500 000

30

Go West

R2 250 000

31

Jazz River Carnival

R 2 250 000

32

Isinqisethu Cultural Festival

R2 000 000

33

PE Opera House

R4 000 000

34

Mpumalanga Cultural Experience

R2 000 000

35

Discop

R10 000 000

(1-b) Open Call projects

No.

Event / Project Name

Beneficiary

Location / Municipality/ City /Town

Province

Total Grant Value

2014/15

1

The Alfred Nzo Choral Festival

Lint Industries T/A Lint Foods (Pty) Ltd:

Umtata

Eastern Cape

R 1 000,000.00

2

Creative Arts talent: It’s our Art Conference

Digimap Media Global PTY LTD/ T/A

Qwaqwa

Free State

R500 000.00

3

Youth with Disability Development Arts and Culture

Sechaba Advancement Enterprise PTY LTD:

City of Johnnesburg

Gauteng

R300 000.00

4

Mzansi traditional and Cultural shows

Ukhamba Communications PTY LTD:

Soweto

Gauteng

R400 000.00

5

Siyafunda and training development

Teboho Le Teboho Initiatives PTY LTD:

Ekurhuleni

Gauteng

R150 000.00

6

The Secret

Sibusisiwe Commuity Development PTY LTD:

Ekurhuleni

Gauteng

R300 000.00

7

Two world apart

Bala Brothers Productions PTY LTD:

Durban

Gauteng

R800 000.00

8

Qhakaza Nathi Fashion Development Project

SarageB Gal Fashion (PTY) LTD:

Ethekwini

Kwa-Zulu Natal

R900 000.00

9

The Uzalo choir experience

Stained Glass Productions (PTY) LTD:

EThekwini Municipality

Kwa-Zulu Natal

R250 000.00

10

Bom Gospel Talent Search

Bao Music Business Learnership CC:

East London

Kwa-Zulu Natal

R750 000.00

11

Reggae Picnic festival

Milla Communications CC:

City of Johannesburg

Eastern Cape

R950 000.00

12

National Professional Choirs League

National Professional Choirs League CC:

East London

Gauteng

R300 000.00

13

Inhalanga Cultural Moods

Keraway Investment CC:

Eastern

Gauteng

R500 000.00

14

Blouberg Annual Festivals

Mak Herp cc:

Bloeberg

Limpopo

R800 000.00

15

Hihlurile Pot of Beads Exhibition

Hihlurile Pot of Beads CC:

Giyani

Kwa-Zulu Natal

R800 000.00

16

Vhuthihi African Music Extravaganza

Contimental Entertainment CC:

Vhembe

Limpopo

R600 000.00

17

Arts and Music live experience

Rebone Brand Creation CC:

Welkom

Limpopo

R800 000.00

18

Mzansi Raggae Unite

Lioness Productions SA CC:

City of Johannesburg

Limpopo

R700 000.00

19

Developing Young Film Makers

The Ergo Company CC:

City of Johannesburg

Free State

R500 000.00

20

Mamelodi Rondavels Campus

Izipho Zethu Zezobuciko Arts CC:

Mamelodi

Gauteng

R300 000.00

21

International Workers Day (May Day) Commemorations

Splendor Trading and Projects CC:

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R1 000 000.00

22

Project of the Year

Zero to Hero Theatre production NPO:

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R300 000.00

23

Performing arts development project

Publik Kreativity Drama Krew NPO:

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R600 000.00

24

Colour me human

Colour me human NPC:

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R350 000.00

25

Xibelani Music Festival

Kenny Shibambu Talent Development Institute NPO:

Giyani

Limpopo

R950 000.00

26

Soulbent Day Drama and Cultural Dance Show

Soulbent Project NPO:

Makhado/Tshiodzwe

Limpopo

R700 000.00

27

Swilombe Music Association

Swilombe Music Association NPO:

Giyani

Limpopo

R500 000.00

28

Performing Arts Workshop and Festivals

Factory of the Arts and Production NPO:

Siyabuswa

Mpumalanga

R180 000.00

29

Cape Town TV Arts Desk

Cater bridge Music Academy NPI:

Cape Town

Mpumalanga

R500 000.00

30

Ixopo Indigenous Dance and Music Festival

Cape Town TV, Represented by Workers World Media Productions NPO:

Khayelitsha

Western Cape

R300 000.00

31

Afrika Rize Reggae Festival

Unyezi Theatre Organisation NPO:

Richardsbay

Kwa-Zulu Natal

R00 000.00

32

Love and Hope Africa Gospel Music Festival

Qhawes Entertainment Group NPO:

Nkowankowa

Limpopo

R900 000.00

33

African Youth Theatre & Dance Festival

To The Throne Music Production NPO:

Cape Town

Western Cape

R400 000.00

34

Iqonga Creative Productions

Assitej South Africa NPO:

Cape Town

Western Cape

R400 000.00

35

BASA business breakfast and engagement in Mozambique

Rainbow Arts Organisation NPO:

Mozambique

Gauteng

R60 000.00

36

Paarl Festival

Business and Arts SA Institution:

Paarl

Western Cape

R800 000.00

37

Eden International Youth Festival & Exchange

Enklyve Media Investments Section 21:

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R800 000.00

38

Building Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurs

Kaos Projects T/A Suff Academy- Section 21 Film+Media&Arts:

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R700 000.00

39

3rd African Women Writers Symposium

African Arts Institute Section 21:

Johannesburg

Western Cape

R800 000.00

40

Beautiful Land

Joburg city Theatres:

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R200 000.00

41

Makgalakwena Cultural Dance Festival

Malose Samuel Rasito:

Polokwane

Limpopo

R250 000.00

2015/16

42

Annual Isi-Xhosa Music Festival

Impact Leisure Investment (Pty) Ltd

 

Buffalo City

 

Eastern Cape

R500 000.00

43

Eastern Cape Fashion Festival

Elitt Technology Solutions (pty) Ltd

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R750 500.00

44

Oppikoppi Festival

Hillop Live performance promotions PTY LTD

Johannesburg

Limpopo

R700 000.00

45

Madiba the African Opera

Opera South Africa PTY LTD

Lesedi municipality

Gauteng

R1 000 000.00

46

Anual Hlanganani and Traditional Music and Arts celebration

Kincha Media PTY LTD

Thulamahashe

Mpumalanga

R700 000.00

47

Summer Music Explosion

MJM Promotions: PYT LTD

Francis Baard

Northern Cape

R500 000.00

48

Nayanaya Pictures

Nayanaya Pictures

Chris Hani District

Gauteng

R900 000.00

49

Igqophamlando Multi-cultural traditional music festival and craft exhibition

Ngqobhongqobho Contractors

Nquthu

Kwazulu-Natal

R500 000.00

50

Ubuntu International Reggae Festival "Africa salute"

Mosadi Mooka Empowerment Services CC

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R400 000.00

51

Annual Ebubeleni Music Festival

Mahambehlala Communications CC

Nelson Mandela Bay

Eastern Cape

R800 000.00

52

A new Song

Village Gossip Foudation CC

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R500 000.00

53

Limpopo Royal Heritage Week

Tsalena Media CC

Thulamela

Limpopo

R800 000.00

54

Esiqelini Annual Cultural Event

Masibonisanenisonke trading and Projects27CC

JS Moroka

Mpumalanga

R700 000.00

55

Umthayi Marula festival

Courtecy Marketing Services

Ethekwini Municipality

Kwazulu-Natal

R800 000.00

56

Conference + Festival to bring together Africa's film sector leaders in South Africa 2015 and Cann

Martin Cuff Consultancy

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R700 000.00

57

Moving Performing Arts

Reliable Knowledge Theatre Club CC

Dr Ruth Segomotsi

Northwest

R500 000.00

58

Camp and concerts

Moribo Music development promotions NPO

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R500 000.00

59

Mzansi Reggae Splash

Zmele NPO

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R300 000.00

60

Bohlabela School of Art Festival

Tswelopele Performing Arts NPO

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R200 000.00

61

Dance Umbrella festival 2016

Dance Forum NPO

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R800 000.00

62

Azishe! Festival

Jazzart Dance Theatre

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R400 000.00

63

South African Book Fair

Publishers Association of South Africa

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R500 000.00

64

The Delft Big Band

The Delft Big Band

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R300 000.00

65

4th Iternational Marimba and Stelpam festival

Education Africa Section 21

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R400 000.00

66

Nthiyeng Martha Mabote

N.M Mabote Craft & Development

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R100 000.00

67

Mpho Ngwenya (individual)

Funology

Johannesburg

Gauteng

R300 000.00

68

Pulane Jantjies: Individual

Matlakala

Sol Plaatjie

Northern Cape

R250 000.00

2016/17

70

Sistaz With Soul

Mkhonzeni tradings

Ethekwini municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000.00

71

Phuzushukela memorial Festival

Mkhosi Busa

Nkandla Local Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R1 970 000.00

72

Ugu Jazz festival

Cyassonnd Events management

Ugu

KwaZulu Natal

R1 000 000.00

73

Umthayi marula Festival

Courtesy Marketing services

Ethekwini municipality

Kwa Zulu Natal

R800 000.00

74

The Pietermaritzburg Jazz festival

Starlight Promotions

Umgungundlovu - Msunduzi Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000.00

75

Rofhiwa annual Star Search

Asikulibali Trading and Projects

Vhembe Municipality

Limpopo

R400 000.00

75

Ke Nna Polelo

Lamem Trading

Capricorn Municipality

 

R300 000.00

76

African Fashion & Cultural Exhibition (AFACE)

Roti Enterprise

Makhado Municipality

Limpopo

R 400 000.00

77

Royal Heritage Celebration

Tsalena Media

Vhembe District

Limpopo

R800 000.00

78

Venda Nga

The Branding House South Africa

Vhembe District

Limpopo

R500 000.00

79

Esiqelini Annual Cultural event

Masibonisane Sonke Trading and Project

MPUMALANGA

 

R500 000.00

80

7th Annual Mdantsane Summer Reunion

Loudnoise Entertainment

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

Eastern Cape

R300 000.00

81

Abadala Music Festival

Damilos MP

OR Tambo District Municipality

Eastern Cape

R750 000.00

82

Annual O.R Tambo Homage Concert

Win-Always Projects

Mbizana Local Municipality

Eastern Cape

R550 000.00

83

Buyelembo Arts Festival

Buyelembo Village

City of CapeTown

Western Cape

R150 000.00

84

Mafube Arts Festival

Sastown Entertainment

Mafube Local Municipality

Free Sate

R500 000.00

85

Mapungubultural Landscape & Heritage Music Project - Limpopo

Makotopong Sound Studios

Limpopo

Limpopo

R700 000.00

86

Speak the Mind Festival

LNM Entertainment

Johannesburg Metro

Gauteng

R300 000.00

87

The KwaNdebele Cultural Imbizo

Kushanda Consulting

Bronkhorspruit

Mpumalanga

R500 000.00

88

Yanaya Gender Film and Dialogue Festival

Nayanaya Pictures

Ethekwini

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000.00

89

Abantu Book

Abantu Book Festival

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R500 000.00

90

4th Annual Hlanganani Traditional Music and Arts Celebration

Kincha Media

Ekurhuleni
Metropolitan Municipality

Gauteng

R700 000.00

91

100% Pure Kwaito

Zuztainment

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

Gauteng

R500 000.00

92

Graduate Arts Project (GAP)

DOS Productions

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R800 000.00

93

Tshwane Fashion Project

Black Plum Corporate Enterprise T/A Plum Creative Agency

City of Tshwane (Pretoria)

Gauteng

R500 000.00

94

W.O.M.A.N experential Art Event

Brainbow Consciences Creatives

City of Johannesburg (Down Town)

Gauteng

R500 000.00

95

Creative Mzansi

Target Expresss Computers T/A Morning Star Design

City of Joburg (Market Theatre)

Gauteng

R300 000.00

96

Ukuhlanganisa - Trolley Pushers

M and Z Theatre Productions

Alexandra

Gauteng

R131 400.00

97

Saadjies: A flagship Cool Capital

Cool Captain (implementation agent Mathews and Associates Architects)

University of Pretoria

Gauteng

R300 000.00

98

Arts and Social Enterpreneurship Conference

Grow Khula Multimedia Productions

Durban

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000.00

99

Milodi Arts and Culture Festival

Cybrobrite

Jane Furse

Limpopo

R500 000.00

100

Seetseng Arts and Culture

We- Dia Productions

Modimolle

Limpopo

R500 000.00

101

Royal Night and Heritage Celebration

Bold Move Foundation

Polokwane

Limpopo

R300 000.00

102

Tshivenda Music Awards

Dengetenge Marketing and Communications

Vhembe District Municipality

Limpopo

R500 000.00

103

Munghana Lonene FM Xitsonga Music Awards

GY Promotions

Mopani District/ Greater Giyani Local Municipality

Limpopo

R500 000.00

104

Mayibuye Cultural Festival

Mamba Investments cc

Umlazi

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000.00

105

Annual Cultural Lifestyle Festival

Grass Roots Music Productions cc

Arconhoek

Mpumalanga

R900 000.00

106

Africa Converse

Multi Minds Investments Holdings

Ethekwini

KwaZulu Natal

R700 000.00

107

Africa Heritage Week

African Business Leaders Forum

Maboneng

Gauteng

R600 000.00

108

Dance Africa Dance

Vision Faces

Umlazi

KwaZulu Natal

R700 000.00

109

Traditional Fashion Show

Lick'o Propeties

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R 500 000.00

110

Just Chillin presents the September Issue

Tshokoma Enterprise

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R500 000.00

111

Hello Summer Uitenhage Festival

Stage Elements cc

Uitenhage

Eastern Cape

R750 000.00

112

Melting Pot Arts Festival

GCIE Communications

Mount Ayliff

Eastern Cape

R1 500 000.00

113

The Segopotso Project

Mehlo-Maya-(Eye to the Sun)

Mangaung Municipality

Free State

R750 000.00

114

Africa Day and Xitsonga music festival

Swilombe Music Association

Thabo Mafutsanyane District

Limpopo

R500 000.00

115

Lejweleputswa Music Festival

Ntho Ya Kasi Entertainment

Ethekwini

KwaZulu Natal

R1 000 000.00

116

Matsoara Thebe Senior Citizens Co-operative.

Matsoara Thebe Senior Citizens Co-operative

Rustenburg Local Municipality

NorthWest

R133 000.00

117

Maskandi African Mix Festival 28 May 2016

Unique PR and Events

Klerksdorp

NorthWest

R800 000.00

118

Africa unite Reggae Festival0

Bantu Media Production

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipilaty

Eastern Cape

R400 000.00

119

Kopano Music Festival

WMJ Productions and Events

Dutywa

Eastern Cape

R900 000.00

110

Disabled Community Empowerment Initiative

Southern African Disabled Musicians Association

Nelson Mandela bay Metro

Eastern Cape

R750 000.00

111

Taleni Cultural Festival

Taleni Cultural Festival

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R400 000.00

112

Masibambane Music Festival

Nobadula Trading Enterprise

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R1 000 000.00

113

2nd Annual Motswako Fest

Gateway Media PTY(LTD)

Rustenburg

NorthWest

R1 000 000.00

114

Mtubatuba Youth Celebrations Arts Festival

Isigqi Arts Development

Umkhanyokude District municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R200 000.00

115

Imbokodo Arts Festival

Nquthu Arts Development Programme

Nquthu Local municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R300 000.00

116

Rural Women Empowerment Festival

Dannhauser Active Rural Women Ensemble

Amajuba district

KwaZulu Natal

R400 000.00

117

Isicathamiya Revival Festival

Ladysmith Youth development Ensemble

Umnambithi Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R150 000.00

118

Musina Cultural Heritage Festival

Limpopo Arts & Culture Youth Forum

Vhembe Municipality

Limpopo

R500 000.00

119

Xibelani Music Festival

Kenny Shibambu Talent Development Institute

Mopani Distirct

Limpopo

R900 000.00

120

Masase

Soulbent Project

Makhado Municipality

Limpopo

R500 000.00

121

FOTAAP Performing Arts Festival

The Factory of arts and production

Kwandebele

Mpumalanga

R100 000.00

122

Words of wings Annual Storry Telling Maskandi festival

Calabash Storytellers

Calabash

 

R300 000.00

123

Woodstock Live

Kaggen Music And Film Trust

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R500 000.00

124

Bloekombos Arts and Culture Festival

South African Youth Council

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R400 000.00

125

TE Radebe Arts Alive

TE Radebe Theatre Production Free State

Provincial

 

R150 000.00

126

Access Art - 1 June 2016 - 1 June 2017 nationwide

Shekinah Media (Pty) Ltd

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R2 000 000.00

127

Kusina Kudedelwane Cultural Festival - Gorton Hall, Estcourt

Izigi Zendoda Sport & Culture Group

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R300 000.00

128

Mpumalanga Come Alive Theatre Development Project

Publik Kreativeity Drama Krew

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R500 000.00

129

Artists Preserving Heritage Festival - 5-25 September 2016 Johannesburg

Alexandra Youth in Action Ensemble

Alexandra

Gauteng

R500 000.00

130

Dundee Battlefields Carnival 23-24 September 2016 - Dundee

Doz Holdings

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R700 000.00

131

Neo Motsatse the Concert 2016 - 21 June to 10 July 2016 - National Arts Festival

Fezeka Motsatse Activations (FMA)

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R300 000.00

132

5th International Women's Theatre Festival
Date: 3 November 2016 - 13 November 2016

Olive Tree Theatre Productions

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

Gauteng

R350 000.00

133

Mams Arts Festival

Lamathonsi Entertainment

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R700 000.00

134

Dance Umbrella Festival

Dance Forum

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

Gauteng

R800 000.00

135

The Divas of Kofifi

Phambili Siyaya Arts

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R1 000 000.00

136

Digitizing the Soweto '76 & 1956 Woman March Books.

Mutloatse Arts Heritage

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R100 000.00

137

Naledi Theatre Awards

The Naledi Theatre Awards

Various Theatres

Gauteng

R500 000.00

138

Mabi Gabriel Thobejane with Madala Kunene & Trio SaRoy

Forest Jam South Africa

Umlazi

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000.00

 

2017/18

139

Mindset Concept Production House

Africa Television Market

Ethekwini Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000

140

One Foundation

Eagle Eye Creative Project

Rusternburg Local Municipality

North West

R350 000

141

Malengs Trading

Mpumalanga Fashion and Craft Show

Mbombela

Mpumalanga

R400 000

142

Blaq Maci's PR

"Your rights" Music Festival

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R600 000

143

Patben Projects

Patben Projects

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R300 000

144

Dikgong Arts & Décor

Art & Craft Design Exhibition Project

Mgaka Modiri Molema

North West

R403 000

150

One Heart Music and Television Promotions

Reggae Xplosion - State Theatre

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R600 000

151

AAA Entertainment

Digital Market Access

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R500 000

152

Fuse Africa Group

Johannesburg Reggae Splash

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R100 000

153

Lovemore ndou Tainments

The Annual Tshwane Regional Dance

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R500 000

154

Durban Black Drifters

15th High School Isicathamiya Summit

Ethekwini Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R300 000

155

Bagaka Ba Koma Dance Troupe

Performing Arts Annual Youth Festival

Ratlou Local Municipality

North West

R108 800

156

Tiego Creative Writers

Tiego Creative Writers

Lepelle Nkumpi Municipality

Limpopo

R100 000

157

Ditswantsho Zwifaniso Film

Makhado Literary Fair

Vhembe District

Limpopo

R200 000

158

Amatjathangubo Youth Arts and Culture Music Centre

Fumana Ilemuko Skills Development

 Thembisile Hani

 

R500 000

159

Komani Independent Artists

Women who art in Crafts

Chris Hani Queenstown

Eastern Cape

R300 000

160

Proud Youth South Africa

KwaNxamalala Annual Heritage Celebrations

Mthatha

Kwazulu Natal

R300 000

161

Team Community Development Centre

Phaphama Cultural Events

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R380 200

162

The Delft Big Band

Gauteng Big Band Festival

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R250 000

163

Forest Jam South Africa

Mabi Gabriel Thobejane with Madala Kunene & Trio SaRoy

Ethekwini

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000

164

Pule Mqhedlane

Kopanang ma Africa Annual Youth Theatre Festival

Bothaville

Gauteng

R200 000

165

Mr Israel Lebogo

Now or Never

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R250 000

167

CACPIR

Boundless Africa: Heritage in Motion

City of Johannesburg

Gauteng

R600 000

168

Accatones Vocal Blend Co-operative Limited

31 Days - A Musical

Mmabatho

North West

R150 000.00

169

Cyassound Holdings PTY LTD

UGU Jazz Festival

UGU District Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R800 000

170

Madlosi Entertainment CC

Southern African Music Conference/Miami Winter Music Conference

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R400 000

171

Unique PR and Events PTY

2nd Imvunge Maskandi African Festival

 Ethekwini

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000

172

AML - PAZ Africa Group

8th Annual Onkweni Royal Cultural Festival International (ORCFI)

Ethekwini Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

800 000

173

Fashion Engagement PTY LTD

Traditional Horse Racing Fashion Event

Buffalo City

 

R500 000

174

Alexandra Youth in Action Ensemble PTY LTD

Emalahleni Artists Preserving Heritage Festival (UBUNTU)0

City of JHB

Gauteng

R500 000

175

Thiko Events Management PTY LTD

Reconciliation Festival

Ekurhuleni

Gauteng

R450 000

176

Phambili Siyaya Arts Section 21

DIVAS of Kofifi - Touring to Mbombela

Tshwane

Gauteng

R500 000

177

Mpumalanga Choral Music Association NPO

Mpumalanga Choral Eistedfod

Gert Sibande District Municipality

Mpumalanga

R400 000

178

NEWLIBIX NPC

DSTV I rock Legends and Talent search

Capricorn district

Limpopo

R500 000

179

Damilos MP

Abadals Cultural Project

Mhlontlo

Eastern Cape

R500 000

180

A Creative Trading and Projects

Kids, Arts and Craft Festival

Nelson Mandela Bay

Eastern Cape

R500 000.00

181

Naleli M Holdings

Second Chances Training Workshop

Joburg

Gauteng

R300 000.00

182

Ndikho Events

Battle Field Festival

Nquthu Municipality

Kwazulu Natal

R500 000.00

183

LCP Concepts

90'S Affair Festival September 2017

Mangaung

Free State

R500 000.00

184

AB Art Studio

Vryburg Food, Art and Craft Market

Vryburg

Free State

R500 000.00

185

Baitshepi Ba Thari Entertainment and Projects

Re godisa ngwa ya setswana

Dr Ruth Mompati District

North West

R 200,000.00

186

Bantu Media Production

3rd Annual Africa Unite Reggae Concert

Rusternburg

North West

R500 000.00

187

MIOWN

Youth Day Reconciliation Expo Music Festival

Vhembe

Limpopo

R300 000.00

188

Mkhonzeni Trading PTY Ltd

Sistaz with Soul - 2nd

EThekwini Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R300 000.00

189

DOZ Holdings

Dundee Battlefields Carnival

Umzinyathi District Dundee

KwaZulu Natal

R300 000.00

190

Mkhosi Busa Pty Ltd

Phuzushukela Memorial Maskandi Festival

King Cetshwayo Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R500 000.00

191

Milla House

Polokwane Fashion Show 30 August 2017

Capricorn District

Limpopo

R278 604.00

192

Media Entertainment

Arts Media Alive Young Script Writers Festival 01 - 30 July 2017

Capricorn Blouberg Municipality

Limpopo

R300 000.00

193

Are Berekeng IT Enterprise

African Poetry with South African Children

City of JHB

Gauteng

R150 000.00

194

Black Affirmations Creative Arts

A Jewel in the Wilds- The Story of Pace College, Soweto 19/06/17-09/17

City of Joburg

Gauteng

R 151,000.00

195

Abantu Book Festival

Abantu Book Festival

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R 700,000.00

196

Table Manners J and J Productions T/A Jack and Jull Productions

Table Manners

Joburg Metro

Gauteng

R500 000.00

197

New Life Foundation NPO

Mbombela International Film Festival

Nkomazi Local Municipality

Mpumalanga

R300 000.00

198

Matatiele Arts Development Organisation

Matatiele Indigenous Dance Festival 30 April

Matatiela

Eastern Cape

R200 000.00

199

Kwa Bhaca Kingdom

Umkhosi Wokukhahlela

Mthathe

Eastern Cape

R500 000.00

200

Head Boy Arts Production

Badimo Ba Rona Ba Kae? (Musical Production)

Kuruman

Northen Cape

R300 000.00

201

Namahadi Youth project

Manyano Project

Mafube Municipality

North West

R100 000.00

202

Free State Wombman in Theatre FSWT

CAMAGU Theatre and Dance festival

Mangaung Metro

Free State

R500 000.00

203

Ditlhodi Tsa Magagane Cultural

Batsha le Setso Festival

Vrischgewaagte

North West

R250 000.00

204

Mamama Trading & Projects

Battle of Schools

Atamelang

North West

R150 000.00

205

Kenny Shibanbo Talent Development institute

Xibelani Music Festival 01 July

Mopani

Limpopo

R400 000.00

206

Gay and Lesbian Network

Pink Mynah Festival

Pietermaritzburg

KwaZulu Natal

R50 000.00

207

Sakhisizwe Community Projects

Cleremont Arts Festival

EThekwini Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R300 000.00

208

Isigqi Arts Development NPC

2nd Annual Mtubatuba Youth Celebration Arts Festival

Umkhanyakude District Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R400 000.00

209

Nkungumathe Youth Development Forum

Nkungumathe Arts

King Cetshwayo District

KwaZulu Natal

R300 000.00

210

The Web NGO

Bubula Praise Poetry

Durban Metro

KwaZulu Natal

R250 000.00

211

Afropolitan Explosive

SA Festival for Black-Centered Film

Amajuba Disctrict Municipality

KwaZulu Natal

R300 000.00

212

Isiko FoundationNPC

Annual Collins Chabane Cultural Heritage Festival

Vhembe district

Limpopo

R500 000.00

213

1st Pati Glass and Fine Arts Project

The Transparent Beauty of Ubuntu

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R300 000.00

214

Simon Moshiwadiba Foundation

Siyaya Arts Development

Lesedi Municipality

Gauteng

R250 000.00

215

Deep Ratanda Development Projects

The Book of Love

Ekurhuleni

Gauteng

R200 000.00

216

Soweto African Revolution

Relukisa Bokamoso

Ekurhuleni

Gauteng

R150 000.00

217

Batsumi Cultural Group

Senzangakhona Arts, Culture and Heritage;

City of Joburg

Gauteng

R200,000.00

218

Midvaal Arts Institution

5TH Midvaal Arts Festival Tour

Midvaal Municipality

Gauteng

R300,000.00

219

True Butterfly (Girl Programme)

Pampiri Arts Programme

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R 150,000.00

220

Zanethemba Arts and Culture Project

Ses' Fikile Arts Festival

City of Joburg

Gauteng

R150,000.00

221

Refubish Project Development organisation

Film Fest and Fashion

Midrand

Gauteng

R400 000.00

222

The Maboneng Township Arts Experience

The Annual 2017 Maboneng Township Arts Experience (MTAE)

Alexandra Township

Gauteng

R600 000.00

223

South African National Youth Orchestra Foundation

Orchestra Courses and Programmes

City of Joburg

Gauteng

R 500,000.00

224

Moji Entertainment

Africa Dance Festival

Tlhabane; Rustenburg

North West

R150 000.00

225

BAO Music Business Leadership

BOM Music Development Programmed

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R400 000.00

226

Coalition Trading 1237T/A Creative Solutions

Reconciliation Comedy Night 2016

Kimberly

Northern Cape

R150 000.00

227

Outrage Concept

3rd Annual We can Arts Festival

eThekwini

KwaZulu Natal

R800 000.00

228

Bardill Entertainment

UP& Coming -Live Music Showcase February - November 2017

Sandton

Gauteng

R 400,000.00

229

Zuniza Investment Corporation CC T/A Nikis Oasis Restaurant

Niki's Jazz Development Project May 2017 - April 2018

City of Joburg

Gauteng

R 500,000.00

230

Lamathonsi Entertainment

Mams Arts Festival

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R 700,000.00

231

Errol Teddy Mattera T/A teddy Sometimes Productions CC Dungamanzi film

Cinema From Within - Who are we Reall

City of Joburg

Gauteng

R500 000.00

232

Pule Mqhedlane

Kopanang Africa Annual Youth Theatre Festival

Lejwe Le Putswa

Free State

R150 000.00

233

Beauty M Mlokoti

ICAMAGU 24 April - 26 May 2017

Mangaung Metro Municipality

Free State

R100 000.00

234

Thabo Isaac Rapoo

Workshops that end with a production

Brits District

North West

R 156,000.00

235

Ms Sarah Nhlapo

Ventersdorp / Tlokwe Africa Day Celebrations

Potchestroom

North West

R300 000.00

236

Petrus Sello Lephotho

LETS TAP

Ekurhuleni

Gauteng

R100 000.00

237

Tebogo Edward Radebe

Yes We Can Disability, Old Age & Orphan Dance Development);

Ekurhuleni

Gauteng

R150 000.00

238

Gauteng Music Development

Music Transcribing

City of Joburg

Gauteng

R300,000.00

DAC ENTITY: NATIONAL ARTS COUNCIL (NAC)

MUSIC FESTIVALS Supported

Organisation Name

Funding No

Genre

Province

Amount

EspAfrika

MC/26/13

Jazz

Western Cape

R 1m (Development Programme)

Drakensburg Promotions

M/316/14

Jazz

Gauteng

R 250 000

The Jazz Foundation of SA

MC/30/13

Jazz

Gauteng

R 750 000

Ekhoneni Production Trading Enterpise

M/123/14

Hip Hop Music

Gauteng

R 150 000

Teb’s Management

MC/61/13

 

Gauteng

R 300 000

         

MULTI DISCIPLINARY FESTIVALS

Organisation Name

Funding No

Genre

Province

Amount

National Arts Festival

AC2013

Multi Discipline

Eastern Cape

R 3m

Diamonds and Dorings

F2013

Multi Discipline

Northern Cape

R 500 000

VryFees – Vryfestival

AC5313

Multi Discipline

Free State

R 363 000

Bolotsa Letsema Holding

AC20813

Multi Discipline

North West

R 600 000

Suidoodstefees

AC4813

Multi Discipline

Western Cape

R 3000 000

Cape Town Festival

AC7913

Multi Discipline

Western Cape

R 700 000

Cederbergfees

AC21813

Multi Discipline

Western Cape

R 350 000

MACUFE

F2017

Multi Discipline

Free State

R 500 000

ROUTE FORM

SUBMISSION TO THE MINISTER OF ARTS AND CULTURE

PROGRAMME

2

FILE NO.

 

SUBJECT

QUESTION NO. 3876-2018: NATIONAL ASSEMBLY: MR L G MOKOENA (EFF): TO ASK THE MINISTER OF ARTS AND CULTURE: WHAT NUMBER OF LOCAL MUSIC AND ART FESTIVALS HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM HIS DEPARTMENTAND ENTITIES REPORTING TO HIM IN EACH OF THE PAST FIVE YEARS

SURNAME AND INITIALS

ABBREVIATED DESIGNATION

IGNATURE AND DATE

SEE COMMENTS

CHABALALA D

DD/CD

   

MABASO C

CD/CD

   

MABASO C

ACT DDG/ACPD

   

MKHIZE V

DG

   

HANI,N

H/DM

   

SOTYU, M

DM

   

BESANI, S

CoS

   

MTHETHWA, N

MINISTER

   

NAME AND DESIGNATION

COMMENTS

   
   

14 December 2018 - NW3612

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

Whether the Competition Commission purchased any motor vehicles since 1 April 2015; if so, what is the (a) make, (b), model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased?

Reply:

Motor vehicles purchased since 1 April 2015

Yes, the Competition Commission purchased motor vehicles in each financial year since 1 April 2015. Expenditure has been disclosed in the relevant annual financial statements.

Details of the purchases are as follows:

2015/16 Financial year

  • One Toyota Corolla was procured at a purchase price of R 271 566.
  • One Audi A4 was procured, at a purchase price of R 430 212.
  • One Toyota Hilux was procured at a purchase price of R242 012.

2016/17 Financial year

  • Two Toyota Corolla vehicles were procured, at purchase prices of R 270 795; and R282 275 each.

2017/18 Financial year

  • Two BMW 3-series vehicles were procured, at purchase prices of R420 800 and R425 700 each and two BMW 5-series vehicles were procured, at purchase prices of R621 501 each.

 

-END-

14 December 2018 - NW3893

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What was the total monetary value of textile (a) exports and (b) imports in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(a) Exports

Country’s textile exports per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Textile

6 713

Textile

7 175

Textile:

7 837

Textile

8 964

Textile

10 201

 

(b) Imports

Country’s textile imports per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Textile

12 975

Textile

14 295

Textile

15 967

Textile

17 112

Textile

17 169

14 December 2018 - NW3611

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What is the (a) total amount spent by the Competition Commission on the Market Inquiry into the Private Healthcare Sector since its establishment in 2013 and (b) detailed breakdown of the amount spent by the Competition Commission on services provided by external (i) economists, (ii) lawyers, (iii) expert consultants and (iv) a certain legal firm (name furnished)?

Reply:

The Competition Commission set up a Market Inquiry under the current provisions of the Competition Act, in 2014 to consider the state of competition in the private healthcare market, covering a large number of services across the value-chain.

An independent Panel was appointed by the Commissioner to preside over the market inquiry, chaired by ex Chief Justice Sandile Ngcobo, and it engaged Experts as panellists and a number of specialists to support the Chairperson and Panel of Experts.

The Commission decided that a mix of skills would ensure that the Panel oversees and evaluates both legal (administrative, procedural) and technical (healthcare, health and competition economics) aspects of the inquiry. In addition to the mix of skills, the Commission also had to consider the independence of the various panel members. In particular, the Commission had to seek experts with relevant sector-specific experience that would not result in a conflict of interest. Details of the individual panel members appointed by the Commission to oversee the HMI are reflected in greater detail in Table 1 below:

TABLE 1: Panel members

Panellist

Reasons for selection

Chief Justice Ngcobo (Rtd)

  • Justice Ngcobo, in his capacity as the Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court was the head of the judiciary in the Republic of South Africa.

Dr Cees van Gent (Netherlands)

  • Dr van Gent has both competition economics, regulatory and health economics experience from the Netherlands. Unlike locally based competition economists, he has not presided over any matters that may be reviewed during this inquiry.

Professor Sharon Fonn

  • Professor Fonn is the Dean of Health Sciences at Wits. She brings sector and system-wide experience.She is a well-respected academic with extensive publications.

Dr Ntuthuko Bhengu

  • Dr Bhengu has public and private sector experience. He has also worked in nearly all parts of the private healthcare sector, bringing experience from all relevant markets.

Dr Lungiswa Nkonki

  • Dr Nkonki holds a PhD in health economics. She is an academic and has no conflicts of interests in the sector.

The total amount spent by the Competition Commission on the Market Inquiry into the Private Healthcare Sector since its establishment in 2013 amounts to R196 949 637.

The detailed breakdown is as follows (Table 2):

Table 2: cost breakdown

No

Description

Amount

1

Legal Expertise & Litigation

R12,537,881.16

2

Healthcare Sector Experts

R5,627,139.65

3

Data Warehousing & Actuarial Services

R13,486,040.63

4

Data De-Identification & Security

R9,598,784.61

5

Economics Experts 

R38,959,579.39

6

Media and Communications

R1,391,211.99

7

Panel Members

R36,794,302.06

8

Human Resources and Operational costs

R78,554,697.51

Total

R196 949 637

 

In respect of the Panel Members, payments were made as follows (table 3):

Table 3: Payments made to Panel Members.

Panel Members

Total

Justice Sandile Ngcobo

R5 929 016

Dr Ntuthuko Melusi Bhengu

R9 716 935

Cees Van Gent

R11 748 087

Dr Sharon Fonn

R3 328 763

Dr Lungiswa Nkonki

R6 071 501

In respect of the specific query in the Parliamentary Question regarding a certain law firm, I am advised that Ndzabandzaba Attorneys were not appointed to represent the Commission in the Market Inquiry and accordingly no monies were paid to them.

-END-

14 December 2018 - NW3514

Profile picture: Mulder, Dr CP

Mulder, Dr CP to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) How many (i) public servants and (ii) Ministers have received legal and financial support from the state annually since 1 January 2014 during court cases arising from the execution of their duties and (b) what were the costs related to each specified case; (2) in how many cases have such civil servants and Ministers forfeited their administrative protection; (3) whether the financial expenses associated with such forfeited cases have been recouped from the said civil servants and Ministers; if not, why not; if so, what is the extent of the financial expenses recouped in each case; (4) whether he will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Office of the Acting Chief Litigation Officer as follows:

(1)(a)(i) 526 public servants; and (ii) 4 Ministers; and (b) the statistics concerned regarding the costs, have not been kept separately, because they are managed in the normal processes and kept with all other files, which are allocated to a State Attorney if and when such an application is brought. The costs that could be sourced, are indicated in the tables below.

(2) None. In the normal processes in State Attorneys’ Offices, such statistics are not kept separately, but are kept with all other normal files and allocated to a State Attorney if and when such an application is brought. In respect of the Heads of Department, Chief Financial Officers and Members of the Executive Council who applied for State cover, no separate record or statistics of such matters, were kept.

(3) No, because I have been informed that it is mostly SAPS members who are faced with this situation; and SAPS recoup the money themselves. The SAPS members sign an undertaking to pay before the matter is referred to the State Attorneys’ Offices and SAPS executes it internally.

(4) No such statement is necessary.

Background information:

The tables below provide statistical information of the Offices of the State Attorneys and the Chief Directorate: Law Enforcement within the Office of the Chief Litigation Officer dealing with matters of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development:

1. STATE ATTORNEY: BLOEMFONTEIN

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

43

None

R267 431.74

None

None

None

2015

5

None

R50 015.47

None

None

None

2016

95

None

R700 828.03

None

None

None

2017

27

None

R289 980.35

None

None

None

2018

33

None

R304 75.30

None

None

None

2. STATE ATTORNEY: EAST LONDON

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

2

None

None

None

None

None

2015

2

None

None

None

None

None

2016

1

None

None

None

None

None

2017

3

None

R33 961.81

None

None

None

2018

None

None

None

None

None

None

3. STATE ATTORNEY: PRETORIA

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

9

4

None

None

None

None

4. STATE ATTORNEY: DURBAN

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

None

None

None

None

None

None

5. STATE ATTORNEY: MTHATHA

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

2

None

None

None

None

None

6. STATE ATTORNEY: KIMBERLEY

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

None

None

None

None

None

None

Regarding the Kimberley State Attorneys’ Office, it has been reported that no records were kept regarding public servants. Nor were records kept of Ministers who received legal representation in the scope of their duties.

7. STATE ATTORNEY: MAHIKENG

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

None

None

None

None

None

None

Regarding the Mahikeng State Attorneys’ Office, the information as received from the Office of the State Attorney, is that the State Attorneys have represented Ministers in all claims. This was however in the official (normal) capacity and not in their personal capacity. The State Attorney, Mahikeng is therefore not aware of any Minister who forfeited administrative protection. Therefore the Head of the Office informs me that there are no such cases.

The Office of the State Attorney has also represented individual officials in their official capacities who were cited as co-defendants with the relevant Minister. The State Attorney is not aware of any of those officials who forfeited their administrative protection. Therefore the Head of Office informs me that there are no such cases.

As the Office has not kept statistics of this nature before, it is not possible to provide a breakdown of the costs incurred in respect of all these cases. In this respect, I am informed that there are no costs to report on, as there were no such cases where the Minister, Member of the Executive Council (MEC) or Officials have applied for legal representation in their personal capacity.

8. STATE ATTORNEY: JOHANNESBURG

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

66

None

R1 188 735.00

None

None

None

2015

49

None

R1 462 626.00

None

None

None

2016

18

None

R395 845.00

None

None

None

2017

10

None

R222 566.00

None

None

None

2018

8

None

R22 292.00

None

None

None

9. STATE ATTORNEY: CAPE TOWN

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

135

None

None

None

None

None

10. STATE ATTORNEY: THOHOYANDOU

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

4

None

R36 559.00

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

1

None

R4 305.00

None

None

None

2018

None

None

None

None

None

None

11. STATE ATTORNEY: PORT ELIZABETH

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

2

None

R31 468.00

None

None

None

2015

3

None

R138 372.00

None

None

None

2016

5

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

None

None

None

None

None

None

12. STATE ATTORNEY: POLOKWANE

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

None

None

None

None

None

None

Regarding the Polokwane State Attorneys’ Office, the Head of Office has reported that there are no such applications that have been submitted to their office. Hence the nil return on the table, above.

13. CHIEF DIRECTORATE: LAW ENFORCEMENT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT:

Year

No. of Public servants

No. of Ministers

Costs for public servants

Costs for Ministers

No. of cases where public servants forfeited their administrative protection

No. of cases where Ministers forfeited their administrative protection

2014

None

None

None

None

None

None

2015

None

None

None

None

None

None

2016

None

None

None

None

None

None

2017

None

None

None

None

None

None

2018

3

None

None

None

None

None

14 December 2018 - NW3740

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he was made aware of the (a) attack on editors on social media and/or (b) meeting held with the SA National Editors Forum by the Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni; if so, what is the position in this regard; (2) whether (a) he and/or (b) any person in his Office communicated (i) directly or (ii) indirectly with Mr T T Mboweni on this matter; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) No

(b) No. I am encouraged by the fact that the Minister of Finance reached out to the SA National Editors Forum and had a constructive discussion on matters that were of concern to both parties.

(2) (a) No

(b) No

14 December 2018 - NW3672

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) What number of schools in Gauteng in each year since 1 January 2014, (a) (i) were built and (ii) should have been built and (b) what are the relevant details for the specified results; (2) whether, if the results are negative, existing single-medium schools will be forced to include learners speaking other languages so that such schools will eventually become dual medium schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. (a)(i) The table below indicates the number of planned schools and schools built since the 2014/15 financial year.

Financial Year

Target

Schools Built

School Name

2014/15

11

13

1. Munsieville Primary School

2. Iketleng Primary (Hammanskraal) School

3. Nellmapius Primary School

4. Phomolong Primary School

5. Oos Rand Secondary School

6. Buhle Park Primary School

7. Fochville Secondary School

8. Magaliesburg Secondary School

9. Freedom Park Secondary School

10. Naturena Primary No. 2 School

11. Slovoville Primary School

12. Imphendulo Primary School

13. Rosslyn Primary School

2015/16

13

16

1. Chief A Luthuli Primary School No.2 

2. Christiaanville (Montana Poort Primary School)

3. Doornkop (Obed Mosiane Primary School)

4. Etwatwa Primary School

5. Evans Park Primary School

6. Glen Vista Primary School

7. Kaalfontein Secondary School

8. Khutsong South Primary School

9. Mahareng Secondary School

10. Nellmapius Ext.6 Primary School

11. Palmridge Secondary School

12. Protea Glen Primary School

13. Ratanda Bertha Gxowa Primary School

14. Soshanguve East Secondary School 

15. Soshanguve Primary School

16. Tswelapele (Andrew Mapheto Primary School)

2016/17

13

08

1. Bophelong New Secondary School

2. Ga-Rankuwa Primary School

3. Mokone Marupeng Primary School

4. Moses Kotane Primary School

5. Nellmapius Secondary School

6. Nomzamo Madikizela Mandela Primary School

7. Sinenhlanhla Primary School

8. Wierdapark Primary School

2017/18

05

06

1. Olievenhoutbosch Sec No.2/Seshegong Sec School

2. Everest Primary School

3. Menzi Primary school

4. Julius Sebolai Primary School

5. Marotola Primary School

6. Nokuthula Special School (LSEN school)

(ii) Please see (i) above.

(b) The Department has a backlog in relation to the new and replacement schools, that is perpetuated by the constant influx of learners into the province. The Department has not achieved all its targets related to building schools, as indicated in (a) above, due to a number of reasons that have had an adverse impact on the delivery of schools. These include but not limited to:

• Budgetary Constraints;

• Under perfomance by contractors;

• Community disruptions; and

• Inclement weather.

2. The Department will not be forcing but engaging and encouraging the existing single-medium schools that have received a sufficiently large number of learner applications for admission, to offer additional languages and thereby become dual-medium schools. It must be noted that the process is guided by, amongst others, the number of applications to a school.

14 December 2018 - NW3229

Profile picture: Ryder, Mr D

Ryder, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

There is no entity and/or department reporting to the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans that borrowed any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China

14 December 2018 - NW3874

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

What (a) number of (i) local films and (ii) film producers have received funding from (aa) his department and (bb) each of the entities reporting to him in each of the past five years and (b)(i) was the name of each company and (ii) total amount did each company receive in each case?

Reply:

My department supported (i) twelve (12) local films and (ii) eleven (11) film producers in the past five years. The entity reporting to my department, namely, the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) supported 408 local films and 65 film producers.

In respect of each case: (a) (i)(ii); (aa) (bb), (b)(i)(ii), relevant details are outlined and included as Annexure A and B, below.

(a) Number Local Film

(bb) YEAR

(I) NAME OF FILM

(ii) PRODUCER

(ii) AMOUNT

 

2014

None

None

None

1

2015

Dinizulu

Ms Khubu Zulu: Sakhuri Media

R 500 000

2

2016

Mangoyi Mother of Black resistance

Mr Nqaba Ngoyi: Fort Films

R1 147 290

3

2016

Khalushi

Mr Mandla Dube: Montage online

R3 000 000

4

2017

Cinema from within: Who are we really

Mr Teddy Mattera

R 500 000

5

2017

Table Manners

Ms Nkuli Sibeko & Mr Leli Maki: Jack & Jill Productions

R 500 000

6

2017

Winnie

Mr Steven Markovits: Big World Cinema

R 800 000

7

2017

The Whale Caller

Mr Zola Maseko: Black Roots Productions

R 600 000

8

2017

Noem My Skolie

Ms Motshidi & Mr David Maxbrown: Maxi D Productions

R 300 000

9

2017

Visual Artists Living Legends: Documentary

Mr Monna Mokoena: Momo Gallery Foundation

R 800 000

10

2017

Mandela Man of Peace: Documentary

Ms Xoliswa Sithole: Nayanaya Productions

R 800 000

11

2017

Inkonyana yohlanga

Imiliza Productions

R 800 000

12

2018

Mandela Man of Peace: Documentary

Ms Xoliswa Sithole: Nayanaya Productions

R1 500 000

TOTAL

 

12 x Local Films

11 x Producers

R11 247.290

Annexure A. Local Films and Producers as well as amount supported by my Department in the past five years:

ANNEXURE B. Films supported by the Department’s entity, National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF)

Approved Projects 2014- 2015

Cycle 1

Documentary Development

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

Ocean Driven

Chris Bertish

CMB Agencies

R100 000.00

Feature Length Development

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

Break it Down

Lorreal Ferris

N/A

R140 000.00

Collide

Mpho Kgosana

Virya Management

R200 000.00

Strange Love

Zuko Yafele

Durban Motion Pictures

R200 000.00

The Wasteland

Mark Engels

Blast Films

R200 000.00

Production Documentaries

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

A True Patriot?

Kevin Harris

Rainbow Independent

Film & TV Productions

R100 000.00

iAfrikaner

Joanna Higgs

Go Trolley Films

R191 760.00

Wild Dog and Mrs

Heart

Riaan Hendricks

A Season of Film

R200 000.00

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

Echo Beach

Jyoti Mistry

Blackboard Trust

R600 000.00

Krotoa

Roberta Durrant

Penguin Films

R1 200 000.00

The Umbrella Man

Linda Bogle

WE 3 Films

R1 200 000.00

Production Short Films

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

Into the Ring

Francois Le Pere

Allegoria

R198 440.00

The Man with the

Dragging Leg

Janette De Villiers

Groundglass

R200 000.00

The Marriage of

Heaven and Hell

Cornel Rayners

Saint Moonriver

Productions

R200 000.00

Female filmmaker project

Carolyn Carew

Female Filmmaker projects

R176 800

Approved Projects 2014 2015

Cycle 2

Documentary Development

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

Double Lives of Children of Revolutionaries

Khalo Matabane

BFM Features (PTY)LTD

R120 000.00

Skate

Joe-Anne Mirosevic

Alpha-Beta Project

Management

R91 200.00

Smoke and

Thunder

Malcom Macnaughton

Malcom Macnaughton

R100 000.00

The Sound Of

Masks

Kofi Zwana

N/A

R100 000.00

Wizard of Zim

Samora Sekhukhune

Away From Keyboard

R120 000.00

Feature Length Development

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

An anthology Film

Feizel Mamdoo

N/A

R189 000.00

Harmony

Tim Argall

bugbox

R250 000.00

Knock on

John Volmink

Diprente

R120 000.00

Egypt’s Modern

Pharaohs

Rehad Desai

Uhuru Productions

R350 000.00

Hard Livings

Jason Staggie

Accidental Films and TV

R350 000.00

When Buddah comes to Africa

Nicole Schafer

Thinking strings Media

R100 000.00

The Fix

Saskia Schiel

Stage5 Films

R199 100.00

The Legend of the

Karoo

Raffaella Delle Dome

N/A

R150 000.00

The Tree

Adraan Louw Venter

Urucu Media

R200 000.00

Short Film Development

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

Nyanga sky

Rafeeqah Galant

Echoledge

R110 000.00

Production Archive

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

The boy, The

Blade , The man

Mayenzeke Baza

Mandela Bay Pictures

R200 000.00

Production Documentaries

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

-

-

-

-

Production Features

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

Love The One You

Love

Jenna Bass

Fox Fire Films

R790 000.00

Production Short Films

Project Name

Applicant’s Name

Production Company

Amount Allocated

The Discovery of

Fire

Warren Ferreira

Tin Toy Productions

R200 000.00

The National Film and Video Foundation

14 December 2018 - NW3665

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What number of public resorts were managed by Aventura Ltd before it was liquidated, (b) what were the specific reasons for the liquidation of Aventura Ltd and (c)(i) to whom were the public resorts that were managed by Aventura Ltd sold and (ii) at what price?

Reply:

DPE response

a) There were in total fourteen (14) public resorts that were managed by Aventura. Six of those resorts, which were seriously loss making were the first to be disposed of to different purchasers.

Then the remaining and better performing eight (8) situated at Badplaas, Blydepoort, Loskopdam, Swadini (Mpumalanga) Tshipise, Warmbath (Limpopo), Plettenburg Bay (Western Cape), Gariep (Free State) were sold to a single purchaser named Forever Siyonwaba Consortium.

b) Government had in 2001 as part of its restructuring policy taken a decision to dispose all the Aventura resorts. Hotel and leisure was regarded as non- core to Government. The decision to dispose was further underpinned by the fact that some of the resorts were seriously loss making. Aventura was disposed through a normal purchase and sale process however difficulties were encountered in concluding the process all together. The process was beset by land claims in some of the areas (e.g Blydepoort, Swadini and Tshipise) where the resorts were situated, incorrect description of the Aventura properties, e.g there were discrepancies in Aventura property description set out in the Deeds office and the inventory/schedule of those properties laid out in the Overvaal Resorts Limited Act 127 of 1993. These difficulties caused the disposal of Aventura to be protracted. Thus, against the background that the Aventura resorts were already sold even though difficulties in transferring some of them were encountered, in 2013 an optimal route to bring closure to the purchase and sale process was considered and liquidation was found to be appropriate. The Shareholder (Minister of Public Enterprises) then passed a resolution to liquidate Aventura.

(c) (i) the eight(8) resorts were sold to a company called Forever Siyonwaba Consortium

(ii) the Purchase Price for the eight was R200m.

 

       
         
         
       
       
       

14 December 2018 - NW3830

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture”

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him contracted the services of a certain company (name and details furnished), in each of the past 10 financial years; if so, (i) number of contracts were signed, (ii) was the date on which each contract was signed, (iii) was the duration of each contract, (iv) services did the company render and (v) was the monetary value of each contract in each case;

Reply:

My department and it’s entities reporting to me has not contracted the services of Bosasa, now known as African Global Operations, in the past 10 financial years.

14 December 2018 - NW3831

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her contracted the services of a certain company (name and details furnished), in each of the past 10 financial years; if so, what (i) number of contracts were signed, (ii) was the date on which each contract was signed, (iii) was the duration of each contract, (iv) services did the company render and (v) was the monetary value of each contract in each case; (2) whether any irregular expenditure relating to the contracts was recorded and/or condoned in each case; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4408E

Reply:

1. (a)The Department was never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

(b) UMALUSI

1. Umalusi has never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

(b) SACE

1. SACE has never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

14 December 2018 - NW3844

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Robinson, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him contracted the services of a certain company (name and details furnished), in each of the past 10 financial years; if so, what (i) number of contracts were signed, (ii) was the date on which each contract was signed, (iii) was the duration of each contract, (iv) services did the company render and (v) was the monetary value of each contract in each case; (2) whether any irregular expenditure relating to the contracts was recorded and/or condoned in each case; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Yes, the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has informed me that Bosasa was awarded with a contract in the past (ten) 10 financial years.

  1. One (1) contract was signed as RFB 2010 02B.
  2. The award was approved on 16 December 2010.
  3. The duration was from 1 January 2011 to 30 September 2013.
  4. The service provider was appointed to render security guarding and special services to the Department.
  5. The total amount spent was R535 330 659.

(b) I have also been informed by the entities reporting to me, i.e. the Legal Aid South Africa, National Prosecuting Authority and Special Investigating Unit that they never contracted Bosasa in the last ten (10) financial years.

2. No, the Department did not incur irregular expenditure since the departmental Supply Chain Management Policy and prescripts were followed.

14 December 2018 - NW3809

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether the forensic investigation into allegations of corruption and mismanagement in her department that was commissioned by the Auditor-General has been completed; if not, by what date is the investigation envisaged to be completed; if so, (a) on what date was the investigation completed and (b) what are the main findings of the investigation?”

Reply:

The investigation has not been completed. The Auditor-General has informed the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) that the envisaged completion timeline for the investigation is early 2019.

a)  The investigation was envisaged to be completed by 10 September 2018.

b) Findings will be known once the investigation report is issued.

14 December 2018 - NW3739

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his reply to a supplementary question on question 20 on 6 November 2018, (a) he and/or (b) any person in his Office communicated (i) directly or (ii) indirectly with the Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni the Government’s position on the future of the SA Airways; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) & (b) (i) (ii): No. There is agreement in the Executive that the immediate priority for government is to stabilise SAA financially and through a rigorous process of cost-reduction and commercial re-orientation, to turn it into an airline that is financially and operationally sustainable.

14 December 2018 - NW3269

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

a) The Department has not awarded any contracts or tenders to Vox Telecommunication.

b) Based on the information submitted by public entities reporting to the Department, the following responses were provided:

Entity

Company awarded contracts and/or tenders (details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to specified date

(i) Service provided

(ii)(aa) Value of the tender and/or contract

(bb) Length of the tender and/or contract

(iii) Official approved the tender and/or contract

(iv) Compliance with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines

1. Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Support and maintenance of the financial system

R1 903 513.12

1 February 2011 to 31 March 2020

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

2. Mining Qualification Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Internet services

R6 770 219.68

  • Services Level Agreement 1: July 2011 to June 2014
  • Extension of contract (Addendum 1): July 2014 to March 2016
  • Extension of contract (Addendum 2): April 2016 to March 2018
  • Services Level Agreement 2: April 2018 to March 2020

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

3. Public Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Internet services

R493 197.32

3.5 years

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

4. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Wide Area Network (WAN) services

R1 425 026.28

1 June 2014 to

31 May 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

5. Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Wide Area Network (WAN) infrastructure services

R76 411.54 per month

The appointment was based on a monthly rental and a once off set up cost of R56 658.00

31 March 2016 to

31 March 2020

The appointment was for the period up to 31 March 2016 with an option to renew for another twelve months period.

The contract was extended to 31 March 2020 after permission obtained from National Treasury.

Administrator

Yes

6. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

Vox Communication

IT infrastructure support

R5 444 515.13

1 March 2018 to

28 February 2021

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

7. Services Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Implementation of Voice over IP (VoIP) solution

R2 620 748.75

11 April 2016 to

30 November 2018

Accounting Authority

Yes

8. South African Qualifications Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Implementation of new data provision and VoIP

R231 876.00

December 2013 to November 2014

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Renewal of data provision and VoIP contract

R398 855.88

1 March 2015 to

28 February 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Upgrading data provisioning from 5 Mbps to 20 Mbps

R147 159.06

Once-off for the upgrade and after that month-to-month for four months
(March to June 2017)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Expansion of the Vox telecom for data and VoIP services for six months

R325 776.62

6 Months (1 July to
31 December 2017)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Fibre and VoIP services

R165 302.73

3 months (1 March to
May 2018)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

PABX Solution

Solution cost of

R4 407 757.27

Telephone call charges rate per minute is between R0.23 and R0.33 (local) depending on the network.

The rate for international calls is R0.92 per minute.

1 June 2018 to

31 May 2023

Finance Committee

Yes

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR CASPER BADENHORST AND MR OUPA MUTANDANYI

CONTACT: 012 312 5730/5111

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 3269.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 3269 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

14 December 2018 - NW3901

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to questions 141 for oral reply on 7 September 2018, his department and the entities reporting to him implemented the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council resolution that all person employed in the Public Service as Assistant Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 9 to 10, and that all Deputy Directors must have their salaries level upgraded from level 11 to level 12;if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

There is no Public Service Co-coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCC) resolution that provides for movement from one salary level to another. Grade progression is done in line with PSCBC Resolution 3 of 2009 upon meeting all the requirement. The department implements the provision of Resolution 3 of 2009 accordingly.

14 December 2018 - NW3728

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Mrs NKF

Hlonyana, Mrs NKF to ask the Minister of Economic Development

Whether, his department subsidises any industries in the country; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which industries, (b) where is each industry located, (c) what does each industry produce and (d) what is the monetary value of each subsidy?

Reply:

No, the budget of the Economic Development Department is not used to subsidise any industries in the country.

The Industrial Development Corporation (“IDC”) does provide concessional funding to a number of industries and sectors, including its Black Industrialist Programme and Gro-E Youth Programme, to encourage youth entrepreneurship. This support is provided across the country. Further details of IDC programmes may be found in the Integrated Report on the IDC’s website: https://www.idc.co.za/images/2018/IDC-IR-2018-Final.pdf.

In the past EDD has raised R95 million for the Downstream Steel Competitiveness Fund utilising funds paid over to the National Revenue Fund as a result of penalties imposed on ArcelorMittal South Africa for its role in cartels in the steel industry. The funds raised by EDD has been used for concessional funding to provide support to qualifying smaller competitors and downstream players. Funding has been approved for companies in Gauteng, Eastern Cape, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and North West.

 

Similarly, EDD has raised R250 million for the Agro Processing Competitiveness Fund utilising funds paid over to the National Revenue Fund as a result of penalties imposed on Pioneer Foods for its role in the bread cartel. Funding has been approved in 42 deals to provide concessional funding for companies in Eastern Cape, Western Cape, Free State, North West, Mpumalanga, Limpopo, Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal.

The work of EDD in competition matters has resulted in R4.5 billion raised from private companies to support small and medium business and black-owned businesses in a number of industries including agriculture, construction, manufactured consumer goods and spaza shops. The impact of this support has been across the country.                            

-END-

14 December 2018 - NW3663

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) nurses, (b) doctors, (c) social workers and (d) teachers have graduated from institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below reflects the number of nurses, doctors, social workers and teachers who graduated from public higher education institutions over the past five academic years.

Universities

Year

(a) Nurses

(b) Doctors

(c) Social Workers

(d) Teachers

2013

2 817

1 346

2 546

16 808

2014

3 157

1 170

2 787

19 124

2015

3 242

1 454

2 875

20 698

2016

2 801

1 496

3 200

22 150

2017

3 154

1 574

3 288

25 212

14 December 2018 - NW3743

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Wana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that a sign was put up for Mahabaneng Primary School at the abandoned Lebaka B Primary School site in Mohlabaneng in Limpopo?

Reply:

Lebaka B was built as an offshoot of Lebaka A where the school buildings were dilapidated and no longer hospitable. Security was engaged and the repairs were effected. There are plans afoot to bring in Gr R –Gr 3 to the school in January 2019. The original name was supposed to be Mahabaneng Primary School instead of Lebaka B but the name was not registered at EMIS.

14 December 2018 - NW3515

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What is the reason that public technical and vocational education and training colleges that offer qualifications from Level 2 to 4 deny entry to learners who graduate at Level 2 from skills schools and who wish to improve their qualifications beyond this level; (2) whether her department will be exploring options for such learners to be able to improve their skills and formal qualifications at public institutions; if so, (a) what would be required of such an exploratory study and (b) by what date does she expect to report regarding her findings in this regard; (3) whether she will be engaging with both the Department of Basic Education and her department in order to create a learning pathway in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what options are there currently for such learners to improve their formal qualifications on a full-time basis?

Reply:

1. Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges cannot deny access to students based on the fact that they come from skills schools. All students who apply to colleges must meet the institution’s admission criteria. Some applicants might not meet the academic criteria for their vocational or occupational programme of choice, because the skills schools are essentially special schools focussing on practical skills and do not offer NQF level 2 qualifications.

2. Where students do not meet the academic criteria, 45 TVET colleges will from
January 2019 offer the Pre-vocational Learning Programme (PLP), which is designed to strengthen the learning foundations of students who wish to study further in the vocational qualifications offered by the chosen college. This is a one-year programme comprising of Foundational Language, Foundational Mathematics, Foundational Science and Life Skills (which includes basic computer literacy). Such students may then ideally articulate into occupational qualifications offered at NQF levels 1 - 2, or even the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC(V)] if the learner is in a position to and wishes to pursue a broader vocational pathway.

(a) The Department is currently in the process of configuring the suite of programmes to be offered in the Community Education and Training (CET) colleges so that other options will be available to learners from skills schools. There are 25 skills schools in Gauteng and 22 in the Western Cape, while the other provinces have between 1 to 5 such schools. The Department will be requesting its Regional Managers to engage with Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) to link these schools to TVET and CET colleges so that opportunities for these students can be mapped out as a collaborative initiative.

9b) The process is in its early stages and therefore data cannot be provided at this stage.

3. Engagements with the Department of Basic Education are already underway on a number of programmes and qualifications affecting the two Departments. The overall intention is to create a comprehensive and integrated public education system, which addresses issues of duplication, as well as gaps in learning pathways.

4. Depending on the competencies of the learners from the skills school, they may access the NC(V) qualifications (if they have the equivalent of a Grade 9 or the General Education and Training Certificate for Adults), N1 programmes or NQF level 2 occupational qualifications offered in TVET colleges. They may gain access either directly or through the PLP programme. Colleges are required to administer baseline tests in language and Mathematics to make this determination.

14 December 2018 - NW3875

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Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

What are the details of the support that his Department offers to South African authors?

Reply:

My department has a unit which deals with Books and Publishing, focusing on promoting a culture of reading, writing and developing authors, supporting initiatives that provide public platforms for authors working with the book sector stakeholders including authors to engender wider audiences for South African literature and enhance the development of a dynamic book sector.

The Department provides funding to individuals, institutions, community groups and organizations, including literature. It also provides financial support for creative writing including biographies and autobiographies. In addition, in the case of international partnerships, funds are allocated to authors to travel to international literary events and attend international Book Fairs and Festivals. 

The Department in partnership with the South African Literary Awards, pays tribute to South African authors who have distinguished themselves as ground-breaking producers and creators of literature. The Department is further committed  to financially supporting activities of the Writers Guild, the National Writers Association of South Africa, the African Women Writers Network, the Abantu Book Festival, the Mthatha Word Festival and National Book Week, the latter of which takes place in every September and is held in all Provinces. A campaign aimed at stimulating a reading and writing culture in all South African languages and to promote easy access to books.

The Department also provides support to the National Library of South Africa for the activities of the Centre for the Books as well as National Library Week activities and related publishing and literary initiatives including the Funda Mzantsi National Reading Competition which promotes reading among book clubs from all over the country. Together with the National Library, the Department is finalizing a strategy and programme of rolling out writing grants to aspiring writers and authors.

17 October 2018 - NW2815

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Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

By what date will she commit to finalise the payment of the outstanding (a) salary from April 2010 to October 2017, (b) the promised pension arrangement and (c) promised leave gratuity as undertaken by her department on 26 October 2017 to Mr Dyafta (details furnished)?

Reply:

Mr Dyafta is not an employee of the Department of Higher Education and Training. Mr Dyafta was transferred to the Department of Education in the Eastern Cape after the migration process on 1 April 2015. The question should therefore be directed to the Department of Education in the Eastern Cape.

17 October 2018 - NW2742

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the total number of students who enrolled in (a) community education and training colleges, (b) technical and vocational education and training colleges and (c) universities in each of the past 10 academic years?

Reply:

The total number of students enrolled in Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and universities for the past 10 academic years are provided below:

Academic year

a) CET Colleges

b) TVET Colleges

c) Universities

  1. 2008

*

**

799 490

  1. 2009

*

**

837 776

  1. 2010

*

358 393

892 936

  1. 2011

*

400 273

938 201

  1. 2012

*

657 690

953 373

  1. 2013

*

639 618

983 698

  1. 2014

*

702 383

969 154

  1. 2015

283 602

737 880

985 212

  1. 2016

273 431

705 397

975 837

  1. 2017

262 156

In the process of quality checking for official release in November 2018

1 036 984 ***

* The enrolment data for CET colleges is provided from the 2015 academic year onwards as CET colleges were only established in 2015.

** Enrolment data prior to 2010 resides with the Department of Education.

*** Provisional data as verification will be finalised by 31 October 2018.

17 October 2018 - NW2406

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What periods were set from the last examination session for the target dates for the bulk release of examination results for the (a) National Accredited Technical Education Diploma and (c) National Certificate (Vocational) at each public technical and vocational education and training college since the November 2015 examination cycle, (d) how do the periods differ from those set in the previous 10 years and (d) what are the reasons for any changes; (2) whether any delays were experienced in the publication of examination results for the specified programmes since the November 2015 examination cycle; if so, (a) why was the publication of the results delayed, (b) which subjects’ results were delayed, (c) for what amount of time were the results delayed and (d) what mechanisms have been put in place to eliminate these delays in the future?

Reply:

  1. (a)-(c) The dates for the bulk release of examination results for the National Accredited Technical Education Diploma and National Certificate (Vocational) at each public Technical and Vocational Education and Training college since the November 2015 examination cycle are provided in the table below.

Qualification

Examination cycle

Scheduled release dates

Actual dates

(exceptions are given in 2(a) below)

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2015

11 May 2015

22 May 2015

 

August 2015

04 September 2015

04 September 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

Business Studies (BS)

June 2015

17 July 2015

17 July 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2016

10 May 2016

10 May 2016

 

August 2016

06 September 2016

06 September 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2016

31 December 2016

Business Studies (BS)

June 2016

13 July 2016

12 July 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2016

30 December 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2017

30 December 2017

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2017

09 May 2017

09 May 2017

 

August 2017

05 September 2017

05 September 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

Business Studies (BS)

June 2017

18 July 2017

18 July 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

d) The target dates for the bulk release of examination results for the 2015-2017 academic years are more or less the same with insignificant changes due to college recess periods. These dates are in line with those of the past 10 years for both NATED and NC (V) qualifications respectively.

However, there were minor changes to the release date for November examinations. From 2015, the release of results was moved from between the 3rd and 8th January to 31 December. This change was made to afford colleges’ the opportunity to distribute results and conduct candidate registration in time for the new academic year.

To standardise raw marks, the Department is required by Umalusi to capture 95% for a subject to be considered suitable for standardisation. This is an increase from 80% for NATED qualifications.

Largely due to the introduction of an offline data capturing desktop system which provides an easy-to-use mechanism for the capturing of marks, there has been a significant improvement in respect of the timeous release of results compared to the previous ten years. The delays experienced in the release of the results were remnants of challenges inherited with the function shift of the TVET colleges from Provincial Education Departments to the Department of Higher Education and Training.

2. (a)-(c) Despite the general improvement in the timeous release of results there have been exceptions to this.

The Department may only standardise raw marks where the capture rate meets the required 95% as already indicated. In smaller cohorts of students, for example 1 to 14 students, the capture rate needs to be 100% before the subject results can be released.

The Department may not release results for the following reasons:

  • Where an irregularity reported during the conduct of examinations is of such a nature that it affects the overall integrity of the subject, e.g. suspected leakage of papers. In this instance, the results for affected subjects are released as soon as the investigation is completed if nothing wrong is found.
  • Where a candidate is alleged to have engaged in an act of dishonesty during an examination, e.g. copying, ghost writing, and crib notes. The national policy allows for 21 days for the candidate to be informed of the alleged irregularity post resulting and a final decision on the candidate’s status (guilty / not guilty) is made by the National Examinations Irregularities Committee on the basis of reports and evidence submitted and investigations where required. In such instances, the results for the affected candidates are only released where a candidate has been found not guilty.
  • Candidates who wrote examinations starting from the November 2016 examinations without complying with the minimum examination admission requirements (MQ) as indicated in Memorandum 46 of 2015 as well as 80% attendance. These candidates were reflected as MQ in the Schedule of Results released to centres and would therefore not receive a subject result for the affected subject(s). Unfortunately, despite the instruction in Memorandum 46 of 2015, a significant number of candidates who did not meet the requirements were still allowed to write the examinations, which shows that colleges fail to manage the implementation of the minimum examination entry requirements.
  • Where the examination centre has not submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of a subject, the raw marks may not be processed to generate subject results. In instances where a centre submits an outstanding mark (777) the accompanying evidence (scripts, portfolios of evidence) must be verified by both the Department and the quality council before the raw marks can be captured and the results for the affected subjects or candidates are released. This verification process can delay the release of the results of the affected students because Umalusi needs to verify the marks that are submitted outside the examination cycle.
  • Where an examination centre submitted incorrect raw marks and requests the amendment of a mark, the accompanying evidence (scripts, portfolios of evidence) must be verified by both the Department and Umalusi before the raw marks can be amended and the results for the affected candidates are released. This also causes the delay in the release of the results of few affected students.

While the Department is responsible for the entire value chain, some functions are performed by different role players as follows: quality assurance, standardisation and approval of results (Umalusi and QCTO); the development and maintenance of the examination IT system {State Information Technology Agency (SITA)}, processing of examination results (the Department), distribution of results to candidates (TVET colleges).

Generally, the bulk release for the November examination results are released earlier than anticipated to afford colleges an opportunity to begin the new academic year on time. Where the results were not released on the scheduled date, this was due to the non-submission of raw marks on the part of the examination centre; examination irregularities; or due to examination technical IT system challenges.

Delays in the bulk release of 2015 examinations results

A National Examination Irregularities Committee (NEIC) has been established to manage irregularities and to ensure that the results of those found guilty are declared null and void. The core business of the committee is to protect the integrity of the results.

Irregularities can take place at any point in the value chain or organisation and it is always a challenging task to detect the genesis of the irregularities

For the April 2015 examinations all NATED subject results were delayed by approximately 4-9 days due to SITA examination IT processing problems.

For June 2015 examinations all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates except for some subjects where the electronic file submitted by the examination centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. As a result, the outstanding mark sheets/marks were sourced and the “missing” marks were captured at the beginning of the academic year and an updated schedule of results were released on a date following the bulk release date.

For August 2015 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with the exception of the 25 subjects, namely, Electrical Trade Theory N2, Electro-Technology N3, Engineering Drawing N3, Engineering Science N1, Engineering Science N2, Engineering Science N3, Fitting and Machining Theory N2, Industrial Electronics N2, Industrial Electronics N3, Mathematics N2-N3 and Mechanotechnology N3, Engineering Science N4, Electrotechnics N4, Industrial Electronics N4-N6, Mathematics N4-N6, Mechanotechnics N4-N5, Power Machines N5-N6 and Supervisory Management N6 due to alleged irregularities. These results were delayed with approximately 7-22 days due to the nature of examination anomalies, which required a protracted investigation before the release of the results.

For December 2015 examinations, the results of more than 600 subjects were released on scheduled dates. There were delays in releasing the results of NC(V) (i.e. Stored Programme Systems Level 4); and 3 NATED (i.e. Industrial Orientation N3, Motor Trade Theory N3 and Mechanical Drawing and Design N5) subjects’. This was due to Umalusi requesting re-marking of the scripts of these subjects at certain raw mark intervals (i.e. 30-39% and 40-49%).

Bulk release of 2016 examination results

For April 2016 examinations, all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates with the exception of four subjects (4) (i.e. Plating and Structural Steel Drawings N3, Electrical Trade Theory N3, Water Treatment Practice N3 and Waste-Water Treatment Practice N3). The delays were due to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of these subjects. The remaining results were released on 16 May 2016, shortly after the scheduled release on 10th May.

For June 2016 examination all NATED results were released on the scheduled dates, except that there were gaps in the subject results for examination centres where the electronic file submitted by the examination centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates. The outstanding mark sheets/marks were sourced and an updated schedule of results were released on a mop-up date following the bulk release date.

For August 2016 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with the exception of 8 subjects, namely, Engineering Science N3, Mathematics N3, N4, N5, Mechano-Technology N3, Electrotechinics N3 and Engineering drawing N2 due to alleged irregularities. In addition, Plant Operation Theory N2 examination results were not released on the scheduled date owing to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of this subject. A protracted investigation into examination anomalies delayed these results by 1-23 days.

For December 2016 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with exception of Engineering Science N3, Engineering Science N2, Mathematics N5, Building Drawing N3 and Electrical Trade theory N2 due to alleged irregularities. The results of 13 subjects were delayed due to low capture rate: Aircraft Maintenance theory N3, Aircraft Metalwork Theory N3, Building Drawing N3, Building Science N2, Digital Electronics N4, Electronic Trade Theory N2, Engineering Science N3, Logic Systems N3, Mathematics N5, Motor Electrical Theory N5, Refrigeration N3, and Water and Waste-water Treatment Practice N2. These results were released between 4-10 days after the bulk release of results.

Bulk release of 2017 examinations results

For April 2017 examination all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates, except where the electronic file submitted by exam centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates (i.e. it was incomplete) or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. An updated schedule of results were released on a mop-up date following the bulk release date.

For June 2017 examination all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates except, as indicated previously, where the electronic file submitted by exam centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates (i.e. it was incomplete) or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. These were addressed as indicated previously.

For August 2017 examinations all NATED results were released on the scheduled dates with the exception of following subjects, namely, Rigging Theory N2, and Logic Systems N5 owing to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of these subjects. The results for these subjects were released on 10 September 2017 (three days after bulk release).

For December 2017 examinations all results were released on scheduled dates with exception of 5 NATED subjects, where there were alleged irregularities, namely, Engineering Science N3, Industrial Electronics N2, Mathematics N2, N3 and MechanoTechnology N2. In addition, there were delays in the release of results for 2 NATED subjects (i.e. Radio Theory N1 and Motor Bodywork Theory N3); and 4 NC (V) subjects (i.e. Engineering Fabrication-Sheet Metalwork L3, isiXhosa First Additional Language L3, Engineering Fabrication- Sheet Metalwork L4, ixiXhosa First Additional Language L4). These results were delayed by approximately 5 days due to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of this subject.

(d) The Department conducts a mock end-to-end examination process to simulate the examination process in order to diagnose any examination IT system challenges for improvement purposes. The Department has also met with all role players in the value chain and formed a technical task team to look at all examination challenges including certifications in between examinations. The Director-General also instituted weekly meetings with the SITA Chief Executive Officer and both SITA and departmental senior managers responsible for the examinations function. These meetings have been instrumental in ensuring that the pressure is kept on SITA to resolve the exam IT system challenges and is the reason that substantial improvements have been made in resulting in the past two years.

The Department has built capacity to conduct investigations of any reported examination anomalies or irregularities. Papers that are reported to have been leaked are replaced. If the paper has already been written, the scripts of the candidates are audited to assess if there are common responses that may suggest that candidates had prior access to the paper. The Department has made significant progress in eliminating the phenomenon of leakages. Umalusi commended the Department for managing the April 2018 examination leakages; while in August 2018, the allegations were not confirmed and Umalusi approved the results.

The Department issued a non-compliance directive to all public TVET colleges that displayed non-compliance to a lesser or greater extent in respect to the non-submission or incorrect submission of raw marks. This process has resulted in a significant improvement in terms of the timeous release of results compared to the previous ten years.

Finally, the development of the new integrated examination computer system is at an advanced stage and the data migration process, which entails the transfer of the old SITA data to the new system, is ongoing. The Provincial Education Departments and national examination officials have already tested and assessed the completed modules against the user requirements/ specifications

17 October 2018 - NW2758

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether she has found that students who recently walked out of an examination at the University of Limpopo did so because the examination was deemed too difficult; if not, (2) whether she has found that the walk-out was staged due to a different reason; if so, what (a) was the reason, (b) are the further relevant details of the walk-out, (c) action will be taken to address the situation and (d) consequences will be faced by the students who walked out?

Reply:

1. The University of Limpopo responded to the posed question as follows:

The session was not an examination paper as reported in social and mainstream print and electronic media. It was a scheduled test for the second semester Education Studies (HEDA032) module. While the preliminary outcome of the investigation indicates that the test content was of an appropriate standard, the test cover had mistakes, which resulted in a small number of students disrupting the test session.

(2) (a) and (b) While the Department of Education Studies, in which the module is located, has sufficient summative and formative assessment moderation procedures in place, it was found that the test in question was not subjected to these checks. This unfortunately has been found to be one of the contributory factors that led to the disruptions of the test.

(c) Students and staff (lecturer, invigilators, Head of Department and Director of the School) are being subjected to a formal investigation process.

(d) The matter is still under investigation.

17 October 2018 - NW2574

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

1.The table below shows the total number of Deputy Directors-General and Chief Directors employed on an acting and permanent capacity in the Department and the total number of women in each case.

 

(aa) Acting

(bb) Permanent

Total Number

(a) (i) Deputy Directors-General

3

3

6

(b) Women

2

2

4

 

(aa) Acting

(bb) Permanent

Total Number

(a) (ii) Chief Directors

7

23

30

(b) Women

1

8

9

2. The entities reporting to the Department have provided the following information to the question posed.

Entity

(a)(i) Chief Executive Officers

  1. (ii) Directors

(b) Number of women

Council on Higher Education

1

7 including 1 in an acting position

4

National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences

1

2

3

National Student Financial Aid Scheme

1

26

9

South African Qualifications Authority

1

11

8

21 Sector Education and Training Authorities

21 (7 filled and 14 vacant with acting CEOs)

184

104

National Skills Fund

1

15

9

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

1

6

3

17 October 2018 - NW2843

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) is the (i) name and (ii) identity number of each member of the advisory board of the Makhado-Musina Special Economic Zone and (b) are the details of approved projects that received investment from Chinese companies?

Reply:

a) The names and identity numbers of the Musina-Makhado SEZ are stipulated in the following table.

Names and IDs of MMSEZ Board Members

NAME

IDENTITY NUMBER

DESIGNATION

CONTACT DETAILS

  1. Mr. J Morotoba

Director

Cell: 0828518849

jamesmo@foskor.co.za

  1. Prof R Howard

Director

Cell: 0713589695

Rachmond.howard@ump.ac.za

  1. Ms. K Selane

Director

Cell: 0630912363

E.kselane@gmail.com

  1. Mr. K Mphela

Director

Cell: 0733355791

Mphelakj82@gmail.com

  1. 5. Prof H Maserumule

Director

Cell: 083 3835890

E. maserumulemh@tut.ac.za

  1. 6. Mr. P Sebola

Director

Cell: 0739173021

E. sebolatp@yahoo.com

  1. 7. Mr. S Zikode

Director

Cell: 0825637046

E. szikode@thedti.gov.za

  1. 8. Mr Thivhedzo Nathaniel Tshiwanammbi

 

Musina Local Municipality Representative

CELL: 082 046 5101

nathit@musina.gov.za

mimieb@musina.gov.za

  1. 9. Mr Freddy Tshivhengwa

Makhado Local Municipality Representative

Cell: 066 305 8676

freddyt@makhado.gov.za

10. Ms Thivhinda Mufunwa

Vhembe Local Municipality Representative

Cell: 0767822570

mufumuneri@gmail.com

rambadom@vhembe.gov

11. Awaiting Nomination

Vacant

Community Representative

Mulambwane Community Representative

b) There are no approved projects that received investment support from Chinese companies. the dti, LEDET (Limpopo Economic Development Environment and Tourism) and its agency, LEDA (Limpopo Economic Development Agency) are currently finalizing technical due diligence processes with potential investment companies from China.

17 October 2018 - NW2623

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether her department’s language policy on higher education, of which the concept was published in the Government Gazette of 23 February 2018, has already been finalised; if not, (a) which processes are still outstanding and (b) what is the timeframe for finalisation; if so, when will it be published; (2) whether her department received and considered submissions from (a) the SA Academy for Arts and Science, (b) the Afrikaans Language Board and (c) Afriforum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether, if the specified policy is not yet finalised, she will possibly consider hosting a symposium in order to refine it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she has found that the policy is in compliance with her obligation under subsection 6(4) of the Constitution, 1996, to regulate and monitor the use of official languages by means of legislative and other measures, as subsection 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 of 1997, has the aforementioned as its underlying basis; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department is still in the process of finalising the Language Policy for Higher Education, which was published in February 2018 for public comment.

(a) The draft was a revision of the 2002 Language Policy for Higher Education. The Department received a large volume of submissions/inputs from various stakeholders, mainly universities and agencies interested in language development in South Africa. The Department has analysed these inputs and is in the process of developing a final draft taking into account the various comments received. The following aspects of the policy are still outstanding:

  • Department must submit and request the advice of the Council on Higher Education, as required in terms of the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997); this advice may lead to further policy changes; and
  • Socio-Economic Impact Assessment.

(b) The Department envisages that the final policy will be published by 31 March 2019.

2. The Department received submissions from the SA Academy for Arts and Science and AfriForum. No submission was received from the Afrikaans Language Board. All submissions are being considered to ensure that the language policy is consistent with the Constitution and begins to address the historical marginalisation of indigenous African languages. The relevant details of the submissions are as follows:

The SA Academy for Arts and Science welcomed the revised Language Policy for Higher Education and proposed that specific universities be assigned to develop indigenous South African languages. It called for research to be done to establish guiding principles and procedures for the development of new terminology for African languages. Moreover, the Academy suggests that a core cohort of lecturers proficient in African languages be developed to ensure that there are lecturers who can teach in these languages.

Afriforum generally welcomed the review of the policy and called for funding allocations to be made in support of multilingualism at universities. It highlighted the fundamental right of learners/students to receive education in their mother tongue or language of their choice. It supported the proposed partnerships with the Department of Basic Education in promoting the development of all indigenous languages in South Africa. It welcomed the explicit recognition of Afrikaans as an indigenous South African language in the policy.

3. The Department has already held a number of symposiums and seminars on this matter and is not planning to hold any others before the policy is finalised. However, the Department will continue to engage with universities and other relevant bodies regarding the implementation of the policy once it is published.

4. The revision of the Language Policy for Higher Education is being done in compliance with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 and the Higher Education Act of 1997
(Act 101 of 1997).

5. The Minister will communicate to all stakeholders once the policy has been published in the government gazette for implementation.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR SIMON MOTLHANKE

CONTACT: 012 312 5260

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 2623.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 2623 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

17 October 2018 - NW2877

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 2479 on 3 September 2018, what is the monetary value of investment in operations at the special economic zones of (a) Maluti-A-Phofung, (b) Musina-Makhado, (c) Saldanha Bay and (d) O R Tambo?

Reply:

There are currently no operational investors in all of the SEZs in question. All these SEZs are working on concluding their respective pipeline investments, which are at different stages of negotiation and development. Two (2) of the SEZs, the OR Tambo and Maluti-A-Phofung SEZs are currently busy with construction of top structures for their signed investors, which are funded through the dti SEZ Fund. The Saldanha Bay and Musina-Makhado SEZs are finalising their investor agreements to enable the process of business infrastructure readiness support to commence.

Below are the projected pipeline investment values for each of the zones:

Pipeline Investment for MMSEZ, SBSEZ, MAPSEZ and ORTSEZ

Name of SEZ

Number of Investment Companies

Estimated Investment Value

Saldanha Bay

3

R484 million

OR Tambo (Gauteng)

4

R323 million

Maluti-A-Phofung

3

R440 million

Musina- Makhado

4

R145 billion

Total

14

R146,25 billion

17 October 2018 - NW2799

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) lessons has her department learned during past implementation of the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign and (b) criteria are used to determine the (i) officials and (ii) participants who form part of the campaign?

Reply:

a) Some of the lessons learnt in the implementation of the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign (QLTC) – For the QLTC and/or social mobilisation to find traction on the ground it must be underpinned by the following approaches:

  1. Engage and secure diverse and strong community participation in the identified programme;
  2. Clearly identify the roles and responsibilities the broader community could play in the execution of the targeted programme;
  3. The community members and/or stakeholders must buy into the programme;
  4. Develop a shared vision with the concerned community;
  5. Jointly conduct the needs analysis of the community at large; and
  6. Constantly monitor, support and report on the progress on the implementation of the programme.

b) Criteria used to determine (i) officials

All teacher unions in the education sector were requested to nominate their senior representatives to serve in the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign Coordinating Team (QCT) to implement the QLTC non-negotiables. There were five Union Officials who have been seconded to the Department of Basic Education (DBE) as follows: 2 from South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU), 1 from National Professional Teachers Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA), 1 from Professional Educators Union (PEU) and 1 from National Teachers Union (NATU). However, the Suid-Afrikaanse Onderwysers Unie (SAOU) resolved to waiver its participation in the secondment arrangement in favour of PEU.

b) Criteria used to determine the (ii) participants who form part of the campaign:

During the launching of QLTC, stakeholders (within and outside the education sector) committed to the QLTC Principles and further pledged their respective roles and responsibilities they could play in strengthening the delivery of quality learning and teaching. The following are the stakeholders in question:

  1. Teacher Unions;
  2. School Governing Body (SGB) Association;
  3. Inter-faith based organisations;
  4. Traditional leaders;
  5. Learner formations including Representative Council of Learners’ (RCL);
  6. Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO’s);
  7. Community Based Organisations (including Councillors); and
  8. Others.

17 October 2018 - NW2803

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether learners with severe to profound intellectual disabilities in each province have been included in the LURITS or EMIS as required by its agreement with the National Treasury and the Auditor-General of South Africa, as indicated on page 71 of the 2018-19 Annual Performance Plan of her department; (2) by what date will her department gazette and promulgate the final Draft Learning Programme; (3) whether (a) provinces record learners at special care centres on a central database and (b) the centres are provided with an EMIS number? NW3096E

Reply:

1.  The Department of Basic Education is in the process of updating SA-SAMS to include information on Learners with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities which will be provided to Care Centres as their administrative tool. This will enable them to upload data into Provincial Warehouses and thereafter to LURITS. However, this requires all centres to have computers.

In the interim, the Education Management Information System (EMIS) together with Inclusive Education Directorate have developed a survey tool to collect data on Learners with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities, which was uploaded into DBE (MOODLE) platform. This platform serves as a central database for Care Centre Information, though the information is aggregated.

2. The Draft Learning Programme is envisaged to be gazetted and promulgated by 31 October 2018.

3. (a) No, learners at the special care centres are not recorded.

(b) The Department is in the process of registering Care Centres through Provincial Education Departments which will assist in obtaining EMS numbers.

17 October 2018 - NW2688

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in the country (i) have swimming pools and (ii) do not have swimming pools and (b) where is each of the schools with a swimming pool located?

Reply:

a) (i) A total of 562 schools have swimming pools.

(ii) 22707 schools do not have swimming pools.

b) See attached annexure

09 October 2018 - NW2494

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Finance

Why has a certain person (name furnished), whose partner (name furnished) passed away on 1 May 2017, not received a spousal allowance more than a year after the spouse passed away?

Reply:

A certain person (name furnished), (applicant) applied for the funeral benefit in respect of the death of the member, (name furnished), during June 2017. At that time there was insufficient evidence submitted to support the application to be recognized as the life partner of (name furnished) and the accompanying related benefits. The applicant was requested to resubmit her application for recognition of a life partner which resubmitted application was received in March 2018. This application however erroneously indicated that (the applicant) was the child of the deceased in which case the applicant cannot be recognized as the life partner.

It was hereafter established that this was an error as applicant was not the child of the deceased. There were however still insufficient and supporting evidence from the family of the deceased to corroborate the existence of the life partnership as the evidence submitted purported to substantiate the factual dependency of the applicant only due to the family of the deceased not wishing to provide verification of the existence of a life partnership. As a result of the conflicting accounts, the matter was submitted to the internal Fraud Unit of the Government Pensions Administration Agency to validate the existence of the life partnership between the applicant and the deceased. The validation investigation was concluded on 3 September 2018 and payment in this matter in recognition of the life partnership application is currently in process.

09 October 2018 - NW2507

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) amount did each state-owned entity borrow from any entity in China (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

ASB

The Accounting Standards Board has no loans from any entity in China, nor has it had any loans during the past three years.

CBDA

Co-operative Banks Development Agency has never borrowed from any entity from China.

DBSA

a) (i) NONE

    (ii) N/A

b) N/A

(c) N/A

(d) N/A

FAIS OMBUD

Zero

FIC

(a)(i)(ii) No amount was borrowed from any entity in China in each of the past three financial years since 1 April 2018.

(b)(c)(d) Not relevant to the Financial Intelligence Centre

FSCA

Financial Sector Conduct Authority

(a) +(b) Not applicable

GEPF

The Government Employees Pension Fund has no loans from any entity in China.

GPAA

The Government Pensions Administration Agency (GPAA) never took any loans with any entity in China since 1 April 2018 and in the past 3 financial years.

LAND BANK

The Land Bank’s borrowings from entities in China in each of the past three financial years and since 1 April 2015 are summarised as follows:

Financial Year

Lender

Loan Conditions

Repayment Period

Loan

       

Amount

Outstanding

FY2016

¹RMB/CCB

Syndicated Loan

To apply the amounts borrowed for general corporate purposes

3 years

CCB R275m

Other R500m

Voluntary Prepaid on 29 September 2017

Amount outstanding: R0

FY2016

Absa/SBSA R2.7bn Syndicated Government Guaranteed Term Loan Facility

To increase the maturity profile of the Land Bank’s funding liabilities

Facility A – 6 years

Facility B – 7 years

Facility A

²BOC R77m

Other R1 527m

Facility B

BOC R77m

Other R1 019m

Facility A (Bullet)

BOC R77m

Other R1 003m (R524m voluntary prepaid on 31 May 2018)

Facility B (Amortising)

BOC R65m

Other R289m (R679m prepaid on 29 June 2018)

FY2017

None

       

FY2018

None

       

YTD

None

       

¹Rand Merchant Bank/China Construction Bank (“CCB”)

²Bank of China (“BOC”)

The table above shows that a total amount of R429m has been borrowed from Chinese entities during the past three financial years and that no borrowings have been raised during the current financial year that started on1 April 2018. As at 31 August 2018, the outstanding borrowings from entities in China amounted to R142m calculated as follows:

Total loans received from Chinese entities: R429m

Voluntary Prepayments: (R275m)

Instalments Paid: (R12m)

Loan Amount Outstanding 31 August 2018: R142m

PFA

a) The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator has not borrowed money from China in the past three financial years and since 01 April 2018.

PIC

The Public Investment Corporation (PIC) has never borrowed any money from any entity in China.

SARS

SARS has not borrowed any amount from any entity in China in the past 3 years or since April 2018 and therefore section b, c and d of the question is not applicable.

SASRIA

Sasria SOC Ltd is self-funded, with no loan facilities and has not held any loan facility in the past three financial years. Therefore, there has not been any borrowings from any entity in China.

TAX OMBUD

The Office of the Tax Ombud has not borrowed money from any entity from China.

09 October 2018 - NW2755

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

What are the details of the appointment of certain persons (names furnished) in terms of the (a) qualifications required for each position, (b) qualifications that each specified person possessed, (c) process that was followed to attract applicants for each position, (d) applicants who applied for each position, (e) reasons each specified person was appointed to each position and (f) remuneration package of each person, including (i) the date of appointment, (ii) remuneration package at the date of appointment, (iii) any salary adjustments, including the amounts, dates on which adjustments were made and (iv) the person(s) who authorised the adjustments?

Reply:

  1. DR BROWN

a) Qualifications required for the position – FFC Chief Executive Officer : Post-Graduate degree in Economics, Finance or Commerce / Business Administration / Public Administration

b) Qualifications of Dr Kay Brown

(i) Senior Certificate at Westering High School, Port Elizabeth, 1985.

(ii) B.Comm with Economics and Accounting as major subjects, University of Port Elizabeth (now the Nelson Mandela University), 1988.

(ii) B.Comm (Honours) in Economics, University of Port Elizabeth, 1989.

(iv) Doctoral Degree in Economics, University of Cape Town, 2001 - (In June 2000 registration for a M.Comm degree was upgraded to a PhD.)

c) Process that was followed to attract applicants – Chief Executive Officer Position

(i) Request For Quotation (RFQ) was awarded to DAV on 17 January 2017 for the recruitment of the Chief Executive Officer.

(ii) A formal briefing meeting was held with FFC Officials and DAV Official. DAV was briefed on :

    • Understanding and appreciating the FFC environment, culture, mission and values;
    • Provided with full job specification
    • The ideal candidate profile;
    • Shortlisting selection criteria and the methodology;
    • The advertising requirements; and
    • Deadlines and delivery dates.

(iii) DAV received the advert sign-off on 2 February 2017 and advertised internally and externally in the Sunday Times on 5 February 2017 with a closing date of 27 February 2017.

(iv) Interviews were scheduled with the above candidates on 6 October 2017.

  • Dr Kay Brown;
  • Dr Patrick Mabuza;
  • Mr Norman Baloyi;

The following candidates withdrew their candidature:

  • Dr Vuyelwa Nhlapo:
  • Ms Zukiswa Potye.

The panel consisted of :

  • Prof Daniel Plaatjies- Chairperson
  • Dr Sibongile Muthwa- Deputy Chairperson
  • Professor Nico Steytler-Commissioner
  • Mr Sipho Lubisi- Commissioner
  • Mr Romeo Adams – Independent Member

In attendance

  • Mr Velile Mbethe- Acting CEO
  • Karen Robertson- Principal Consultant DAV
  • Ansuyah Maharaj-Dowra- Commission Secretary.

Both Dr Kay Brown and Dr Patrick Mabuza were sent for a competency assessment on 12 October 2017.

d) Applicants who applied for each position

(i) A total of fifty-seven (57) applications was received.

(ii) Fourteen (14) applications fitted the shortlist and were shortlisted by a panel which met on 19 May 2017. The panel consisted of:

    • Dr Sibongile Muthwa- Deputy Chairperson
    • Mr Sipho Lubisi- Commissioner
    • Mr Velile Mbethe- Acting CEO( FFC)
    • Ms Ansuyah Maharaj-Dorwa- Commission Secretary
    • Dr Elsie Greyling- Independent Consultant
    • Karen Robertson- Principal Consultant DAV

The following five (5) candidates were shortlisted:

    • Dr Kay Brown;
    • Dr Patrick Mabuza;
    • Mr Norman Baloyi;
    • Dr Vuyelwa Nhlapo: and
    • Ms Zukiswa Potye.

e) Reasons each specified person was appointed to each position

Based on the outcome of the interview and competency assessment process, experience and qualifications, Dr Kay Brown was recommended for the role of the Chief Executive Office at the Financial and Fiscal Commission

f) Remuneration

i. Date of Appointment – 1 April 2018

ii. Remuneration package at the date of appointment – Salary level 15 – R1 544 406.00

iii. 1 April 2018 – Cost of Living Adjustment 5.5% from R1,544,406.00 to R1,629,348.00

iv. Authorised by the Commission Chairperson, as informed by the DPSA directive and Circular No. 17 of 2018.

 

2. MR MBETHE

(a) to (d) MR Mbethe was seconded as per request by the FFC Commissioners to the Financial and Fiscal Commission as the Acting Chief Executive Officer by the former Minister of Finance, the Honourable Minister PJ Gordhan as per the letter signed dated 9 September 2016. His term as Acting CEO ended on 31 March 2018. From 1 April 2018 Mr Mbethe was seconded to FFC as Executive Manager to mainly oversee disciplinary hearings coming out of the forensic investigation report.

(f) (i) 9 September 2016 – Salary level 15 – R1,299,501.00

(ii) 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018- (First Notch – Salary level 15)- R1,370,973.00

(iii) 1 April 2018 – Salary level 15- R1,370,937.00

- Cost of Living Adjustment 5.5% from R1,370,937.00- R1,446,377.00, effective 1 April 2018.

(iv) Authourised by the Chief Executive Officer as informed by the DPSA directive and Circular No. 17 of 2018.

3. MR G PETLELE

a) Qualifications required for the position – Human Resources Specialist: Post-Graduate Diploma or Degree in Human Resources Management or equivalent qualification

b) Qualifications for Mr G Petlele

i. Matric – Tshukudu High School - 1986

ii. BA degree Industrial Psychology and Communication - (UNISA);

iii. Masters Diploma in Human Resources Management ( RAU) Now University of Johannesburg);

iv. Programme in Business Leadership(UNISA–School of Business Leadership); and

v. Master Degree in Business Leadership (UNISA–School of Business Leadership).

c) Process that was followed to attract applicants

The vacant Human Resources Specialist position was advertised internally (FFC) and Externally in the Sunday Times with closing date 15 September 2017. Interviews were conducted on 23 January 2018 consisting of a panel of five (5) members.

i. Mr Velile Mbethe – Chairperson – Acting CEO- FFC

ii. Dr Ramos Mabugu- FFC Research Director

iii. Dr Thembi Ntshakala- Programme Manager – Intergovernmental Fiscal Relation

iv. Mr Mandla Tatana – Human Resources Specialist

v. Ms Chandrika Jugroop – Labour Relations Specialist

d) Applicants who applied for each position

One-hundred and eight (108) applications were received and six (6) candidates interviewed.

    • Mr Gift Petlele;
    • Ms Puleng Ratlabala;
    • Ms Mandidsa Mtyila;
    • Ms Chairmaine Koffman;
    • Mr Anton Zondi
    • Ms Jullena Thanjekwayo

e) Reasons each specified person was appointed to each position

i. M G Petlele possessed the appropriate and relevant qualifications as listed in b) above;

ii. Mr G Petlele possesses relevant in private, public and public service experience, gained from the following organisations/companies:

Industrial Development Corporation, Land and Agricultural Bank, Coca-Cola South Africa, Development Bank of Southern Africa, Civil Aviation of South Africa and National Treasury.

iii. Interview performance – Based on the possessing of the technical human resources experience, demonstrated managerial and leadership experience, Mr.Petlele was recommended as the best suitable candidate for the Human Resources Specialist post.

f) Remuneration

i. The date of appointment – 1 April 2018

ii. Remuneration package at the date of appointment – Salary level 14 – R1,127,334.00

iii. August 2018 – Cost of Living Adjustment 5.5% from R1,127,334.00 - R1,189,337.00, effective 1 April 2018.

iv. Authourised by the Chief Executive Officer as informed by the DPSA directive and Circular No. 17 of 2018

 

09 October 2018 - NW2709

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Finance

What has been the return on each investment of the Public Investment Corporation over the past 10 years?

09 October 2018 - NW2754

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What are the details of (a) the date on which a certain person (name furnished) was appointed to a certain position (name furnished), (b) the remuneration package of the specified person at the date of appointment, (c) any salary adjustments awarded to the person, including the dates and amount of salary adjustments and (d) who authorised the (i) original and (ii) any subsequently adjusted remuneration package; (2) what are the details of any reimbursements that were paid to the person for (a) telephone, (b) motor vehicle, (c) travel and (d) accommodation and any other expenses since the appointment date?

Reply:

1. (a) A certain person (name furnished) was appointed as Chairperson of the Financial and Fiscal Commission for a period of five years with effect from 1 July 2017.

(b) R1, 927, 497, 00 (The Chairperson is responsible for his own pension and medical aid contributions and since appointment has not claimed for any incidental expenses)

(c) No adjustment has been made.

(d) (i) The remuneration package was based on the salary level on which the position was advertised and the remuneration he was earning as a Special Advisor to the former Minister of Public Enterprises.

(ii) No adjustment has been made.

2. (a) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

(b) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

(c) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

(d) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

09 October 2018 - NW2383

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)In light of the fact that the (a) SA Revenue Service and (b) Customs Office have proven and uncontested knowledge of the tariffs applicable to the imported material (details furnished) and given the fact that he and/or the National Treasury are provided with regular reports about extended demurrage of the specified items and cost for storage to importers, has he found that there are procedures and processes that are problematic and/or overly bureaucratic, which need speedy resolution in the interest of fairness, rationality and lawfulness; if not, how was the conclusion reached; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The South African Revenue Services has a mandate to control the import, export, manufacture or use of goods. SARS Customs is responsible for implementing a wide range of government policies, including revenue collection, trade compliance and facilitation, control over prohibited and restricted goods, protection of cultural heritage and enforcement of intellectual property laws. 

This mandate is inter alia exercised by the risk based assessment and examination (documentary and/or physical) of goods to ascertain whether the provisions of the Customs and Excise Act No. 91 of 1964, (‘the Act”) or other relevant legislation have been complied with. In this regard, the Act makes provision in section 4(8A) for an officer to stop and detain and examine any goods while under customs control in order to determine whether the provisions of the Act or any other law have been complied with in respect of such goods. Section 107(1)(a) of the Act further provides that all expenses of landing, examination, weighing, analysis etc. of imported goods shall be borne by the importer,  owner or other person , whoever is in control of those goods. The Act further provides in terms of section 107(2)(a)  that goods may be released  on provision of security by the client, pending the final outcome of an intervention.  

This policy position is also internationally applied in the customs legislation of other jurisdictions and is very much aligned to acceptable international practice. In instances where the goods are not dealt with in terms of section 107, such goods are transferred to the state warehouse pending the final outcome of the intervention.

All Customs declarations are submitted through automated channels and risk assessed based on a variety of factors that may include commodity type (tariff), value, origin, rebate provisions etc. In this regard, more than 90% of all trade are automatically risk-assessed and released within seconds. The balance is subjected to documentary inspection where the officer will consider the customs declaration against a variety of trade documents in order to establish correctness and any further possible risks or interpretive matters to be considered. This may lead to further physical examination of the goods.

This process does often result in goods for a particular trader being stopped repetitively over a period of time, and accordingly, SARS was approached by trade to explore improved resolution where the importer/exporter, supplier and commodity type is the same. Formal communication was sent to trade during October 2016, outlining a process through which the client can attach supporting documents reflecting outcomes of previous identical cases for documentary inspection purposes. Customs, at the time, committed to consider and review such supporting documents in their approach to mitigate perceived risk which will assist in reducing the likelihood of an intervention that may require physical inspection. This process is being utilised successfully by most traders today, and although documentary inspection do increase the time to release goods, in most cases this process is concluded within 4 hours after trade submits supporting documents. It is to be noted that there are infrequent incidents where goods are stopped for further examination despite the supporting documentation submitted.

In instances where a trader is uncertain of the correct tariff, value or origin to use on the goods being imported or exported, such trader may apply for a firm determination from SARS. A process, which commenced in May 2018, geared at eradicating the historical tariff determination backlogs resulted in related delays been eliminated. Goods subject to tariff disputes may be cleared with SARS following the section 107 route.

Further to this, SARS Customs is in the process of upgrading its risk systems to the effect that it will provide necessary tools to inspectors to enhance their decision making capabilities and reduce unnecessary and repetitive stops.

Clients who experience delays as a result of this can also contact the Customs Contact Centre or e-mail their query to the Customs Escalations mailbox for assistance. Customs further provides a facility for a Client to apply for Release and provide surety pending the final outcome of an intervention.

In addition to this, in acknowledging the opportunities to improve service, SARS have published a Client Charter which holds SARS accountable against its commitments in processing times and resolving queries within published timeframes.

09 October 2018 - NW2449

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) the National Treasury and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

NATIONAL TREASURY

(a)(i) National Treasury does not own any land and therefore does not have any company investing on land.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii) Not applicable.

ASB

The Accounting Standards Board does not own any land or any other investment property.

CBDA

The Co-operative Banks Development Agency does not own land.

DBSA

No party, other than the Development Bank of Southern Africa, has invested in land owned by it.

FAIS OMBUD

None

FIC

Not applicable to the Financial Intelligence Centre.

FSCA

Financial Sector Conduct Authority - not applicable.

GEPF

As an investor, the GEPF owns a large number of properties within its property portfolio. The property portfolio is divided into directly held properties and indirectly held properties through corporate and listed property companies.

The link below reflects the amount and type of properties that the GEPF directly holds:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2449_GEPF_TABLE.pdf

GPAA

The Government Pensions Administration Agency (GPAA) does not own any land.

IRBA

IRBA does not own any land.

LAND BANK

No investing company has invested on land owned by the Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa.

PFA

The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator does not own land.

PIC

As an operating entity, the PIC has no investments in land, neither directly held nor through investment companies.

The rest of the question falls away.

SARS

SARS does not have any land that is owned or managed through an investing company.

SARS however owns buildings that have vacant land for possible expansion purposes.

SASRIA

Sasria SOC Ltd does not own land, and as such has no investments on land. Our investments are administered by asset managers, and consist of various asset classes. We are not aware of any of our investment being specifically on land, however, we do carry investments in property bonds.

TAX OMBUD

The OTO does not own any land.