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04 January 2021 - NW2385

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department has shut down the homeless shelters in two of the three districts in Limpopo; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What emergency interventions has she made to ensure that the homeless persons in the specified districts do not suffer?

Reply:

(1) The shelters in Mopani and Sekhukhune are closed

Those who wanted to be assisted with rehabilitation from substance abuse addiction were admitted at the Seshego treatment centre.

Those that wished to be with their families were assisted in tracing their families and were transported home as part of our family reunification programme. It should be noted that role of the Department of Social Development in homeless Shelters is to provide Psycho-social support services, working with other stakeholders, Cogta provided shelter, and security in some instances provided food, SAPS brought in beneficiaries collected from the streets and arrested those with outstanding criminal cases, home affairs assists with repatriation and the department of Health was responsible for the provision of health services.

(2) Reunification services were rendered and the homeless who wanted to be reunified with their families were taken home. Some were admitted at the Seshego treatment centre for substance abuse rehabilitation, most preferred to go back to the streets as they wanted to make money.

In Waterberg, Thabazimbi one shelter with nine beneficiaries is still functional. The beneficiaries are mentally challenged and the department in collaboration with the department of Health, SAPS and Home Affairs are currently assisting them.

The nine beneficiaries have been put on an advert for their families to recognise them as they don’t know who they are and where they come from.

The Vhembe shelter has also closed, beneficiaries from local areas were given money to go home. The illegal undocumented foreign nationals left the shelter to look for work in town when lockdown restrictions were eased. Department of Home Affairs could not repatriate them as the Zimbabwe borders were not open for people, they are open only for cargo.

 

04 January 2021 - NW2842

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the reasons that her department has not paid Tswelopele Educational Programme despite the court judgment?

Reply:

The Honourable Member to indicate the place where the said organisation is situated in order for the Department to provide a response.

04 January 2021 - NW2373

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 1350 on 21 September 2020, (a) on what criteria were the beneficiaries chosen and (b) what (i) total amount did each food parcel cost including the exact details of costing per food item and (ii) was the total cost of the project?

Reply:

a) All applicants for social relief of distress as administered by SASSA must meet qualifying criteria as set in the Social Assistance Act, 2004. This means that all applicants would have met one or more of the following criteria:

  • Not receiving any social grant
  • Temporarily disabled for less than 6 months
  • Breadwinner of the family admitted to a state institution
  • Applicant affected by a disaster
  • Refusal of the application would cause undue hardship

b) (i) Each approved applicant was provided with a standard food parcel at a cost of R1 200 per food parcel. Each item was not costed separately, but the food parcel contained the items as indicated on the list attached as Annexure A.

(ii) SASSA utilised the allocated budget for social relief of distress. There was no specific allocation for Ekurhuleni. The total allocation for Gauteng Province is R61 050 000 for the 2020/21 financial year.

 

04 January 2021 - NW2392

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What total number of foster care applications are still unprocessed in her department and (b) by what date does she intend to have all of the specified applications processed?

Reply:

(a) It should be noted that the National Department of Social Development does note process Foster Care applications but provinces do. The following provinces have the following total number of foster care applications that are still unprocessed:

Eastern Cape: The Eastern Cape Province has a total of 665 foster care applications that have not yet been processed as at end September 2020.

Gauteng: The Gauteng Province has a total of 4025 foster care applications that are still unprocessed.

Limpopo: The new intakes that the department has to date is 1 068.

KZN: The province of KwaZulu-Natal has a total of 1637 foster care applications that are still to be processed.

Northern Cape: There are 184 applications for foster care placements under investigation.

Western Cape: The total number of foster care applications unprocessed until 30th September 2020 1900.

The reasons for deviations for non-finalisation of foster care applications are as follows:

  • Challenges in tracing birth parents.
  • Outstanding birth certificates from the Department of Home Affairs.
  • Delayed responses from the National Department of Social Development in issuing Form 30 due to impact of lockdown.
  • Outstanding school reports. We do, however, acknowledge the notable support from the WCED during the COVID-19 lockdown period.
  • Await court dates from the Department of Justice & CD to finalise court matters.
  • High turnover of social workers in Designated Child Protection Organisations.
  • Unmanageable high caseloads of social workers.
  • The safety situation in communities making it impossible for social workers to render supervision services as legally required.
  • Administrative demands requiring more support staff.
  • Reconsolidation/verification of information with SASSA to update orders on SOCPEN and submitting to the Provincial Office on a weekly basis.
  • Foster care applications pending finalisation.

(b) by what date does she intend to have all of the specified applications processed?

The provinces are to complete processing these applications as follows:

Eastern Cape: The applications will be processed by 31 December 2020.

Gauteng: The finalization of the foster care process is dependent on other Departments and prospective foster parents. As a result, it is not possible to indicate by when the cases will be finalised. In terms of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005, the turnaround time for foster care applications is six (6) months.

KZN: The department intends to have all foster care applications processed by 30 January 2021.

Limpopo: It is difficult to anticipate the date for finalisation of cases since the Department depends on other departments to finalise but efforts are made to fast track the finalisation of cases in the best interest of the child.

Mpumalanga: The department has a turnaround time of 6 months to investigate and finalize foster care applications as per the department’s service standards. However, in cases where there are challenges (e.g. documentation, advertisements for unknown fathers etc.) the finalisation of the cases may take longer.

Northern Cape: All placements will be finalised by 30 January 2021.

Western Cape: The Department of Social Development is in the process of consulting with regions (DSD and NPOs) and the relevant stakeholders in foster care management regarding the finalisation of unprocessed foster care applications. A date for finalisation will be determined.

It is expected that the challenges presented with the inevitable lockdown period would have had a restrictive effect on operations overall in the public and private sector. Although the courts could still be accessed for urgent matters pertaining to children and specifically foster care matters, there were operational limitations caused by limited access to courts and other lockdown restrictions. Various role-players, including the state attorneys’ offices, legal advisors and counsel had to meet lockdown requirements. The co-dependent functionalities have been highlighted with the authorities concerned and redress is awaited.

04 January 2021 - NW2179

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, with reference to her department’s Early Childhood Development (ECD) workstreams focusing on a response to Covid-19, she will provide Ms A L A Abrahams with a detailed list of (a) the full names and employment particulars of all persons who make up her department’s ECD workstreams and (b)(i) all dates on which the specified workstreams have met since their formation and (ii) the attendance registers thereof; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether the workstreams recommended that her department should spend R1,3 billion on ECD compliance monitors; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether all members are invited to attend every workstream meeting; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) what is the purpose of the workstream meetings and (b) how were the specified persons selected to form part of the workstreams; (5) whether the workstreams constitute a permanent body which will consult on ECD matters; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The details of the members of each of the nine workstreams (8 workstreams were initially established, with a ninth one on communication established later) that were established, numbered as Annexure A.

(b)(i) Each workstream managed its own process to achieve the objectives of a workstream, under the lead of the workstream leader. The workstreams determined their own meeting dates.

(ii) The meetings of the workstreams under the lead of each workstream leader were held virtually, and as such no signed attendance registers were kept.

(2) No, the workstream did not recommend that R1,3 billion should be used for the appointment of compliance monitors. It should however be noted that initially the Presidency approached the department indicating that the department has been allocated R1.3 billion as a stimulus relief package for early childhood development sector. The department therefore deemed it fit to appoint the compliance monitors to support the ECD sector programmes. Subsequently, national treasury indicated that the department has to bid for the funds for them to be considered for the allocation. The department therefore developed a proposal for bidding of funds. This proposal was consulted with the National Inter-Sectoral Forum for Early Childhood Development established in terms of paragraph 7.3.3.5 of the National Integrated Early Childhood Development Policy (2015) civil society secretariat regarding this programme as announced by the Minister to obtain views and inputs to complete the proposal that was submitted to National Treasury, of which ECD compliance officer is only a sub-component. National Treasury approved an allocation of R588 728 000; allocated for employment risk support that will benefit existing ECD workforce, 25 500 compliance support officers already employed in ECD centres, registration support officers who will support registration of ECD programmes recorded through Vangasali campaign and sustenance of 1 809 social workers who were appointed on contract.

(3) The workstreams were established at the meeting led by the Department of Social Development on 26 May 2020, where-after the leaders of each workstream had to take the responsibility to convene workstream meetings. The Department of Social Development invited all members of the workstreams to the general meetings where feedback was provided.

(4)(a) The below indicated the main purpose of each workstream:

Workstream 1: Data and information on the current situation and the implementation of measures.

Workstream 2: Assessment of ECD services: Covid 19 compliance before and after re-opening (including self-assessment)

Workstream 3: Support package (what is needed to support the re-opening)

Workstream 4: Protocols for re-opening;

Workstream 5: COVID-19 education and awareness as part of early childhood development programmes (for staff and children)

Workstream 6: ECD Programme Re-design (Including parent programmes), looking at adjustments in early childhood development programmes to accommodate the minimum health, safety and social distancing measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19.

Workstream 7: Practitioner training and capacity building;

Workstream 8: Monitoring and Evaluation of implementation

Workstream 9: Communication and General COVID 19 awareness.

(b) During the meeting dated 26 May 2020 when the workstreams were established, officials were invited to volunteer to serve on the respective workstreams to facilitate representation based on interest. During this meeting participants also agreed on the leadership for each workstream.

(5) The workstreams were established for the purpose indicated above and were not permanent. The workstreams have served their purpose well and the work assigned to the workstream was concluded by mid-June 2020. The Department of Social Development is continuing to consult with the ECD sector through the civil society secretariat of the National Inter-Sectoral Forum for Early Childhood Development. The latter is the official mechanism established by policy for engagement and consultation with civil society.

ANNEXURE “A”

Membership for the work streams to support the DSD Inter-sectoral ECD COVID 19 Task team

Work stream 1: Data and Information

 

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/

Member

1.

Sumaya Hendricks

Nelson Mandela Foundation

SumayaH@nelsonmandela.org

Lead

2.

Robyn Wienand

Preschools 4Africa

robyn@pwap.org.za

 

3.

Jacqueline Saaiman

Lima – Do More Foundation

jackie@lima.org.za

 

4.

Janeli Kotzé

DBE

kotze.j@dbe.gov.za

 

5.

Colleen Daniels

Gerards ECD

gerardsecdcenter@gmail.com

 

6.

Leonard Saul

SA Congress for ECD

congress@global.co.za

 

7.

Mpho Komane

SA Congress for ECD

lttlroses@gmail.com

 

8.

Ivy Rapoo

NDSD

IvyR@dsd.gov.za

 

9.

Ipeleng Mohlala

Early care Foundation

ipeleng@earlycarefoundation.org

 

10.

Phumzile Ndlovu

NDSD

Phumzilend@dsd.gov.za

Member

11.

Huldah Barnard

Custoda Trust

custodaepos@gmail.com

 

12.

Bukiwe Lupindo

DPME

bukiwe@dpme.gov.za

 

Work stream 2: Assessment of ECD services: Covid 19 compliance

 

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/

Member

1.

Nabeel Bassadien

Ilifa Labantwana

nabeel@ilifalabantwana.co.za

 

2.

Lyndsey Petro

Innovation Edge

lyndsey@innovationedge.org.za

 

3.

Doreen Malinga

DSD Mpumalanga

DoreenM@dsdmpu.gov.za

 

4.

Andrea Sciarappa

Tools for Schools

andrea@toolsforschool.net

 

5.

Robyn Wienand

Pre school Africa and Jam

robyn@pwap.org.za

 

6.

Rebecca Hickman

SMART START

Rebecca@smartstart.org.za

Lead

7.

Justine Jowell

Smart Start

Justine@smartstart.org.za

Member

8.

Lize Bredell

AECYC

lize@vvos.co.za

Member

9.

Caroll Warmberg

NECTA EC

Caroll@itec.org.za

Member

10.

Tracey Collins

GROW

traceycollins@growecd.org.za

Member

11.

Kathy Rautenbach

ECD Upliftment

kathy@vanilla.co.za

 

12.

Melissa Jacobs

SA Congress for ECD

Jmelissa021@gmail.com

 

13.

Mpho Papale

NDSD

Mphopa@dsd.gov.za

 

14.

Ntombizodwa Sonkayi

 

ntombizodwa@earlycarefoundation.org

 

15.

Natalie Gross

SAMA

nat.rep@samontessori.org.za

admin@samontessori.org.za

Member

16.

Saartjie Viljoen

AECYC

eldoraign@opti-baby.co.za

 

17.

Pheladi Makwala

NDSD

pheladima@dsd.gov.za

 

18.

Badi Mziwamadoda

Ubunye Foundation and NECTA

badi@ubunyefoundation.co.za

Member

Work stream 3 : Support Package

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/ Member

1.

Zaheera Mohammed

Ilifa Labantwana

zaheera@ilifalabantwana.co.za

Lead

2.

Patsy Pillay

New Beginnings

patsyp@intekom.co.za

 

3.

Jennifer McQuillan

Preschools 4 Africa

jennifer@pwap.org.za

 

4.

Jeffrey Wienand

Preschools 4 Africa

jeffrey@pwap.org.za

 

5.

Lisa Voortman

GROW

lisa@growecd.org.za

 

6.

Lizette Berry

Children’s Institute (UCT)

lizette.berry@uct.ac.za

 

7.

Mpho Papale

NDSD

Mphopa@dsd.gov.za

 

8.

Ghalieb Dawood

NT

Ghalieb.dawood@treasury.gov.za

 

9.

Yusuf Mayet

NT

Yusuf.mayet@treasury.gov.za

 

10

Thando Ngqase

NDA

thandon@nda.org.za

 

Work stream 4: Protocols for reopening

 

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/

Member

1.

Rodgers Hlatshwayo

SMART STRAT

rodgers@smartstart.org.za

Lead

2.

Jennifer McQuillan

Preschools 4 Africa

jennifer@pwap.org.za

 

3.

Cathy Moore

ACSI

Cathy_moore@acsi.org

Member

4.

Nelie Viljoen-Toet

SAVF

nviljoen-toet@savf.co.za

Member

5.

Mziwamadoda Badi

NECTA EC

badi@ubunyefoundation.co.za

Member

6.

Kathy Rautenbach

ECD Upliftment

kathy@vanilla.co.za

 

7.

Jabu Mthembu-Dlamini

DoMoreFoundation

Jabu.Mthembu-Dlamini@domore.org.za

 

8.

Andrea Scirappa

Tools for School

andrea@toolsforschool.net

 

9.

Colleen Daniels

Gerards ECD

gerardecdcenter@gmail.com

 

10.

Christine Radebe

SA Congress for ECD

matinteradebe@yahoo.com

 

11.

Bombeleni Munzhedzi

NDSD

BombeleniM@dsd.gov.za

 

12.

Natalie Gross

SAMA

nat.rep@samontessori.org.za

admin@samontessori.org.za

Member

13.

Saartjie Viljoen

AECYC

eldoraign@opti-baby.co.za

 

14.

Ntombi Mazibuko

NDOH

Ntombi.Mazibuko @health.gov.za

 

15.

Rebone Ntsie

NDOH

Rebone.Ntsie @health.gov.za

 

16.

Sebotse Ngake

NDOH

Sebotse Ngake @health.gov.za

 

17.

Lesley Bamford

NDOH

Lesley.Bamford @health.gov.za

 

Work stream 5: COVID 19 education and awareness

 

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/

Member

1.

Rebecca Hickman

SMART START

 

Lead

2.

Bonginkosi Mpinda

Preschools 4Africa

business@pwap.org.za

 

3.

Christine Radebe

SA Congress for ECD

matinteradebe@yahoo.com

 

4.

Shireen Miller

GrowEcd

shireen@growecd.org.za

 

Work stream 6: ECD Programme Re:design (Parent programmes)

 

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/

Member

1.

Andre Viviers

UNICEF

 

Lead

2.

Thandeka Rantsi

Bridge

thandeka@bridge.org.za

Member

3.

Louise Erasmus

AECYC

louise.erasmus9@telkomsa.net

Member

4.

Michelle Wienand

Preschools 4Africa

michelle@pwap.org.za

 

5.

Pam Picken

Do More foundation

pam@leadershipindevelopment.co.za

 

6.

Lizette Berry

Children’s Institute (UCT)

lizette.berry@uct.ac.za

 

7.

Lydia Plaatjies

SA Congress for ECD

plaatjiesl@gmail.com

Member

8.

Prof Nicky Roberts

SA Congress for ECD

nicky@kellelo.org

Member

9.

Bombeleni Munzhedzi

NDSD

BombeleniM@dsd.gov.za

 

10.

Natalie Gross

SAMA

nat.rep@samontessori.org.za

admin@samontessori.org.za

Member

11.

Puleng Motsoeneng

Ntataise

puleng@ntataise.org

 

12.

Liesel Brymmer

AECYC

Liesel.brummer@aros.ac.za

 

Work stream 7: Practitioner Capacity Building

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/

Member

1.

Ruby Motaung

NECDA

director@tree-ecd.co.za

Lead

2.

Charmaine Botha

Edu X SA

ceo@eduxsa.org

 

3.

Patsy Pillay

New Beginnings

patsyp@intekom.co.za

 

4.

Sheila Drew

SAIDE

sheilad@saide.org.za

 

5.

Bonginkosi Mpinda

Preschools 4Africa

business@pwap.org.za

 

6.

 Bonita Daniels

TEEC South Africa

info@teec.org.za

 

7.

 Arina Kitching

Learn2Live Community Centre 

arinak@oakhill.org.za

 

8.

Leonard Saul

SA Congress for ECD

congress@global.co.za

 

9.

Meraldia Tape

Grassroots Training Provider

maredia@grassroots.org.za

 

10.

Leanne Keet

MASIKHULE

lee@masikhule.org

 

11.

Nontsapo Pasiya

Early Care Foundation

nontsapo@earlycarefoundation.org

 
 

Puleng Motsoeneng

Ntataise

puleng@ntataise.org

 

12.

Mr. Rex Molefe

Motheo Training Institute Trust

rexmotheo@gmail.com

 

13.

Tessa

Browne

Africa Reggio Emilia Alliance

tessa@reggio.co.za

 

14.

Sanny Maluleka

NDPWI EPWP Social Sector

sanny.maluleka@dpw.gov.za

 

15.

Roeleen Lemmer

AECYC

roeleenlemmer@gmail.com

 

Work stream 8: Monitoring and Evaluation

 

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Email Address

Lead/

Member

1.

Melissa Jacobs

SA Congress for ECD

Jmelissa021@gmail.com

 

2.

Lydia Plaatjies

SA Congress for ECD

plaatjiesl@gmail.com

Member

3.

Prof Nicky Roberts

SA Congress for ECD

nicky@kellelo.org

Member

4.

Ivy Rapoo

NDSD

IvyR@dsd.gov.za

 

5.

Kathy Rautenbach

ECD Upliftment

kathy@vanilla.co.za

 

6.

Andrea Sciarappa

Tools for School

andrea@toolsforschool.net

 

7.

Bonginkosi Mpinda

Preschools 4Africa

business@pwap.org.za

 

8.

Masego Maselwanyane

NDPWI

Masego.Maselwanyane@dpw.gov.za

 

9.

Nkululeko Kalipa

DPME

Nkululeko@dpme.gov.za

 

10

Kaley Le Mottee

Ntataise

   

11

Charmaine Jooste

AECYC

jooste.charme@gmail.com

 
 

No

Name

Name of Organisation

Lead/

Member

1.

Jeffrey Wienand

Pre Schools 4 Africa

 

2.

Cathy Moore

ACSI

 

3.

Charmaine Botha

EDUxSA

 

4.

Andrea Scirappa

Tools for Schools

 

5.

Mpho Komane

SA Congress for ECD

 

6.

Lydia Plaatjies

SA Congress for ECD

Member

7.

Prof Nicky Roberts

SA Congress for ECD

Member

8.

Mariette van Eeden

AECYC

 

General Issues

Issues:

  • Will extra-mural activities continue;
  • How will aftercare take place
  • How will this be communicated so there is a common message?
  • Suggestion to integrate parent issues across all the work streams.
  • Also to integrate special needs issues across all the work streams.
  • Involving municipalities
  • DSD will send all documents that have been developed to date, including Overall discussion document by UNICEF for dissemination to wider sector.
  • How to adapt ECD daily programmes to allow for social distancing
  • How to encourage and support play under different conditions
  • How to ensure that children experience all the varied play and early learning experiences to support their holistic development
  • Development of play activities, stories, songs and rhymes to help children remember things like handwashing; to help them understand the changes in their daily lives; to help them develop resilience in the context of things they are hearing/experiencing
  • How to fully engage and support parents to provide for their young children’s health, safety, nutrition and development, and involve them in their ECD services

04 January 2021 - NW3040

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What is the total number of (a) SA Post Office (SAPO) branches that have been earmarked to disburse SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grants and (b) the specified offices that are still operational; (2) what (a) is the total number of persons who are solely reliant on the SAPO for the payment of their SASSA grant and (b) is the breakdown of the number for each province; (3) what is the (a) breakdown for each province of the number of recipients that use bank ATMs and (b)(i) number of beneficiaries and (ii) percentage who have chosen to receive their grants through SAPO; (4) what is the (a) number of beneficiaries and (b) percentage of beneficiaries who have chosen to receive their grants through card payments?

Reply:

(1) a) A total of 1 374 post offices provide disbursement services for the social grants. The provincial split is indicated in the table below:

Branch Summary

Region

Branches

Eastern Cape

166

Gauteng

302

KwaZulu-Natal

213

Free State

115

North West

112

Limpopo

141

Mpumalanga

99

Northern Cape

65

Western Cape

161

Total

1,374

(b) The list is attached as Annexure A

2(a) Social grants are paid by SASSA. All social grants are paid through a direct deposit into the beneficiary bank accounts, regardless of whether this is a private bank account or the SASSA card account. SAPO is responsible for the disbursement of social grants for those clients who access their grants using the SASSA card. The total number of persons who use the SASSA card to access their grant is 8,105,671.

(b) The breakdown per province is as follows:

SAPO is responsible, in terms of the contract to ensure multiple access channels for grant beneficiaries to access their grants. Of the total number using the SASSA card to access their grants, approximately 93% access their grants through the National Payment System – that is at bank ATMs and retailer point of sale devices; while 5% access their grants over the counter at post offices, and 2% access their grants through the remaining 1 740 cash pay points.

The actual numbers fluctuate monthly, as beneficiaries have the right to choose which channel they utilise. There are no designated cash beneficiaries.

The table below indicates the numbers of clients who use the SASSA card to access their grants through the various channels. There is unfortunately no provincial breakdown of these numbers.

PAYMENT CHANNELS STATISTICS

Month

SAPO Branches

NPS ( Retailers)

NPS (ATM)

Cash Pay Points

Total

April

315 716

2 396 250

5 184 787

96 910

7 993 663

May

287 537

2 367 234

5 153 083

254 051

8 061 905

June

327 439

2 322 316

5 225 329

225 926

8 101 010

3(a) SASSA pays a total of 11 509 390 social grant beneficiaries monthly (as at December 2020). The breakdown per province is as follows:

(b)(i) The number of beneficiaries who have chosen to receive their grants through SAPO by using the SASSA card total 8,105,671 while 3,403,719 or 29,6% receive the grants directly into their private bank accounts.

(ii) The percentage who have chosen to receive their grants through SAPO is 70.4%

4(a) Every beneficiary receives their social grant directly into their bank accounts. As indicated above, 8 105 671 receive their grants directly into their SASSA cards.

(b) The percentage of SASSA cards used in the payment environment is 70,4% of the total beneficiary population.

04 January 2021 - NW3070

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of recent reports that there are more than 14 000 homeless persons in Cape Town, what kind of intervention has her department offered to assist homeless women and children in particular?

Reply:

All women and children are assessed and provided with psychosocial support and social relief if needed. Part of the process is also to try and reunify them with their families.

During lockdown, the Western Cape Department of Social Development established a 60 bed family shelter, specifically focusing on single women/parents and their children that are homeless. The Department is planning on expanding it to 90 bed spaces by the end of March 2021.

04 January 2021 - NW2558

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department will still be employing Early Childhood Development Compliance Officers in the current financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department will employ Early Childhood Development Compliance Officers in the current financial year. R116 million has been allocated for the support of 25 500 compliance support officers, who are existing staff members at early childhood development programmes that will play a compliance support role within their ECD programmes. The Department is working with the Inter-Sectoral Forum (ISF) on the programme to make sure that the right services benefit from this grant.

04 January 2021 - NW3069

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department has conducted any studies on the phenomenon of ukuthwala and its impacts on young girls in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, (a) how prevalent is the practice and (b) what measures has she put in place to protect young girls and/or young orphaned girls in particular?

Reply:

The department conducted the study on Ukuthwala: Baseline Assessment on the Prevalence and Perceptions about Harmful Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children in the OR Tambo District Municipality, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa (November 2011 and will be updated in 2020).

The study revealed the following impacts on young girls in the Eastern Cape:

Health: Young girls may be married to an older more experienced partners and therefore get exposed to sexually transmitted infection including HIV – partners who are less likely to test for HIV before the incident of ukuthwala. Girls below the age of 18 have small pelvises and are not ready for child-bearing, this puts them at risk hence higher morbidity and mortality rates. There is poor access to sexual reproductive health services and delayed testing for HIV during pregnancy resulting to late enrolment to Prevention of Mother to Child HIV Prevention program.

Education: Early school dropout by child brides may lead to increased economic dependency to the male partner. Early school dropout further perpetuates discrimination and low status of women and girls.

Emotional: Isolation and depression as a result of unrealistic expectations from the family and the husband to assume makoti duties while she is physically and emotionally not ready for this responsibility.

(a) Ukuthwala was found to be amongst practices that are prevalent in OR Tambo district and widely practiced although respondents were not clear about its origins however they participated in the practice. The frequencies of occurrence of these practices vary with the practice some occurring daily others weekly and monthly while others occur every six months and yearly. The findings also show that the majority of the people in OR Tambo district do not know the decision makers on these cultural practices. Men were identified as key decision makers when it comes to Ukuthwala.

The research found that it is not clear how the decision makers got their powers but the findings seem to suggest that only a small proportion of the population have knowledge on how decision makers got the powers to determine when these practices should happen. Ukuthwala was identified as one of the practices that is mostly disliked by the communities. The findings suggest that cultural marriages are more commonly practiced than civil marriages.

(b) The following institutions have been engaged in public education:

Office of the Premier (OTP); the Chapter 9 Institutions: CRL Rights Commission; The Public Protector; Commission for Gender Commission and the SA Human Rights Commission.

Eastern Cape House of Traditional Leaders; the Civil Society Organizations; the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund; the Children’s Institute; South African Council for Educators; Traditional Leaders in the Province; Government Departments and a joint program implemented by United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) that was funded by the Department for International Development was implemented and output three of this program focused on social change interventions conducted through community dialogues. The program also invested in building the capacity of traditional leaders on their role in gender based violence prevention efforts.

UNFPA also took a delegation from OR Tambo District led by the then Executive Mayor Zoleka Chapha with a provincial delegation from the House of Traditional leaders, OTP and COGTA to Amhara Region Ethiopia on a South-South learning exchange. Ethiopia had previously had a similar challenge but had been able to reverse this picture through social behavior change programs and social change program.

An integrated approach was used utilising key community leadership, government Departments, civil society organizations from 2009 in OR Tambo District. This involved door to door visits, community dialogues and focus groups discussions.

The purpose was to discuss the practice of ukuthwala and to find out how communities at different age groups feel about the practice.

Household profiling conducted in June 2012 reaching 396 households in the following sub-locations – Buthulo, Mathambo and Gqibelana Locations and Hlabathi J.S.S.

Awareness Campaign on promotion of safety and healthy lifestyle was conducted in June 2012 during June 16 Youth Celebrations.

A Family Resource Centre was established to educate women and families about Human Rights and Children’s rights and to address all gender and family issues.

There is after school program for orphaned and vulnerable children in the area. The program provides life skills to the children and the volunteers assist with homework and holiday programs.

Conclusion: During 2021-2022 this subject has emerged as the focus again and this will be dealt with through a social norms change program that will be technically supported by partners like UNFPA. This will also extend the focus districts to OR Tambo and Alfred Nzo. It is also worth noting that this practice is a hidden practice and it happens in the furthest and left behind populations, these are the populations that will be prioritized in the coming financial year.

04 January 2021 - NW2180

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she and the Deputy Minister has each employed ministerial special advisor(s); if so, in each case, (a) what is the name of the special advisor, (b) on what date was the advisor appointed, (c) what are the duties of the advisor, (d) at what post level was the appointment made, (e) what is the salary level of the advisor, (f) what is the duration of the employment contract that was entered into with the advisor and (g) what are the reasons they found it necessary to appoint the advisor?

Reply:

The Deputy Minister has not appointed a special advisor as it is not provided for in Ministerial Handbook.

Only the Minister has appointed a special advisor.

a) Ms ESJS Hlapolosa.

b) 1 July 2019.

c) (i) To advise the Minister on the development of policy that will promote the departments objectives;

(ii) To advise Minister on the exercise or performance of the Ministers powers and duties; and

(iii) To perform any task as may be appropriate in respect of the exercise and performance of the Minister.

d) Compensation level IV.

e) R 1 978 533.00.

f) Fixed term contract linked to the term of office of incumbent Minister, Ms Lindiwe Zulu.

g) As indicated in (c) above, to advise on the development of policy that will promote the Departments objectives.

04 January 2021 - NW3092

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, with reference to the subsidy that the Tutela Springs Family Care, NPO 001/188, receives from her department, she will indicate the reasons that (a) the subsidy for October 2020 was not paid and (b) no payment was made as at 16 November 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has been informed that the late payment caused the organisation and its staff and social workers significant hardship and dire financial circumstances; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps will be taken to ensure payment is made on time in future?

Reply:

The Honourable Member to indicate the place where the said organisation is situated in order for the Department to provide a response.

04 January 2021 - NW3021

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What is the justification of (a) charging persons with mobile devices the cost of a television (TV) licence and (b) transferring all the income of TV licences derived from mobile devices to the SA Broadcasting Corporation?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:

On 09 September 2020, Cabinet, approved the publication of the Draft White Paper on Audio and Audio-Visual Content Services Policy Framework: A New Vision for South Africa 2020, for public consultation and comments. The department has since gazetted the Draft White Paper (No. 43797, Vol. 664) for public comments which has now been extended till 15 February 2021 to give the stakeholders enough time to engage with the complex proposals raised within the Policy Framework.

Section 4.2.2.3. of the draft White Paper, with reference to the SABC and licence matters propose that:

”provisions of the financial matters and staffing of the Corporation are necessary, although they require review and consequential amendments to the TV licence fee section to broaden the definition and collection system for television licences and to strengthen enforcement mechanisms and penalties of non-payment”.

Achievement of the above will be determined by the submissions expected from all South Africans towards the draft White Paper.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 January 2021 - NW2726

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether, with reference to the court judgement of 20 October 2020 by Judge Janse Van Nieuwenhuizen, in terms of which she was instructed to file, within five days, and to provide copies to the applicants, a plan and programme which she will implement without delay so as to ensure that the eight provincial Members of the Executive Councils for Social Development immediately carry out their duties in respect to the payment of subsidies to early childhood development centres (ECD), she will confirm that they have complied with the court order in respect of (a) filing her plan and programme for payment within five days, (b) providing each applicant with the plan and programme for payment and (c) and ensuring that all ECD subsidies were paid; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) & (b) The Court did not grant an order for the MEC to file a plan within five (5) days to the Court nor to the applicant no plans have thus been submitted.

(c) ECD centres were paid 60% of the subsidy from April to September 2020. The 40% of the subsidy that was not paid will be transferred to ECD centres from 18 November 2020. A total of 368 centres will be paid the backdated 40% for nutrition and the projected amount is R11 million.

04 January 2021 - NW2955

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) has been the ratio of grant recipients to the population since 27 April 1994 and (b) is the proportion for each year to date?

Reply:

The table below indicates the numbers of grant recipients per year as at 31 March of each year, from 1996/97, expressed as a percentage of the populations estimates. Unfortunately, the data from 1994 is not available, as this had not yet been consolidated into a single database, but was managed provincially.

FINANCIAL YEAR

Daily Stats as at 31 March

Population Estimates

% Share

1996/97

3 018 909

41 226 700

7%

1997/98

2 832 156

42 130 500

7%

1998/99

2 923 718

43 054 306

7%

1999/00

3 034 381

43 685 699

7%

2000/01

3 864 463

44 560 644

9%

2001/02

4 033 384

45 454 211

9%

2002/03

4 969 666

46 429 823

11%

2003/04

6 494 115

46 586 607

14%

2004/05

9 421 654

46 888 200

20%

2005/06

10 974 076

47 390 900

23%

2006/07

12 015 059

47 850 700

25%

2007/08

12 423 739

48 687 000

26%

2008/09

13 072 173

49 320 500

27%

2009/10

14 057 365

49 991 300

28%

2010/11

14 935 832

50 586 757

30%

2011/12

15 407 194

50 586 757

30%

2012/13

16 106 110

52 982 000

30%

2013/14

15 932 473

54 002 000

30%

2014/15

16 642 643

54 956 900

30%

2015/16

16 991 634

55 908 900

30%

2016/17

17 200 525

56 521 900

30%

2017/18

17 509 995

57 725 600

30%

2018/19

17 811 745

58 775 022

30%

2019/20

18 290 592

59 622 350

31%

04 January 2021 - NW2264

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the challenges faced by Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres in relation to the Covid-19 regulations;

Reply:

1. These are some of the challenges faced by Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres in relation to the Covid-19 regulations and these are not exhaustive.

  • Non-adherence to COVID 19 health and safety requirements including lack of PPEs,
  • Financial constrains due to loss of income during lockdown period.
  • ECD centres depend on fees paid by parents and this was not possible as the children were at home.
  • COVID 19 has affected economic situation of many households and as such many children are still at home due to loss of income by parents as they cannot afford paying fees for their children.
  • Some parents/caregivers are scared that their children will be infected by the pandemic and prefer keeping them at home.
  • Some ECD centres might not reopen as practitioners are part of vulnerable groupings with existing co- morbidities and/or are 60 or above.

2. According to guidance from provinces there may be some challenges with ECD centres closing. It will be difficult to have accurate information in this regard due to us not having adequate data of all ECD centres in the country. The department repurposed Infrastructure Conditional Grant to prepare ECD centres for reopening, by facilitating the supply of essential equipment to meet COVID 19 health and safety measures. These include equipment that will enable temperature screening, frequent hand washing, frequent cleaning and basic hygiene to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The department is also continuing to pay subsidy to funded ECD centres.

31 December 2020 - NW2856

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total number of extradition requests are currently pending and/or under review and (b) are the details of the (i) number of cases, (ii) time it has taken thus far and (iii) progress made for each case under review; (2) what (a) is the total number of extraditions and mutual legal assistance treaties that have been negotiated but not yet signed and/or ratified as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) are the details of the progress of the specified treaties and projected timeline of their completion?

Reply:

1. The table below provides details on the number of incoming extradition requests are currently pending and/or under review, as well as the details on the number of cases, time it has taken thus far and progress made for each case under review

(1) (a)

53

(b) (i)

Details of cases

 

Nature of offence

Number of cases

 

Murder

15

 

Attempted Murder

3

 

Culpable homicide

3

 

Assault

3

 

Rape / attempted rape

2

 

Robbery /armed robbery

6

 

Fraud

8

 

Drug related offences

4

 

Hunting without permit

2

 

Money laundering

5

 

Corruption

3

 

Terrorist activities

1

 

Assault

1

 

Theft

17

 

Housebreaking

1

 

Escape from lawful custody

1

 

Sexual exploiting/neglect of children

2

 

War crimes

1

 

Total

74

N.B. Seven (7) countries reported more than one (1) criminal case per extradition request, which explains the total number of 74 cases versus the total number of 53 extradition requests.

(b) (ii)

Cases received from 2012 to 2017

29

 

Cases received from 2018 to date

24

 

Total

53

(iii)

Progress on cases

 

Interpol

5

 

Section 5 notifications served/submitted to Minister

15

 

Extraditions to be served after sentence

2

 

Requests incomplete and returned

9

 

Cases before court

7

 

Outgoing requests sent but no response received

15

 

Total

53

 

2. The total number of extraditions and mutual legal assistance treaties that have been negotiated but not yet signed and/or ratified as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) are the details of the progress of the specified treaties and projected timeline of their completion?

(a)

Treaties negotiated but not yet signed

9

(b)

Country

Progress

Projected Timeline

 

CUBA

(Extradition and MLA)

Await comments from the Cuban authorities

Possible entry into force during the fourth quarter of 2021

 

BELARUS

(Extradition and MLA)

Presidential Minute for signing issued Belarus to indicate whether they are ready to sign

Possible entry into force during the third quarter of 2021

 

VIET NAM

(Extradition and MLA)

Minor amendments to be effected on request of Viet Nam

Possible entry into force during the fourth quarter of 2021

 

PAKISTAN

(Extradition)

Treaty negotiated during 2014

Pakistan yet to confirm that they will provide death penalty undertakings

 

ETHIOPIA

(Extradition and MLA)

Treaty negotiated during 2015

Ethiopia still to accept South Africa’s proposal regarding terrorism

 

UNITED KINGDOM

(MLA)

Presidential Minute already issued UK to indicate whether they are ready to sign

Possible entry into force during the third quarter of 2021

 

MOZAMBIQUE

(Extradition)

Treaty negotiated during 2017 OCSLA (DIRCO) requested certain amendments to comply with Article 19 of the SADC Protocol on Extradition

Possible entry into force during the fourth quarter of 2021

 

BRAZIL

(MLA)

A new Presidential Minute requested Brazilian Ambassador in Pretoria has been authorized to sign on behalf of the Brazilian Government

Possible entry into force during the third quarter of 2021

 

BOTSWANA

(Extradition and MLA)

South Africa is ready to sign await

Botswana’s approval to sign

During February 2020, the office of the Director of Public Prosecutions indicated that they are still waiting for Cabinet to approve that the Amendment Treaty be signed.

END

31 December 2020 - NW659

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)(a) What measures have been put in place at each of the correctional facilities administered by his department to (i) isolate detainees showing symptoms of being infected with the coronavirus, (ii) isolate detainees who have tested positive for infection with the coronavirus, (iii) identify and isolate contacts of detainees or staff members who tested positive for the coronavirus, (iv) assist members of the prison population to practice regular hand-washing and other hygiene practices recommended by the World Health Organisation, (v) encourage social distancing and (vi) test for infection and (b) in each case (i) what are the full relevant details and (ii) from what date were the specified measures implemented; (2) what number of (a) employees at the Department of Correctional Services and (b) detainees under the supervision of his department have been tested for the coronavirus to date?

Reply:

(a) What measures have been put in place at each of the correctional facilities administered by his department to:

(i) isolate detainees showing symptoms of being infected with the coronavirus,

On 14 March 2020, Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for Preparedness, Detection and Response to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) of the Department of Correctional Services were approved and circulated to all regions for implementation. Since the lockdown, 10 035 Remand Detainees (RDs) have been admitted to Correctional Centres nationally. All RDs are screened for COVID-19 symptoms and those showing symptoms of being infected with the Coronavirus are quarantined from the other detainees for 14 days and monitored on a daily basis. A swab is collected for testing by the NICD; monitored on a daily basis in isolation area whilst awaiting the results.

(ii) isolate detainees who have tested positive for infection with the coronavirus, Detainees who test positive for COVID-19 are categorised by the health care professional as mild, moderate and severe according to the COVID-19 categories. However, the following procedures are implemented:

  • Once the positive results are received, the detainees are moved from quarantine to isolation;
  • A medical practitioner at the Department of Health designated Hospital will be engaged to determine the need for the detainee to be treated in the department or at the designated hospital;
  • Detainees with mild and moderate symptoms will be treated at a designated treating site in the department whereas those with severe symptoms will be admitted at the Provincial Designated Hospital;
  • The isolated detainees are monitored and treated symptomatically by the health care professionals;
  • The Department will inform the relevant Health District and the Provincial Communicable Disease Control Directorate for support in conducting contact tracing;
  • The notification of the COVID-19 positive case will be as per Department of Health and the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) prescripts;
  • The Department of Health links the relevant Health District office to the centre for further monitoring.
  • Remand detainees with co-morbidities, (i.e above 60, diabetics, HIV positives, TB patients, Asthmatics, cancer patient, pregnant females), are identified and are classified as per risk factors and monitoring is intensified.
  • Isolated/Quarantine inmates are retested for COVID-19 before exiting out of quarantine.
  • Psychological, Spiritual services care are provided to Confirmed inmates.

(iii) Identify and isolate contacts of detainees or staff members who tested positive for the coronavirus,

  • The detainees who test positive are interviewed by health care professionals to identify the possible contacts;
  • The staff utilises admission registers into the cell where the positive inmate was accommodated to identify possible contacts of the detainee;
  • Those detainees who shared the same cell with the positive case are identified as possible contacts;
  • The contacts are quarantine and monitored for symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days; and
  • Should the contacts present with symptoms they will also be tested for COVID-19 as per DoH guidelines.

Regarding the officials the following processes are followed:

  • All officials with COVID-19 signs and symptoms are identified and referred for testing;
  • Presumptive cases are reported and partner Departments are contacted (SAPS, DOH, NICD etc);
  • Self-isolation/quarantine forms are acknowledged and signed off by officials who are requested to isolate/quarantine;
  • All Confirmed COVID-19 cases of officials and presumptive persons under investigation are self-quarantined (either home or State provided facility);
  • Psychological services are provided to confirmed cases; and
  • Reintegration is done upon re-test and negative confirmation.

(iv) assist members of the prison population to practice regular hand-washing and other hygiene practices recommended by the World Health Organisation

The Department is dealing with this pandemic by implementing a disaster management plan that is embedded in national government’s adopted approach of ‘prevention, containment/treatment and disaster recovery’. The Department’s Disaster Management Response Plan is designed to prevent, contain, disrupt and mitigate COVID-19 from spreading in the department’s facilities and administrative offices.

Health care professionals disseminate hand hygiene and infection control information through awareness sessions and conduct hand washing campaigns. Each inmate is provided with soap for hand washing purposes; installation of secured hand washing soap and sanitizers is done in most centres. Educational posters on hand wash are placed on all notice boards in all Correctional Facilities.

Security equipment including vehicles are being sanitised and cleaned with the necessary detergents daily before and after utilisation by Correctional Centres and Community Corrections. Scrub down of facilities continues on a daily basis to ensure that areas are scrubbed down at least once a week. Officials have been assigned to sanitise hands of officials, inmates and visitors at all entry points and exit points in Correctional Facilities. Cleaning and enforcement of sanitisation are maintained at the Correctional Centres and Community Corrections especially at the reception, admission areas and living cells.

(v) encourage social distancing

Social distancing is encouraged in all Correctional Facilities and work places by introducing below mentioned measures as a form of promoting social distancing:

  • Reduce the number of offenders appearing before the CSPB for placement consideration and CMC. During these sittings social distancing must be adhered to;
  • Reduce number of offenders attending group programmes;
  • Reduce the number of representatives attending meeting/sessions/training/VC meetings including decreasing meeting times;
  • Decreased travelling to and from or within the Management Areas;
  • Reduce the movement within management areas between correctional centres;
  • Encourage electronic submission of documents where facilities are available;
  • Promote increased exercise for offenders in manageable groups;
  • Members record on duty at the entrance gate to prevent congestion;
  • Minimise congestion in the admissions areas by calling new admission one by one to admission table; and
  • Reduced number of inmates in library.

Social distancing for offenders in their cells is a challenge given the limited floor space for each offender in a cell and is further exacerbated by overcrowding ,hence offenders are encouraged to implement good hand hygiene practices.

(vi) test for infection

Naso-pharyngeal or Oro-pharyngeal swabs are collected by health professionals and sent to laboratory.

(b) in each case (i) what are the full relevant details and

In each case the Naso-pharyngeal or Oro-pharyngeal swabs are collected by health professionals and sent to laboratory and the results will determine further management of the detainee per stipulations.

(ii) from what date were the specified measures implemented;

Approved 2020 DCS Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for Preparedness, Detection and Response to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) of the Department of Correctional Services.

(2) what number of (a) employees at the Department of Correctional Services and (b) detainees under the supervision of his department have been tested for the coronavirus to date?

(a) As at 26 April 2020, there are 536 officials who have been refereed to health care services for testing. It is important to highlight that most employees possess medical aids which they utilize for coronavirus testing. (b) To date there are 2 611 inmates that have been tested for coronavirus under the supervision of the Department of Correctional Services.

END

31 December 2020 - NW600

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) On what grounds was a certain person (name furnished) granted parole after only serving four years of an 18-year sentence for 20 charges of racketeering, corruption and money laundering, including the distribution of lethal weapons to gangs in the Western Cape and (b) what are the details of the specified person’s parole conditions?

Reply:

a) The offender in question qualified for remission of sentence which reduced his sentence with 01 year. He then became eligible to be considered for parole as part of the Special Parole Dispensation and his placement on parole was approved by the parole board;

b) The parole conditions such as reporting twice a week at Community Corrections Office are applicable to all. We will continue to monitor his parole conditions accordingly.

It should also be noted that the offender in question is currently under Witness Protection. We are limited by regulations to disclose information on this matter. However, we have been briefed by the Department on this matter and details will be communicated as other cases are enrolled with the justice system.

c) According to Section 299A of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977 as amended (“the CPA”) provides for the right of complainant to make representations with regard to placement on parole, on day parole, or under correctional supervision in the following cases:

  1. When a court sentences a person to imprisonment for-

(a) murder or any other offence which involves the intentional killing of a person;

(b) rape or compelled rape as contemplated in sections 3 or 4 of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, 2007, respectively;

(c) robbery where the wielding of a fire-arm or any other dangerous weapon or the infliction of grievous bodily harm or the robbery of a motor vehicle is involved;

(d) sexual assault, compelled sexual assault or compelled self-sexual assault as contemplated in section 5, 6 or 7 of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, 2007, respectively;

(e) kidnapping; or

(f) any conspiracy, incitement or attempt to commit any offence contemplated in paragraphs (a) to (e)

Therefore, the offender’s victims were not approached to participate in the Parole Board’s meeting when he was considered for parole placement as the crimes committed by the offender do not fall within the ambit of the section stated above.

END

31 December 2020 - NW2468

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the Humansdorp Magistrates Court which has been scheduled for an upgrade since 2006 and for which the plans were signed off in 2007 but where there has been no progress to date, a new set of plans has been adopted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the proposed date for commencement of the upgrade; (2) What immediate actions are being taken to address the huge security problems following the promises made last year of a fence around the precinct and access control at the entrance; (3) what actions are being taken to improve the (a) access control and (b) proper training of the security guards to ensure that the safety of all people in the building is addressed; (4) What are the time frames for addressing the immediate security problems; (5) What immediate actions are being taken to address the lack of toilet facilities for women members of the public and that the urinals in the male toilets are repaired?

Reply:

(1) (a) Although there were discussions to revamp the Humansdorp Magistrates Court as early as 2006 there were no formal designs and plans which were finalised at that stage. The initial plans were formally endorsed in 2013 with the submission on the needs assessment to the Department of Public Works (now Department of Public Works and Infrastructure) (DPWI). Following several interactions and consultations with various stakeholders, the revised Needs Assessment was officially signed off by the Accounting Officer on the 19th November 2019 and forwarded to DPWI to conduct a feasibility study and to prepare a detailed estimate for consideration by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development. It appears that the project was delayed by challenges encountered by DPWI regarding the consolidation of the ERFs and rezoning of the property, which has now been resolved.

(b) Several meetings and interactions with consultants and various stakeholders were held to consider the revised needs and concept designs in through a Zoom meeting held on 14 July 2020. It was unanimously agreed that the Concept 3 (demolition and rebuild) be adopted and this has since been formalised in writing for official signing off by all stakeholders for approval by National Office before the end of December 2020. This will then result in finalisation of sketch plans for approval and for cost estimates to be determined. Construction will commence immediately after the approval of the sketch plans and it is anticipated that the project will get underway during the second half of the 2021/2022 financial year.

(2) (a) The Project is currently registered for additional accommodation and is currently in stage 4, i.e. planning stage. A decision was taken to adopt a phased approach where the project will be split into two phases to address the urgent security measures and shortage of ablutions at the facility in the first phase as follows:

  1. Phase 1: Security measures i.e. installation of a perimeter fence and security gates only, minor repairs to existing ablutions and provision of a temporary ablution park home.
  2. Phase 2: Demolition of the existing single storey magistrate office and construction of new court house in accordance to the approved designs. The new designs will also provide adequate undercover parking for court officials.

(b) The fence and gates will be placed within the boundary to avoid having to demolish the low boundary wall and trees on the perimeter will be cut down and removed. A temporary mobile unit accommodating additional ablutions, storage facilities, and consultation offices for prosecutors, will be placed in a position where the court can still operate when construction commences on the second phase.

(3) (a) As part of the current capital works project, the fencing and gates will be addresses as phase one of this project and the other access control measures will be addressed in the second phase of the project.

(b) The department has appointed the services from a departmental appointed security service provider to conduct security functions at the court daily. Recruitment is done by this service provider in line with the Departmental specifications and required security grading who then further receive on the job training by the employer during the induction phase and is monitored in line with the service level agreement on an on-going basis.

(4) Security problems at the court are infrastructural instead of physical in nature and therefore the concerns will be addressed under the registered Capital Works Project but done in Phases. Since the site clearance was issued and submitted to the department on 19 November 2020, the department will start making arrangements to attend to the fence and the ablutions by March 2021.

(5) (a) Based on municipal approval and site clearance, the ablution facilities will require electrical, sewerage and water connections to be fully operational. Chemical toilets cannot be considered as this is not an economically viable solution, sustainable, or hygienically suitable for this type of environment in the absence of running water. Current ablutions are maintained when the need arises through day to day maintenance on an on-going basis, but challenges are often experienced with breakages as a result of vandalism by end users.

(b) The Department is working closely with DPWI to ensure the project phase 2 is under implementation in the next financial year 2021/22.

END

28 December 2020 - NW2678

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Bongo, Adv BT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In view of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan that was announced by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, which presents an opportunity for the Government Printing Works (GPW) to enhance its work in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region and noting that the GPW is a revenue-generating entity which contributes to the fiscus, how does his department intend for the GPW to expand its footprint in the SADC region?

Reply:

GPW has been implementing its Integrated Marketing and Communications Strategy which incorporates its efforts to penetrate the market in the SADC region as a government printer, in order to offer Africa, solutions brewed within the Continent. GPW will continue to be supported by DHA through collaboration with SADC countries by facilitating visits by member states to view GPW facilities and service offerings, enhance business opportunities for GPW.

GPW has been visiting SADC countries to present its products and service offerings in order to expand its footprint. Engagements through various platforms like exhibitions and online meetings, have occurred with all SADC countries, but GPW has started discussions on the printing process of state security documents with eSwatini, DRC, AU Commission and Namibia.

The South African Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan presents an opportunity for GPW to realise its strategic intent of exploring economic opportunities outside the borders of the Republic thereby expanding its footprint into SADC and other African countries.

END

.

28 December 2020 - NW2547

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether her department awarded any tenders to any non-South African companies (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each business to whom the tender was awarded, (b) is the name of the country where each company is based, (c) is the amount of each tender that was awarded to each specified company and (d) was the service and/or product that was supplied by each business?

Reply:

I was advised by the department as follows:

1. (a) No, there were no tenders awarded in the past three financial years.

(b) No. No tenders were awarded to any non-South African companies since 1

April 2020.

(c) Not applicable.

(d) Not applicable.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

28 December 2020 - NW2977

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she can provide reasons as to why the SA Social Security Agency is reducing the food parcels during the COVID-19 pandemic, taking into consideration the high unemployment rate and the looming holiday hunger with the upcoming festive season; if not, why not; if so, what are the reasons?

Reply:

SASSA provided food parcels during the initial hard lockdown implemented as a measure to limit the spread of the virus. In excess of 147 000 food parcels were distributed by SASSA during this period.

The decision taken during the period when food parcels were provided to reduce the size of the food parcel was taken to try and standardise the support provided within the Social Development sector, and to provide support to more people.

With the introduction of the R350 relief grant, SASSA stopped the distribution of food parcels, as the qualifying citizens were effectively being supported by the special relief grant and could not benefit from both forms of relief.

SASSA is no longer distributing food parcels but is continuing to provide support in terms of the social relief of distress programme through vouchers and direct humanitarian support to citizens affected by disasters other than the pandemic, in accordance with the provisions of the Social Assistance Act.

24 December 2020 - NW741

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What total number of (a) international and (b) domestic hotel bookings did her department make for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since they were appointed as members of the Executive; (2) what was the (a) date, (b) name of the hotel and (c) cost in respect of each booking?

Reply:

1. (a) Total number of international hotel bookings for the:

(i) Minister: 29

(ii) Deputy Minister: 11

(b) Total number of domestic hotel bookings for the:

(i) Minister: 241

(ii) Deputy Minister: 47

2. (a) Refer to the attached document.

(b) Refer to the attached document.

(c) Refer to the attached document.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

     

24 December 2020 - NW2229

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to investigations conducted into governance and corruption in her department and all the entities reporting to her, what is the (a) total number of investigations that were referred to the (i) SA Police Service and (ii) National Prosecuting Authority, (b) date on which each specified case was handed over, (c)(i) status of each specified investigation and (ii) docket number for each investigation and (d) total number of cases that are being prosecuted?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Department and Entities as follows:

DEPARTMENT

(a)(i) Nil

(a)(ii) Nil

ENTITIES:

NEMISA, Broadband Infraco, Film and Publication Board, ICASA, Post Bank, ZADNA,

(a)(i) Nil

(a)(ii) Nil

South African Post Office (SAPO)

(a)(i) One incident of alleged corruption in relation to IT Software procurement was referred to South African Police Service

(a)(ii) No incident was reported to National Prosecuting Authority

(b) SA Police Service: 05 July 2017

(c)(i) The case is still under SA Police Service investigation.

(c)(ii) SA Police Service: Lyttleton CAS 200/07/2017

(d) There are no prosecutions as yet. The case is still being investigated by the SA Police Service.

South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC)

(a)(i) one (1) case was referred to the SA Police Service

(a)(ii) No incident was reported to National Prosecuting Authority

(b) Brixton SAPS Case 341/11/2019, the case was transferred to the Camps Bay SAPS jurisdiction where the crime was committed on 12/12/2019, Case 69/11/2019

(c)(i) The case is still under investigation.

(c)(ii) Case 69/11/2019

(d) One (1) Case

SENTECH

There is one case referred to the SAPS in April 2020, the case is still ongoing and the Station is Honeydew. The case number is CAS 456/04/2020, the matter to be referred to the National Prosecuting Authority by SAPS for decision.

State Information Technology Agency SOC (Ltd) (SITA)

(a)(i) 2017/2018: eight (8) case investigations were referred to the SAPS

2018/2019: one (1) case investigation was referred to the SAPS

2019/2020: one (1) case investigation was referred to the SAPS

2020/2021: one (1) case in progress

A total of ten (10) cases were reported to SAPS

(a)(ii) No case was referred to the National Prosecuting Authority.

(b) Date upon which case handed over

(c)(i) status of each specified investigation

(ii) docket number for each investigation

(d) total number of cases that are being prosecuted

August 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 408/8/2017

No cases are currently being prosecuted

September 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 318/9/2017

 

August 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 359/8/2017

 

June 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 22/6/2017

 

October 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 258/10/2017

 

May 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 146/5/2017

 

September 2017

Unable to contact Investigation Officer to be determined

Pietermaritzburg Cas 748/9/2017

 

October 2017

Unable to contact Investigation Officer to be determined

Brooklyn Cas 232/10/2017

 

May 2017

Under Investigation

Sunnyside Cas 334/5/2018

 

December 2017

Under Investigation

DPCI H/O Enquiry no. 1/12/2019

 

Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA)_

1. (a) Total number of total number of investigations that were referred to the:

(i) SA Police Services

(ii) National Prosecuting Authority

Date of which each specified case was handed over

Status of each specified investigation

Docket number of each investigation

Total number of cases that are being prosecuted

USAASA is not aware of any being reported to the SAPS.

One (1)

The proclamation was dated March 2014

SIU report was dated 16 April 2018

USAASA does not have this information

USAASA is not aware of any.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

24 December 2020 - NW2871

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of housing megaprojects does the Department of Human Settlements have in partnership with black-owned property developers and (b)(i) is the total value of each specified housing project and (ii) in which provinces are the housing projects located?

Reply:

Honourable Member, please note that the National Department of Human Settlements does not contract developers. The appointment of contractors are done by provinces, municipalities and entities reporting to the Department. The National Department of Human Settlements is in the process of collating this data and it will be verified before publication.

The Honourable Member will be well aware that as part of transforming the construction sector, the Department of human Settlements through the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) and Urban Settlement Development Grants (USDG) has set aside 30% of the projects to be allocated to women-owned business entities and 10% to youth-owned businesses, which is being implemented by all Provinces and Metros.

We are proud to mention that the Limpopo Province and Ekurhuleni Municipality have already achieved their 30% target in this financial year. This means that they are likely to achieve the Presidential directive of 40% this year. 

I have requested my Department to work with Treasury on ring-fencing these targets to allow us to monitor our performance better.  Our entities have also aligned their procurement targets with sector charters. These targets are reflected in the annual plans and annual reports of the entities. 

24 December 2020 - NW2601

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entities reporting to her sponsored any non-governmental organisations in the past two financial years; if not, what is the position in this regards; if so, for each specified organisation, what (i) was the monetary value of each sponsorship and (ii) were the reasons behind the awarding of the specified sponsorship?

Reply:

I was advised by the Department and Entities as follows:

1. (a)   No, the department did not sponsor any non-governmental organisation in the past two financial years.

    1. Nil
    2. Not Applicable

(b) Entities:

The Postbank, South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), Broadband Infraco (BBI), Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA), State Information Technology Agency (SITA), Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), Nemisa and South African Post Office (SAPO) did not sponsor any non-governmental organisation in the past two financial years.

Entity

Name of NGO

(i)Monetary Value

(ii)Reasons behind awarding

Film and Publication Board (FPB)

WebRangers Cyber Safety Project

2018/19:

R 346 166

 

The project is aligned with the Film and Publication Board’s mandate to protect the public, and especially children, from exposure to harmful content. The WebRangers project aims to create a cadre of cyber safety leaders and ambassadors amongst the youth of South Africa that are empowered on safe usage of the digital space. These youth leaders are equipped and developed during the year-long programme to bring the message of cyber security and cyber safety into their communities through peer-to-peer education. The project runs in 4 Provinces (Gauteng; Western Cape; North West and Limpopo).

 

2019/20

R 395 000

 

zaDNA

iWeek

2018/19 and

2019/20

R 49 205.87

To enable ZADNA to market its services to the core internet audience (stakeholders) in South Africa.

Sentech

2018/19

Itlotleng Early Learning Centre and

Sithandiwe Disabled Care Centre

Kutlwanong Centre for Maths, Science and Technology

2019/20

1. Makana Rape Survivors Support Group

2. Cuddles and Care ECD Centre)

R 235 000

R 3 000 000

R 470 000

Charity Golf Day (Funds were raised externally and divided between the two beneficiaries).

Maths and Science Centre - CSI Project

Charity Golf Day (Funds were raised externally and divided between two beneficiaries each awarded R 235 000).

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

24 December 2020 - NW2521

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that on 11 April 2019, less than a month before the 2019 national elections, the President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr M C Ramaphosa, allegedly promised the people of Alexandra in Gauteng one million houses, (a) by what date does she envisage the building project of the one million houses will be completed, (b) is there enough land to accommodate the specified houses and (c) what total amount has she budgeted for the specified project?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the President of the Republic promised the residents of Alexandra proper and decent houses. My department, together with the Housing Development Agency are working with the Department of Human Settlements in Gauteng to realise this within available resources. More than 594 hectares of land has been identified and assembled for human settlements development within the Greater Alexandra Priority Human Settlements Housing Development Area. A preliminary allocation of R56 000 000 has been made for the planning process and the first units.

24 December 2020 - NW2157

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether there have been any delays with payments of the Covid-19 Relieve Fund Voucher; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the progress made to date in payments, (b) is the total number of small-scale farmers who had their vouchers redeemed, (c) is the total amount paid since the end of July 2020, (d) are the reasons for any delays in payments, (e) plans does her department have to address the delays including timelines for each action and (f) steps has her department taken to support the current production input costs requirement while recipients wait?

Reply:

Yes.

a) R519 926 531 paid to date.

b) The Department is unable to determine the number of farmers who redeemed their vouchers as one farmer might have several vouchers but not redeem them all at once.

c) R482 930 327 paid as at end of July 2020.

d) Delays are mainly attributable to the process of reconciliation of each voucher and validating that the right person has redeemed the voucher.

e) Capacity for performing verification and reconciliation of invoices and supplier statements has been enhanced within the Department. Daily reconciliation is done with all invoices submitted.

f) The Department has extended the voucher validity period from 30 September 2020 to 31 December 2020 in order to afford suppliers an opportunity to replenish their stock levels as well as to afford farmers enough time to redeem their vouchers.

24 December 2020 - NW2941

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Communications

What was the total number of branches of the SA Post Office in each year from 2015 to 2020 (a) nationally and (b) in each province?

Reply:

I have been advised by the South African Post Office (SAPO) as follows:

(a) and (b)

Provinces

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

CURRENT

(from April 2020)

Eastern Cape

354

342

326

323

319

311

Free State

158

153

140

140

139

136

Gauteng

364

354

350

343

328

309

KwaZulu-Natal

329

320

310

310

307

277

Limpopo

326

324

260

259

259

255

Mpumalanga

192

194

206

207

207

205

Northern Cape

142

134

130

130

130

130

North West

262

247

209

209

207

206

Western Cape

321

300

288

288

284

279

Total

2 448

2 368

2 209

2 209

2 180

2 108

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

24 December 2020 - NW2520

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether, since she had announced her department’s plan to release state-owned farms to aspirant farmers, her department conducted an audit of all the specified farms to ascertain the details of the (a) current occupiers, (b) rights of holders and informal rights holders and (c)(i) value and (ii) current use of any infrastructure on farms; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) Whether her department has made any projections regarding support to aspirant farmers; if not, why not; if so, will the support be quantified?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department conducted the assessment of the land in question to determine the state of occupation, immediately identifiable encumbrances and suitability for cultivation or grazing. It is through this work that about 300 000 hectares were identified for restitution, leaving about 700 000 hectares for release. This study further revealed that some pieces of land had occupiers, but the circumstances under which they had obtained possession of the land were not immediately ascertainable hence an enquiry would be necessary to establish, amongst other things, how they accessed the said land

(a),(b),(c)(i),(ii) Falls away.

2. Yes. Assessments and verification of the farms has been conducted by a team of engineers and other crop and livestock specialists. The aim is to assess the farms’ conditions in terms of infrastructure and input requirements. The analysis will be used to provide support in the form of start-up packages in accordance with available resources and in terms of each property’s needs. Support will be guided by the norms and standards for specified infrastructure on these farms. Training for successful beneficiaries is being prioritized and this will involve a skills audit which will be conducted, followed by relevant training. The Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) is geared to support the settled beneficiaries. There are 2 450 Extension Practitioners available in all Districts to support the settled beneficiaries with technological transfer of the latest agricultural production practices.

23 December 2020 - NW2378

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, in view of the Free State asbestos roofing scandal (details furnished) and the arrests relating to it, and given that residents in the Free State continue to be exposed to asbestos and that long-term consequences may result in fatal health complications, her department alongside its provincial structures informed affected households about potential health effects resulting from long-term exposure; if so, what total number of residents have been reached and informed thus far; (2) whether her department has statistical data on the total number of (a) households and (b) residents who are experiencing health complications from long-term exposure to asbestos; if so, what (i) are the findings from the statistical data and (ii) assistance is being given to those persons affected by long-term exposure?

Reply:

1. The Department acknowledges that studies reveal that there are health effects of asbestos which are directly related to the condition of the asbestos-containing material. These studies further highlight that asbestos is dangerous when the material is broken thus increasing the amount of fibres that can be emitted from asbestos products. Whilst the need to inform the affected households exist, Section 3 of the Housing Act of 1997 differentiates the responsibility of the national and provincial government in respect of housing development. Therefore, the responsibility of developing houses and its related beneficiary administration processes rests with the provincial government.

Notwithstanding the above, I will ensure that the relevant MECs table reports on this matter at our MINMEC meetings where issues of concurrent functions are discussed. Further, it should be noted that the use of asbestos is against the norms and standards of the Department and it is also a violation of the existing government regulations, the regulation on the Prohibition of the Use, Manufacturing, Import and Export of Asbestos and Asbestos Containing Materials forms part of the Environment Conservation Act of 1989).

2. The department does not have the latest statistical data on the total number of households and residents that are experiencing health complications from long-term asbestos exposure. However, what the Honourable Member is raising is part of the joint work we are doing with the Departments of Environmental Affairs (the convenor) and Public Works and Infrastructure.

23 December 2020 - NW2844

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total amount did the Government spend on food parcels from 1 March 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) are the details of each (i) supplier and (ii) price of each contract in each province?

Reply:

The total amount spent on food parcels was R176 807 844. The details per province is provided below:

1. KwaZulu Natal Region

a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in KwaZulu-Natal spent R27 510 529.13 on food parcels.

b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in KZN:

(i) Name of Suppliers:

  • KTZ Trading Enterprise
  • Uzimatu J Events and Communication
  • Bendalo Holdings
  • Full Stop Logistics
  • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd

(ii) Price of each contract

  • KTZ Trading Enterprise was awarded 5751 food parcels at a total price of R7 013 429.13
  • Uzimatu J Events and Communication was awarded 5781 food parcels at a total price of R6 937 200.00
  • Bendalo Holdings was awarded 5636 food parcels at a total price of R6 763 200.00
  • Full Stop Logistics was awarded 1575 food parcels at a total price of R1 890 000.00
  • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd was awarded 4089 food parcels at a total price of R4 906 800.00

REPLY: 2. Northern Cape Region

a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Northern Cape spent R13 906 445.71 on food parcels.

b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in NC:

(i) Names of Suppliers:

    • Mandlakomoya Trading and Projects
    • Mamonyai Consulting
    • Bompembe Trading
    • Matiko
    • Mortar Board Trading Solutions

(ii) Price of each contract

- Mandlakomoya Trading and Projects was awarded 1683 food parcels at a total price of R2 041 345.94

- Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 2 582 food parcels at a total price of R2 994 076.25

- Bopembe Trading was awarded 3 084 food parcels at a total price of R3 865 032.38

- Matiko Holdings was awarded 2 601 food parcels at a total price of R3 164 634.36

- Mortar Board Trading Solutions was awarded 1 512 food parcels at a total price of R1 841 356.78

REPLY: 3. Eastern Cape Region

a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Eastern Cape Region spent R 47 295 882.62 on food parcels.

b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in the Eastern Cape

(i) Names of Suppliers:

  • Bendalo Holdings
  • Kwasa Food Supplies

(ii)) Price of each contract

  • Bendalo Holdings was awarded 20 560 food parcels at a total price of R 24 784 936.69
  • Kwasa Food Supplies was awarded 18 703 food parcels at a total price of R 22 510 945.93

REPLY: 4. Mpumalanga Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Mpumalanga spent R6 546 600.00 on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in Mpumalanga:
  1. Name of Suppliers:
  • Machaka Harvest Enterprises
  • M2R Events Management
  • Molanco Trading Enterprises
  • Mandlakomoya Trading and Projects

(ii) Price of each contract

  • M2R Events Management 57 (PTY) LTD was awarded 1 505 food parcels at a total price of R1 757 100.00
  • Machaka Harvest Enterprise (PTY) LTD was awarded 1 535 food parcels at a total price of R1 816 800.00
  • Molanco Trading Enterprise (Pty)Ltd was awarded 1 013 food parcels at a total price of R1 196 400.00
  • Mandlakomoya Trading and projects was awarded 1 485 food parcels at a total price of R1 776 300.00

REPLY: 5 North West Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in North West spent R 6 359 392.45 on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in Mpumalanga:

(i) The details of each are:

  • Kokumo Holdings
  • Malakhiwe Akohlulwa Onwabo(Pty) Ltd,
  • Mamonyai Consulting
  • Mortarboard Trading Solutions
  • Ntlhaku Traders
  • Sweet Buss (Pty) Ltd

(ii) Price of each contract

  • Kokumo Holdings was awarded 1 044 food parcels at a total price of R 1 251 400.00
  • Malakhiwe Akohlulwa Onwabo (Pty)Ltd was awarded 6 711 food parcels at a total price of R 808 724.70
  • Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 1 262 food parcels at a total price of R 1 514 400.00
  • Mortarboard Trading Solutions was awarded 572 food parcels at a total price of R 686 400.00
  • Ntlhaku Traders was awarded 775 food parcels at a total price of R 795 400.00

REPLY: 6 Free State Region

The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Free State spent R13,286,994.16 on food parcels.

  1. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in FS:

(i) Name of each Suppliers:

  • Imvusa Trading 509 cc
  • Mamonyai Consulting
  • Soft Touch Tours and projects
  • Thengokhulu Investment Group holdings
  • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd

(ii) Price of each contract

    • Imvusa Trading 509 cc was awarded 1708 food parcels at a total price of R2,098,237.50
    • Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 1667 food parcels at a total price of R2,012,926.40
    • Soft Touch Tours and projects was awarded 1945 food parcels at a total price of R2,334,000.00
    • Thengokhulu Investment Group holdings was awarded 1904 food parcels at a total price of R2,302,362.00
    • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd was awarded 1896 food parcels at a total price of R2,306,036.26

REPLY: 7. Limpopo Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Limpopo Region spent R35 112 000.00  on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in LP:
  3. Name of Suppliers:-
  • DMB Leisure Solutions
  • Mamonyai Consulting
  • Kitso Projects and event management
  • Mamoratwa Enterprice,Book shop,catering and Social Consultancy

(ii) Price of each contract

  • DMB Leisure Solutions was awarded 8000 food parcels at a total price of R9 600 000.00
  • Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 7050 food parcels at a total price of R8 472 000.00
  • Kitso Projects and event management was awarded 6200 food parcels at a total price of R7 440 000.00
  • Mamoratwa Enterprice,Book shop,catering and Social Consultency was awarded 8000 food parcels at a total price of R9 600 000.00

REPLY: 8 Gauteng Region

(a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Gauteng spent R14 708 400.00 on food parcels.

(b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in Gauteng:

(i) Name of Suppliers:-

  • Kualah Investments
  • Nakapedi Investments (PTY) LTD
  • Ramafoko Cleaning & Projects CC
  • M2R Events Management 57 (PTY) LTD
  1. Price of each contract
    • Kualah Investments was awarded 2 988 food parcels at a total price of R3 585 600.00
    • Nakapedi Investments (PTY) LTD was awarded 2 972 food parcels at a total price of R3 566 400.00
    • Ramafoko Cleaning & Projects CC was awarded 3 291 food parcels at a total price of R3 949 200.00
    • M2R Events Management 57 (PTY) LTD was awarded 3 006 food parcels at a total price of R3 607 200.00

REPLY: 9 Western Cape Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Western Cape spent R12 081 600 on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in WC:
  3. Name of Suppliers:-
  • Ithemba Labantu
  • Ciaca Primary Coorp
  • Bendalo Holdings
  • Mandlakamoya trading

(ii) Price of each contract

  • Ithemba Labantu was awarded 2697 food parcels at a total price of R3 236 400.00
  • Ciaca Primary Coorp was awarded 2458 food parcels at a total price of R2 949 600.00
  • Bendalo Holdings was awarded 2414 food parcels at a total price of R2 896 800.00
  • Mandlakamoya Trading was awarded 2499 food parcels at a total price of R2 998 800.00

23 December 2020 - NW1981

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) listed on the published grant beneficiary list of the National Lotteries Commission for the (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2018-19 financial years and (c) Covid-19 Relief Projects by the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition, Mr E Patel, on 27 July 2020, (i) which of the listed CSOs had nonprofit organisation (NPO) and/or nonprofit company (NPC) registration numbers at the time of receiving the grant, (ii) on what dates did the CSOs receive their first NPO and/or NPC registration numbers and (iii) what is their current NPO and/or NPC registration status?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development would not be in a position to have access of the list of the funded NPOs from Lotteries Commission.

However; in order to provide the requested information; the Department must be furnished with the information of grants paid out by Lotteries Commission.

Only on receipt of the list of beneficiaries from Lotteries Commission; the Department of Social Development will only be able to provide information about the NPOs that are registered in terms of NPO Act.

23 December 2020 - NW68

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) type of performance and/or incentive bonuses exist in her department excluding the 13th cheque and (b) amount was budgeted for these performance and/or incentive bonuses in the (i) 2017-18, (ii) 2018-19 and (iii) 2019-20 financial years?

Reply:

a) The Public Service Regulations (PSR), 2016, provides for the Head of Department to establish a financial incentive scheme for employees or any category of those employees.

The Department of Defence pays a Performance Bonus in terms of its Performance Management and Development System (PMDS). The Performance Bonus is a financial reward granted to eligible officials in recognition of performance that is significantly above expectations provided that the official completes a continuous period of at least twelve months in his/her salary level on 31 March of a specific year.

(b) The amounts budgeted are indicated in the table below:

FY2017/18

FY2018/19

FY 2019/20

     

Budget Vote

Expenditure

Budget Vote

Expenditure

Budget Vote

Expenditure

R355,996,901

R191,601,890

R277,289,665

R200,571,892

R289,517,939

R224,545,442

23 December 2020 - NW2786

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

In view of the fact that one of the conditions attached to the child support grant (CSG) is that the recipient must be enrolled in and attend school, (a) how are the current conditions of the CSG being (i) enforced and (ii) applied and (b) what recourse and/or intervention is taken when a CSG recipient is not enrolled in, nor attends school regularly?

Reply:

In terms of Regulation 6(5)(a) to the Social Assistance Act, a primary care giver applying for a child support grant for a child aged between 7 and 18 years, has the responsibility to ensure that the child is enrolled at and attends school.

Regulation 6(5)(d) requires the National Department of Social Development to notify the Department of Education, if it is aware that any child benefitting from a child support grant does not attend school, and the Department of Education has a responsibility to take steps to ensure that the child does attend school.

a) Currently, when an application is taken for a child support grant, the primary care giver is requested to provide proof that the child is enrolled at school. This is in the form of a report card or a letter from the school. If the applicant does not have the required letter, the application is still taken and processed but the letter of award, if the grant is approved, requires the care giver to submit the required proof within a period of 6 months.

b) There is no provision in the Social Assistance Act or Regulations to suspend payment of the grant if the confirmation of school attendance is not provided. This is considered a “soft” condition, as there are no consequences for failure to meet the requirement. There is therefore no enforcement of this particular provision.

National Assembly Written Reply: 2786 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

Possible follow up questions from the ANC:

Question

What is the current position regarding school attendance by children in South Africa?

Response

School attendance, particularly for children younger than 16 years of age is relatively high. Generally, where children are not attending school, it is because there is no school available within their vicinity. The challenge with school attendance is generally with children older than 16 years, where attendance is not compulsory.

Question

Is there any incentive for care givers to keep their children in education?

Response

The Department of Social Development, working together with SASSA, has signed an agreement with the Departments of Basic and Higher Education to identify all children who benefit from social grants, to ensure that they are the first priority for funding from NSFAS for their further education and training. This project has yielded very positive results, with some of our grant beneficiaries doing extremely well in both the matric examinations as well as in the higher education environment.

It is believed that this is the first step towards breaking the cycle of poverty – through education, children who benefitted from grants are able to compete on an equal footing with their more privileged peers.

Possible questions from the opposition

Why is the requirement in legislation if it is not enforced?

Reply

The inclusion of school attendance in the Social Assistance Act was to raise the profile of the importance of school attendance in ensuring that all care givers are aware of the importance of creating a solid foundation for children. The linking of child support grant beneficiaries to NSFAS funding is a further incentive for care givers to keep children in school, and then to get financial support for their further education and training.

Despite the obligations which are placed on the Department of Education, this cannot be managed through the Social Assistance Act, 2004.

23 December 2020 - NW3088

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Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number of persons who fall under the category of (a) pensioners, (b) child-headed households, (c) child support grants and (d) COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress grant recipients in Johannesburg, Gauteng relied on social grants during the period 27 March 2020 until 27 October 2020?

Reply:

The table below shows the number of social grants paid in Johannesburg during the period March to October 2020 to;

a) Pensioners who receive the Old Age Grant or War Veterans Grant.

b) NB: SASSA does not have information on child headed households.

c) Child Support Grant

 

 

Number of Grants in Johannesburg in 2020

 

 

 

 

Grant type

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

     

Care Dependency Grant

6,890

6,870

6,978

6,966

6,940

6,927

6,914

6,941

     

Child Support Grant

580,369

579,904

577,837

580,131

581,204

582,846

584,342

586,613

     

Disability Grant

34,570

34,365

35,678

35,563

34,270

35,089

34,899

35,008

     

Foster Care Grant

8,488

8,461

8,582

8,841

8,998

9,250

9,341

9,451

     

Grant-In-Aid

2,043

2,026

2,014

2,005

1,964

1,954

1,944

1,940

     

Old Age Grant

190,373

189,733

191,317

192,864

192,002

192,374

193,144

193,884

     

War Veteran’s Grant

7

7

7

7

5

4

4

4

     

Total

822,740

821,366

822,413

826,377

825,383

828,444

830,588

833,841

     

Please note that information on all the other types social of grants paid during the period in question has also been included in the table.

d) The table below shows the number of COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress grant recipients in Johannesburg and Gauteng during the period May 2020 until October 2020. Please note that only 7% of the Covid SRD recipients provided information on the districts in which they reside. Thus the information on the entire Gauteng Covid SRD grant recipients has also been provided. Also note that no Covid SRD grant payments were made in March and April 2020.

Table: Covid SRD grant recipients in Gauteng from May to October 2020

2020

May

June

July

August

September

October

Gauteng

961157

1088058

1180741

1253453

1261494

1270938

Johannesburg

27337

32189

35821

39169

40120

41127

22 December 2020 - NW2686

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

In view of recent reports of hospital administrators being investigated and/or suspended following misconduct and deteriorating security conditions in their hospitals leading to alarming cases of violence and rape between patients, what (a) total number of hospital administrators are currently under investigation leading to temporarily suspension throughout the Republic in the past five years, (b) are the names of the specified (i) hospital administrators and (ii) the respective hospitals and (c) is the nature of the specified investigations?

Reply:

According to the Provincial Departments of Health, the responses to these questions are as follows:

1. Eastern Cape

The Eastern Cape Department of Health does not have a hospital administrator (CEO) that is currently under investigation leading to temporal suspension. In 2018, the CEO of Livingstone Hospital was suspended and subsequently resigned and left the service. He was on a precautionary suspension and investigated on allegations of fraud and corruption.

2. Free State

NAME OF EMPLOYEE

RACE

SALARY LEVEL

GENDER

NAME OF THE INSTITUTION

DATE OF THE SUSPENSION

DATE SUSPENSION LIFTED

REASON FOR SUSPENSION

TYPE OF TRANS-GRESSION

REASON FOR DELAY / FINALISATION

HIGHLIGHTS / CHALLENGES OR TRENDS

Noge SR

A

7

F

Bongani Regional Hospital

27 March 2019

10 May 2019

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Charge sheet is complete the role players to be appointed

N/A

Tau LW

A

11

M

Bongani Regional Hospital

27 March 2019

10 May 2019

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Charge sheet is complete the role players to be appointed

N/A

Mfanta X

A

12

M

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

27 April 2019

23 October 2019

Misconduct

Sexual Harassment and Irregular Expenditure

The case was set down for the first time on the 27th November 2020.

N/A

NAME OF EMPLOYEE

RACE

SALARY LEVEL

GENDER

NAME OF THE INSTITUTION

DATE OF THE SUSPENSION

DATE SUSPENSION LIFTED

REASON FOR SUSPENSION

TYPE OF TRANS-GRESSION

REASON FOR DELAY/

FINALISATION

HIGHLIGHTS/

CHALLENGES OR TRENDS

Kgaile P.I

A

11

M

Mangaung Metro

20 May 2019

30 August 2019

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Investigations has been Finalized and the charge sheet is still being Formulated

N/A

Christou A

W

10

F

Mangaung Metro

30 May 2020

30 August 2020

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Investigations has been Finalized and the charge sheet is still being Formulated

 

Ramodula BS

A

14

F

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

31 March 2020

29 May 2020

Misconduct

Failure to put measures in place for management of COVID-19 ward

Case Finalized and Final Written Warning issued on the 29 May 2020.

N/A

Molefe M

A

11

F

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

31 March 2020

29 May 2020

Misconduct

Failure to put measures in place for management of COVID-19 ward

Case Finalized and Final Written Warning issued on the 29 May 2020. The appeal of the Final Written Warning was upheld.

N/A

Seboko JM

A

13

F

Free State Psychiatric Hospital

16 May 2019

19 July 2019

Misconduct

Gross negligence

Waiting for the Investigations to be finalized.

N/A

Marefeka MJ

A

12

F

Free State Psychiatric Hospital

16 May 2019

19 July 2019

Misconduct

Gross negligence

Waiting for the Investigations to be finalized.

N/A

Moshao IN

A

11

F

Free State Psychiatric Hospital

16 May 2019

19 July 2019

Misconduct

Gross negligence

Waiting for the Investigations to be finalized.

N/A

3. Gauteng

INSTITUTION

FINANCIAL YEAR

DATE OF THE INCIDENT

SURNAME & INTIALS

JOB TITLE

SALARY LEVEL

RACE

GENDER

TYPE OF MISCONDUCT

SANCTION

STATUS

Dr Yusuf Dadoo

2018/2019

19/02/2018

Maanwane KM

Session Doctor

Session

African

male

Rape

contract expired

Closed- the perpetrator left the Department

4. Kwa-Zulu Natal

There are no investigations that are currently being conducted on hospital administrators for alleged maladministration.

5. Limpopo

There are no investigations that are currently being conducted on hospital administrators for alleged maladministration.

6. Mpumalanga

  1. The Mpumalanga Department of Health has not experienced any case of violence and or rape between patients and therefore, there are no Hospital administrators who are being investigated or temporarily suspended regarding this matter.
  2. As stated in paragraph (a) above, none of the Hospital Administrators are under investigation nor suspended, therefore there are no investigators taking place for the past five years up to the current financial year.

7. North West

 

The North West Department of Health does not have such cases. The only CEO currently under investigation and on suspension has not relationship whatsoever with security concerns, violence and/or rape.

8. Northern Cape

The Northern Cape Department of Health does not have CEOs that are currently suspended from the hospitals for any of the allegations as contained in this question.

9. Western Cape

The Western Cape Department of Health does not have such cases for the last five years neither do we have current or pending cases.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW3067

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether the appointment of a certain person (name furnished, Advocate Terry Motau) to investigate fraud and corruption in the water boards and in her department is not a duplication of the investigation done by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has her department taken to implement the recommendations of the SIU investigations?

Reply:

No, there is no duplication. The Terms of Reference for the person referred to by the Honourable Member are specific and indicate that those cases investigated by the SIU will not be included in his scope of work.

A joint media statement was issued by the Department of Water and Sanitation and the Special Investigation Unit (SIU) on 26 November 2020. It highlighted all the work that the Department and the SIU are doing related to the fight against fraud and corruption as well as the outcomes of some of the investigations.

The joint statement referred to above is attached for the Honourable Member’s ease of reference.

22 December 2020 - NW2979

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Dlomo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What strides has his department made with the Public Health Infrastructure Refurbishment Programme which was one of the key focus areas for his department as part of implementing the pillars of the Presidential Health Compact; (2) whether the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted or assisted to accelerate the specified programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The approved Health Compact raised a pillar that required the execution of an infrastructure plan to ensure “adequate, appropriately distributed and well maintained” health facilities. The Public Health Infrastructure Refurbishment Programme identified as the vehicle to do so and executed within the legislative framework of government facilities. This framework guides the maintenance of government faculties that includes health facilities and infrastructure as guided by strategies and guidelines driven from the national department of public works as the mandated department for all public properties in the country.

The National Department of Health (NDOH), together with National Treasury (NT) implemented a system which requires Provincial Departments to develop and submit what is called an User Asset Management Plan (U-AMP). This plan details the condition of each health infrastructure asset per province and their equipment. From the U-AMP, provinces are required to draw a three-year priority plan called an Infrastructure Programme Management Plan (IPMP). This is the plans that are submitted to the Implementing Agents (i.e. Public Works, Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) etc.), who should provide the Provincial Health Departments with an Infrastructure Project Implementation Plan (IPIP). The IPIP indicate the readiness of the Implementing Agents to execute the projects listed and all of these plans are submitted to NDOH and NT for review and approval.

Provinces are allocated three-year Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budget based on the needs identified and the money available and required to adjust their plan to fit within the approved budget. These adjusted plans are presented to Provincial Executive Committee (EXCO) for endorsement and implementation.

From a systems perspective thus, strides have been made to ensure that the programme is well executed and prioritised facilities where refurbishment is most needed. In addition to this, the National Department in partnership with the various Provincial Health departments and supported by DBSA, initiated not only the development of a Health Maintenance Strategy, but also appointed contractors to develop a 10-year Infrastructure Plan.

The Maintenance strategy developed under the aegis of the Department of Health, seeks to establish a consolidated maintenance management approach, that is specific to health infrastructure and includes the specialist field of health technology equipment that is vital for the effective and efficient health services across the country. On the other hand, the 10-year infrastructure plan aims to provide a development window to ensure that the distribution and planning of infrastructure refurbishments are in alignment with the needs of the provinces as identified through the various communities they serve.

2. COVID-19 has elevated the need for properly maintained and adequate health facilities and have thus contributed towards a reprioritisation of projects in order to facilitate the curbing of the spread. Towards this end the various maintenance projects related to oxygen and ICU wards were brought forward and expedited.

In the Eastern Cape for example eighty-five (85) contract awards, amounting to R578,902,253 million have been made to contractors for refurbishment of 67 Health Facilities across the province for COVID-19 purposes. Of these 85 projects, forty-eight (48) have now been completed at a total cost of R123,809,915.06 and have yielded 1259 Covid-19 isolation beds. A total of thirty-seven (37) projects are currently at advanced stages of construction within the province with a combined cost of R466,618,721.25. Upon completion, these projects will yield a total of 1179 Covid-19 isolation beds. The total cumulative expenditure to date on the 85 projects is R248,507,116.

For the primary health care facilities in terms of clinics and community health centres, various movable units were targeted for space augmentation to improve service delivery as part of the COVID-19 Treatment Surge and Resurgence. Post COVID-19 the units will be utilized for the HIV Treatment Surge in line with the project identified during the 2018/19 financial year under the auspices of the PEPFAR Facility Infrastructure Improvement Project.

In the hospitals, these units will be used to complement the screening and testing spaces needed during this COVID-19 Surge and Resurgence. Post COVID-19, the units will be mainly utilized for records storage. Currently patient files and general records are highly paper driven resulting in volumes of files that need to be appropriately kept for ease of retrieval and maintenance.

In Gauteng a Rapid intervention programme was launched to assess 32 hotspot facilities in the province to increase its COVID-19 surge capacity. This included the provision of P1, P2 and P3 level care related to administration of oxygen, especially high flow oxygen, provision of beds in terms of high and critical care beds and to identify problems in dealing with capacitation at these sites. As a result of these assessments, various projects were identified and now in planning, procurement and implementation to facilitate the improvement and refurbishment of surge capacity at these priority facilities.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW3012

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What (i) criteria and (ii) scientific data are used to create the red list of high-risk countries from where persons are permitted to travel to the Republic, (b) on what date is the list updated and (c) what criteria determine that the list needs to be updated?

Reply:

a) (i) The model that South Africa used to determine the red list of high risk countries from where persons are permitted to travel to the Republic is based on a scientifically robust and tested approach that was benchmarked with other countries. The benchmarking process assisted the country to understand how best other countries are implementing interventions to enable proactive risk categorisation processes. The model and the criteria applied were based on globally accepted standards taking into consideration the guidelines as set by the World Health Organisation.

(ii) Several criteria and scientific data are utilised to design, develop and refine the RSA risk categorization model. The primary considerations include the following:

(1) the number of new cases per 100,000 persons over 14 days;

(2) the number of new deaths per 100,000 persons over 14 days; and

(3) the total number of accumulated cases in the given country since the first case.

Furthermore, the model also considers sensitivity analyses to assess the tolerance level rate to the RSA baseline. Other parameters such as testing data and active cases are considered. However, due to the absence of sufficiently updated data across different countries, it was recommended that these factors are not significantly relied upon. Based on all these factors, countries were classified according to three distinct categories: “Low Risk”, “Similar Risk” and “High Risk”. The “High Risk” category is what is used to create the red list of high risk countries.

b) The list was updated fortnightly, that is, every 14 days. Given the nature of the pandemic and the evolving data dynamics in every country, the model that was utilised could not be static as the baseline was expected to change over time. The considerations include the 10% tolerance level on the South African baseline which are used to compare against other countries. Countries with an estimated baseline of +/-10% to South Africa were considered “Similar Risk”; those with a score that was higher than the baseline + 10% were classified as “High Risk”; and all other countries with a population of less than 1 000 000 people were classified as low risk (or ignored). All countries in Africa were classified as low risk (or their high scores are ignored).

c) Taking into account recent global developments and trends, the Cabinet resolved that the strategy of using the red list of high-risk countries should be changed and instead use the 72 hour PCR test and the screening of incoming passengers to determine if they should be allowed into the country.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW3015

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to a certain person (name furnished) who was appointed by his department, (a) what number of hours did the specified person work in the six months, (b) what was the total amount paid to the person in terms of the contract, (c) what other amounts, over and above the hourly rate, were paid to the person and (d) what legislative processes were followed in terms of the appointment of the specified person?

Reply:

a) 946 hours over 6-month period.

b) R1,740,632.26 over 6-month period.

c) R13,234.26 as reimbursement for use of private vehicle to and from the airport at a rate of R3,61 per km over a 6-month period.

d) A departmental tender (NDoH20/2019/2020) was awarded to the supplier.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2722

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all advisory committees and/or advisory bodies reporting to (a) her, (b) any structure, (c) employee, and/or (d) entity of the national departments of (i) Human Settlements and (ii) Water and Sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date; (2) what is the (a) name and (b) highest qualification of each person serving in such advisory committee and/or advisory body; (3) what are the details of the legislative prescripts which empower the establishment and functioning of each advisory committee and/or advisory body; (4) what are the details of the remuneration and bonuses paid to each member in each week, month and year?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is referred to the reply I provided to her question, number 657. Further, there are no bonuses payable to the members of the Advisory Panel in the Department of Human Settlements and the Advisory Committees in the Department of Water and Sanitation.

22 December 2020 - NW2978

Profile picture: Dlomo, Mr S

Dlomo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Health

In view of the recent report by the Minister of Police, Mr B H Cele, wherein he stated that the highest number of rape cases are in the areas of Inanda and Umlazi and that rape is usually associated with violence and the killing of women and children, what full, detailed information can his department provide for the period 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2020 from four forensic pathology services mortuaries (names and details furnished) with regard to the (a) total number of (i) women, (ii) men and (iii) children admitted, (b) breakdown of the specified women, men and children according to race, (c) total number of (i) women and (ii) men admitted with gunshot wounds, (d) total number of victims admitted with (i) stab wounds and (ii) soft tissue injuries suggestive of trauma inflicted and (e) total number of victims of motor vehicle accidents?

Reply:

According to the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Health, the following tables reflects the details in this regard:

(a)

Mortuary

number of (i) women admitted

number of (ii) men admitted

number of (iii) children admitted

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-June 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-June 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-June 2020

(i) Pinetown,

263

94

1 148

542

134

45

(ii) Gale Street,

452

74

1 872

340

129

36

(iii) Phoenix,

256

159

1 265

652

121

70

(iv) Park Rynie

92

34

426

196

41

9

(b)

Mortuary

number of (i) women admitted

 

African

Asian

Coloured

White

Other

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

221

70

23

10

3

2

16

11

0

1

(ii) Gale Street,

338

55

41

8

20

2

31

4

22

5

(iii) Phoenix,

190

124

49

30

3

2

14

3

0

0

(iv) Park Rynie

89

30

2

2

0

0

1

2

0

0

Mortuary

number of (ii) men admitted

 

African

Asian

Coloured

White

Other

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

986

464

116

45

4

9

41

24

1

0

(ii) Gale Street,

1 563

292

135

25

65

8

93

15

16

0

(iii) Phoenix,

1 031

536

193

83

11

5

30

28

0

0

(iv) Park Rynie

403

189

9

4

0

0

14

3

0

0

Mortuary

number of (iii) children admitted

 

African

Asian

Coloured

White

Other

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

132

43

1

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

(ii) Gale Street,

120

35

8

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

(iii) Phoenix,

106

62

12

6

1

1

2

1

0

0

(iv) Park Rynie

35

9

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

(c)

Mortuary

number of (i) women admitted with gunshot wounds

number of (ii) men admitted with gunshot wounds

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

31

13

292

160

(ii) Gale Street,

42

3

391

82

(iii) Phoenix,

26

12

320

133

(iv) Park Rynie

9

2

76

65

(d)

Mortuary

total number of victims admitted with (i) stab wounds

total number of victims admitted with (ii) soft tissue injuries suggestive of trauma inflicted and

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

157

59

181

91

(ii) Gale Street,

282

33

223

73

(iii) Phoenix,

188

81

148

104

(iv) Park Rynie

68

24

69

44

(e)

Mortuary

total number of victims of motor vehicle accidents

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

232

67

(ii) Gale Street,

490

80

(iii) Phoenix,

280

136

(iv) Park Rynie

130

27

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2998

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to the 2019-20 Annual Report (details furnished) of his department wherein it is stated that R5 000 of registered irregular expenditure was for repairs to his DStv, he will provide the relevant information as to why his department is paying for the repairs to his DStv; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) who is the person and/or persons who authorised the payment of the repairs; (3) whether he is prepared to pay back the R5 000 paid to repair his DStv, and provide proof thereof; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the costs in question were incurred by Department, however it serves to be mentioned that the total cost of R 5000.00 was incurred by the Department as a result of Chapter 8 paragraphs 2.9 and 7 of the Guide for Members of the Executive that came into effect on the 20th of November 2019 which states that:

2.9 “Where a Member moves from a State-owned Residence to a Private Residence to be used for official purposes in the same seat of office, personal effects may be packed and transported at the expense of the relevant Department. This is a non-recurring concession and cannot be utilised more than once during the Member’s term of office”.

7. The relevant department shall be responsible for the costs of installation and maintenance of fax, internet/wifi facilities, computer equipment and relevant television subscription services for official use by the Member at the Official Residence

2. The service in question was initiated and sanctioned by the support staff in the Office of the Minister and it took place based on the call out fees and diagnostic services. Once the service provider has submitted the invoice, proper procedures will have to be undertaken through Supply Chain for the purpose of processing the payment. It also serves to be mention that services of this nature are not easy for three (3) quotations to be sourced due to the fact that a diagnosis to determine the nature of work to be done must be concluded prior to rendering a service. Sourcing three (3) quotations will require that three providers must go on site of which they will all charge a call out and diagnostic fees which may result to fruitless and wasteful expenditure, hence one (1) quotation was sourced.

3. Based on Chapter 8 paragraphs 2.9 and 7 of the Guide for Members of the Executive, the Minister is not liable for the cost but it for the account of the Department.

Lastly, this transaction has to be subjected to a determination process which includes an investigation to determine the cause, the impact of the transgression and who must be held accountable in terms of Irregular Expenditure Framework issued by National Treasury.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2981

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Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

As the Republic enters the holiday season, and with malaria being an important public health consideration, with the World Health Organisation predicting more deaths due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, what (a) impact has the COVID-19 pandemic had on programmes aimed at mitigating against the malaria epidemic, such as Indoor Residual Spraying, community testing and treatment and (b) plans and measures will his department put in place to mitigate against the malaria epidemic?

Reply:

a) Malaria is a seasonal disease, transmission increases during the summer months, and is exacerbated when there is higher rainfall. The COVID-19 pandemic started in March and peaked in July this year- when the malaria transmission period was waning.

There was a timely start of the Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) programme this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Spraying started as planned in September 2020 in each of the malaria-endemic provinces. As 18 November 2020, a total of 1,112,637 structures (624,365 structures in Limpopo; 410974 in Mpumalanga and 77298 in KwaZulu-Natal) have been sprayed of the targeted 2 059 979 structures for the 2020/2021 financial year. The current national spray coverage is 54% (51.94%, 54.29% and 76.53% in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KZN provinces respectively), noting that spraying will continue into the early part of the new year.

Community testing and treatment was adopted as part of the malaria elimination strategy for South Africa and cross-border collaboration with eight malaria eliminating countries (E8) that form the SADC Elimination 8 countries. It mostly targets the border districts to prevent secondary transmission from malaria cases imported from the high malaria-endemic countries bordering the Republic of South Africa. The screening process was slow with only a few cases reported during the initial days of the COVID-19 pandemic due to level 5 Lockdown and border closures when travel was limited. The screening gradually improved and will continue in the border areas over the festive period. During the 2020/2021 financial year a total of 66 162 people suspected to have malaria have been tested in the community and a total of 517 have been found to be positive through active case detection. All the positive cases were treated with the recommended treatment for malaria.

b) The holiday season (Christmas and New Year) coincides with the malaria transmission season hence the Malaria programmes embark on spraying in September 2020 to protect the communities at risk in the three malaria-endemic provinces of Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal. The provincial Malaria Programmes have updated their Epidemic Preparedness Plans to ensure that there are adequate stocks of diagnostics, treatment and insecticides.

In addition, health promotion and awareness campaigns are essential interventions for the prevention of malaria morbidity and mortality and were enhanced during the first week of November 2020 when the SADC Malaria Day was event was commemorated in the endemic provinces. These interventions will continue during the peak season covering December to April.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2720

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (a) total cost to company salaries and (b) bonuses of executive employees, including the chief executive officers in all entities reporting to the national Departments of Water and Sanitation and Human Settlements for the past five financial years?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is provided in Annual Reports tabled yearly in Parliament by departments and public entities.

22 December 2020 - NW2982

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Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the issue of personal protective equipment (PPEs) which came under the spotlight in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, what (a) actions and/or measures has he and/or his department taken to address the (i) availability, (ii) quantity and (iii) quality of PPEs and (b) role has the relationship between his department and the labour unions played to improve the situation and to ensure that frontline healthcare workers, including community health workers, are well protected against the pandemic?

Reply:

1a)  Actions and/or measures has he and/or his department taken to address the

 

(i) Availability of PPEs

The National Department of Health developed an Infection Control and Prevention (IPC) Guideline that identifies in detail what PPEs are required in by health care and support personnel require in the different health care service delivery settings. This document formed the basis of determining what PPE’s and in what quantity each health care worker and support personnel will require.

(ii) Quantity of PPEs

The IPC Guidelines informed the PPE demand forecast, initially projected for a 6-month period and subsequently the PPE forecast was projected until March 2021. The PPE demand forecast projections are utilised to identify resources required to procure PPEs, finalise transversal contracts with National Treasury, secure and negotiate availability of PPEs with suppliers.

A PPE module was also added to the stock visibility system (SVS) used to monitor medicines. This enabled health facilities and depots in provinces to report PPE stock on hand against forecasted demand and identify shortfalls and surpluses. The SVS system is used by provinces to monitor PPE availability and to address shortfalls at a health facility level.

(iii) Quality of PPEs

The National Department of Health in collaboration with South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA), the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) sets the quality standards for the various personal protective equipment items. Each province is responsible for ensuring that the quality standards of PPE’s procured are maintained.

The National department of Health has also supported the provinces with availing a Policy on Respiratory Protective Equipment and a list of PPE specifications that provinces can utilise to guide the PPE procurement process. In addition, PPE quality assurance training was conducted for provinces. The Department of Trade and Industry also provides support to local manufacturers and distributors in respect of compliance with applicable standards and conformity assessments to assist them to prepare for the licensing and approval process.

Meetings with provincial PPE coordinators, depot managers and PPE supply chain officials are convened bi-weekly to monitor and address availability, security of supply and quality assurance of PPE.

b) The labour unions participate in the weekly Project Management Office meetings chaired by the Director-General where updates are given on personal protective equipment (PPE) availability and quantity at facility level through analysis of data on the Stock Visibility System (SVS). The SVS also allows for access to trade union representatives to sign-off on the quantity of PPE at the facility level. I have convened meetings with the trade unions to update them on PPE availability and quantity. In addition, PPE and Occupational Health and Safety are standing agenda items on the Tech-NHC and NHC meetings.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2361

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to international travel restrictions under Level 1 of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, what methodology was used to identify (a) China as a low-risk travel country and (b) Maldives a high-risk country; (2) whether (a) non-residents, (b) persons employed abroad and (c) persons who will be relocating will be allowed to travel to identified high-risk countries; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. The model that South Africa used to determine the red list of high-risk countries from where persons are permitted to travel to the Republic is based on a scientifically robust and tested approach that was benchmarked with other countries. The benchmarking process assisted the country to understand how best other countries are implementing interventions to enable proactive risk categorisation processes. The model and the criteria applied were based on globally accepted standards taking into consideration the guidelines as set by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Several criteria and scientific data are utilised to design, develop and refine the RSA risk categorization model. The primary considerations include the following:

a) the number of new cases per 100,000 persons over 14 days;

b) the number of new deaths per 100,000 persons over 14 days; and

c) the total number of accumulated cases in the given country since the first case.

Furthermore, the model also considers sensitivity analyses to assess the tolerance level rate to the RSA baseline. Other parameters such as testing data and active cases are considered. However, due to the absence of sufficiently updated data across different countries, it was recommended that these factors are not significantly relied upon. Based on all these factors, countries were classified according to three distinct categories: “Low Risk”, “Similar Risk” and “High Risk”. The “High Risk” category is what is used to create the red list of high-risk countries.

Therefore, the methodology outlined above is what was used to determine (a) China as a low-risk country and (b) the Maldives as a high-risk country. It must be noted that due to recent global developments and trends, the Cabinet resolved that the strategy of using the red list of high-risk countries should be changed and instead use the 72-hour PCR test and the screening of incoming passengers to determine if they should be allowed into the country or not.

 

Based on recent global developments and trends, the Cabinet resolved that the strategy of whether (a) non-residents, (b) persons employed abroad and (c) persons who will be relocating will be allowed to travel to identified high-risk countries should be based on the use of the 72-hour PCR test and appropriate screening interventions at both the departing border and those implemented in the destination country to which all individuals are expected to comply as per those countries’ COVID-19 prevention and screening protocols. This decision takes into consideration the WHO’s guidelines on public health considerations while resuming international travel as published in June 2020 and subsequently updated advisories.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2983

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Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

In view of the important role that public-private partnerships have played in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, (a) are there any other initiatives that he and/or his department have to continue in co-operation with the public-private partnerships and (b) how will the co-operation be taken forward to achieve a unified healthcare system under the National Health Insurance?

Reply:

a) The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the need for a concerted societal response to design and implement innovative, quick and practical solutions to address the impact of the pandemic on the national health system. A key element of this response was the interactions between the public and private sector stakeholders of different kinds (most importantly private healthcare professionals) to collaborate with Government at various levels. This collaboration and open engagement allowed for some innovative solutions, such as the Private Laboratory network (22 Laboratories) agreeing to work with the National Health Laboratory system (27 Laboratories) to scale up testing capacity; the private health facilities availed their beds and ICUs for the management of cases; as well as establishing platforms for the coordination and sharing information with the private sector which was essential in monitoring ICU capacity and where additional patients could be referred particularly during periods of the pandemic peaks in some provinces.

b) The National Department of Health continues to cooperate and regularly engages the private health sector on a variety of matters pertaining to priority programmes for the sector. This engagement and cooperation will continue to be followed through as we make progress towards the implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI), through ensuring a coherent and sustainable plan as outlined in the White Paper on NHI and the NHI Bill. Some of the core areas for continued engagement with the private sector include how best to incorporate the skills and clinical insights of the private sector into both the primary and hospital-based health care services, the role to be played by the multidisciplinary district health teams; and the development and implementation of alternative reimbursement strategies. Equally important is the aspect of digital integration of private health information platforms into the Health Normative Standards for Interoperability with the systems that are being designed and implemented as part of the NHI Fund’s information system.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW3047

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) is the total number of ICU and high care nurses who have been recruited, trained and have been assigned to work in COVID-19 sites in KwaZulu-Natal thus far and (b) are the full details of the sites the specified nurses have been dispatched to; (2) whether his department intends to employ the nurses permanently once the COVID-19 pandemic has ended; if not, why not; if so; where will the nurses be assigned to work; (3) how does his department intend to deal with the shortfall in clinical psychologists and physiotherapists in the province as they indicated that funds were unavailable to recruitment?

Reply:

1. According to the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Health, there is a total of 153 Nurses which is inclusive of nurses employed on contract basis and permanent employees. Nurses were from the following sites:

  • Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital
  • Greys Tertiary Hospital
  • King Edward Hospital
  • Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital
  • RK Khan Regional Hospital
  • Mahatma Gandhi Regional Hospital
  • Port Shepstone Regional Hospital
  • Newcastle Hospital
  • Madadeni Hospital
  • Addington Regional Hospital
  •  Ladysmith Regional Hospital
  • General Justice Gizenga Memorial Regional Hospital
  • Ngwelezane Tertiary Hospital

2. These nurses have been employed on contract up until 31 March 2021. No decision has been taken regarding the retention of these healthcare personnel on permanent basis after Covid-19 pandemic. The decision will be based on need and availability of budget.

3. The Department intends to prioritize appointing post-community service personnel into permanent existing posts of clinical psychologists and physiotherapists. Plans are also in place to advertise more bursaries in these professional categories. The Department also intends to target students who are pursuing Honours and Master’s Degree to address the shortfall.

END.