Questions and Replies

15 August 2019 - NW324

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the state of the nation address by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa on 20 June 2019 and the targets set for tourism, (a) what measures are put in place by her department to meet the targets for tourism, (b) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) who will be responsible to ensure that the targets are met, (d) how will the targets be measured and monitored and (e) who will measure and monitor the targets?

Reply:

a) What measures are put in place to meet targets for tourism as per the SoNA on 20 June 2019?

Work on breaking down the 21 million international tourists by 2030 target provided by the President has produced a target of 15 million international tourist arrivals by the end of 2024. Engagement with the private sector and other stakeholders is already underway in order to increase market penetration of identified critical growth markets such as China, India, Nigeria and Russia. There is also ongoing work that relates to defending our current strong inbound markets while increasing market penetration in markets that we have identified as strategic in meeting the target provided by the President. Constant engagement is being maintained on matters relating to online Visa applications and Visa wavers with the department of Home Affairs.

The Department of Tourism and SAT are in the process of institutionalizing the achievement of the 21 million international tourists by 2030 through the incorporation of the 2024 annual international tourist arrivals of 15 million in the five-year strategic plan and the annual targets.

Measures also include ongoing engagement with the private sector, other government department and other stakeholders in their respective roles in achieving the target set by the President given the supply side and demand side conditions and interventions that need to prevail in order for the target set by the President in the June 2019 State of the Nation Address to be achieved. The targets will form part of the Strategic Plan 2020/21 – 2025/26 of the Department and SA Tourism.

b) What are the:

(i) Time lines

The time lines will be included in the 5-year Strategic Plans that are currently being finalized and will then be broken down into annual targets and then incorporated in the Annual Performance Plans.

(ii) Time frames

The targets will be broken down into years and within each year, into quarters.

(iii) Deadlines

The deadlines for achieving the targets will be aligned to the Strategic Plan and the National Development Plan.

c) Who will be responsible?

The responsibilities will be determined as the Programmes in the Strategic Plan is finalised.

d) How will the targets be measures and monitored

Performance is measured through the tourist arrivals statistics as reported monthly by Statistics SA through the report P0351 Tourism & Migration and SA Tourism’s monthly departure and domestic surveys.

  • Monthly EXCO meetings where each executive provides a monthly update on the implementation of the APP;
  • Organisational Performance Reviews held quarterly chaired by the CEO;
  • Quarterly Performance Reports which show the performance of SA Tourism against its APP targets and are reviewed by Board and the Department of Tourism.

e) Who will measure and monitor the targets?

Answered in point (d) above

15 August 2019 - NW369

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The Information requested by the Honourable member is not yet available, as decision has not yet been made.

15 August 2019 - NW408

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) specific upgrades and/or changes have been made to the office of each (i) Minister and (ii) Deputy Minister since 29 May 2019 and (b) what amount did the upgrades and/or changes cost in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

No upgrades or changes were made by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to any of the offices of the Ministers and Deputy Ministers since 29 May 2019 to date.

(a) (i), (ii) and (b) Fall away.

15 August 2019 - NW285

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Minister de Lille was appointed on 27 May 2019.

(a) The Private Office of the Minister includes the salary of the Minister plus her 2 advisors, totalling R17 144 000

(b) (i) to (v). Please refer to table below

Job Title

Salary Level

Total Remuneration

Qualifications

Job Description

Start date

Chief of Staff

14

R1 251 183

Bachelor of Arts in Human and Social Sciences

To manage, provide strategic and administrative direction within the office of the executing authority of the Department of Public Works

12 June 2019

Administrative Secretary

13

R1 057 326

Diploma in Education

Performer’s Diploma in Speech and Drama

Manage the administrative activities within the office of the Executing Authority

15 July 2019

Private/ Appointments Secretary

13

R1 057 326

Bachelor of Commerce in Human Resources

To effectively assist in managing the flow of information in and out of the Minister’s office and also assist in managing the Minister’s office diary at Head Office.

11 July 2019

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

13

R1 057 326

Bachelor of Arts Honours in Journalism, Bachelor of Arts in Media Studies and History

To offer Cabinet/ Parliamentary Support to the Department of Public Works including the Ministry, the Head of the Department and their Entities as well as enhancing Stakeholder Relations significance to the Department.

29 July 2019

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

11

R733 257

Senior Certificate

National Diploma, Journalism

To offer Cabinet/ Parliamentary Support to the Department of Public Works including the Ministry, the Head of the Department and their Entities as well as enhancing Stakeholder Relations significance to the Department.

22 July 2019

Community Outreach Officer

11

R733 257

Diploma in Public Administration and Local Government

To effectively coordinate liaison/ interaction between the minister’s office, stakeholders and the community.

8 July 2019

Assistant Appointments Secretary

09

R376 596

Senior Certificate with 5 years’ experience in administration

To effectively assist in managing the flow of information in and out of the Minister’s office and also assist in managing the Minister’s office diary at Head Office.

3 July 2019

Registry Clerk

07

R257 508

NQF Level 4 certificate in Office Administration

To provide registry services and administrative related services

22 July 2019

Secretary/ Receptionist (Cape town)

07

R257 508

Performer’s’ Diploma in Speech and Drama

To provide reception and secretarial services to the Office of the Minister.

21 June 2019

Secretary/ Receptionist (Pretoria)

07

R257 508

Bachelor of Arts in Politics

To provide reception and secretarial services to the Office of the Minister.

24 June 2019

15 August 2019 - NW204

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in (i) her department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to her and (b) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

(a)

(i) Response in respect of the Department:

Department

Number of Vacancies

(b) What date will the vacancy/vacancies be filled

Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI)

95

DPWI Main Vote has advertised 29 positions to be filled within the next six months (starting from July 2019

Proper Management Trading Entity (PMTE)

450

PMTE has advertised 234 positions and will be filled within the next six months

TOTAL: DPWI & PMTE

545

 

(ii) In respect of provincial Department responsible for Public Works:

Name of Province

(a)(ii) What is the total number of vacancies each of the provincial departments reporting to her

(b) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled

Gauteng

There are 370 vacant positions

The Department as guided by the Provincial Budget Committee (PBC) has implemented cost containment measures to ensure that there is no/minimal overspending on the compensation budget. To this end the Department has implemented a decision to “Prioritise the Filling of only identified Critical Vacant Positions”, if not filled, will result in the collapse of operations. It also be noted that the Department is currently finalising its Strategic Plan and this has prompted the “review of the organisational structure” in line with the new mandate and service delivery targets.

KwaZulu Natal

There are 181 vacant positions

It is envisaged that these vacant posts will be filled within the next 8 months.

Limpopo

There are 465 vacant posts in its establishment which is 15% vacancy rate.

The department is planning to fill the 84 posts out of the 465 posts during the 2019/ 20 financial year as approved by the Provincial Personnel Management committee and Treasury.

The remaining posts will be filled when the process of reviewing the structure is completed as directed by the Provincial Treasury

North West

There are 371 vacant positions

The anticipated date to fill the vacancies will be 31 March 2020

Mpumalanga

The Executive Council resolved to implement a Moratorium on filling of vacant positions in the Provincial Administration with effect from February 2015 to date in an effort to reduce the provincial wage bill. All provincial departments were directed to rationalise functions and this process has led to the identification of 64 critical technical posts for the Building Infrastructure Programme.

  • The posts have been submitted to the Executive Council for consideration;
  • The department will fill these posts within 6 months should approval be granted by the Executive Council.

Western Cape

There are currently 95 vacant, established posts, out of a total of 449 posts in the Public Works Infrastructure domain. 

 

Of these vacancies, 67 are currently in a recruitment process, while one (1) post was funded to facilitate appointment in an acting capacity.  The remaining 28 (6%) vacancies are unfunded, and due to COE upper limits.

Based on standard recruitment time of 90 days, it is expected that these recruitment processes will be concluded by end of September 2019, and given the required notice periods, that the candidates will be able to assume duty by October/November 2019

Eastern Cape

As per the 2019/20 approved Annual Recruitment Plan this provincial department has 150 vacant funded posts (vacant).

The department intends is to ensure that all the posts are filled by 30 November 2019.

Northern Cape

There are 99 vacant positions

The posts will be filled by February 2021.

Free State

In terms of the approved Annual Performance Plan the province has 60 vacant funded posts;

The posts were planned for filling in this financial year, in accordance with HR Planning processes aligned to the appropriate compensation budget.

15 August 2019 - NW205

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

In view of the fact that a responsibility for infrastructure has been added to her portfolio, how will she ensure that the mandate of her department, in terms of development and economic growth, is intertwined to rejuvenate the economy and that it works with the construction industry to create jobs?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) and government will act as a catalyst for the private sector and the construction industry to grow and create jobs while transforming the industry.

An infrastructure investment fund of R100 billion has been established as a commitment from Government. It is Government’s hope that the private sector will come on board to contribute towards a “crowd-funding” effect. To improve Infrastructure in our country we will need the help of all sectors in society especially the private sector.

As part of the reconfiguration of Government, over and above the historic role of the Department of Public Works, the function of infrastructure co-ordination was assigned to my Department which is now called the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI).

In addition to this function, the Department has been assigned the responsibility to coordinate the Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS) – a function previously performed by the National Treasury as well as the transfer of the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC), previously performed by the former Department of Economic Development.

15 August 2019 - NW370

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Minister and Deputy Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure may travel on official visits abroad if these are essential, in the national interest and with due regard to the availability of Departmental funds. International trips are planned on a case by case basis and when the need arises for them to travel on official business abroad. At this point in time there are no planned official visits abroad in the 2019 – 2022 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) for the Minister and the Deputy Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure.

(a)(i) and (ii), (b) (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) and (c) (i), (ii) and (iii) Fall away.

 

15 August 2019 - NW203

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What is the total (a) number of government employees in her department who are being paid whilst on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to the Government in each case? NW1161E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

a) The total number of government employees in the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure on long period incapacity leave are 20

b) The total cost in terms of salary is R2 253 929.80 on average and it is R 112 696.49 per case

15 August 2019 - NW300

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) number of workers in the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) are currently employed in the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality, (b) is the duration of the workers’ employment, (c) is the monthly stipend paid to each worker and (d) method is used to appoint the EPWP workers?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) In the 2018/19 financial year, a total of 183 work opportunities were reported by the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality. The work opportunities reported were from the Environment and Culture and the Infrastructure Sector projects.

b) The average duration of work opportunities that were created in the municipality is 84 days.

c) The monthly wages paid to each worker differs from project to project. The minimum daily wage paid to participants in the municipality was R90 per day, whilst the maximum daily wage was R150 per day.

d) The suitable method of recruitment is determined by the public body responsible for the implementation of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) Projects. However, there are guidelines on recruitment available, developed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, which public bodies must follow to ensure fair, transparent and equitable recruitment of participants.

15 August 2019 - NW342

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What monetary amount was invested or spent by the Expanded Public Works Programme to assist entities within the Department of Arts and Culture in each province in the past five years, (b) what (i) projects were funded and (ii) is the breakdown of the total amount invested or spent in terms of what projects were funded and (c) what number of jobs were created?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) No funding was provided by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) in assisting the Department of Arts and Culture (DAC) entities to create the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) work opportunities in the past five years (2014/15 – 2018/19) in any province.

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) is the overall coordinating department for Government’s Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP). The EPWP is comprised of four (4) sectors, namely: Social; Environment and Culture; Infrastructure and Non-State Sectors. Each of the sectors are coordinated by specific national Lead Sector Departments as per the Cabinet approval. The Department of Arts and Culture (DAC) is one of the departments within the Environment and Culture Sector (E&C) which is coordinated by the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries.

15 August 2019 - NW407

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What is the total (a) number and (b) extent of all state-owned land parcels under the custodianship of her department that was lost to illegal land invasions (i) in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019? NW1379E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

The recorded total number and extent of state owned land parcels under the custodianship of Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) which are illegally invaded are as follows:

(a), (b),(i), (aa)

(a), (b), (i), (bb)

(a), (b), (i) (cc)

(a), (b), (ii)

2016/17 Financial Year

2017/18 Financial Year

2018/19 Financial Year

1 April 2019

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha)

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha)

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha)

38

3554,16

4

705,21

8

715,61

6

1331,64

14 August 2019 - NW128

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Small Business Development to question 3767 on 21 December 2018, what (a) is the current total Rand value of each government department’s backlog for paying service providers within 30 days in compliance with the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and (b) steps will her department take to address the specified backlogs?”

Reply:

a) The National Treasury does not differentiate between large and SMME in its report of non-compliance with payment of suppliers.

According to the National Treasury 2018/19 Annual Report - the total Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid by national Departments at the end of the 2018/2019 financial year amounted to R 634 million with the following Departments leading:

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation = R492 million or 78% of the total Rand value;
  • The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries = R99 million or 16% of the total Rand value; and
  • The South African Police Services = R24 million or 4% of the total Rand value.

The total Rand value of invoice older than 30 days that are not paid by Provincial Departments for the 2018/19 financial year amounted to R 6.5 billion with the following Departments leading:

  • Gauteng Provincial Treasury = R2.6 billion or 40% of the total Rand value; and
  • Eastern Cape Provincial Treasury = R2.1 billion or 32% of the total Rand value.

(b) Steps the Department will implement to address the gap:

(i) The Department is working on a database for SMMEs that will be linked to the Central Supplier Database (CSD) of the National Treasury. When the systems are integrated, the Department will be able to know the amount owed to SMMEs.

(ii) sefa is the largest funder of SMMEs who are not paid and this in turn impacts on the sefa impairment ratio. The Department has requested the National Treasury to authorise cession agreement for sefa and when the cessions for sefa and other Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) are implemented, the DFIs will support SMMEs to collect invoices owed to them.

(iii) In addition, in instances where Departments owing a lot of money to SMMEs, the Department will be engaging with the National Treasury to top-slice from their budgets and enable the National Treasury and various Departments to pay the SMMEs directly.

(iv) The Department is also introducing an application for SMMEs to lodge disputes on their outstanding unpaid invoices.

 

NW1089E

13 August 2019 - NW346

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether his department has any plans in place to retain the services and skills of academics, including academics who have reached retirement age, for the benefit of the Republic in general and for their specialist academic fields in particular; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The appointment and retention of personnel at universities is the responsibility of each institution.

The majority of universities have a normal retirement age of 65. Most of these also allow post retirement employment for a further 3 years (some contract, and some deferred retirement) in selected cases where the expertise is required and under specific conditions. This post retirement employment is specifically allowed to enable the retention of scarce and critical skills.

However, retaining critical and scarce skills post-retirement age is not a long-term sustainable solution, and efforts have to be made to strengthen the academic staff pipeline to ensure that there are academics who can competently replace those who retire.

The Department of Higher Education and Training is implementing the Staffing South Africa’s Universities’ Framework (SSAUF) as part of its comprehensive University Capacity Development Programme. The SSAUF is intended to support universities to recruit, develop and retain academic staff. A number of key programmes are being implemented:

  • The New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP) supports universities to appoint and develop new academics in areas of need, including in critical and scarce skills areas. 473 Posts have already been allocated, and going forward, 100 new posts will be allocated every year.
  • The University Staff Doctoral Programme (USD) supports existing academics to achieve doctoral degrees so that they can progress more rapidly along the research and teaching career trajectory. The programme was initiated in 2018, and approximately 200 academics are currently being supported, with a further 60 to be recruited this year.
  • The Future Professors Programme supports promising academics who have shown academic and research leadership potential to participate in a two-year development programme that will enable them to apply for professor positions. The first phase of the programme will recruit three cohorts of 28 academics over three years, with the first cohort being recruited in 2019.
  • The Supplementary Staff Programme enables the recruitment of skilled retired academics to support the implementation of the other SSAUF programmes and other staff development initiatives. These skilled academics are utilised for example, as mentors, or to replace nGAP and USDP scholars when they undertake mobility opportunities away from the university as part of their development programmes.

The Department intends upscaling these programmes as funding becomes available.

2. The Minister has already communicated to the sector on the need to retain critical and scarce skills whilst new capacity is being developed.

.

13 August 2019 - NW361

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

a) (i) The Minister is planning to undertake three international travel missions abroad for 2019/20.

    (ii) The Deputy Minister is planning to undertake two international travel missions abroad for 2019/20.

(b) The table below outlines the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation.

MINISTER

Destination

Date

Purpose

Delegation

Paris, France

12 – 16 November 2019

The 40th UNESCO General Conference determines the policies and work of the Organisation. Participation will be in the high-level meeting on the Global Convention on Higher Education.

5 Officials

Nicosia, Cyprus

2020

The Minister has been invited to visit and explore educational cooperation opportunities. The Minister will lead a delegation of senior management from universities as part of strengthening institutional partnerships.

4 Officials

Nouakchott, Mauritania

2020

The Mauritanian Minister of Higher Education visited South Africa in 2017 and extended an invitation for the Minister to lead a delegation of officials and academics to visit Mauritania to strengthen bilateral relations in higher education.

4 Officials

DEPUTY MINISTER

Destination

Date

Purpose

Delegation

Kazan, Russia

22 - 27 August 2019

To lead the South African delegation to the World Skills 2019 Competition focusing on vocational education skills development and transformation of education systems.

23 Officials

New Delhi, India

26 - 27 August 2019

To participate in the India-Africa Higher Education and Skills Development Summit. Specific projects for collaboration in the education sector will be discussed.

Spouse and 6 officials

(c) The table below provides a breakdown of the expected costs of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) other expenses.

Destination

Date

Flight

Accommodation

Other Expenses

Paris, France

12 – 16 November 2019

Business Class R25 500

Economy Class R8 100

Suite R12 000

Standard Room R3 500

R1 855 per diem

Nicosia, Cyprus

2020

 

Suite R6 000

Standard Room R3 000

R1 680 per diem

Nouakchott, Mauritania

2020

Business Class R18 450

Economy Class R10 500

Suite R2 300

Standard Room R1 400

R1 395 per diem

Kazan, Russia

22- 27 August 2019

Business Class R28 350

Economy Class R14 300

Suite R3 100

Standard Room R1 400

R4 757 per diem

New Delhi, India

26 - 27 August 2019

R28 000 Business Class

R15 000 Economy Class

Suite R1 750

Standard Room R1 400

R1 200 per diem

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY:

d) The Minister and the Deputy Minister are invited to meetings and conferences internationally by their foreign counterparts, international organizations and by the Presidency among others intermittently. The list of international engagements below reflects only the engagements that both the Minister and Deputy Minister have accepted. The international travel calendar for the outer years is subject to receiving invitations. All international missions require presidential approval prior to traveling.

(i) The Minister is currently planning to undertake two international travel missions abroad for 2019 – 2020.

(ii) The Deputy Minister is currently planning to undertake one international travel mission abroad for 2019 – 2020.

e) The table below outlines the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation as direct support to the Minister and Deputy Minister, which is tentative until approved by the Minister. For the multilateral engagements, additional Departmental officials will participate for example in senior officials’ meetings preparing the ministerial meetings, but not in a direct supporting role to the Minister and Deputy Minister. For the purpose of this reply the number of officials in the delegations assigned to a direct supporting role to the principals is indicated.

DESTINATION

DATE

PURPOSE

DELEGATION

Minister’s Trips

Yokohama, Japan

27-30 August 2019

7th Summit of the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VII).

Africa-Japan Ministerial Dialogue Meeting on Science, Technology and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Meeting is convened on the occasion of the Tokyo International Conference for Africa’s Development (TICAD) – South Africa has played a leadership role in in encouraging a science, technology and innovation focus as part of TICAD. The President also invited the Minister to join his delegation to TICAD.

4 Officials

Dresden, Germany

11-13 October

2019

Carnegie Meeting of Science and Technology Ministers and Science Advisors hosted by the German Minister of Education and Research.

The Carnegie meeting is a prestigious, informal annual gathering bringing together the government science leaders of the G8 (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and the United States); the European Commission; as well as Brazil, China, India, Mexico and South Africa. It provides an opportunity for Ministers to discuss and share experiences in an informal setting with regard to science and technology policy as part of their governments’ and the international agendas

1 Official

Deputy Minister’s Trips

Campinas, Brazil

19 - 20 September 2019

BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Ministerial Meeting – the meeting is the highest inter-governmental BRICS Forum dedicated to decide on and review BRICS science, technology and innovation partnership initiatives.

2 Officials

f) The table below shows the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

DESTINATION

DATE

FLIGHT

ACCOMMODATION

OTHER EXPENSES

Minister’s Trips:

Yokohama, Japan

27-30 August 2019

Business Class R66 000

Economy Class R25 000

Suite R8400

Standard Room R3500

R4370 per diem

Dresden, Germany

11-13 October 2019

Business Class R80 000

Economy Class R21 000

Suite R11 000

Standard Room R3 000

R5800 per diem

Deputy Minister’s Trips

Campinas, Brazil

19 - 20 September 2019

Business Class R80 000

Economy Class R25 000

Suite R3500

Standard Room R3500

R4164 per diem

13 August 2019 - NW277

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) total amount is budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a)    Total amount budgeted for the private office of the Minister for the 2019/20 financial year as on 1 April 2019:

  

2019/20 FY (1 APRIL 2019)

 

R'000

Minister’s Compensation of Employees (CoE)

2 529

Minister’s Office CoE

10 725

Ministry Goods and Services

9 536

Grand Total

22 790

(b)(i)    Total remuneration Ministry budget for 2019/20 = R13, 254 million (R2, 529 million + R10, 725 million).

(b)(ii-v) The table below details employees appointed since I took office in May 2019.

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)

(b)(iv)

(b)(v)

TOTAL ANNUAL REMUNERATION

SALARY LEVEL

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

JOB DESCRIPTION

R1 189 338 PER ANNUM PLUS R7035.00 PER MONTH ROLE-PLAYING ALLOWANCE

14

CHIEF OF STAFF: MINISTRY

POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MANAGEMENT (CORPORATE GOVERNANCE)

Annexure A

R1 035 450 PER ANNUM

13

PARLIAMENTARY AND CABINET SUPPORT

B EDUCATION

Annexure B

R936 177 PER ANNUM

11

CABINET AND PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER

B ADMINISTRATION

Annexure C

R178 965 PER ANNUM PLUS R1600.00 PER MONTH ROLE-PLAYING ALLOWANCE

5

DRIVER/MESSENGER

SENIOR CERTIFICATE

Annexure D

END

12 August 2019 - NW211

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the total number of employees in his department who are being paid whilst they are on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) is cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

(a) The number is twenty (20).

(b)

Employee Figure

Cost

 

1

 

R98 597

2

 

R947 415

 

3

 

R80 403

 

4

R303 233

 

5

 

R491 458

 

6

 

R902 912

 

7

 

R167 690

 

8

R175 274

 

9

R90 231

 

10

R81 244

 

11

R243 470

 

12

R174 013

 

13

R141 024

 

14

R25 496

 

15

R618 468

 

16

R60 575

 

17

R143 218

 

18

R75 905

 

19

R158 417

 

20

R687 020

TOTAL

R5 666 063

 

12 August 2019 - NW244

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) (a) What are the reasons that the Kempton Park Child Welfare organisation closed down, (b) what number of cases was this welfare organisation dealing with and (c) who is now responsible for the cases; (2) (a) what number of nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) closed during 2018, (b) what are their names, (c) where are they situated, (d) what are the reasons for the closure in each case and (e) what number of cases was each NGO dealing with at the time of their closure?

Reply:

1 (a) The reason for the closed down of Kempton Park Child Welfare was due to the non-payment of salaries for the period of November 2018 to January 2019. They received their salaries for January 2019 on the 2nd February 2019. A resolution was taken in the meeting held on the 15th February 2019 with the employees and the board of management to pay February and March 2019 salaries to cover for November and December 2018 salaries not paid. Due to the deficit that led to the unpaid salaries, it was agreed that there will be no salaries paid for 2 months (February and March 2019).

(b) Kempton Park Child Welfare has caseload of 308 cases, which is disaggregated as follows:

• Finalized Foster Care cases: 149

• Children placed in Child and Youth Care Centres: 40

• Lapsed foster care orders: 44

• New Foster care applications: 75

(c) During the strike, Ekurhuleni Social Development Kempton Park office was responsible temporarily for cases referred for social work intervention. Some of the social workers attached to Kempton Park Child Welfare attended to court cases while on strike. The staff/employees went back to work on the 21st February 2019 after they received salaries for November/December 2018 as per agreement.

2 (a) Eight (8) NGOs were closed during 2018.

(b) The name of organisations are as follows: (1) Tshitandani Child Care Foundation in Limpopo and (2) Cafda, (3) four Badisa offices (4) Child Welfare SA in Western Cape Province and (1) Child Welfare East London.

(c) Tshitandani Child Care Foundation is in Vhembe District in Limpopo Province; Cafda, the four Badisa Offices, Child Welfare SA are in the Western Cape Province (places affected is Riebeeck West and Lutzville areas in West Coast Region, Heidelberg and Ladysmith in Eden Karroo Region, Fisantekraal area in Metro North Region) and Child Welfare East London which is in East London.

(d) The reason for closure are voluntarily due to change of strategic focus and economic climate.

(e) 19 cases in Limpopo, between 200 and 4000 cases in Western Cape as informed by the province and 1418 cases in East London.

 

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

12 August 2019 - NW209

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the total number of vacancies in (i) his department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to him and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case?

Reply:

(i) 824

(ii) 

PROVINCE

Number

Entity or Agency

Number

Eastern Cape

46

Supported Employment Enterprises (SEE)

31

Free State

12

Compensation Fund (CF)

195

Gauteng

138

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

60

Kwa-Zulu Natal

49

   

Limpopo

66

   

Mpumalanga

66

   

Northern Cape

31

   

North West

29

   

Western Cape

46

   

SUB-TOTAL

483

SUB-TOTAL

286

 

GRAND TOTAL

769

(b) By end of Financial Year

 

12 August 2019 - NW196

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(1) Whether, with regard to the low subsidies paid to non-profit organisations (NPOs) that provide vital services on behalf of the State, she intends to (a) prioritise and (b) review the funding model of NPOs, especially those that look after the interests of vulnerable women and children; (2) what plans will she and/or her department put in place to ensure that care workers and/or social workers do not earn less than the prescribed national minimum wage?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has embarked on the review of the sector funding policy and in the revised Policy, the Department has sought to align its policy to include a method of planning and prioritising developmental social services. A list of high priority prevention and early intervention focus areas will be developed within which the provinces must plan, budget and implement specific priority services. The prioritized list of social welfare services will be categorized according to their relative priority. The categorization and prioritization will ensure that services that are most important are ranked high and prioritized during the allocation of funds.

(b) As part of implementing the Funding Policy, the Department is testing the Sector Funding Policy in selected provinces with focus on services that address government’s core constitutional and statutory obligation to provide care and protection to children, older persons, and those who are most vulnerable. During the testing, process mapping will be conducted on the following services namely; child protection, services to older persons; gender-based violence and anti-substance abuse.

2. The Department conducted an audit of social sector employees within the funded NPOs in all nine Provinces earning below the national minimum wage. From this audit, a national database has been consolidated and submitted to National Treasury for analysis in order to determine the funding gap. The results of the data analysis will form part of a motivation on DSD budget submission that the department is preparing for submission to National Treasury for the 2020/2021 MTEF period.

_______________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

12 August 2019 - NW210

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the total number of employees in his department who are being paid whilst they are on suspension and (b) is the total cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

a) otal number of employees who are being paid whilst they are on suspension are two (2)

b) R31 974.22 (cost of suspension of less than a year) and R33 821. 04 (total cost of suspension)

 

12 August 2019 - NW437

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Communications

What are the full reasons for her department increasing its advertising budget (a) in the past two financial years and (b) for the 2019-20 financial year?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Departments as follows: -

In respect of the budget allocation for the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services:

a) The Advertising budget decreased in the 2017/18 financial year; it was mainly for the marketing and promotional items as well as advertising to fill vacant posts. In the 2018/19 financial year, the budget increased mainly for marketing and promotional items due to the Department hosting the BRICS Summit and International Telecoms Union (ITU) World Telecom in September 2019 at the INkosi Albert Luthuli Conversion Centre in Durban.

b) The budget for Advertising decreased in the 2019/20 financial year; the budget is mainly for marketing and promotional items as well as advertising to fill vacant posts.

In respect of the budget allocation for the Department of Communications:

a) Advertising budget increased during the 2017/18 financial year due to advertising done in respect of the Digital Terrestrial Television Project (DTT). During 2018/19 financial year, the budget increased due increased branding and promotional items that were procured.

b) The advertising budget for the 2019/20 financial year increased mainly for awareness campaigns for the DTT Project.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER

12 August 2019 - NW306

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the Road Accident Fund (RAF), what number of (a) claims were submitted during 2018-19, (b) cases were disputed and assigned to RAF appointed lawyers for defence and (c) cases which were under litigation during 2018-19 were ruled on in the form of a judgment in court?

Reply:

With reference to the Road Accident Fund (RAF),

a) 328 173 claims were submitted during the 2018-19 financial year,

b) 52 166 cases were disputed and assigned to RAF appointed lawyers for defense and

c) the RAF is not in a position to provide the number of cases under litigation during the 2018-19 financial year which were ruled on in the form of a judgment in court, as the RAF’s reporting systems do not currently distinguish between outcomes resulting from the various court processes.

12 August 2019 - NW147

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)Whether she has established a date on which 5G high-speed mobile network technology will become widely available; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has any strategic partnerships with other countries or companies in rolling out 5G technology; if so, will she furnish Ms Z Majozi with a list of the countries and/or the companies with their country of origin; (3) whether she envisages that the roll-out of 5G infrastructure in alliance with her department’s strategic and investment partners may pose any potential state security threats due to information being shared with the specified partners; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) steps taken by her department to ensure that the security of the State is not compromised; (4) whether she has found that 5G infrastructure can be used to breach individual property and privacy laws; if not, how can she guarantee that this will not happen; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) measures has her department taken to avoid such a breach; (5) whether the White Paper on 5G Radio Network Architecture has been drafted and made publicly available; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms Z Majozi with a copy of the specified white paper?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows: -

1. The Minister is not responsible for technology launches and thus does not determine technology launch dates.

Suffice to say, the Minister provides policies that establish an enabling environment and broad frameworks for creating equitable opportunities for all market players.

2. The department is working with various industry players who are rolling out latest 5G technology. As an example, the department recently partnered with Nokia and Vodacom during the recent Digital Economy Summit wherein President Ramaphosa, speaking at Gallagher Convention Centre, had his address simultaneously broadcast as a holographic image to the Rustenburg Civic Centre.

3. The national security agencies and the departments in the security cluster, continuously scan the environment for any potential threats to the State and its people, and if there is any potential security threat, it will be dealt with. Furthermore, the Cybersecurity Hub in the department falls under the Government’s broader security mandate and such engages with other government security institutions and industry players to implement safety standards and measures.

4. With regards to security, 5G is no different from previous generation networks and the same established security principles will need to be applied. As stated, national security agencies and the departments in the security cluster are continuously scanning the environment to deal with any potential threats to the State and its people. The government has legislated the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-Related Information Act (RICA) and the Protection of Personal Information (POPI) Act. Government has also developed the Cyber Security Policy Framework and the department is currently working on the Data Policy. All these policies and legislation, inter alia, address issues of security.

5. No.

 

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

12 August 2019 - NW188

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Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What was the total projected cost of the construction of the women’s hostel in Mzimhlope in Orlando in (a) 2006, (b) 2012, (c) 2014 and (d) 2016; (2) what (a) amount has actually been spent on the construction of the specified project to date and (b) portion of the specified actual costs were borne by the City of Johannesburg; (3) by what date will the finalised project be handed over to its beneficiaries?

Reply:

The Mzimhlope Women’s Hostel is located in Orlando and falls within the jurisdiction of the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality. The City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality, through the Gauteng Province of human Settlements, indicated that:

1. In 2006 the cost was R2 476 600

In 2012 the cost was R51 485 997

In 2014 the cost was R5 403 373

In 2016 the cost was R6 353 601

2. The total amount that has been spent since the inception of the project is approximately R140 000 000, inclusive of the costs borne by the City of Johannesburg.

3. The project had an original scope of 186 units which were planned to be constructed as double storey structures but to date only 34 units have been completed. Blockages that have contributed to the delays in the project have since been resolved. The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has subsequently appointed a contractor and the process of appointing professionals and engineering services are currently being finalised. It is expected that the project will resume in August 2019 and is anticipated to be completed by the end of the 2020/21 financial year. Once this has been completed, the units will be allocated to qualifying beneficiaries for occupation.

08 August 2019 - NW284

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total amount is budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

a) R20, 558,000.

b) (i) Total remuneration

  • R7,870,773.63

(ii) Salary levels

  • L.14x1; L.13x4; L.11x1; L.9x1; L.7x1; L.5x1; and L.3x2.

(iii) Job Tittles

  • Chief of Staff
  • Private Secretary
  • Media Liaison Officer
  • Community Outreach Officer
  • Assistant Appointment Secretary
  • Domestic Worker (x2)
  • Administrative Secretary
  • Parliamentary and Cabinet Support
  • Registry Clerk
  • Driver/Messenger

(iv) Qualifications

- Matric/NQF 4 - x1

- National Diploma/NQF 6 - x2

- Degree/B Tech/NQF 7 - x4

- Honours/NQF 8 - x2

- Masters/NQF 9 - x1

(v) Job Descriptions attached

08 August 2019 - NW232

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) number of Public Service employees are currently on suspension in (i) the national and (ii) each provincial government, (b) is the average length of time that each employee has been on suspension and (c) is the breakdown of the total cost to the State for each (i) year and (ii) month that the employees have been on suspension?

Reply:

The data provided in response to the question is derived from the PERSAL system as at 30 June 2019 and is for National and Provincial Departments in terms of the Public Service Act,1994.

a) Number of employees currently on precautionary suspension in:

(i) National Departments is 29.

(ii) Each Province

Provincial Governments

Total Number of Suspension

   
   

Total

16

KwaZulu-Natal

2

North West

2

Eastern Cape

4

Gauteng

1

Western Cape

7

b) Average length of precautionary suspension for employees at:

  • National Departments is 2 months,
  • Provincial Departments is as follows:

Provincial Governments

Average Length on Suspension months

   
   

KwaZulu-Natal

8

North West

2

Eastern Cape

2

Gauteng

2

Western Cape

2

(c) Total cost of precautionary suspension for each (i) year and (ii) month that the employees have been suspended is based on the average salary.

(i) 2017/2018 is R 73 976, 00

2018/2019 is R 1 319 887, 00

2019/2020 is R 26 183 216, 00

(ii) See attached

08 August 2019 - NW102

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1408 on 18 June 2018 wherein he requested three weeks' extension to ensure that the information that is provided is factually correct, he is now in a position to indicate what (a) number of firearms and (b) amount of state-owned ammunition in each province and office of the SA Police Service (SAPS) were respectively reported as stolen or as missing in each specified year (details furnished);(2) what number of such (a) stolen and missing firearms are linked to crimes, (b) firearms and what amount of ammunition has been recovered and (c) persons were successfully prosecuted regarding the theft of state-owned firearms and ammunition;(3) whether any SAPS officials were prosecuted for negligence or theft; if not, why not; if so, what number has been prosecuted for negligence and for theft;(4) what measures has his department put in place to combat theft and loss of state-owned firearms and ammunition;(5) whether he will make a statement on the matter? (2) what number of such (a) stolen and missing firearms are linked to crimes, (b) firearms and what amount of ammunition has been recovered and (c) persons were successfully prosecuted regarding the theft of state-owned firearms and ammunition; (3) whether any SAPS officials were prosecuted for negligence or theft; if not, why not; if so, what number has been prosecuted for negligence and for theft; (4) what measures has his department put in place to combat theft and loss of state-owned firearms and ammunition; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1 )(a) The information, regarding the number of firearms, which have been reported as losses from the South African Police Service (SAPS), is reflected in the table below:
 

Province

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

Head Office

87

86

94

138

95

65

Eastern Cape

134

150

134

148

112

49

Free State

38

22

38

36

32

19

Gauteng

165

140

185

123

145

101

KwaZulu-Natal

167

165

180

164

193

142

Limpopo

45

49

37

36

54

28

Mpumalanga

40

45

36

33

46

38


Find here: (1)(b) The information, regarding the number of rounds of ammunition, which have been reported as losses from the SAPS, is reflected in the table below:

08 August 2019 - NW218

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What is the total number of SA Police Service (SAPS) bullet-proof vests that are currently in circulation in (i) each province and (ii) each precinct and (b) on what date was each order procured; (2) whether all bullet-proof vests are recorded in the SAPS asset register; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what is the lifespan of each bullet-proof vest and (b) what number of bullet- proof vests have been disposed of since 2009; (4) whether his department has a procurement plan for the renewal of bullet-proof vests?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The total number of bullet resistant vests, in each province, is as follows:

Province

Total

Head Office

34 916

Eastern Cape

19 028

Free State

13 304

Gauteng

37 093

KwaZulu-Natal

25 181

Limpopo

11 616

Mpumalanga

10 844

North West

11 514

Northern Cape

7 224

Western Cape

26 707

Body Armour Store

18 741

Total

216 168

   

(1)(a)(ii) The total number of bullet resistant vests, in each cluster, is attached as per Annexure A.

(1)(b) The information, per police station, order form and the date on which each bullet resistant vest was procured, is attached as per Annexure B. (Annexure B is attached in the electronic format, due to the size of the document, which consists of more than 3 000 pages)

Bullet resistant vests were only captured as a serialised item, since 2010. Prior to 2010, bullet resistant vests were captured as non- serialised and placed on, either the room inventory or on a members personal equipment sheet (SAPS 108). The SAPS also procured parts for bullet resistant vests parts and assembled them, which were then accounted for, as complete bullet resistant vests. Therefore, the system will not indicate order numbers for the above exceptions.

(2) All bullet resistant vests are captured in the SAPS asset register and the information is reflected in Annexure B.

(3)(a) In accordance with the Supply Chain Management (SCM) guidelines, the life span or useful life of a bullet resistant vest, is determined by the type of operational functions that are performed by the user and not a time frame. Therefore, the lifespan may vary from one day to more than 10 years, depending on the utilisation and treatment, thereof. This is supported by annual physical inspections and conditional assessments.

(3)(b) Since 2009, the SAPS has disposed of the following quantities:

 

Disposals

Pending Disposals

57 212

36 624

(4) Yes, the SAPS is currently doing market research and undertaking a process of evaluation, research and development of new generation bullet resistant vests.

 

Response to question 218 recommended

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-07-26

Response to question 218 approved


 

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER POLICE
Date: 2019-07-26

08 August 2019 - NW127

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department’s Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit has been established; if not, by what date is it envisioned to be established; if so, (2) whether he has found that the unit is (a) fully operational and (b) adequately staffed; if not, in each case, (i) why not and (ii) by what date will the specified unit be fully operational and adequately staffed; if so, (3) whether the unit has conducted successful disciplinary processes against any officials yet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. The Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit was established as per Public Administration Management Act Proclamation, effective from 1 April 2019.

2.a) The Unit is not fully operational and b) it is not adequately staffed. (i) as the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has no funding to staff the unit or to allocate funds for its operations. (ii) The Unit is currently being incubated within the DPSA and is envaseged to be fully operational and adequately staffed by the next financial year, subject to the allocation of funds by the National Treasury.

3. The Unit has not yet conducted any disciplinary process against officials as the Unit is not yet fully operational.

07 August 2019 - NW310

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of the Basic Education

With reference to the state of the nation address on 7 February 2019, (a) which schools will be transformed into technical schools in each province in order to expand participation in the new technological specialisations, (b) what is the time frame in each case, (c) what are the details of how the transformation will take place and (d) what costs will be incurred in each case?

Reply:

a) The Plan is to have a Technical High School in each Circuit. Provinces have not yet identified the schools to be transformed into technical schools.

b) The time frame for the transformation and expansion of schools will be over a period of 5 years starting in 2020 – 2025.

c) Details of how the transformation will take place:

  • Identification of schools by the 9 Provincial Education Departments;
  • Mapping of schools in circuits to be undertaken;
  • An onsite audit of schools will be conducted by the National and Provincial Departments;
  • Mathematics, Science and Technology (MST) Conditional Grant covers all schools offering Technical Occupational and Technical vocational subjects.

d) Costs that will be incurred in each case will include the following:

  • Infrastructure renovation and construction (workshops).
  • Provisioning of equipment tools and consumables for the Technical specialisation subjects.
  • Human Resource recruitment.

07 August 2019 - NW231

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the total current vacancy rate across the Public Service (a) in the Republic and (b) what is the breakdown of the total for (i) each province and (ii) each national department?

Reply:

Based on the information available on PERSAL the vacancy rate in the Public Service for the quarter from April to June 2019 stands at 9.34%. This excludes the Defence Force and the State Security Agency that do not make use of the PERSAL system. The breakdown per department and province is provided in the table below:

National/ Provincial Departments and their Components

Government Components

Filled Posts June 2019

Vacant Posts June 2019

Quarterly Vacancy Rate (%)

Total

 

1,169,580

123,843

9.34

Eastern Cape

Total

 

115,551

20,516

15.23

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

1,378

167

8.52

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

 

508

245

30.48

Education

 

60,891

12,316

17.21

Health

 

40,254

6,653

13.93

Human Settlements

 

530

35

6.61

Office of the Premier

 

345

69

13.67

Provincial Treasury

 

417

22

4.56

Roads and Public works

 

1,639

161

7.33

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

 

2,662

241

11.09

Safety and Liaison

 

131

20

14.44

Social Development

 

3,638

386

9.22

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

 

1,192

33

9.9

Transport

 

1,966

168

6.97

Free State

Total

 

56,301

3,830

5.72

Agriculture

 

987

56

4.43

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

348

53

13.13

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

681

119

14.51

Education

 

27,849

1,664

4.81

Health

 

18,290

770

3.43

Human Settlements

 

409

62

12.89

Office of the Premier

 

493

56

9.81

Police, Roads and Transport

 

2,562

291

10.46

Provincial Treasury

 

380

48

11.21

Public Works

 

1,366

131

11.19

Social Development

 

1,913

464

16.99

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

 

1,023

116

9.85

Gauteng

Total

 

158,807

15,997

8.86

Agriculture and Rural Development

 

947

68

6.63

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

650

45

5.98

Community Safety

 

1,154

105

8.29

E-Government

 

773

76

9.23

Economic Development

 

327

31

8.19

Education

 

83,374

5,619

5.94

Health

 

61,112

7,895

11.2

Human Settlements

 

753

195

20.46

Infrastructure Development

 

2,514

487

15.89

Office of the Premier

 

463

86

14.14

Provincial Treasury

 

779

110

12.93

 

Infrastructure Financing Agency

32

0

0

 

Provincial Treasury

747

110

13.41

Roads and Transport

 

1,888

554

22.17

Social Development

 

3,460

509

12.81

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

 

613

217

27.47

KwaZulu-Natal

Total

 

180,613

17,145

8.31

Agriculture and Rural Development

 

2,449

264

8.98

Arts and Culture

 

473

55

8.87

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

1,233

102

7.09

Community Safety and Liaison

 

162

18

8.99

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

532

128

18.78

Education

 

100,817

8,057

7.16

Finance

 

378

44

10.93

Health

 

64,395

7,554

9.83

Human Settlements

 

579

55

7.5

Office of the Premier

 

512

46

7.21

Public Works

 

1,525

100

6.19

Social Development

 

3,668

278

9.41

Sport and Recreation

 

233

28

10.94

Transport

 

3,657

416

9.72

Limpopo

Total

 

100,509

17,386

14.58

Agriculture, and Rural Development

 

2,496

507

16.31

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

 

1,835

221

10.09

Community Safety

 

127

8

6.17

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

 

1,231

69

5.99

Education

 

52,788

9,336

15.22

Health

 

32,549

3,738

9.85

Office of the Premier

 

457

36

6.63

Provincial Treasury

 

408

58

11.52

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

 

2,784

516

14.32

Social Development

 

3,103

2,590

44.66

Sports, Arts and Culture

 

469

47

8.12

Transport

 

2,262

260

9.76

Mpumalanga

Total

 

70,066

5,742

7.59

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

 

1,493

297

15.75

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

754

25

2.58

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

 

1,482

33

2.92

Culture, Sport and Recreation

 

277

34

10.91

Economic Development and Tourism

 

220

21

5.24

Education

 

40,002

2,461

5.97

Health

 

19,954

2,549

11.18

Human Settlements

 

370

99

20.94

Office of the Premier

 

228

38

15.22

Provincial Treasury

 

279

71

20.19

Public Works, Roads and Transport

 

3,120

51

1.45

Social Development

 

1,887

63

3.08

National

Total

 

332,677

17,803

4.92

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

 

4,850

1,269

20.35

Arts and Culture

 

404

55

9.26

Basic Education

 

733

48

5.22

Civilian Secretariat for the Police Service

 

145

10

7.59

Communications

 

62

8

14.48

Cooperative Governance

 

585

75

10.52

 

Cooperative Governance

421

47

9.33

 

Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent

164

28

13.5

Correctional Services

 

38,142

3,329

7.68

Economic Development

 

95

19

12.87

Energy

 

505

116

17.76

Environmental Affairs

 

1,598

211

11.17

Government Communication and Information System

 

415

52

10.56

Health

 

1,592

262

13.88

Higher Education and Training

 

21,215

1,995

7.97

Home Affairs

 

9,584

190

1.9

 

Government Printing Works

648

137

16.41

 

Home Affairs

8,936

53

0.57

Human Settlements

 

518

86

13.72

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

 

355

36

9.14

International Relations and Cooperation

 

2,198

400

14.01

Justice and Constitutional Development

 

20,377

1,419

6.6

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

16,017

1,413

8.21

 

National Prosecuting Authority

4,360

6

0.16

Labour

 

8,448

853

9.09

Military Veterans

 

137

12

12.53

Mineral Resources

 

1,012

89

7.93

National School of Government

 

203

26

10.77

National Treasury

 

1,972

316

13.84

 

Government Pensions Administration Agency

911

179

16.36

 

Government Technical Advisory Centre

140

13

9.09

 

National Treasury

921

124

11.92

Office of the Chief Justice

 

1,864

209

10.16

Office of the Public Service Commission

 

254

26

7.96

Performance Monitoring and Evaluation

 

418

52

11.29

Police

 

191,211

2,368

1.19

Public Enterprises

 

162

43

19.35

Public Service and Administration

 

379

75

14.33

 

Centre of Public Service Innovation

31

3

8.82

 

Public Service and Administration

348

72

14.77

Public Works

 

4,500

497

9.79

Rural Development and Land Reform

 

5,155

741

12.91

Science and Technology

 

386

104

20.5

Small Business Development

 

188

19

8.21

Social Development

 

690

245

25.29

Sport and Recreation South Africa

 

147

111

41.03

Statistics South Africa

 

3,323

865

20.19

Telecommunications and Postal Services

 

247

17

5.41

The Presidency

 

469

105

16.26

Tourism

 

456

54

9.99

Trade and Industry

 

1,174

39

2.67

Traditional Affairs

 

88

7

9.9

Transport

 

648

239

26.53

Water and Sanitation

 

5,680

1,105

16.02

Women

 

93

6

5.74

North West

Total

 

59,738

10,943

15.22

Community Safety and Transport Management

 

1,439

215

12.37

Culture, Arts and Traditional Affairs

 

695

189

20.94

Economy and Enterprise Development

 

221

21

6.92

Education and Sport Development

 

30,612

4,542

12.73

Finance

 

515

92

15.21

Health

 

18,099

4,372

19.26

Local Government and Human Settlements

 

525

192

27.14

Office of the Premier

 

703

117

13.86

Public Works and Roads

 

2,751

369

11

Rural, Environment and Agricultural Development

 

1,494

600

28.41

Social Development

 

2,540

182

6

Tourism

 

144

52

25.34

Northern Cape

Total

 

21,743

3,477

13.85

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

521

40

5.44

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

 

581

69

9.99

Economic Development and Tourism

 

185

52

14.49

Education

 

10,085

2,196

18.7

Environment and Nature Conservation

 

236

12

3.39

Health

 

6,748

785

10.07

Office of the Premier

 

235

14

5.35

Provincial Treasury

 

350

45

10

Roads and Public Works

 

869

104

8.87

Social Development

 

1,051

84

6.59

Sport, Arts and Culture

 

522

48

8.08

Transport, Safety and Liaison

 

360

28

7.57

Western Cape

Total

 

73,575

11,004

12.18

Agriculture

 

861

24

2.67

Community Safety

 

286

10

2.94

Cultural Affairs and Sport

 

534

15

1.82

Economic Development and Tourism

 

187

13

4.6

Education

 

33,654

8,093

17.69

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

 

350

4

1.6

Health

 

31,377

2,669

7.87

Human Settlements

 

400

19

3.83

Local Government

 

354

4

1.58

Provincial Treasury

 

249

27

6

Social Development

 

2,049

46

2.67

The Premier

 

950

21

2.37

Transport and Public Works

 

2,324

59

3.26

07 August 2019 - NW252

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) (a) Has a full report on all contracts undertaken by a certain company (name and details furnished) been compiled; if not, why not; if so, what was the total value of contracts undertaken by the specified company since it started work in the North West; (2) whether the (a) Bahwaduba and (b) Tlhabologang abattoir projects have been completed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1211E

Reply:

(1) (a) The close out report on all contracts undertaken by Agridelight Training and Consulting has not yet been furnished by the company. This was despite several requests from the Department to the Implementing Agent. In a bid to resolve this matter, the Department is in a litigation process with the Agridelight to source this document. The matter is before the Court and in line with the directives on Section 100 Intervention.

The total amount of all transactions between the Department and Agridelight Training and Consulting contract from 01 November 2014 to 31 October 2017 is R604 048 828.18 as per the financial systems report. The figure includes 10% Management Fee for Agridelight.

(2) Bahwaduba and Tlhabologang Abattoir projects have not yet been completed. This is due to the fact that, upon expiry of the Agridelight Project, the Department attempted to appoint the service provider who was appointed by the Agridelight to complete the project. However, the service provider in question was not, and is still not compliant to the CIDB grading requirement (expired CIDB Grading Level to low) for the value of the project that he was being appointed for. Furthermore, the service provider’s tax compliance matters were not and are still not in order as prescribed by the Treasury Regulations.

07 August 2019 - NW403

Profile picture: George, Dr DT

George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

Does the SA Revenue Service (SARS) have the capacity to conduct investigations into activity in the illicit economy; if so, (a) what is SARS’ capacity in this regard and (b) how is this funded?

Reply:

In terms of its mandate and legal provision, SARS established an interim capability to conduct investigations into the illicit economy. The capability executes integrated enforcement investigations and comprises of data analysis, risk identification, criminal and compliance investigation and audits and debt recovery.

(a) Its current staff complement is 60.

(b) The capability is funded through SARS financial allocation.

The mandate and scope of this capability is currently under review in order to better define and sharpen its focus.

As part of the review by the new Commissioner the following is being assessed:

  • SARS’ capability and capacity to monitor and assess the activities within the elicit economy as well as assess the true revenue impact/ risk that the illicit economy presents to the state.
  • SARS’ capability and capacity to conduct the investigative and audit work
  • The most effective organizational arrangement
  • Collaboration with the agencies of State.

07 August 2019 - NW258

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, taking into account the inherent risks to crops and the high costs of insuring such crops to farmers, her department is considering any government-subsidised crop insurance scheme to assist farmers; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) by what date will the specified scheme be implemented? NW1217E

Reply:

The Department has identified a need for agricultural insurance due to inherent risks and high costs incurred by smallholder and commercial producers in the sector. The department will engage both the National Treasury and the Land and Agricultural Bank on Agricultural Bank on how such an insurance can be developed as well as financed risks that may be associated with the system.”

07 August 2019 - NW262

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will consider to establish a school violence task team to combat violence in the places of learning that will collaborate with the SA Police Service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All schools have established School Safety Committees in line with the National School Safety Framework. Each Committee is comprised of internal representatives from the School Governing Body (SGB) School Management Team (SMT), educators and learners. External role players are comprised of representatives from Government Department such as, South Africa Police Services (SAPS), Health, Social Development, Municipalities as well as Non-Governmental Organisations NGO) including Faith-based organisations.

The Department of Basic Education has also entered into partnership with the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) to coordinate a wide spectrum of stakeholders through the National School Safety Steering Committee (NSSSC).

 

07 August 2019 - NW82

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does the National Treasury currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a) (i) (ii) (iii) (aa)

Own

Nil

(a) (i) (bb)

Rent

Three (3) buildings:

- 1108 John Vorster Drive (1 x floor only)

- 240 Madiba Street; and

- 40 Church Square.

(a) (ii) (iii) (bb)

Nil

(b) (i)

Value and purpose owned property

Not applicable

(b) (ii)

Value and purpose of rented property

1108 John Vorster Drive

(1 x floor only)

R65 033 050.00

Office accommodation and State Transversal Information and Communication Technology site

 

240 Madiba Street

R603 337 824.00

Office accommodation

 

40 Church Square

R19 030 631.00

Office accommodation

(c) (i)

Duration of rental:

1108 John Vorster Drive

(1 x floor only)

20 years

 

240 Madiba Street

16 years

 

40 Church Square

16 years

(c)(ii)

From whom is each property rented:

1108 John Vorster Drive

(1 x floor only)

Rented on behalf of National Treasury by the Department of Public Works, owned by SITA.

 

240 Madiba Street

Rented on behalf of National Treasury by the Department of Public Works, owned by Bothongo Group Management.

 

40 Church Square

State owned - Department of Public Works.

(c)(iii)

Monthly rental fee for each property:

1108 John Vorster Drive

(1 x floor only)

R1 127 659.02

 

240 Madiba Street

R4 221 538.45

 

40 Church Square

R673 134.08

 

07 August 2019 - NW108

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to the issue of land settlement agreements, she has been informed that there are land claims where settlement agreements have been reached by all parties involved in the land claims and approved by either the former Minister or the Chief Land Claims Commissioner (CLCC) in terms of section 14(3) of the Restitution of Land Claims Act, Act 22 of 1994; if not, why not; if so, what is the status of these settlements; (2) whether she has been informed that the office of the CLCC in KwaZulu-Natal, through its officials, have been and currently are interfering by not implementing the agreed settlement and causing conflict within the communities who are of the view that those officials benefit in such settlement; if not, (a) whether she will investigate this matter and (b) what steps will she take in her investigation; if so, what steps does she intend taking against the specified officials; (3) whether she has any contingency plan in place should the steps she intends to take fail; if not, why not; if so, what indicators will she use to measure the success of the steps and the strategy?

Reply:

1. No. The Commission is still in the process of briefing the Minister on the work of the Commission

2. No.

(a) Yes.

(b) The Minister will firstly request details, from the Hon Inkosi Zulu, of those settlements where officials in the Office of the Regional Land Claims Commissioner: KwaZulu-Natal are allegedly not implementing the agreements and are causing conflict. Thereafter, she will investigate the veracity of the allegations and, where necessary, take appropriate action to ensure implementation of the agreed settlements and taking corrective measures against transgressing officials.

(3) No. A contingency plan will only be developed once the details of the allegations have been provided and the allegations investigated.

07 August 2019 - NW165

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What mechanisms has her department put in place in order to transfer vacant land owned by the State to various Government departments; (2) what number of land parcels that are owned by the State have been identified as land that will be transferred?

Reply:

1. A number of organs of state in the three spheres of government (national, provincial and local) are constitutionally empowered to hold land for service delivery objectives. To the extent that the departments falling under the Ministry of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development hold vacant land, there’s no plan to transfer such vacant land to government departments. The plan is to transfer such land to prospective land reform beneficiaries. Our policy however provides for the donation of land falling under our custody to other government departments, in instances where such departments identify such land as suitable for their service delivery objectives.

2. Falls away.

07 August 2019 - NW427

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of educators have been absent from teaching for a prolonged period of time in each province since 1 January 2019, (b) number of days has each of the specified educators been absent from teaching, (c) are the reasons for the extended absence in each case and (d) contingency measures were put in place during the extended periods of absence in each case?

Reply:

(a), (b), (c) and (d).

As part of monitoring, the National Department only collects aggregated information on teacher attendance. The Honourable Member is kindly advised to request the detailed information as requested directly from the Provincial Education Departments.

07 August 2019 - NW118

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land claims have been gazetted, but not yet processed by the Land Claims Commission; (2) whether she has found that the gazetting of land claims has a negative impact on the (a) value of the property and (b) owners’ ability to secure bank loans; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether all land claims that have been found to be invalid have been degazetted; if not, (a) why not and (b) what number of invalid land claims still need to be degazetted; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) 3 358

(2)(a)(b) Section 11(1) of the Restitution of Land Rights Act requires the Commission to publish in the gazette all land claims that are deemed compliant with Section 2 of the Act. To not publish claims that are deemed compliant with the Act will constitute non-compliance with the Act. The Commission has not conducted any scientific studies to determine the impact of the gazetting of claims on affected properties. However, even if such studies were to confirm a negative impact of gazetting of land claims on property values, such impact would not be reason enough for the Commission not to execute the legislative imperative as imposed by Section 2 of the Restitution of Land Rights Act.

(3) (a) Section 11A of the Restitution of Land Rights Act provides for Withdrawal or Amendment of a gazette notice ONLY where either a party affected by the publication, typically a land owner, makes representations to the Commission with information conclusive to the Commission that the claim is non-compliant or the Commission, through detailed investigation, finds information that indicates that the claim is non-compliant.

Since the decision to withdraw a gazette notice is tantamount to the dismissal of the claim, the Commission follows a 2 stage process which is in line with the provisions of administrative justice towards claim dismissal.

In the first stage, the Commission provides the claimant with the notice or letter of an intention to dismiss the claim where after the claimant is provided with a minimum of 30 days to provide the Commission with conclusive reasons and or additional information that may convince the Commission not to dismiss the claim.

The 2nd stage consists of the issuing of the final dismissal letter where the notice period lapses without the claimant providing convincing additional information or where the information so provided is not convincing.

In all instances affected land owners are made aware when land claims are dismissed or when land claimants opt for other forms of settlement such as financial compensation.

(b) The Commission does not gazette invalid claims.

 

07 August 2019 - NW401

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the implementation of the compulsory two-years of Early Childhood Development for all children before Grade 1, what (a) are the exact steps of implementation, (b) are the dates for finalisation of each step, (c) is the expected date of implementation and (d) is the estimated budget implication for this project?

Reply:

a) During the Basic Education Budget Vote 14 debate for the 2019/2020 financial year, it was indicated that the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has committed to developing a comprehensive plan to ensure a phased-in and systematic relocation of the responsibility and leadership for ECD. It was further indicated that this comprehensive plan will include the provision of two years of compulsory ECD prior to Grade 1; as well as the provision of Early Childhood Development (ECD) for 0-4-year-olds. Finally, the Department committed to the costed plan being finalised by March 2020.

The development of these plans is based on two principles:

  1. The plans should ensure that both the access and quality of ECD should improve significantly over the next 10 years; and
  2. The plans should be sensitive to the current model of ECD provision and not destabilise nor cause confusion in either the ECD or schooling sector.

b) The detailed plan for institutionalising the abovementioned high-level objectives is still being developed.

c) The DBE is working towards finalising a detailed, costed plan by March 2020, while at the same time beginning preparations for implementation.

d) The cost will be clarified through the detailed, costed plan.

07 August 2019 - NW164

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of (a) district land reform committees have been established in each province (i) in each of the past 10 years and (ii) since 1 January 2019 and (b) the specified committees are still functional; (2) what are the details of (a) the mandate of district land reform committees and (b) how the committees are constituted; (3) whether her department still recognises district land reform committees; if not, what is the current status of the committees; if so, what are the relevant details of the applicable legislation on which her department relies in its recognition of the committees; (4) whether private sector stakeholders are still involved in the district land reform committees; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a),(i) Please refer to the table below.

Province

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NC

NW

WC

Total

Number of DLRCs

6

5

3

10

5

3

5

4

5

46

(ii0 None

(b) No, they are suspended for review of their functions.

(2) (a) Mandate: To support Government to resolve the slow pace of land redistribution in South Africa, and the lack of successful implementation of policy at the local level.

(b) DLRCs consist of a multi sectoral group of key stakeholders: Private sector, Organized Agriculture, farmers associations, civil society with interest in Land issues and Government.

(3) Yes. In 2018, the Department undertook a decision to review the terms of reference of the committees. The DLRCs are established in terms of Chapter 6 of the National Development plan (NDP) as the guiding framework for the Department.

(4) Yes. The composition as articulated in the Terms of Reference includes private sector stakeholders.

07 August 2019 - NW429

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) In each of the past three years and (b) since 1 January 2019, what number of (i) educators received training in information and communications technology (ICT) and (ii) the specified educators completed the training, (iii) educators benefitted from ICT training and (iv) educators are currently using ICT in the classroom in each province?

Reply:

(a) Table 1, 2 and 3 below provides figures for the past three years and (b) since 1 January 2019, (i) 3 632 educators have been trained on various ICT programmes and (ii) all trained educators have completed the training, (iii) 3 632 educators benefitted from ICT training and (iv) the DBE can provide data on how many educators and/ or schools have received ICT devices. However, the data on the usage of these devices lies in Provinces.

The data as captured by the Curriculum Branch on the training provided to educators on how to operate ICT devices, sourced from NSLA reports and the Moodle Platform is as follows:

Province

2016

2017

2018/19

 

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

GRAND TOTAL

Eastern Cape

2 999

782

632

4 413

8 826

14 653

2 852

26 331

4 056

2 667

291

7 014

37 758

Free State

408

8 092

632

9 132

8 172

3 593

6 378

18 143

181

185

39

405

27 680

Gauteng

1 171

502

632

2 305

4 028

6 885

1 326

12 239

1 987

1 700

600

4 287

18 831

KwaZulu-Natal

57

1 555

632

2 244

4 186

8 315

1 507

14 008

4 470

351

295

5 116

21 368

Limpopo

700

300

632

1 632

2 632

4 564

8 828

16 024

343

223

20

566

18 222

Mpumalanga

3 416

12 914

632

16 962

5 599

6 778

1 226

13 603

1 236

592

321

913

31 478

North West

2 638

1 307

632

4 577

8 615

14 592

2 787

25 994

296

4 675

266

5 237

35 808

Northern Cape

374

1 187

632

2 193

4 131

7 888

1 458

13 477

301

121

266

688

16 358

Western Cape

38 314

250

632

39 196

7 760

7 206

23 416

38 382

6 973

3 221

3 245

13 439

91 117

TOTAL

50 077

26 889

632

77 598

53 949

74 474

49 778

178 201

19 843

13 735

5 323

37 665

298 620

Table 1

The data as captured by the Teacher Development Branch sourced from the NSLA on the ICT integration into teaching training programmes:

PROVINCE

2017/18

2018/19

2019 (Quarter 1)

Eastern Cape

2 334

4 661

1 750

Free State

995

1 205

43

Gauteng

11 574

216

0

KwaZulu-Natal

359

234

368

Limpopo

950

1 480

200

Mpumalanga

1 928

1 605

0

North West

1 547

806

137

Northern Cape

250

727

0

Western Cape

3 832

1 879

634

Total

23 769

12 813

3 132

Table 2

Training provided on the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning since 2018.

PROVINCE

Target Group

Date

KwaZulu-Natal

405 (Provincial Core Training Team)

July 2019

Gauteng

200 subject advisors (3 hour workshops)

August to September 2018

North West

91 (Provincial Core Training Team)

July 2018

Western Cape

30 (30 e-learning specialists, Curriculum Support and Teacher Development)

April 2018

Total

371 provincial and district officials

Table 3

06 August 2019 - NW292

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) total amount is budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) The total amount budgeted for the Private Office of the Minister for the 2019-20 financial year is R22,748,000.00

(b)(i) The total amount in respect of remuneration is R9,355,000.00

(b) (ii)The salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019 are as indicted in the table below.

(ii)

Salary level

(iii)

Job title

(iv)

qualification

(v)

Job description

14

Chief of Staff

Gr 12

BA

BA Honours: Industrial Phycology

Master of Art

Purpose:

To provide a support service to the Minister, ensuring an efficient and dynamic interface between the Ministry, Department, National Parliament and Provincial Legislatures and promoting a sound understanding of the policies and performance of the Minister and the Department

Functions:

1. Render support to the Minister in Cape Town and HQ, Pretoria

2. Manage external and internal liaisons

3. Manage the parliamentary process

4. Manage the Transport Ministry Budget

5. Manage the Transport Ministry

Requirments:

A recognised NQF level 7 qualification in Public Administration/Management / Transport Economics or Planning, or Law with at least 6-10 years relevant experience of which 5 years must be on SMS level

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

6

Receptionist/Secretary, Office of the Minister

Gr 12

Purpose:

To render a reception and general administrative support service to the Ministry in Pretoria

Functions:

1. Render a reception and registry service

2. Render general administrative support

3. Act as relieve to Assistant Private Secretary

4. Act as Manager’s Secretary when s/he is in Cape Town

Requirements:

An appropriate recognized NQF level 5/6 qualification in Public Administration/Office Management

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

5

Registry Clerk

Gr 12

Purpose:

To render a registry service and general administrative support service to the Transport Ministry

Functions:

1. Render a registry service

2. Administer Registers

3. Render general administrative support

4. Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof id understood properly

Requirements:

A minimum recognised NQF level 4 or Grade 12 certificate with at least one year relevant experience

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

3

Food Services Aid

Gr 11

Purpose:

To render an efficient, professional and friendly food service aid to the Ministry

Functions:

1. Provide a food service aid to the staff in the Ministry

2. Prepare Board Room for meetings

3. Prepare refreshments on request for guests

4. Assist with Administrative duties

Requirements:

NQF level 4 qualification

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

8

Private Secretary to the Minister

Gr 12

BA: Health Sciences an Social Studies-

Purpose:

To manage all matters pertaining to the Minister’s executive obligations

Functions:

1. Manage the Ministers program

2. Provide support to the Minister with his executive obligations

3. Manage logistical matters for the Minister

3. Manage logistical matters for the Minister

4. Oversee the management of Correspondence with the approval of the Chief of Staff and the Minister.

Requirements:

A recognised NQF level 7 in Public Service Administration or Political Science/ Communication with 6-10 years’ experience of which 5 years must be on MMS level.

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

11

Assistant Private Secretary, Office of the Minister

Gr 12

BA : Politics

BA: Honours Politics

Fundamental of Project Management

Purpose:

To manage all matters pertaining to the executive obligations in support of the Private Secretary

Functions:

1. Manage the Ministers diary in support of the Private Secretary

2. Assist the Minister with his executive obligations

3. Manage logistical matters

4. Act as alternate in absence of the Administrative Secretary

5. Assist with the overall management of the Transport Ministry

Requirements:

A recognised NQF level 6/7 qualification in Public Administration/Management or Office Administration/ Management with 5 years relevant experience.

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

8

Assistant Admin Secretary, Office of the Minister

(Driver/Messenger)

Gr 12

Purpose:

To assist with the administrative support to the Ministry of Transport with regard to managing external / internal correspondence

To render a messenger and driver service to Transport Ministry

Functions:

1. Assist with external / internal correspondence

2. Assist with managing the general administration of the Ministry of Transport

3. Manage and maintain the filing system

4. Manage incoming and outgoing mail and documents

5. Render assistance with the execution of functions attached to the registry

6. Render driver functions to Ministry as required

7. Assist the Ministry with the procurement of refreshments

8. Perform relief duties when required

Requirements:

An appropriate recognised NQF level 6 qualification in Public Administration with 2 years relevant experience.

Valid Code 08 drivers licence and driving for at least three yearsContract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

13

Media Liaison Officer, Office of the Minister,

Gr 12

BSc: Public Policy and Administration

Purpose:

To enhance the public image of the Minister and manage media liaisons

Functions:

1. Manage the media

2. Produce speeches, publicity and editorial materials

3. Work in conjunction with Communication Unit

Requirements:

An appropriate recognised NQF level 7 qualification in Communication or Journalism with postgraduate studies in media relations with 5 years relevant experience on MMS level

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

13

Director: Cabinet Services (Spokesperson to the Minister)

Gr 12

BA Communication Science

BA Human and Social Studies

Purpose:

To provide an efficient and dynamic interface between the Ministry, Department, National Parliament and Provincial Legislatures

Functions:

1. Manage the parliamentary process

2. Liaise with MPs, Councillors & Parliamentary Standing Committees.

3. Support Parliamentary Study Group(s)

4. Liaise with Stakeholders

5. Manage the Directorate Parliamentary and Stakeholder Management

6. overall

Requirements:

A Recognised NQF level 7 in Public Service Management/ Political Science with 5 years’ relevant experience on MMS level

- Proven track record in strategic management

- Knowledge and experience of Parliamentary & legislative processes

- Political awareness and familiarity with broad lines of government policy

- Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

11

Administrative Secretary to the Minister

National Certificate N3: Business Studies

Purpose:

To promote and enhance communication between all structures in Parliament and the DoT

Functions:

1. Coordinate inputs for Parliamentary Questions

2. Manage the Legislative Process in Parliament

3. Support Parliamentary Study Group(s)

4. Liaise with Stakeholders

Requirements:

An appropriate recognised NQF 6/7 in Public Administration / or equivalent with at least 5 years’ experience

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

12

Parliamentary Officer, Office of the Minister

Gr 12

Purpose:

To provide an efficient and dynamic interface between the Ministry, Department, National Parliament and Prdovincial Legislatures

Functions:

Manage the parliamentary process

1. Liaise with MPs, Councillors & Parliamentary Standing Committees

2. Support Parliamentary Study Group(s)

3. Liaise with Stakeholders

4. Manage the Directorate Parliamentary and Stakeholder Management overall

Requirements:

A Recognised NQF level 7 in Public Service Management with 5 years’ relevant experience on MMS level

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

9

Administrative Secretary (Speech Writing)

Gr 12

Purpose:

To research and compile speeches for the Minister

Functions:

1. Research information on transport related issues

2. Prepare drafts of papers, speeches, or presentations for the Minister

Requirements:

An appropriate recognised NQF level 7 qualification as recognised by SAQA in Journalism, Social Science, Political studies, Communication or Languages/linguistics or Publishing. With at least 5 years relevant experience on MMS level

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

6

Receptionist/Secretary (Cape Town)

 

Gr 12

National Diploma: HRM

National Certificate: Commerce

Post Graduate Diploma: Labour Law

 

 

Purpose:

To render a reception and general administrative support service to the Ministry in Pretoria

Functions:

1. Render a reception and registry service

2. Render general administrative support

3. Act as relieve to Assistant Private Secretary

4. Act as Manager’s Secretary when s/he is in Cape Town

Requirements:

An appropriate recognized NQF level 5/6 qualification in Public Administration/Office Management

Contract appointment linked to term of Office of the Minister

 

06 August 2019 - NW307

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the reasons for the decrease in the budget of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project from R6,3 billion in 2018-19 to R550,5 million in 2019-20, (b) which loans have become due for repayment in the past three years, (c) which loans will be due for payment in the next three years and (d) what was the division between toll and non-toll budget allocations in the past three years in total for the (i) capital and (ii) maintenance expenditure?

Reply:

a) The decrease from R6.3billion to R550.5 million, represents the decrease in the allocation from the fiscus to the project. In 2018/19 a special allocation of R5.75 billion was made due to the funding shortfall created by the non-payment of etoll. This amount was originally earmarked for non-toll roads, but was later un-earmarked and allocated to toll, to prevent a default on SANRALs bonds. The R550.5m is a normal fiscal allocation to SANRAL since the new dispensation in 2015.

b) The bonds which matured in the last three financial years (2017, 2018 and 2019) are as follows:

BOND

DATE MATURED

NOMINAL VALUE

NRA 018

30 Nov 2018

R2 386 500 309

PN001

6 February 2019

R510 000 000

PN002

21 February 2019

R550 000 000

PN003

28 March 2019

R164 000 000

c) the bonds which will be maturing in the next three financial years (2020, 2021 and 2022) are as follows:

BOND

DATE MATURING

NOMINAL VALUE

HWF08

15 July 2019

R1 000 000 000

HWF09

19 September 2019

R700 000 000

HWF10U

30 September 2019

R700 000 000

PN004

6 February 2020

R556 000 000

PN005

21 February 2020

R640 000 000

HWAY20

31 July 2020

R6 744 618 477

d) Toll and Non-toll budget for the past three years

See the link: http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW307TollNonToll.pdf

06 August 2019 - NW394

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether the Government signed bilateral agreements with the (a) United Arab Emirates and/ or (b) Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; if not, by what date will each agreement be signed; if so, on what date was each agreement signed; (2) whether each agreement has been ratified yet; if not, in each case, why not; if so, on what date was each agreement ratified? NW 1366E

Reply:

1. South Africa has signed twelve (12) bilateral agreements with the United Arab Emirates and eight (8) with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

The areas of cooperation include economic, justice, tourism, defence, agriculture and energy collaboration.

According to the Department of International Relations and Cooperation’s records, the already signed agreements with the two countries and the dates of signature, is herewith detailed below:

a) United Arab Emirates

Date signed/ adopted

Title of agreement

Entry into Force

17 May 1994

Protocol on the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations

Entry into force:
19940517

18 November 1999

Defence Cooperation Agreement

Entry into force:
Not in force

3 February
2001

Agreement for Air Services between and beyond the Respective Territories

Entry into force:
20010827

24 September
2005

Bilateral Agreement on Economic, Trade and Technical Co-operation

Entry into force:
Not in force

25 April
2006

Memorandum of Understanding on Police Cooperation

Entry into force:
20060425

14 November
2011

Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on the Establishment of a Joint Commission for Bilateral Cooperation

Entry into force:
20120529

14 November 2011

Defence Cooperation Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates

Entry into force:
20121009

14 November 2011

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Political Consultations

Entry into force:
20111114

23 November
2015

Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income. Plus Protocol

Entry into force:
20161123

25 September
2018

Extradition Treaty between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates

Entry into force: Ratification process underway.

25 September
2018

Treaty between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters

Entry into force: Ratification process underway.

25 September
2018

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Cooperation in the Field of Social Development

Entry into force:
Not in force

b) Saudi Arabia

29 October 1994

Protocol on the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations

Entry into force:
19941029

20 May 1999

Agreement on Economic, Trade, Investment and Technical Cooperation. Plus Protocol

20020522 (r)
Entry into force:
20020522

28 May
2000

Air Service Agreement

Entry into force:
Not in force

3 December
2006

Memorandum of Understanding on Co-operation in the Field of Higher Education

Entry into force:
Not in force

13 March
2007

Convention for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and Prevention of Tax Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income and on Capital

Entry into force:
20080501

25 February 2009

Agreement on Scientific and Technological Cooperation

Entry into force:
Not in force

16 February 2014

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on Co-operation in the Field of Tourism

Entry into force:
20150415

27 March 2016

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Government of the Republic of South Africa on Bilateral Political Consultations

Entry into force:
20160327

2. The majority of the agreements are of a technical nature and as such, according to the Article 231 (3) of the Constitution, “binds the Republic without approval by the National Assembly (NA) and the National Council of Provinces (NCOP), but must be tabled in the NA and NCOP within a reasonable time.” In this regard, agreements only enter into force following their tabling in the NA and NCOP.

The responsibility for ensuring the ratification (if required) and tabling of the agreement rests with the relevant line function department and its Minister. Therefore, it would be incumbent of the relevant Minister to answer the question as to the ratification or tabling of such agreement.

The third column of the table above shows when the agreements were ratified.

06 August 2019 - NW174

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury approved and/or supported any investments made by the Government in energy resources such as coal, oil, gas or other mineral resources and/or beneficiation process for energy resources or the direct supply of energy outside the borders of the Republic (a) in the (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-19 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

National Treasury did not support any investments in energy resources outside the borders of the Republic.

06 August 2019 - NW327

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) How long did the former Deputy Minister, Ms L S Chikinga take to return the ministerial vehicles used while employed at his department after accepting a position in a different Department of Public Service and Administration and (b) what costs did his department incur in this regard; (2) whether any disciplinary action was taken against the specified person for allegedly flouting the provisions of the Ministerial Handbook; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether an investigation was launched into the (a) person’s practice of allegedly hiring rental vehicles from Avis for a relative which was paid for by his department and/or (b) relative’s excessive use of petrol expenses; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (i) investigation and (ii) outcome of the investigation in each case? NW1294E

Reply:

(1) (a) The vehicle was returned on 29 May 2019.

(b) There were no additional costs incurred.

(2) (3) (a)(b)(i)(ii) Investigation was conducted in respect of the matter and disciplinary hearing is currently ongoing and in respect of employees.

06 August 2019 - NW329

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What total number of road deaths (a) took place per 100 000 persons in (i) 2016, (ii) 2017 and (iii) 2018 and (b) were pedestrians?

Reply:

a) Total number of road deaths that took place per 100 000 person in

Number of roads deaths

  1. 2016

25.2

(ii) 2017

24.9

(iii) 2018

22.4

b) Total number of fatalities for pedestrians per year

Road user group pedestrians

  1. 2016

5 410

  1. 2017

5 337

  1. 2018

4 970

05 August 2019 - NW433

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). On what date did his Department ask the President, Mr C. Ramaphosa, to institute a Commission of Inquiry regarding the deaths from the stampede at the FNB stadium on 29 July 2017; and (2). Whether there will be a Commission of Inquiry; if not, why not, if so, a) by what date will it be instituted, b) what are the relevant details and c) has any budget been allocated for such a Commission?

Reply:

The President has taken note of the request and taken the following view regarding the request:

(i) That there is an unprecedented proliferation which has resulted in too many Commissions of Inquiry been established. Besides, the Ngoepe Commission of Inquiry that investigated and reported on the Ellis Park soccer tragedy in 2001 has already constituted rules that relate to incidences in sport at stadiums and elsewhere which should rather be utilized and built on instead of opting to build afresh;

(ii) That we must reflect on all tools in available toolboxes and exhaust all remedies, actions, etc. that stem from the findings and recommendations of the Ngoepe Commission of Inquiry;

(iii) That Commissions of Inquiry have limitations and as such should not be regarded as the first or last resort as there are other avenues to pursue preferably; and

(iv) That even though one can pursue the establishment of a Commission of Inquiry, it would be far quicker and practical, amongst others, to execute applicable and available processes to ensure proper law enforcement and criminal investigations for effective outcomes in the above regard.

At the said meeting of the said former Ministers, the following resolutions were subsequently taken:

That a meeting of Ministers of Justice and Correctional Service, Sport and Recreation and the Police and the National Director of Public Prosecutions (Acting) be convened to discuss the following, amongst others:

(a) The state of and progress made in relation to both the FNB Stadium tragedy and the Moses Mabhida incident relating to failure to comply with the Safety at Sports and Recreational Events Act or any other law including common law by any law enforcement entity or functionary;

(b) The state of, progress and outcome of an Inquest relating to the death of two soccer fans during the FNB Stadium tragedy;

(c) All litigation finalized or pending initiated in any court by any of the functionary involved in the FNB Stadium tragedy and the outcome of the said litigation and its impact;

(d) Any intervention that is necessary and required to address:

(i) Failure or inability by any law enforcement entity or agent to comply with the SASREA or any other law, including common law;

(ii) Complicity or perception thereof in relation to the investigation by the SAPS; and

(iii) Possible and potential gaps in the SASREA and possible amendments to the Act to address same; and

(iv) Alternative means to addressing challenges and gaps in organizing and planning major soccer derbies and other major sporting events to avoid recurrence, including communication and awareness raising prior and before such major events.

It will hence not be necessary to –

  • establish a Commission of Inquiry any more since we have, on the advice of the Department of Justice, decided to execute alternative applicable and available processes as motivated above so as to ensure proper law enforcement and criminal investigations for effective outcomes in the above regard; and
  • cater for any budget for such a Commission of Inquiry any more.

We will liaise with the Department of Justice afresh since they have undertaken to lead the way by coordinating and chairing the meetings referred to above.