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03 October 2022 - NW3187

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

I do not discuss my diary and political activities with those deemed not to be relevant on the matter. The member is requested to explain the relevance of the question to my work as a Minister.

03 October 2022 - NW3136

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to her reply to question 2638 on 6 September2022, and with further reference to the South African Consulate situated 845 3rd Avenue, New York, what (a) total number of (i) staff personnel and/ or delegates are working in the office and (ii) floors and/or offices are included within the rental and (b) is the (i) total square footage of the office and (ii) reason and/or justification for the high rental figure of almost R2,7 million per month?

Reply:

A) What total number of (i) staff personnel and/ or delegates are working in the office and (ii) floors and/or offices are included within the rental?

(i) The total staff establishment of transferred staff and locally recruited personnel for the two (2) missions occupying the premises is 67.

(ii) The missions occupy two (2) floors on these premises. They are occupying the 9th and 10th floor respectively.

B) What is the (i) total square footage of the office and (ii) reason and/or justification for the high rental figure of almost R2,7 million per month?

(i) The total square footage for the two and (ii) reason and/or justification for the high rental figure of almost R2,7 million per month?

(i) The total square footage for the two Missions is 51 843 square feet, and

(ii) The building wherein the Missions are now situated is within close proximity to the United Nations and the transit system. These are critical considerations with regard to the accessibility and mobility requirements of the Missions’ operations.

03 October 2022 - NW2785

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of (a) all contracts awarded to training and development service providers, (b) the breakdown of costs for training and development services in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years, (c) the number of persons trained, (d) the NQF level of the training attained, (e) the certificates awarded and (f) the amounts spent on travel, venues and catering from the cost centre; if not, what is the position in this regard: if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Contracts awarded to training and development service providers:

The Department has not awarded any contracts to training and development service providers. When a training and development request is received, a RFQ is issued to Supply Chain Management to obtain quotations which are sourced as per National Treasury requirements for service providers through the Central Supplier Database through National Treasury.

b) The breakdown of costs for training and development services in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years is tabulated below:

Description

Amount Spent

2021-22 Financial Year

Bursaries

R1 237 000.00

NQF aligned Training and Development

R346 820.49

Non NQF aligned Training and Development

R567 238.51

Internship

R849 781.68

Total spent

R3 000 840.68

2022-23 Financial Year

Bursaries

R117 791.00

NQF aligned Training and Development

R0.00

Non NQF aligned Training and Development

R390 193.00

Total spent

R507 984.00

c) The number of persons trained:

The number of staff members trained in the Department for:

  • 2021-22 financial year amounts to 185 staff members for NQF and Non-NQF aligned training; and
  • 2022-23 financial year amounts to 34 staff members trained for Non-NQF training from 01 April to 05 September 2022.

d) The NQF level of the training attained is tabulated below

NQF Training and Development Interventions for staff :2021-22

NQF Training and Development

NQF Level

Intervention

Number of staff members

NQF levels 1-3

SHE Representative training

25

NQF levels 1-3

Fire Fighting training

25

NQF levels 1-3

Evacuation Marshal training

25

NQF levels 4-6

Assessor training

1

NQF levels 4-6

Moderator training

1

Qualifications

NQF level 6

BA in Public Administration and Communication Facilitation

1

NQF level 8

BCom Honours: Industrial & Organisational Psychology

1

 

BCom Business Management

1

 

BCom Media Studies

1

 

BCom Integrated Organizational Communication

1

 

B-Tech Project Management

1

 

B-Tech Forensic Investigation

1

 

Postgraduate Diploma Management

2

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration

1

 

Bachelor of Law

1

NQF level 9

Master’s in Business Leadership

1

 

Master’s in Business Administration

2

 

Masters in Urban Infrastructure Design and Management

1

e) The certificates awarded to staff:

Certificates awarded to staff members for 2021-22 and 2022-23 financial years are:

NQF, Non-NQF Training and Development Interventions and Qualifications obtained by staff for 2021-22 and 2022-23 financial years

NQF Training and Development

NQF/ Non Level

Intervention

Number of staff members

Certificate as per Programme

None NQF training

Executive Education Programme

2

Certificate as per Qualifications

NQF level 6

BA in Public Administration and Communication Facilitation

1

NQF level 8

BCom Honours: Industrial & Organisational Psychology

1

 

BCom Business Management

1

 

BCom Media Studies

1

 

BCom Integrated Organizational Communication

1

 

B-Tech Project Management

1

 

B-Tech Forensic Investigation

1

 

Postgraduate Diploma Management

2

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration

1

 

Bachelor of Law

1

NQF level 9

Master’s in Business Leadership

1

 

Master’s in Business Administration

2

 

Masters in Urban Infrastructure Design and Management

1

f) The amounts spent on travel, venues and catering from the cost centre:

The amount spent on travel, venues and catering for:

  • 2021-22 financial cycle amounted to R38 400.00; and
  • 2022-23 financial cycle (01 April to 05 September) amounts to R0.00.

03 October 2022 - NW2920

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) How does her department plan to ensure that it fulfils an inclusive and balanced multilateral trading system and reform of the international debt architecture, as alluded to in her department ‘s Framework Document on South Africa’s National Interest and its advancement in a Global Environment and (b) what does the reform of the international architecture entail; (2) Whether the Republic has implemented the reform of debt in the past when negotiating for loans on an international scale; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) does it seek to change through the reform? NW3546E

Reply:

1. Since the pandemic, South Africa has played a more prominent role as an official bilateral creditor and G20 member to provide constructive solutions to the debt challenges on the African continent, first through its participation in the G20 Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI) that was in force from May 2020 until December 2021, and now as vice-chair of Zambia’s official creditor committee (OCC) under the G20 Common Framework for Debt Treatment beyond the DSSI. South Africa has supported the Common Framework which was established in November 2020 as a great improvement in the international debt architecture as it involves the first ever formal coordination between the G20 and the Paris Club creditors on debt treatments for the 73 Low Income Countries (LICs) eligible for the DSSI. The framework is to ensure broad participation of creditors, including the private sector, with fair burden sharing to ensure timely debt resolutions.

South Africa has agreed to become a prospective member of the Paris Club this year, after being an ad hoc participant since 2015. The Paris Club consists of a group of officials from major creditor countries whose role is to find co-ordinated and sustainable solutions to the payment difficulties experienced by debtor countries. South Africa’s enhanced status in the Paris Club provides it with the opportunity to become a full member of the Paris Club within a set period or revert to its former status as ad hoc participant.

The reform of the international debt architecture entails an end objective of broader multilateral cooperation in addressing sovereign debt issues and shifting away from plurilateral arrangements.

2. South Africa previously participated in some of the Paris Club debt treatments and restructuring processes in the 1990s. Also, South Africa participated in the Seychelles restructuring in 2015, during which it became an ad hoc member to the Paris Club. South Africa has credit exposure to Zambia who requested a debt treatment in 2021 from its creditors. This year, South Africa became vice-chair of Zambia’s official creditor committee (OCC) under the G20 Common Framework for Debt Treatment beyond the DSSI, with China and France co-chairing the OCC. The OCC brings together Zambia’s official bilateral creditors to negotiate the parameters of a debt treatment for the country. South Africa’s participation in international debt treatments and restructurings are guided by its status as an African creditor that seeks to implement fair solutions to the debt challenges experienced on the African continent. South Africa has exposure as a creditor through loans provided by its Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) on the continent.

30 September 2022 - NW2913

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What were the outcomes and relevant details of the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) lifestyle audits of senior officials in her department; (2) whether there has been any official red flagged by the SIU; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how does her department intend to recoup funds from officials identified as having engaged in corrupt activities?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure informed me the final report is being compiled for the Phase 1 SIU lifestyle audit project. Phase 1 of the lifestyle audits is focused on salary levels 14 and above. During this first phase of lifestyle audits, 66 of the DPWI’s senior management personnel were subjected to lifestyle audits per circular no 03/221 TAU from DPSA. The draft reports are currently being reviewed, and follow-up areas are being identified. The report will be submitted to the Minister as soon as the Phase 1 report has been finalised.

(2) Several individuals have been red-flagged, and these red flags are being followed up to ensure a fair evaluation of the possible risk. Of great concern is that 11 officials did not submit any of the requested documentation, whilst another one submitted their documents after the final SIU deadline, meaning that 12 officials did not comply and could not be assessed. All of these individuals have been red-flagged by the SIU. They will be dealt with in line with the DPWI disciplinary policy, referred for further investigation and reported to DPSA per the lifestyle audit procedure.

30 September 2022 - NW3223

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) number of fraudulent marriages has his department reversed since 1 January 2022 and (b) are the details of the steps that his department has taken to end fraudulent marriage certification?

Reply:

a) Five hundred and fifty-three (553) fraudulent marriages have been finalised since 1 January 2022.

b) Due to the number of fraudulent marriages reported every year, the department has implemented measures that have largely contributed in reducing the number of fraudulent marriages, as follows:

  • Introduction a new marriage register form (DHA-30) with requires a photo and thumbprint of the couples for verification purposes.
  • The Department requires prospective couples to make an appointment with nearest front office to verify the marital status and to subject themselves for brief interviews prior to registration of the marriage.
  • Couples are also advised and forewarned that marriage is a legally binding contract and that they should be fully aware of the consequences. Couples are thereby encouraged to seek legal advice regarding the benefits and disadvantages of accepting marriage, regardless of it being to a foreigner, as fraudulent marriages are prevalent mainly with foreign nationals marrying South Africans for convenience purposes.
  • On the day of the marriage a couple must present the following documents to the person officiating the marriage ceremony:
  • Identity documents (for each person getting married)
  • If a foreign national is marrying a South African citizen, the non-citizen should present a valid passport as well as well as a completed BI-31 Form (Declaration for the Purpose of Marriage, Letter of no impediment to confirm that he/she is not married in country of origin)
  • If the marriage is for a minor (a person under the age of 18 years), written consent is needed in the form of DHA32 by both parents/ legal guardian or form DHA34 from the Commissioner of Child Welfare or a judge. In the case where the marriage is between minors under the ages of 18 for boys or 15 for girls, written consent from the Minister of Home Affairs will also be required
  • If any of the persons who are getting married are divorced, then the final decree of divorce should be furnished.
  • If any of the persons who are getting married are widowed, the deceased spouse’s death certificate must be submitted.

END

 

30 September 2022 - NW2628

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total number of (a) black, (b) coloured, (c) white and (d) Indian students were enrolled at each of the 26 public universities in the (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 academic years?

Reply:

The table below provides a breakdown of enrolments based on the audit data received from public universities for the 2018 to 2020 academic years. The Department is currently verifying the audited 2021 enrolment data and this information will be available in October 2022. Similarly, information on the 2022 academic year will be available in October 2023.

30 September 2022 - NW2998

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he and/or his department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr E J Marais with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) and its precursor, the Department of Science and Technology (DST) have shared policy documents and policy review documents with structures outside of government during the past five years. Examples of such policy and policy review documents are given below:

  • The 2019 White Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation (STI)
  • The 2020 Ministerial Review of the Higher Education, Science, Technology and Institutional Landscape (HESTIIL Review)
  • The Draft 2022 Science, Technology and Innovation Decadal Plan

In addition, policies and reviews are regularly made available on the DSI Website where these can be accessed widely. Finally, when the DSI organises science engagements, conferences (for instance the upcoming World Science Forum to be hosted in South Africa) and exhibitions of South African science and innovation advances and technological progress, copies of policies and other documents relevant to the topic under discussion, are also provided to the attendees.

a) The copies of the documents referred to above are attached to this reply.

b) It is the mandate of the DSI to steer the national system of innovation (NSI) in South Africa. For the NSI to function optimally the flow of information across South African society is critical. Innovation is driven by the private sector, with the role of government being to create and enabling environment for innovation and to set the regulatory parameters for innovation-related activity in the NSI. For instance, the government provides financial support to undertake research linked to the national priorities and global opportunities for economic growth for instance in the Digital and the Circular Economies. The government further supports the necessary education and skills development, and the acquisition and maintenance of knowledge and innovation infrastructure to help South African research organisations and universities compete on the global stage. However, because of fiscal strain, the government cannot fund all of the research and education needs of South Africa. Funding is also derived from investments in the South African NSI by private sector firms, and foreign governments. The private sector is the main driver of innovation performance in the country, and the government needs to ensure that it responds to the needs of industry and society in developing policies and regulations, for instance proposed procurement of locally developed technologies and business incentives to stimulate innovation in South Africa.

Therefore, it is necessary to involve all of the NSI actors (academia, industry, government and civil society, including labour) in the development of science and innovation policies. It is for these purposes that policy reviews and policy documents are regularly shared with stakeholders such as the following:

  • Business associations (for instance the Manufacturing Circle and the Minerals Council South Africa);
  • Universities (for instance through USAf, Universities South Africa and the Deputy Vice-Chancellors: Research of South African universities);
  • Public research organisations (for instance the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research and the Medical Research Council, as well as the Committee of Heads of Research and Technology Organisations, COHORT);
  • Foreign governments (for instance through the British Council, aid organisations and multilateral organisations such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD);
  • Civil society organisations (for instance through the South African Local Government Association, SALGA, the Engineering Council of South Africa, ECSA; and activist non-governmental organisations such as Section 27 in the health field), and finally
  • Labour organisations (for instance through NEDLAC).

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

The Department submits policy documents to stakeholders within and outside of government as part of the consultation process.  The relevant policies are:

  1. The Recognition of Prior Learning Coordination Policy (2016);
  2. Articulation Policy for the Post-School Education and Training System of South Africa (2017);
  3. The National Skills Development Plan (NSDP) (2019);
  4. The SETA Landscape’ (2019); and
  5. Skills Strategy to support Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP)’ (2022).

The Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Coordination Policy provides a strong enabling policy environment for the further development and implementation of RPL across the Post -School Education and Training System (PSET), and across all levels of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). It guides the implementation of RPL, especially concerning the roles and functions of the Department, the South African Qualifications Framework (SAQA), the Quality Councils, the national coordinating mechanism, and the funding mechanisms for RPL implementation.

The Articulation Policy establishes the overarching conceptual structure, principles, and policy statements to support the implementation of credible approaches to articulation within the South African PSET system.

Prior to the publication of these policies in a gazette, SAQA, the Quality Councils, and other relevant stakeholders were consulted as they have a role to play in the implementation of RPL and Articulation.  

The RPL Policy is currently under review and consultations with SAQA, and the Quality Councils were held through meetings including the Chief Executive Committees (CEO) meetings. An online consultative workshop on the Review of the RPL Coordination Policy took place with stakeholders including government; universities; Private Higher Education Institutions; Universities South Africa; SAQA; Quality Councils; Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs); Professional Bodies; DHET Regional Offices; Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET); and Community Education and Training (CET) Colleges.

The overarching purpose of the National Skills Development Plan (NSDP) is to build the capability of South African citizens through the provision of quality education and skills development thereby contributing to economic growth, employment creation and social development in South Africa.

The New SETA landscape was ushered in on 1 April 2020 by the NSDP and the re-establishment of the SETAs by the Department. In this new dispensation, the role of the SETA’s has been streamlined and re-focussed in order to strengthen their ability to successfully contribute towards the achievement of the NSDP outcomes.

The Skills Strategy has been designed to ensure that skills are available to support the implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP). The strategy identifies the skills implications of the ERRP and outlines ways in which the PSET system, together with other key role-players, will ensure that the skills required to implement this plan are available.

The Department consulted with National Skills Authority (NSA) and social partners at the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC) since these stakeholders have an interest in Skills Development Act and related policy documents. Such consultations were conducted to solicit further inputs since the National Skills Development Plan (NSDP), SETA Landscape and ERRP have implications for Organised Labour, Organised Business and Community Constituency.

30 September 2022 - NW2851

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) How is Eskom working with provincial governments to solve the energy supplied to pensioners, indigent and unemployed residents to be converted from conventional to prepaid electricity; (2) whether his department, working with the provincial governments, has plans for residents with arrears and disconnections to be rehabilitated and provided with access to prepaid supply as a matter of urgency; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3448E

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the Department of Public Enterprises.

30 September 2022 - NW2938

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) (a)In what year did her department inspect the lifts in the various buildings in parliamentary precinct and (b) what is the due date for the next inspection; (2) whether she has found that the inspections are overdue; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the reasons that they have not been carried out and (b) on what date will the next inspections take place; (3) whether the lift contracts are in place for the ongoing inspection and maintenance of the lifts; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. (a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) informed that a routine inspection of lifts in the various buildings at the Parliamentary Precinct was done on October 2020 by an independent lift inspector, which is a two-year inspection. However, every month, the DPWI conduct a 10-point service checklist. Due to the fire in Parliament, the client (Parliament) requested that we conduct another routine inspection which DPWI conducted in March 2022. The last 10-point service checklist was done at the end of August 2022.

(b) The due date for the next routine inspection by an independent lift inspector is in October 2022, and the due date for the 10-point service checklist is at the end of September 2022.

2. There is no overdue inspection of lifts

(a) Not applicable.

(b) The routine inspection by an independent lift inspector is due in October 2022, and the 10-point service checklist is due at the end of September 2022.

3. Two lift contracts are in place for the serving and maintenance of the lifts. One contract will expire in November 2022, while the other will expire in January 2023. The process of appointing the replacement contract for the next five years is underway.

30 September 2022 - NW2912

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What steps is her Department taking against companies flagged for corruption and looting of funds for the rebuilding of infrastructure in KwaZulu-Natal following the April flood disaster; (2) whether any contract been cancelled following the Auditor General’s red flagging of dubious contracts linked to the rebuilding efforts; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Auditor General of South Africa (AGSA) findings were noted. In response, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI), through its KZN regional office, prepared a comprehensive report on actions taken and recommendations thereto, in consultation with the Directors General: Project Management Office and Facilities Management, which was submitted to the Director General and Head: Property Management Trading Entity (PMTE) dated 28 August 2022. The matter was also referred to the Labour Relations unit in the Department for further investigation.

In addition to the above, information was forwarded to the Special Investigative unit (SIU) as requested in a letter dated 30 August 2022. Both processes are still unfolding, and the outcome of both processes will guide any further action.

(2) To date, the Department has not paid any service provider for the refurbishment of infrastructure owing to the April storm damages, even though all work on infrastructure was finished months ago. The payments will be processed once the investigation report has been finalised.

30 September 2022 - NW2561

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether a decision has been taken to sell the building which houses the offices of the Independent Development Trust (IDT) Head Office and the Gauteng IDT branch in Tshwane; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are reasons that the decision was taken; (2) whether a tender has been advertised; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether the tender has been adjudicated on; if so, (a) what are the details of the (i) sale and (ii) purchase price and (b) at what stage is the process; (4) whether a new building has been identified to house the staff from the Head Office and the Gauteng office; if not, what progress has been made in this regard; if so, what is the (a) monthly rental, (b) cost per square metre and (c) date of relocation to the new offices?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. I was informed that the Board of Trustees of the Independent Development Trust (IDT) resolved to sell the National Head Office building during a meeting that was held on 23 February 2022. The Board resolved to sell the building as there are office space challenges, plus structural and electrical issues affecting the building. The building is unsafe to be occupied by employees as it does not comply with the Occupational Health and Safety Act. The building also has high maintenance costs.

2. The sale of the building has not been advertised as yet. To do that, the IDT still needs to secure a Certificate of Compliance.

3. As stated in (2) above, the tender has not been advertised and has not been adjudicated. As such, (3), (a) (i) and (ii), and (b) fall away.

4. No, a new building has not been identified to house the staff from the Head Office and the Gauteng office; the advertisement for the lease of a new building was issued on 12 August 2022, and the procurement process is in progress.

(a) IDT does not have monthly leasing costs at this stage.

(b) As the procurement process is still underway, there is no cost attached to square metres at this stage.

(c) The date for relocation to the new building will be determined once the procurement process is finalised.

30 September 2022 - NW2824

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With reference to the service provider who was appointed by the Independent Development Trust (IDT) in 2017 to assist in driving the Organisational Development (OD) process, for which the service provider was contracted for around R4,2 million for the entire OD job, with payments to be staggered according to the project progress milestones, and in view of the fact that the appointment of the service provider was found by the Internal Audit report and the Interim Board in 2018 to be highly irregular as the service provider hurriedly left the OD job incomplete, but was paid the full contract amount, what are details of the findings of the Internal Audit Unit into the procurement of the OD service provider, in view of the fact that the IDT has again advertised an OD tender with exactly the same terms of reference as the one in question, who was found to be responsible for the irregular payment of the OD service provider; (2) whether consequence management action was meted out to the specified person in terms of Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what (a) is the reason that the IDT is advertising another OD tender with the same TORs as the previous one, (b) is this new OD tender intending to do that was not covered in the previous OD and (c) number of IDT officials were targeted for retrenchment in terms of the previous incomplete OD process; (4) whether all of the officials were retrenched as planned; if not, (a) why not and (b) how does this impact on the officials who were already retrenched; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) was there any litigation action filed against the IDT, challenging the OD-related retrenchment; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the latest relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Independent Development Trust (IDT) informed me that its Internal Audit did an audit on the Supply Chain Management process regarding this appointment; however, it was not substantive. There was no one found responsible. The report identified general weaknesses in the Supply Chain Management Processes.

(2) No consequences management was recommended, as no one was held liable. The report was inconclusive, and the Board at the time only noted the report and did not recommend any further action.

(3) The IDT advertised another tender, but it was withdrawn because the reconfiguration process needed to be approved first by Cabinet.

b) The reconfiguration process will result in a different organisational redesign, which will be dealt with once Cabinet approves.

c) 50 Officials were retrenched as an outcome of the then OD process.

(4)

a) All employees who participated in the Voluntary Severance Process were retrenched.

b) There is no discernible impact on the officials who left.

5. Yes, there is one case at Labour Court. IDT defended the matter and is awaiting court judgement.

30 September 2022 - NW3070

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What total number of farm worker cases of the (a) Unemployment Insurance Fund, (b) Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and (c) Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act were recorded and/or attended to successfully in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

a) There are 90724 cases registered by UIF during the financial year 2020/2021, and 68 669 cases were paid.

During the Financial Year 2021/22, 116250 cases were registered and 91034 paid.

In the period of 2020-2021

The Total Number of Farm worker cases for:

UIF

17

CCMA

33

COIDA

6

30 September 2022 - NW2518

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) (a) What (i) total number of employees of his department are currently working from home, (ii) number of such employees have special permission to work from home and (iii) are the reasons for granting such special permission and (b) on what date will such workers return to their respective offices; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) A total of (7) employees in DMRE are currently working from home;

(ii) These 7 employees have special permission to work from home; and

(iii) One employee has an injury, while two were pregnant ladies with a comorbidity who are currently on maternity leave and other four officials are sick: and

(b) The injured employee is expected to return to the office on 19 September 2022 while the ladies who are on maternity leave will come back respectively on 29 November 2022 and 02 January 2023.

(2) whether he will make a statement on the matter? Not necessary as such statistics are always available as and when required/requested.

30 September 2022 - NW2852

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) How is the Government taking care of the vulnerable people in financial difficulties in accessing electricity; (2) whether the Government intends to take steps to prioritise the roll out subsidised prepaid meters for Eskom-direct customers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the Department of Public Enterprises.

30 September 2022 - NW3003

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Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he and/or his department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr M S Mabika with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

All Policy review documents and /or any other government policy document developed by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) follows policy development processes as prescribed by the legislature.Reviewed policy documents and /or any other government policy document developed follows a consultative process and are also gazetted if required for public comments and are accessible by the public, interested and affected parties, including by private or external structures or structures of any political party.

30 September 2022 - NW2633

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

With reference to one of the interventions announced by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in his Energy Response Plan, which is the assistance that would be given to 80 projects that represent over 6 000MW of new generation capacity, to obtain the remaining approvals as quickly as possible, (a) what number of the projects have been assisted to obtain the requisite approvals to date and (b) by what date is the Government expecting to have all the 80 projects approved?

Reply:

The 80 projects being referred to are developed by private parties and the DMRE has no visibility on the progress. Since the lifting of the licensing threshold, many people seem to be developing energy projects and have no obligation to apprise the department. NERSA has registered projects totalling 688 MW to date.

30 September 2022 - NW2626

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)(a) On what date did the practical studies on (i) the new university of science and innovation in Ekurhuleni and (ii) the new crime detection university in Hammanskraal commence and (b) what is the timeline for completion of the studies; (2) whether the universities will be classified as university colleges or full universities; if so, what (a)(i) is the reason for the classification in each case and (ii) are the further relevant details and (b) is the estimated cost to establish the universities?

Reply:

1. The process of establishing the two new higher education institutions commenced in April 2021 with the appointment of a Project Steering Committee constituted by stakeholder representatives from various organisations and sectors.

The two feasibility studies are expected to be completed and submitted to the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation by 31 October 2022.

2. The classification of these two new higher education institutions as university colleges or universities will only be known once the feasibility studies have been completed.

30 September 2022 - NW2936

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What is the status of the boards of the (a) Acacia Park, (b) Laboria Park and (c) Pelican Park Parliamentary Villages, (2) whether each board comprises the requisite number of members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the boards have met the threshold of (a) board and (b) resident meetings since 1 January 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Parliamentary Villages Management Board was appointed by the Minister on 26 November 2022

(a) The following Members represent Acacia Park;

  • Hon H April, MP
  • Hon B Tshwete, MP
  • Hon T Letsie, MP
  • Mr G Kobo, Sessional Official

(b) The following Members represent Laboria Park;

  • Hon J Manganye, MP. The Member replaced the late Hon Nkosi, MP, who was the Laboria Park residents committee, chairperson.
  • Hon R Semenya, MP
  • Hon N Gantsho, MP
  • Mr M Ndara, Sessional Official

(c) The following Members represent Pelican Park;

  • Hon N Mvana, MP
  • Hon P Mahlo, MP
  • Hon Lesoma, MP

(2) Acacia and Laboria Park parliamentary villages are fully constituted. However, Pelican Park is not fully constituted as there is a vacancy for a sessional official.

(3)

(a) No, plans are afoot to convene a Board meeting at the beginning of October 2022, depending on the availability of Board Members.

The previous board appointed on 31 July 2020 met its threshold in that meetings were held as follows, 16 September 2020, 23 March 2021, 01 April 2021 and 07 June 2021.

(b) According to Rules, Conditions and General information, there is no threshold for residents' meetings.

30 September 2022 - NW3264

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What actions are taken against mining companies that have failed to rehabilitate the disused mines according to the original agreement entered into between the State and such mining companies?

Reply:

The Department oversee the rehabilitation of disused mines that are owner less. It should be indicated the pace and the rate at which rehabilitation of the owner-less mines are carried out is largely informed by the allocation of funds from Treasury. It is common knowledge that the allocated funds remain in adequate to address the existing backlog of operations.

In respect of the mines with owners, administrative processes are followed in that mines are issued with legal notices to carry out rehabilitation as per the approved Environmental Authorization or approved Environmental Management Programme. It should be indicated that where there are challenges relate to areas that are already rehabilitated (in accordance with the commitments outlined as per Environmental Authentications or approved Environmental Management Programme) and are reopened by illegal miners (who are undocumented migrants). Rehabilitation of such area follows after the conclusion of the criminal enforcement process.

 

 

30 September 2022 - NW2918

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to the comments by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that the Government, in support of or collaboration with his department, is tackling illegal migration and alluded to meetings between the Republic, Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Botswana, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Lesotho, what are the full and relevant details of the (a) plan to effectively deal with illegal migration and (b) meetings held with the Southern African Development Community and other African leaders in relation to illegal migration; (2) whether such meetings will be held with leaders of other countries such as Pakistan, Bangladesh, Somalia, Ethiopia and others; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)&(2) The Republic of South Africa does have diplomatic relations with the above mentioned countries and many more. There are regular bi-lateral engagements with those countries at senior official and ministerial level. The details of when these meetings will be held will be communicated prior to their commencement with a communique released afterwards explaining the issues discussed and agreements reached.

END

30 September 2022 - NW2850

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

In light of the fact that Eskom customer services offices are closed nationally since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, on what date is it envisaged that the (a) offices will reopen to the public and (b) operational issues and services are improved, namely reporting structures such as Alfred Chat bot and email that do not generate valid reference numbers and timeous responses?

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the Department of Public Enterprises.

30 September 2022 - NW3171

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What amount was paid to the facilities management service that provided services to the Lindela Repatriation Centre from 1 April 2021 to 31 January 2022, (b) what procurement process was undertaken to contract a facilities management service provider on 31 January 2022 when the contract of Enviromongz expired, (c) who was the successful service provider that was appointed and (d) what is the (i) duration and (ii) value of the contract?

Reply:

(a) The total amount for the indicated period from 1 April 2021 to 31 January 2022 was R77,708,123.

(b) The process followed was an open one at the beginning with the advertisement of the Request for Qualification (RFQ) on 14 May 2021 which closed on 18 June 2021.The Bid Evaluation Committee (BEC) made a recommendation to the Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC) on 21 October 2021, in relation to the bidder which complied with the requirements and the proposal was approved.

The process then assumed a closed format with the Request for Proposals (RFP) circulated to the shortlisted bidders. The closing dates for the submission of costing was 14 December 2021. At the conclusion of the evaluation process, the contract offer was made to the successful bidder on 18 January 2022 and which was accepted on 19 January 2022.

(c) Enviromongz Projects (Pty) Ltd

(d)(i) The contract is for 60 months from 1 February 2022

(d)(ii) The value is R51,886,730.83 per annum

END

 

 

30 September 2022 - NW3292

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

In view of the burst in the Jagersfontein tailings dam on 11 September 2022, the Merriespruit tailings dam disaster in 1994 and the Bafokeng tailings dam failure in 1974, what regulatory oversight and enforcement measures are in place for (a) major and smaller mining companies and (b) retreat operations with regard to the maintenance and monitoring of tailings dams?

Reply:

The Department enforces compliance in the mining sector through the following legislation:

a) Mine Health and Safety Act, 1996 (Act 29 of 1996, as amended),

b) Guideline for the Compilation of a Mandatory Code of Practice on Mine Residue Deposits (issued by the Chief Inspector of Mines),

However, the Department does not have the authority to regulate the processing of residue deposits at the Jagersfontein dam. This is as a result of the De Beers court judgment over Jagersfontein residue deposits (De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd v Ataqua Mining (Pty) Ltd & others, case no. 3215/06, Free State Provincial Division, 13 December 2007). The judgement held that historical mine residue deposits (those created before the coming into operation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MPRDA) on the 01st of May 2004) are not minerals as contemplated in the MPRDA and such they are not regulated under provisions of the MPRDA. The processing of historical mine residue deposits does not constitute mining and the area where they are situated is not classified as a mine. This was again confirmed by the court judgment in the case of Ekapa Minerals (Pty) Ltd & Others vs Lucky Seekoei & Others (2057/2016) [2017] ZANCHC 5 (13 January 2017). The Department is fully committed to providing its technical and other expertise regarding mining related matters to the relevant government authorities.

30 September 2022 - NW2627

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In what way is the process to establish (a) technical and vocational education and training centres and (b) new colleges or college campuses the same as the process to establish universities?

Reply:

The process to establish Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College is outlined on Chapter 2 of the Continuing Education and Training Act, Act 16 of 2006 which says the Minister, after consultation with the institution, may, by notice in the Gazette and from money appropriated for this purpose, establish a public-

(a) Technical and Vocational Education and Training College; or

(b) Community Education and Training College.

The notice in the Gazette must set out -

(a) The date of the establishment of the College:

(b) Whether the college is a technical and vocational education and training college or the college is a community education and training college;

(c) The name of the College; and 

(d) The physical location and address of the college.

The University is established in terms of Higher Education Act 101 of 1997 which says on chapter 3 the Minister may after consulting Council on Higher Education, by notice in the Gazette and from money appropriated for this purpose by Parliament, establish a university. 

b) new colleges or college campuses the same as the process to establish universities?

The process of establishing a new university is the responsibility of the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation.  It should be noted that the cost of developing a new university is very high and will require Cabinet approval and the appropriation of funds through the National Treasury process. At this time in South Africa’s development trajectory, there are many competing needs and given the current fiscal constraints, funding for new universities is limited and will require more feasibility studies to ascertain the probabilities of establishing new institutions in the future, more so in remote areas to limit the influx and movement of students into cities. 

Cabinet has approved the establishment of new universities in Ekurhuleni and Hammanskraal. A feasibility study is underway in this regard, and this will advise on the size and shape of these two institutions.

In respect to the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges, the process of establishing new colleges or college campuses is exactly the same as that set out for Universities.

At present the Department is implementing new infrastructure for TVET Colleges as follows:

Msinga Campus   of UMgungundlovu TVET College at Cwaka 

Greytown Campus of Umgungundlovu TVET College at Greytown

Umzimkhulu Campus of Esayidi TVET College at Umzimkhulu 

Bhambanana Campus of Umfolozi TVET College at Bhambanana

Nkandla A Campus of Umfolozi TVET College at Nkandla Town

Nkandla B Campus of Umfolozi TVET College at Nkumgamathe

Vryheid Engineering Campus of Mthashana TVET College at Vryheid

Nongoma Campus of Mthashana TVET College at Nongoma

Kwagqikasi Campus of Mthashana TVET College at Nongoma

Giyani Campus of Letaba TVET College at Giyani

Balfour Campus of Gert Sibande TVET College at Balfour

Aliwal North Campus of Ikhala TVET College at Aliwal North

Sterkspruit Campus TVET College of Ikhala at Sterkspruit

Ngqungqushe Campus of Ingwe TVET College at Lusikisiki

Graaff Reneitt Campus of East Cape Midlands at Graaff Reneitt

Thabazimbi Campus of Waterberg TVET College at Thabazimbi.

At present there are no further funds to construct new campuses or colleges.

30 September 2022 - NW3224

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) Who is responsible for the enforcement of the mandatory Code of Practice for Mine Residue Deposits at a mine, with particular reference to the monitoring, maintenance, risk assessment and disaster prevention and recovery for tailings dams and (b) with reference to the Jagersfontein dam, what work had been done to monitor the maintenance of the dam to minimise disasters such as the one that happened at the Jagersfontein mine in Free State on 11 September 2022?

Reply:

a) The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy, is responsible for the enforcement of the respective legal provisions in the mining sector.

b) The court in the De Beers judgment over Jagersfontein mine residue deposits (De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd v Ataqua Mining (Pty) Ltd & others, case no. 3215/06, Free State Provincial Division, 13 December 2007) held that historical mine residue deposits (those created before the coming into operation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MPRDA) on the 01st of May 2004) are not minerals as contemplated in the MPRDA and such they are not regulated under provisions of the MPRDA. The processing of historical mine residue deposits does not constitute mining and the area where they are situated is not classified as a mine. This was again confirmed by the court judgment in the case of Ekapa Minerals (Pty) Ltd & Others vs Lucky Seekoei & Others (2057/2016) [2017] ZANCHC 5 (13 January 2017). Consequently, the Department did not have the authority to regulate the activities (including health and safety) in the processing of mine residue deposits at the Jagersfontein dam. However, the Department is fully committed to providing its technical and other expertise in the investigation of the accident by the relevant government authorities.

30 September 2022 - NW2911

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1) Whether, with reference to the Women’s Month Roundtable where he pointed out that 10% of all rape cases take place in universities, his department has regulations in place in terms of processes and procedures that serve as guidelines on how universities deal with Gender-Based Violence and rape cases; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details thereof; (2) whether his department follows up on cases reported to the university to ensure that the processes it follows are equitable and sensitive to victims; if not, why not; if so, what practices of accountability are there from his department to ensure that cases are handled correctly; (3) whether his department offers any legal and/or psychological support to victims going through university-led legal processes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Addressing the occurrence of GBV forms part of integrated Gender Equality functions in the Department of Higher Education and Training (the Department), under the umbrella of Social Inclusion across all branches.  Every branch, in this case the University Education and Planning, Policy and Strategy branches each have unique responsibilities.  These include for the University Education branch:

  • Create the enabling environment, coordinate, support institutions in the implementation of social inclusion in the PSET system;
  • Manage the institutional policy environment; and
  • Manage and support implementation programmes within institutions.

The Planning, Policy and Strategy branch is responsible for:

  • Develop and manage the enabling policy environment (including sector policies, guidelines, standards, protocols and tools) for social inclusion in the PSET system;
  • Support (where needed) implementation branches in the implementation of Social Inclusion and Equity;
  • Collate information from Branches and monitor the implementation of social inclusion policies and programmes in the PSET system;
  • Report on the implementation of social inclusion in the PSET system;
  • Liaise with Chapter 9 institutions, other Departments; and
  • Report on national and international obligations.

(1) In order to create the enabling environment to address GBV and rape cases in Universities the Department has published the Policy Framework to address Gender-based Violence in the Post-School Education and Training System (Government Gazette No 43575, 31 July 2020). The purpose of the Policy Framework is to create an enabling environment for the eradication of GBV and instil respect, protection, promotion and fulfilment of human rights as enshrined in the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act No 108 of 1996). The Policy Framework intends to assist PSET institutions to address the occurrence of GBV and to provide a monitoring instrument to the Department to assess the implementation of the Policy Framework.

The Policy Framework aims to:

  • Conceptualise GBV and define its manifestation in terms of existing laws and policies;
  • Detail the international and national regulatory framework compelling institutional and departmental responses to GBV;
  • Provide guidance around the structures, mechanisms and processes that PSET institutions must put in place to address GBV;
  • Compel PSET institutions to both create awareness of GBV policies and prevent incidents of GBV; and
  • Set out a framework for oversight of the DHET and PSET institutions’ development and implementation of policy.

The Policy Framework has 3 strategic objectives, including:

  • Create an enabling environment in the Department and PSET institutions to ensure the effective implementation of the Policy Framework, actions and programmes;
  • Promote the safety of all students and staff by putting in place comprehensive prevention and awareness programmes intended to raise the importance of policies and services addressing GBV, as well as other measures aimed at preventing incidents of GBV; and
  • Provide comprehensive support, assistance to victims and refer them appropriately to specialised support and assistance in line with the National Instructions, National Directives, List of Designated Health Establishments and Additional Services directives under the Sexual Offences and Related Matters Act (SORMA) (Act 32 of 2007). 

It is the responsibility of PSET institutions to implement the Policy Framework with the support of the Department and HIGHER HEALTH. 

Following the release of the Policy Framework and as part of its work, the Ministerial Task Team on GBV in Universities held a series of engagements with university communities across various institutions.  Amongst others the aim was to establish how universities respond to sexual harassment and GBV and harm, and what support is needed from the Department to enable effective implementation of the Policy Framework.

It has been established that not all universities have sufficient means to deal with GBV, and the Department and HIGHER HEALTH aim to support these universities and campuses in addressing the problem. The Ministerial Task Team, as soon as the report is released. will advise on areas requiring improvement in institutional responses to GBV violence and sexual harassment and appropriate levels of support needed for the implementation of the National Policy Framework to address gender-based violence by universities.

The Department furthermore plays an oversight role, monitoring institutions to ensure that they take full responsibility for addressing GBV on their campuses.

The Department supports institutions in implementation, monitors the implementation of the Policy Framework and is now finalising the Social inclusion Review and Implementation Model (SI-RIM) that is a mechanism to provide information on what to include in addressing GBV and also for reporting purposes.

The Department, HIGHER HEALTH, in collaboration with several Departments (such as Health, Justice and Constitutional Development, South African Police Service (SAPD) and others), experts and institutions developed institutional implementation Guidelines and supporting protocols and standards for Institutions to address GBV. 

HIGHER HEALTH, through the Department has furthermore released a set of instruments that will strengthen the realisation of the Policy Framework. These instruments include directives to all institutions and Management to put the necessary infrastructure towards a comprehensive response on cases of sexual and gender misconduct, rape, sexual assaults across all our campuses. The procedural guidelines and protocols on rape, code of ethics ensure that reporting of cases, disciplinary systems, safeguarding evidence, provision of rape kits, psychosocial support services and survivor friendly infrastructure is developed across campuses.

The Department is supporting institutions to develop and implement policies and protocols on GBV.  All universities have measures in place to raise awareness, and offer guidance and advice on GBV related matters. These include, but are not limited to:  workshops or presentations during orientation weeks and during various parts of the year for students; roadshows; training; production and dissemination of brochures and other literature for the university community; and information on institutional websites. In addition to these initiatives, a large number of students have completed a curriculum on GBV prevention and mitigation via HIGHER HEALTH, empowering them with knowledge and understanding of GBV and related matters. Higher Health is the Department’s implementing agency for student health, wellness and development in the post-school sector.

(2)  The Department through HIGHER HEALTH follows up on cases reported to the university to ensure that the processes it follows are equitable and sensitive to victims.  

HIGHER HEALTH provides psycho-social support services through two main modalities: (1) through the HIGHER HEALTH toll-free helpline, and (2) through interventions provided by counselling and clinical psychologists. HIGHER HEALTH is also providing support to victims through trained mentors and they are also running a comprehensive awareness programme through several focussed campus activities, campus radio programmes and peer support mechanisms.

HIGER HEALTH works closely with psychosocial support structures on and off-campus.  Victims are supported on campus through trained mentors and staff, as well as specialist support personnel such as counselling and clinical psychologists.  They also assist victims through the reporting processes and refer them to specialist psychosocial support off-campus.  Thorough follow-up is being made to support victims throughout the process of reporting and rehabilitation.

HIGHER HEALTH is implementing a comprehensive and integrated programme promoting health and wellbeing of students across South Africa’s public universities and TVET colleges and provide on-campus support to PSET institutions in 7 priority areas:

This year, over 14 000 students accessed the various HIGHER HEALTH models of psychosocial support. Academic stress and anxiety (30%), general stress and substance abuse (22%) depression and suicide (18%) and sexual, physical and emotional abuse (19%) present the main reasons for accessing support care.

HIGHER HEALTH has set up campus and community radio stations to engage young students routinely on matters related to Sexual and Gender Based Violence and mental health as a matter of priority. There is also HIGHER HEALTH's 24-hour toll-free helpline available in all 11 official languages.  The line offers health, wellness and psychosocial risk assessment toolkits for early screening, empowerment and referral related to gender-based violence, mental health, HIV, TB and other matters.

(3)  Through HIGHER HEALTH he Department offers legal and/or psychological support to victims going through reporting and legal processes. Universities also have their own systems and processes to support students and staff in these areas.

30 September 2022 - NW3103

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What total number of (a) permanent and (b) contract workers are employed in the horticulture section of the Western Cape regional office; (2) which properties in the Western Cape are serviced by the specified section; (3) whether any vehicles are available for use by the section to perform their functions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

  1. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has informed me there are 111 permanent workers and zero contract workers employed in the horticulture section of the Western Cape regional office.
  2. The horticultural section services 58 properties.
  3. Yes. One car, one 8-seater bus, one long wheel base bakkie and one 4x4 bakkie – it is important to note that this section also has access to other vehicles as and when required.

30 September 2022 - NW2711

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Considering the addition of specialised medical occupations such as chemists, specialist nurse educators, anaesthesiologists and dentists to the critical skills list, in addition to the Republic’s shortage of doctors and nurses, what is the reason that he is not prioritising the establishment of colleges to absorb more medical students?

Reply:

In 2011, the Minister of Health appointed a Ministerial Task Team on Nursing Education and Training following the National Nursing Summit of April 2011. The Ministerial Task Team report, which was finalised in August 2012, made several recommendations, including that nursing colleges be declared as higher education institutions in compliance with the Constitution and provisions of the Higher Education Act (101 of 1997, as amended). The Ministerial Task Team also recommended that while nursing education and training should be regarded as a national competence, it should account to the Director-General of Health, rather than Higher Education and Training.

The priority at the time was to align the nursing qualifications to the Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework.

The Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation has designated that the 10 public Nursing Colleges and 9 public Emergency Medical Services Colleges can offer qualifications on the Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework leading to Certificates, Diplomas and Bachelor’s degrees until such time as they are declared an institutional type contemplated in the Higher Education Act. These qualifications must be accredited by the Council on Higher Education and registered by the South African Qualifications Authority on the National Qualifications Framework.

30 September 2022 - NW2749

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

How often does her department audit the occupancy of the houses allocated to sessional workers at the parliamentary villages; (2) what is the period of occupation for sessional workers; (3) whether she is aware of the allegations that sessional workers are not residing in their allocated houses, but are renting them out instead; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether her Department intends to do a full audit to confirm that houses allocated to Members, staff and sessional workers are primarily occupied by the individuals to whom they have been allocated; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has informed me that it conducts an annual occupancy audit of the Parliamentary Villages, usually after all Client Departments have confirmed their Sessional Officials for the Parliamentary year.

(2) Sessional Officials are designated as Sessional for one Parliamentary year at a time.

(3) No, the Department informed me that it is not aware of such allegations, as no specific allegations have been brought to the Department’s attention. However, details of such allegations would be appreciated to ensure that they are investigated accordingly.

(4) The Department commenced the annual occupancy audit in mid-August 2022, and the process is expected to take three (3) months to complete. The biggest challenge experienced thus far is that tenants are not always in Cape Town all the time and that the exercise is completed primarily after hours as the primary tenant needs to confirm the occupant declared. There is the Parliamentary Programme, which also determines the Members’ availability at the residence.

 

30 September 2022 - NW2950

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What is the total amount paid annually to the security company at the Sarah Baartman Centre of Remembrance in the Hankey district in the Cacadu District Municipality in the Eastern Cape in the (a) 2018-19, (b) 2020-21 and (c) 2021-22 financial years; (2) what is the (a) name of the security company that has been appointed in the 2022-23 financial year and (b) total cost of the contract; (3) whether her department and/or any of the previous contractors own the unprotected building plans in one of the rooms at the Sarah Baartman Centre; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has informed me as follows:

(a) None

(b) None

(c) R 415 805,75

(2)

(a) Capital Ship Trading 605 (PTY) LTD

(b) The contract is a rate-based two (02) year term contract which commenced on 26/04/2021 for the protection of vacant state property within the jurisdiction of the PE Regional Office. The monthly rate for a single 12-hour shift per guard is R 13 860, 19. See the table below for security payments from April 2018 to September 2022.

INVOICE DATE

AUTHORISED DATE

AMOUNT

2021/11/15

2021/11/16

R83 161,15

2021/11/15

2021/11/16

R83 161,15

2021/11/15

2021/11/16

R83 161,15

2022/02/18

2022/02/21

R 83 161,15

2022/02/18

2022/02/21

R 83 161,15

 Payments Made During 2021/2022 Financial Year 

R415 805,75

INVOICE DATE

AUTHORISED DATE

AMOUNT

2022/04/05

2022/04/05

R83 161,15

2022/04/11

2022/04/11

R83 161,15

2022/05/10

2022/05/11

R83 161,15

2022/06/20

2022/06/27

R83 161,15

2022/07/11

2022/07/12

R83 161,15

2022/08/02

2022/08/03

R83 161,15

2022/08/31

2022/09/01

R83 161,15

 Payments Made During 2022/2023 Financial Year 

 

R582 128,05

(3) These are site plans issued to the previous contractor that was left behind when the site was vacated. These plans will be replaced with an updated set of plans when a new contractor is appointed to complete the project.

30 September 2022 - NW3043

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of (a)(i) applications, (ii) reports and/or (iii) grievances of undocumented South Africans have been received by his department in the 2021-22 financial year and (b) the specified cases were resolved?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of (Late Registration of births) applications received of undocumented South Africans in the 2021/22 financial year were 104 823.

(a)(ii)&(iii) The total number of reports and grievances of undocumented South Africans that were received in the 2021/22 financial year were 598.

(b) The total number of the specified cases that were resolved in the 2021/22 financial year were 260.

END

30 September 2022 - NW3008

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether she and/or her Department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Ms E R J Spies with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) informed me that no policy review document or any other government policy document has been submitted by the Department to structures outside of Government unless such was part of a policy development process in line with the approved Policy framework where a stakeholder matrix was developed with key stakeholders identified in advance in terms of their participation and contribution in the development of policy.

The Department follows government-based policy development processes. When a policy is developed and ready for consultation with stakeholders, the process follows approval from the Accounting Officer and/or the Executive Authority before engaging stakeholders. The Policy, Research and Regulation Branch is charged with the responsibility of assisting the Minister in the development of policy (e.g. legislation or regulations) in terms of the construction and property industries also align to policy development processes prescribed in the National Policy Development Framework (NPDF).

In the last five years, policies developed or reviewed were engaged in the prescribed format through gazetting for public comment. For instance, in terms of the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB), regulations such as the amendment to the Best Practice Project Assessment Scheme were gazetted in September 2020 and in 2018, the CIDB adjusted range of tender values that were also gazetted. In such instances, members of society have access to these documents as they are public documents. With regards to the Expropriation Bill [B23-2020], on the other hand, the Department consulted with various government departments as part of developing SEIAS; and we have also engaged with the Ambassadors (Minister’s engagement) of different countries.

Therefore, apart from a standard and approved policy development process where relevant stakeholders are identified and consulted in different stages of the process, no policy document has been shared with structures outside of Government.

29 September 2022 - NW2513

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether Botswana and Namibia have closed their borders to imports of certain fruits from the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the action by the two countries is a unilateral act against the trade agreement with the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she will intervene on the matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the steps she intends to take in this regard?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department received reports from the industry and official media releases that Botswana and Namibia are imposing import restrictions (border closures) as an instrument to protect domestic producers from import competition. These border closures impact largely on the vegetable products exported by South Africa to these countries. The Department is working with the industry and the Departments of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) (lead department) and International Relations & Cooperation to address this challenge.

(2) Yes, border closures are being imposed as a unilateral act. Botswana and Namibia claim the measure is provided for in the South African Cultural Union (SACU) Agreement.

(3) Yes, The Minister received a submission from the industry regarding the challenges of persistent border closures in Botswana and Namibia. She will be engaging with the industry on the matter before addressing it with her counterparts in the two countries. Furthermore, the Department is working with the DTIC, National Treasury, South African Revenue Service (SARS) and International Administration Commission (ITAC) to investigate a permanent long-term solution to all trade challenges in the SACU. The Agricultural Trade Industry is regularly consulted and engaged through the Agricultural Trade Forum (ATF).

29 September 2022 - NW3254

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 2206 on 21 June 2022, what (a) progress has been made to date to finalise the settlement of the Lower Zingcuka land claim and (b) is the anticipated date of settlement?

Reply:

a) Verification for Lower Ngqumeya and Lower Zingcuka has been finalized. The Claimant Committee is to adopt final verification lists by 30 September 2022

b) Phase 1 of claim consisting of Lower Ngqumeya and Lower Zingcuka is projected to be settled in Quarter 3 of 2022/23 Financial Year, on condition that the Commission receives full co-operation from the community.

29 September 2022 - NW2602

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department has taken any action to support persons living on farms who are not working on the farms they live on to supply them with electricity and/or provide them with alternative energy arrangements to ensure that they are able to do basic cooking; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. DALRRD has approved subsidies of R58,588 million in the financial year 2021/2022 in terms of section 4 of the Extension of Security of Tenure Act, 2018 (Act No. 2 of 2018) ESTA and sections 26 and 27 of the Labour Tenants Act, 1996 (Act No.3 of 1996) for installation of electricity as well as installation of solar panels. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is also providing mediation services and Legal Aid South Africa provides legal representation under the Land Rights Management Facility to farm dwellers in circumstances where landowners are refusing to consent to the Municipality and or Eskom to provide electricity.

Furthermore, the courts have ordered that it is the responsibility of Local Government through municipalities to provide all basic services to the people living, staying and working on the farms.

29 September 2022 - NW2899

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the land claim of the Hoxani Traditional Community of Phabheni, reference number: No. KRP912, what has hindered her department from completing the claim within the envisaged financial year?

Reply:

The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights does not have a record of a land claim lodged by Hoxani Traditional Council nor a record of claim with reference number KRP 912.

29 September 2022 - NW2481

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What (i) total number of employees of her department are currently working from home, (ii) number of such employees have special permission to work from home and (iii) are the reasons for granting such special permission and (b) on what date will such workers return to their respective offices; whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a)(i) None. On the announcement by the Minister in the Presidency on 23 June 2022 the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) issued a Departmental Circular reiterating the aspect of 100% return to work was announced. All personnel inclusive of personnel with comorbidities had to return to work with a 100% of the workforce back at their workstations. As of 23 June 2022, all comorbidities related to Covid-19 were/will be managed in accordance with the “Determination and directive on leave of absence in the public service”: issued in August 2021.

(ii) Falls away.

(iii) Falls away.

(b) Falls away.

(2) No.

29 September 2022 - NW3402

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, considering the July 2016 Constitutional Court judgment relating to new order claims which found the Amendment to the Restitution of Land Rights Amendment Act, Act 15 of 2014, unlawful, many land claims made in the period 1 July 2014 to 31 July 2016 were declared validly lodged, but interdicted from processing and finalising, and noting that all claims made within the specified period have now fallen in the unresolved category, and given that after the ruling, no new claims have been lodged and/or processed, with her department being unable to provide clarity and/or time frames as to when it will address the legitimate land claims, any progress has been made in drafting new legislation in accordance with the July 2016 Constitutional Court judgment, so that all legitimate land claims can be resolved; if not, (a) why not and (b) how does she intend to resolve the long outstanding issue; if so, at what stage is the Bill; (2) (a) what total number of claims have been received in the period that are now classified as unresolved and (b) by what date does the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights envisage to re-open the claims?

Reply:

1. (a)(b) A Private Members Bill was introduced by the African National Congress on 16 August 2017 during the Fifth Parliament and lapsed when Parliament rose at the end of their term. The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights (the Commission) is currently dealing with old order claims lodged before 31 December 1998 and is not in a position to process new claims as there is no legislation nor budget allocated to do so. The Commission reports to the Land Claims Court every six months on progress of outstanding Old order claims in line with LAMOSA 2 order, the last report was submitted on 30 June 2022.

2. (a) 163 383 new order claims

(b) When Parliament enacts new legislation to allow the processing of these New Order claims or the Commission settles all the outstanding old order claims lodged by 1998 as ordered by the LAMOSA Constitution Court judgment in 2018.

END

29 September 2022 - NW3100

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the current Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) pandemic, what are the reasons for the large Disease Management Areas (DMAs) declared in the Free State, while the DMAs in provinces such as Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga, where the FMD outbreak has not been brought under control yet, are still relatively small; (2) what are the reasons that (a) the restriction on the movement of cattle have been extended to include sheep and goats and (b) pigs have not been included in the restriction; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The boundaries of all Disease Management Areas (DMAs) for Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) were determined using a risk-based approach taking into account evidence of recent spread, in an effort to limit the negative effects of the disease as much as possible.

(2)(a) Cattle were mostly affected in the recent outbreaks and the movement of live cattle clearly poses the highest risk. The initial movement ban was thus limited to cattle in order to limit the negative effects on other sectors of the livestock industry. Since sheep were involved in some recent outbreaks, sheep and goats have now been included in the Gazette Notice of 8 September 2022.

(b) Pigs continue to be excluded in order to limit the economic impact on an industry that so far has not been affected by the outbreaks.

(3) No. The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development will continue to update everyone if there is new information.

28 September 2022 - NW3119

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether his department funded the indoor heating pool project at the Retreat Swimming Pool in Cape Town; if not, who did; if so, on what date (a) did the specified project start and (b) was it completed. (2). what (a) was the initial project scope and Memorandum of Understanding between Aquatics Swimming Clubs and Swimming South Africa and (b) is the reason that the indoor heating swimming pool is still operating with cold water. (3). what planning and budget are being considered to ensure that the new indoor swimming pool complies with competition and/or gala standards. (4). what are the reasons that the (a) showers are not accessible to swimmers, (b) cloakrooms are used for storage space and (c) steel seating structures in the cloakrooms are not covered with wood and/or plastic material. (5). what are the reasons that the complaints which were submitted to the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee have not been attended to?

Reply:

The provision and maintenance of Sport and recreation facilities is the constitutional responsibility of Local Government through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) and the Metropolitan Municipalities through the Urban Settlement Development Grant (USDG).

My department is in contact with the Provincial Department and the City of Cape Town to get more details in terms of the project.

28 September 2022 - NW3236

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(What total number of Europeans in the Republic have (a) migrant statuses, (b) refugee statuses and (c) work permits?

Reply:

a) The Department does not maintain migration data disaggregated by nationality on other types of visa except in respect of critical skills, business and general work visa.

b) There are currently 26 European nationals with active section 24 permits (Refugee Status).

c) The total number of Europeans in the Republic with work visas is 2 770 with effect from 04 January 2016 (this is from the period when the Department introduced an Online Visa Adjudication System).

END

28 September 2022 - NW3162

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)Whether, with reference to the congress of the SA Football Association (SAFA), there is any litigation as at the latest date and/or envisaged in order to stop the congress; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is SAFA doing about mediation in respect of the issues to stop any pending or envisaged court action. (2) (a) what amount has been budgeted for the elective congress, (b) who will be presiding at the elective congress and (c) who are the members running for election? NW3874E

Reply:

The South African Football Association (SAFA) has in their response indicated that they are unable to respond to this question as they state it may result in third party interference which they indicate is forbidden by FIFA and has dire consequences to the National Federation. See attached letter received from SAFA in this regard.

28 September 2022 - NW3163

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With regards to his department requesting information about the Theatre and Dance Policy Consultative Conference that was scheduled from 2 to 3 September 2022, what (a) number of submissions did his department receive in response to its call for submissions on the Draft National Theatre and Dance Policy document, (b) were the contents of the submissions that were received,(c) are the reasons that the submissions were not published by the department to ensure that the process was transparent,(d) number of persons and/or organizations that have been included and/or excluded from the conference, (e) are the reasons that the invitation was sent out to Mr. T W Mhlongo only at 19:21, and (f) are the reasons that invitations were not sent out by his department while it is now evident the conference is presented by his department?

Reply:

(a). 27 written submissions were received by the Department.

(b). Various submissions were received, some were just acknowledging and appreciating the invitation to be part of the policy development process. Whilst others were talking directly to policy focus areas such as education and training, research and information, 4th Industrial Revolution in Arts, funding, artists’ rights, social benefits, bursaries, networking, companies and career paths, awards, and recognition. These submissions are being consolidated into policy documents for ease reference.

(c). Submissions are currently being analysed, aligned, and consolidated into the final draft policy.

(d). Invitations were done through the Provincial Task Team members representing the sector. In addition, independent practitioners and institutions were invited from within different theatre and dance structures, including State theatre, Playhouse, Market theatre, PACOFS, Arts Cape, the Nelson Mandela Bay Theatre Complex, ASSITEJ, TADA, SAID, SADAF, SACCYF, CCIFSA

Over and above the specified structures, invitations were also issued to various role players across the value chain of the theatre and dance sector. A virtual link was also shared for a wider reach to ensure that all those who wish to participate, can. We are not aware of anyone, or any structures being deliberately excluded from the Policy Conference

(e). We are not aware of the invitation that was sent out to Mr TW Mhlongo at 19h21.

(f). A service provider was appointed to project manage the policy development process inclusive of the policy conference on behalf of the Department.

28 September 2022 - NW3231

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Which recent measures have been taken in building quality recreational facilities which would cater for aspiring (a) karate, (b) judo and (c) boxing athletes in the Republic. (2). whether his department has set any time frames for the development of the specified facilities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a), (b) and (c)

While provision of sport and recreation facilities are, in terms of Schedule 5B of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, a mandate of local government/ municipalities, the department has been able to ensure that such mandate is fulfilled through ring-fencing and allocation of a portion of 5% earmarked for sport facilities in the Municipal Infrastructure Grant. Through this ring-fenced Grant, department has among others allocated the following facilities that caters for karate, judo, and boxing:

28 September 2022 - NW3165

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury is involved in the administration of the Makana Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the involvement of the National Treasury?

Reply:

Yes. The Minister of Finance is responsible for administering the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) in all the 257 municipalities in the country. The National Treasury in collaboration with the Eastern Cape Provincial Treasury continue to perform the monitoring and oversight role to Makana Local Municipality in terms of the MFMA.

In addition, the municipality is currently placed under intervention in terms of Section 139 (1) and (5) of the Constitution because of a crisis in its financial and service delivery affairs. This is a mandatory intervention by the Eastern Cape Provincial Executive; however, the Municipal Finance Recovery Services unit in the National Treasury has drafted the Financial Recovery Plan for this intervention as is required in all mandatory interventions.

The financial recovery plan was prepared in July 2021 and handed to the municipality for implementation. The recovery plan is monitored by the National Treasury and the Eastern Cape Provincial Treasury.

28 September 2022 - NW3212

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(2) whether (a) his department and (b) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee have given the medalists bonuses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? (2) whether (a) his department and (b) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee have given the medalists bonuses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. My department and the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) have long committed that as a norm medallist at major multi-coded international events shall be awarded and given prize money as incentives. The date for ceremony to present the Awards and Prize money to Commonwealth Games Medallists is yet to be determined.

We trying to finalise a common date that will suite everyone involved to award the Commonwealth Games Medallists their dues.

28 September 2022 - NW3211

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) (a) How has his department prepared for the Netball World Cup in 2023 that will be hosted by the Republic in 2023 and (b) what are the financial implications of the plans and preparations for his department. (2) whether his department has offered any (a) financial and/or (b) other assistance to Team South Africa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details. (3) whether there are any measures in place to encourage sports tourism leading up to the event; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details. (4) what steps is his department taking to promote local cultural events for an international audience. (5) whether his department has any partnerships with the Department of Tourism to promote local cultural events for international audiences and tourism; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) There is significant progress being made regarding the preparations. The following is progress on key delivery areas.

  1. The venue and seating layout plans have been finalized.
  2. Training venues have been identified
  3. Accommodation plans for teams have been finalized
  4. Accreditation and security plans are progressing well with the assistance of State Security Agency and SAPS.
  5. The Travel agency has been appointed.
  6. Transport plans for teams will be finalized once the announcement has been made of qualified teams that will participate in the Netball World Cup 2023.
  7. A Marketing agency has been appointed and is finalizing the following plans:
    1. A. International
    2. B. Domestic and
    3. C. Public Relations plans
  8. The official ball has been revealed and named (Kganya).
  9. Official Mascot (Letsatsi) was launched at the Africa Regional Qualifiers in Pretoria.
  10. The Timing, Scoring and Result system has been procured and evaluated including the umpire alert system.
  11. The title and first tier sponsors have been secured.
  12. First phase of ticket sales will go on sale at the end of October 2022 which will be the hospitality and tour packages.
  13. The draw will take place in November 2022 after the conclusion of Regional Qualifiers.
  14. On the 25 May 2023 we will receive the Trophy in KZN and begin the trophy tour in all Provinces.

(1) (b) The following are the financial implications of plans and preparations

Projected income:

  1. R196,673,798 which is made up of Public Funding, Sponsorship, Ticketing, Broadcast, Merchandising, Accommodation and Other Income.
  2. Projected Expenditure:
  3. R189,867,110 which is made up of Business Operations, Tournament Operations, Workforce costs, Legacy costs and Hosting Fees to World Netball.

Profit / Deficit:

(i) Currently NWC23 projects a profit of R7,414,017 against an original deficit budget of (R30,245,756)

2)(a) Yes, the Department is offering financial assistance to Netball South Africa. As part of the annual grant Netball Ball identifies areas that require support. (b) As part of growing netball and making the national team competitive the Department is implementing the legacy programme. Key element of the legacy programme is the roll-out of the netball courts in schools.

(3) Various netball specific and sport specific events are being used to promote the 2023 Netball World Cup. These include but are not limited to the Quad series which involves Australia, England, and New Zealand to encourage sports tourism which will be held in Cape Town. The Spar Diamond challenge which will be held in Durban involving Scotland and Zimbabwe will also be used to promote Sport Tourism.

The Trophy tour will take place in all provinces therefore generating domestic interest and domestic tourism. The broadcasting plan involves a thirty second tourism video, which will be played at the beginning of each live broadcast at various build up competitions. There is strong collaboration with Tourism South Africa to effectively encourage sports tourism.

The broadcast partners have committed to give the Host City / Country a sixty second video at the start of each match during the World Cup2023 which will be broadcasted to the global audience to promote tourism to the country beyond the World Cup.

(4). A sustainability village will be set up by South African Tourism at the venue which will promote local crafters. Cultural performances will be included throughout the event commencing with the showcasing of South African Arts Culture during the Opening and the Closing ceremonies. The Western Cape Province has also translated the Netball Rule book to IsiXhosa. This contributes to social inclusion, promotes indigenous language and access to the sport in the first language.

(5) The Department of Tourism is one of the Departments that are part of the Inter-Ministerial Committee on NWC2023 as approved by Cabinet. The Department of Tourism through Tourism SA are key in amplifying and promoting the World Cup in all missions abroad. South African Tourism will assist the appointed ticketing agency with the promotion and marketing of travel packages for the NWC 2023 and quality assure the packages for teams and visitors.

28 September 2022 - NW3074

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts, and Culture

What (a) procedures were followed in the appointment of Bongani Tembe, who is currently working as both councillor and Chief Executive and Artistic Director of the KwaZulu Natal and Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestras and (b) is the policy provisions he relies on for the working for one entity while at the same time being contracted to another

Reply:

The recruitment policy or appointment of Mr Tembe by the orchestras is an internal matter of the boards of those orchestras.

These orchestras are not entities of the Department, so they do not report to us. The Honourable Member can contact the orchestras themselves for clarity on the matter.