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16 April 2021 - NW708

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)    What are details of any passengers carried on the aircraft during the outbound and return flights of the SA Airways (SAA) aircraft that departed on 24 February 2021 to the Kingdom of Belgium to collect another batch of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines, including but not limited to (a) the names of ach passenger and (b) the amounts charged to each passenger; (2) Whether SAA and/or Mango airline will be awarded any further government tenders for the transportation of COVID-19 vaccines (a) within the Republic and (b) within Africa; if not, why not in each case; if so, what (i) aircraft will be used and (ii) are the details of all procurement regulations and legislation that will be followed for the procurement of such air services?

Reply:

(1) No passengers were carried on the outbound and inbound flights

(2)(a) The awarding of such tenders is the responsibility of the National Department of Health. SAA has the capacity an infrastructure to transport cargo including the vaccines. SAA will put forward its value proposition for this role in South Africa and in the continent.

(2)(b)(i) The aircraft used will depend on the size of the consignment and distance to and from where the vaccine is transported.

(2)(b)(ii) The vaccine procurement regulations are the responsibility of the Department of Health.

Obtaining and transporting vaccines to SA is of national interest and importance. The state’s limited capacity must be utilized to avail vaccines to South Africans who are waiting to be vaccinated in order to prevent the worst effects of the COVID pandemic.

It is regrettable that some pilots and their collaborators, are doing everything possible to selfishly extract more Benefits for themselves, even if it means misleading the public.

Government is fairly advanced in securing an equity partner, and every effort must be made to ensure that this is successful- such that there is no future imposition on the fiscus.

16 April 2021 - NW740

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he has been informed that 5 452 officials working for Eskom have to date failed to submit their declaration forms relating to potential conflicts of interest at Eskom; if not, why not; if so, what steps are being taken to ensure compliance?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom:

On 14 October 2020, the SIU issued a report to SCOPA for the period 2015/16 to 2019/2020 identifying 5452 cases involving Eskom officials that had failed to submit declarations of interest for the indicated period. These cases have been handed over to Eskom by the SIU and the disciplinary process has commenced for the identified employees.

In order to ensure compliance, Eskom has implemented the following improvement actions to the declaration of interest management process:

  • The information system used to monitor employee declarations has been upgraded to enhance the ability to track and monitor non-compliances to the Eskom requirements.
  • Trained ethics coordinators and trainers have been appointed throughout the organisation to assist with ethics issues at the Eskom sites throughout the country.
  • Ethics training is provided to all employees through online learning, as the classroom training sessions have been placed on hold due to the Covid-19 restrictions.
  • Employees that fail to comply are taken through a consequence management process.

16 April 2021 - NW823

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, in light of the five State-owned enterprises (SOEs), namely SA Airways, Alexkor, Safcol, Denel and SA Express that failed to submit their annual reports as required in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1996, his department will support the policy position which seeks to provide for additional measures in order to ensure SOE accountability in instances where the executive authority fails to table an annual report and financial statements of a department and/or public entity?

Reply:

10. The Department has adequate measures to ensure SOCs accountability in instances where the executive authority fails to table an annual report of the department and/or entity. Furthermore, extenuating circumstances would need to be considered on a case by case basis. The following are the extenuating circumstances that led to the following SOCs in not tabling annual reports and financial statements:

a) Denel: Denel’s AGM was held on the 29 January 2021. Several reasons resulted in the delay, including the liquidity challenges, which affected its ability to continue operating on a going concern basis. Consequently, Denel was unable to provide sufficient evidence to demonstrate that it is a going concern, resulting in the delayed external audit finalization by the Auditor General. The delayed finalisation of the AFS was also exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic which impacted day-to-day activities in general. The AFS and Integrated Report were tabled at Parliament on Tuesday, 9 February 2021.

b) Safcol: The audit was protracted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The annual report was tabled on 10 March 2021, followed by the presentation to the Portfolio Committee, held on 17 March 2021.

c) Alexkor: The Alexkor AGM is expected to be held during the last week of March 2021. Alexkor’s operational and liquidity challenges not only resulted in delayed finalisation of the AFS and external audit by the Company’s auditors but has impacted its ability to continue operating on a going concern basis, resulting in a disclaimed audit opinion. It is expected that the AFS and IR will be tabled immediately after the AGM is held.

d) SAA: The airline could not table the annual report and financial statements due to financial and liquidity challenges. This had an impact on the going concern assessment which eventually led to the airline being placed under business rescue.​e) SA Express: The airline could not table the annual report and financial statements due to financial and liquidity challenges. This had an impact on the going concern assessment which eventually led to the airline being placed under business rescue and is now in provisional liquidation.

 

2. The last 2 years have been a difficult period for all SOCs, in terms of addressing all matters related to state capture, stabilising the SOC, and the impact of COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of the SOCs are facing serious financial challenges, which impact on going concern and the audit outcome. The accountability framework includes the oversight of Parliament as it relates to non-submission of annual reports. The SOCs, being corporate entities are also required to apply to the Companies Tribunal to grant an extension of the date within which to hold the Annual General Meeting and to present its annual report to the Shareholder. Late submission of the annual report, coupled with going concern and the viability of the company also impacts on loan covenants, which the Board and the Shareholder must address.

3. The Boards are also accountable for other non-negotiable targets such as the achievement of an unqualified audit outcome and the achievement of at least 80% of the total sum of key performance indicators of the Compact. In line with consequence management, but also informed by the financial constraints, Boards and management takes a 0% annual increase when these non-negotiable targets are not met. However, addressing the viability of the SOC remains one of government’s key objective.

16 April 2021 - NW528

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What (a) are the details of the role his department plays in terms of the development of the new generation Rooivalk MK 11 and (b) budget has been provided for this purpose; (2) Whether Denel has been able to form partnerships (a) within the Republic and (b) internationally at this stage; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, with whom in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department is not playing a direct role in the development process of the new generation Rooivalk Combat Helicopter MK II. The discussions are still at a technical level between Denel and Armscor.

(1)(b) No budget provision has been made by the Department.

(2)(a) Domestic partnership is the Light Mobility (LMT) Holdings. Denel acquired the controlling stake in LMT in 2012. Denel owns 51% of LMT Holdings, PAMODZI 29% and the remainder is owned by the previous owners of LMT.

(b) Yes, Denel has in the past managed to enter into international partnerships. These are:

(i) With SAFRAN of France in 2002 to form Turbomeca Africa. SAFRAN owned 51% of Turbomeca Africa and Denel 49%. The company was based in South Africa. The joint venture was discontinued in 2017.

(ii) With SAAB of Sweden in 2007 to form Denel SAAB Aerostructures (DSA). Denel owned 80%  of DSA and SAAB 20%. The company was based in South Africa. SAAB sold back to Denel its 20% stake left the partnership in 2010. Denel Aerostructures was discontinued in 2019.

(iii) In Optronics with Carl Zeiss of Germany in 2007 to establish Carl Zeiss South Africa (now Hensoldt South Africa). Carl Zeiss owned (now Hensoldt) 70% of Carl Zeiss South Africa (Hensoldt South Africa) and Denel 30%. The company is based in South Africa

(iv) With Rheinmetall of Germany in 2008 to establish Rheinmetall Denel Munitions (RDM). Rheinmetall owns 51% and Denel 49%. The company is based in South Africa

(v) With Tawuzan of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2012 to establish Tawuzan Dynamic (now Barij Dynamics)s. Tawuzan owns 51% and Denel 49%. The entity is based in the UAE

(vi) With International Golden Group(IGG) PJSC of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2014 to establish Pioneer Land Systems LLC. Denel (through its subsidiary) own 49% of Pioneer Land Systems LLC and IGG 51%. The company is based in the UAE.    

                                               

16 April 2021 - NW692

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) total number of incidents of fuel theft has Transnet had (i) in the 2019-20 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) was the total monetary value of the stolen fuel, (c) security measures have been put in place to prevent the incidents of fuel theft from reoccurring and (d) were the outcomes of law enforcement processes that unfolded to the incidents of fuel theft?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

A. (I) and (II): FUEL THEFT INCIDENTS 19/20 AND 20/21 FINANCIAL YEARS:

(b) TOTAL MONatETARY VALUE OF THE STOLEN FUEL:

The total monetary value of the stolen fuel is arrived at utilising the approximate volume lost at the Basic Fuel Price (BFP) plus taxes over the respective reporting date.

(i) 2019/20: R 147 m (11,9 million litres at R12,38 BFP & Tax)

(ii) 2020/21: R 102 m (8,5 million litres at R12,03 BFP & Tax)

(C) security measures put in place:

Transnet has implemented various security measures which include tactical and aerial surveillance deployments. There is close collaboration with the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (“Hawks”), National Crime Intelligence and the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to deal with related fuel theft in the country.

Detail of Security Preventative Measures applied to reduce incidents:

(i) National Organised Crime Project registration (National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), Directorate Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) and Crime Intelligence)

(II) Specialised Tactical Security deployments

(iii) Specialised Aerial Surveillance deployments

(iv) Specialised Aerial drone deployments

(v) Law Enforcement and TPL Security information/Intelligence led security operations

(vi) National Law Enforcement engagements for interventions and support (SAPS, NatJoints and SANDF)

(vii) Critical and Essential Infrastructure Protection Motivation – TPL Network (Pipeline) vs. only Pump Stations

(viii) Establishment of Transnet Group Security Fusion Centre

In addition there are specific anti-intrusion systems that are in the process of being implemented along the pipeline system.

(D) OUTCOMES OF LAW ENFORCEMENT PROCESSES:

16 April 2021 - NW819

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).What are the terms of the NAC Grant Management Policy if an applicant still has an active project and/or file; (2). whether the applicants have received the final funding; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. According to NAC policy and procedures, applicants with active files are not eligible to be funded. They are declined at assessment stage on the basis of having active files or expired files. However, if a narrative report has been sent with financial reports, and compliance documents such as a valid tax clearance certificate, evidence of work done, the new application will be considered according to its own merit. In the event of expiry, three -year cool off period is observed before any application is considered.

2. Applicants only receive the final pay out of funding once they have provided satisfactory reports (narrative and financial reports depending on amounts granted) with valid tax compliance status as per the signed funding agreement. Where applicants have failed to comply with reporting processes, then their projects are expired based on failure to comply within specified time periods. There are five organizations funded under AOSF 2019–2021 that were expired immediately; due to falsification of information, attached as Annexure 4.

16 April 2021 - NW842

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What steps is he taking to ensure that officials who resign from state-owned enterprises to avoid disciplinary action are not reemployed in other government department?

Reply:

The SOE’s are separate legal entities and employees in the SOE’s are not employed in terms of the Public Service Act. This makes the flagging of the employees who leaves the SOE’s pending disciplinary action or investigation difficult to track and trace in as far as other government departments. Heavy reliance will be on the strengths of our government departments recruitment processes to ensure that the vetting is done diligently to be able to detect such red flags. The prescripts developed under the auspices of Department of Public Service and Administration place a responsibility on the accounting officer of each government department to ensure that rigorous integrity assessments and background checks are conducted against candidates applying for employment.

The SOE’s have measures in place as part of their recruitment processes to prohibit the reappointment of employees who left through dismissal. The SOE’s are reviewing their measures to ensure that through the HR processes employees who leave the institution whilst under investigation or pending a disciplinary procedure are flagged. These should be done in line to what is permissible in terms of our Labour Relations Act.”

The department has also developed the SOC Risk and Integrity Management Framework that will be implemented with effect from 01 April 2021. Among others, the framework introduces reforms designed to regulate the affairs of the SOCs under the Ministry of Public Enterprises as follows:

  • Ensure that SOCs conduct rigorous background checks to prevent employment of candidates whose integrity indicates that they cannot be entrusted with the management of public resources;
  • Prohibit employees and board members of SOCs from doing business with their respective SOC.
  • Prohibit employees and board members of SOCs from soliciting or accepting gifts and/or donations from companies doing business with the SOC.

16 April 2021 - NW241

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)      Whether, given the state of affairs at SA Airways (SAA), he can account as to the reason that the voluntary severance package (VSP) payments of more than 3480 former SAA employees have not been paid, despite promises by his department to effect the payment by 31 January 2021; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What plan does his department have in place to ensure that the rest of the 1220 SAA employees who were not subjected to the section 189 retrenchment process do not encounter a similar payment issue; (3) Whether, in light of the recorded R10,5 billion bail-out for SAA that the Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni, had set out, of which R2,2 billion had been set aside to fund retrenchment packages, the specified funds have been made available to the Ministry of Public Enterprises; if not, why not; if so, what are the reasons that the specified funds have not reached the intended recipients; and (4) By what date will his department process the VSPs of all affected employees as a matter of urgency?

Reply:

  1. The VSPs have since been paid with non-management and management employees paid on 12 and 19 February 2021 respectively. The payments could not be paid until the funds had been secured and this was achieved with the adjusted national budget on 28 October 2020. Immediately R3.5 billion of these funds were made available to start payment of employee related liabilities.
  2. The Department does not anticipate that payment related to further restructuring including section 189 retrenchments shall be delayed. Funds necessary for this purpose have been deposited with BRPs.
  3. All the funds for retrenchment packages for SAA employees have been transferred to SAA.
  4. See (1) and (2) above.
     
     
     
     
     

16 April 2021 - NW608

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What: (a) Total amount did Eskom pay a certain law firm (name furnished) to investigate fraud and corruption at the Wilge Residential Development project and (b) Process was followed to appoint the specified law firm to conduct the specified

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) The Wilge Residential Development investigation under Bowmans’ mandate letter dated 14 May 2018 and further Phase 2 mandate letter dated 08 August 2018 cost Eskom approximately R2,819,376.00 up to May 2019.  

Bowmans’ further investigation and attendance to the disciplinary proceedings under their mandate letter dated 20 June 2019 has cost Eskom R 2,811,915.37 up to 28 February 2021.

b) Bowmans was on Eskom’s panel of approved legal service providers when they were originally appointed in May 2018 to investigate procurement irregularities at Eskom. In June 2018, and pending the appointment of a new panel of attorneys, National Treasury provided approval for the continuation of existing legal services until completion of the work. This was for continuity purposes.

16 April 2021 - NW964

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With reference to the efforts made by her department to ensure that youth and women are empowered and given work opportunities by her department, what is the percentage of (a) women and (b) youth recruited and/or provided with work opportunities under the current Expanded Public Works Programme by public bodies; (2) whether her department has met its targets in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) I have been informed by the Department that for the period 1 April 2020 – 31 December 2020, a total of 515 862 work opportunities have been reported through the EPWP Reporting System across all the spheres of Government and the four (4) EPWP sectors. Of the 515 862 work opportunities, 68% of work opportunities (i.e. 349 311) were for women empowered in the programme.

(b) In the same reporting period, 44% of work opportunities (i.e. 225 753) were accounted for youth empowerment.

 

2. The target for women is 60% and the target for youth is 55%, which means that the EPWP programme, which is coordinated by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has managed to exceed the women target, but has been unable to reach the youth target.

The rationale for achieving the targets on women participation is attributed to the nature of the Programmes implemented. For example, the Provincial Roads Programme has contributed 102 336 work opportunities out of the 515 862 work opportunities, this means 20% of the total work opportunities came from the Provincial Roads Programme. The Provincial Roads Programme is a routine road maintenance programme, mainly located in rural areas and has a 75% ratio of work opportunities (i.e. 77 037) going to women, whilst only attracting 23% youth (i.e. 23 826). Based on the nature of the work in this programme which entails cleaning of the road surface, clearing of drains & channels and clearing & cleaning of verges, a lot of youth do not find this type of programme attractive.

Furthermore, programmes such as the Home Based Community Care (HBCC) contributed 60 857 work opportunities toward the 515 862 work opportunities. Eighty-eight percent (88%) of work opportunities (i.e. 53 774) were awarded to women, whilst only 27% of the work opportunities were provided to the youth (i.e. 16 681). In this programme, the nature of work entails caring for the poor, elderly and sick through house visits, the provision of palliative care and patient referrals and most youth do not find this work attractive.

However, there are Programmes within EPWP that have high youth participation and these programmes are the National Youth Service, the NPO Programme, Tourism & Creative Industries, Mass Participation and Sustainable Land Based Livelihoods which are implemented on a smaller scale than the above-mentioned programmes and collectively contribute to 84 820 work opportunities.

16 April 2021 - NW518

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a)

Yes. DPE has recorded staff members who, according to the Financial Disclosures System on the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) website, were noted to have performed remunerative work outside the Public Service dating back to April 2014.

(b)

These cases are reported on, on an annual basis through the DPSA’s financial disclosures system and is verified by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) system conducted by the Public Service Commission (PSC), by determining whether an employee is a Director of a registered company(ies). The available records are as follows:

2014/2015: eleven (11) staff members were detected through the financial disclosure and CIPC verification systems to have registered companies. During consultation with the officials, most companies were reported to be dormant, not trading, being a stokvel, staff members not actively involved, not generating an income, assisting on a voluntary basis, and staff member having resigned from the companies. Three (3) officials obtained formal approval to conduct Remunerative Work Outside the Public Service (RWOPS) and approval was confirmed.

2015/2016: twenty-one (21) staff members were detected through the financial disclosure and CIPC verification systems to have registered companies. During consultations held with the officials, most companies were reported to be dormant, not trading, being a stokvel, staff members not actively involved, not generating an income, assisting on a voluntary basis, and staff member having resigned from the company.

2016/2017: four (4) staff members were detected through the financial disclosure and CIPC verification systems to have been engaging on RWOPS. Three cases had no RWOPS approval.

2017/2018: six (6) staff members were detected to have been engaging in RWOPS through the financial disclosure and CIPC systems. RWOPS approval only confirmed for Three staff members.

(i) The number of staff members confirmed to have been involved in RWOPS are as follows:

• 2014/2015: a total of 11 staff members with registered companies,

• 2015/2016: a total of 21 staff members with registered companies,

• 2016/2017: a total of 4 staff members engaged on RWOPS, and

• 2017/2018: 6 staff members engaged on RWOPS.

(ii) Job categories of these staff members are as follows:

• 2014/2015: Directors-5 & Chief Director- 4 & Deputy Director-General-2.

• 2015/2016: Directors-13, Chief Director -5, Deputy Director-General-2, Director-General-1.

• 2016/2017 – Director – 2, Chief Director-1, & Deputy Director-General-1.

• 2017/2018: Director -3, Chief Director – 2, Deputy Director-General-1.

(2) RWOPS approvals verified were: 2014/2015 -3 approvals, 2016/2017 – 3 approvals, and 2017/2018 – 1 approval.

(a)

The Department does not have its own separate policy as this is a regulatory function prescribed in terms of Regulation 19 of the Public Service Regulations (PSR), 2016, which provides a list and details of financial interests which designated employees (SMS and Non-SMS) are required to disclose. This explanatory manual is issued by the DPSA to guide designated employees on the required information relating to financial disclosures. Details of interests to be disclosed include different categories, namely (1) Shares, loan accounts or any other form of equity in a registered private or public company and other corporate entities recognised by law, (2) Equity, (3) Loan accounts (4) other forms of financial interests from which he/she receives an income (4) Income generating assets; (5) Trusts, (6) Directorships and Partnerships, (7) Other Remunerative Work outside the employees’ department (RWOPS), (8) Retainers, (9) Gifts, (10) Sponsorship, (11) Immovable property and (12) Vehicles

Other remunerative work refers to any work which an employee performs and receives remuneration for, outside his or her official employment. This category covers other remunerative work not disclosed under directorship/partnership, consultancy/retainership, and trustee. All employees must obtain written approval to perform other remunerative work outside of their official duties before engaging in such other remunerative work. The certificate of approval must be uploaded on the eDisclosure system.

(b)

All employees must obtain written approval to perform other remunerative work outside of their official duties by the Minister (Executive Authority) before engaging in such other remunerative work.

(c)

None. In terms of the Public Service Regulations, transgressions are required to be reported to the PSC and the DPSA, and not to National Treasury.

(d)

The Department engaged all implicated staff members and obtained written reasons for non-compliance with RWOPS prescripts. Warning letters were issued where it was found that financial disclosures were submitted late. Officials who were conducting RWOPS without approval were required to cease with the activity. A workshop was also offered to assist staff members to comprehend the DPSA policy and regulations and its implications.

16 April 2021 - NW859

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether there is a maintenance plan in place with regard to the dry-dock at the Port of Cape Town; if not, why not; if so, how often does maintenance take place; (2) Whether there are any plans in place to upgrade the dry-dock; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

1. Every asset in the dry dock facility in the Port of Cape Town has a maintenance plan. Each maintenance plan is derived from the Original Equipment manufacturer (OEM) operating and maintenance manual. Each asset has its own maintenance interval (daily, weekly, monthly, yearly etc.). All maintenance plans are raised in the form of job cards through Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), in this instance SAP.

The port adheres to annual maintenance repairs and ad hoc maintenance plans. This involves the reaction to the predicted asset failure which is not imminent. The repair cost is estimated, and funds are allocated accordingly. Job cards are created, and jobs are executed and documented and kept for a period of three years for auditing purposes.

2. The Port of Cape Town is in the process of refurbishing its outdated ship-repair facilities in line with Operation Phakisa initiatives. The port is providing an essential gravity point in the ship-repair sector. It has three main facilities namely, Robertson Dry Dock (RDD), Synchro-lift (SL) and Sturrock Dry Dock (SDD). The investment in the refurbishment of the facility to date is as follows:

  • All three-facilities combined capital spend to date is approximately R50 Million
  • Latest Estimate by end of the financial year is approximately R69 Million
  • The total estimated capital spends inclusive of all facilities above is “R1b”.
  •  

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi P J Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

16 April 2021 - NW800

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether the areas that are both supplied in bulk and billed by Eskom for energy provision are entitled to and receive a subsidy for the installation of prepaid meters as per relevant government programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

All residential customers who fall within the allocated area to be funded by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy qualify for free prepaid meters (20A) installed by Eskom or by municipalities. The electrification programme is rolled out in line with the municipalities’ Integrated Development Plans (IDP).

Only customers who require more than 20A supply are required to pay an upgrade fee from 20A to 60A.

16 April 2021 - NW860

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)In view of the delays in the Port of Cape Town’s container terminal that is often as a result of equipment breakdowns, (a) what was the average number of breakdowns experienced in each shift at the Port of Cape Town’s container terminal in 2020; (2 Whether Transnet keeps record of what is causing breakdowns at the Port of Cape Town’s container terminal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

1. The average number of equipment breakdowns at the Cape Town Container Terminal per shift for the 2020/21 financial year, in respect of all equipment is as follows:

  • Shift One = 162 breakdowns per month (April 2020 – March 2021)
  • Shift Two = 134 breakdowns per month (April 2020 – March 2021)
  • Shift Three = 126 breakdowns per month (April 2020 – March 2021).

2. Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) keeps daily statistical records of the number of equipment breakdowns, the description of each breakdown and the associated outage times. The root cause of these breakdowns is largely attributed to the equipment reaching its mid-life.

There are 8 (eight) Ship-to-Shore Cranes due for mid-life refurbishments and with the high demand for crane density, a new strategic approach to replace all critical components within these cranes is now in place and will take Transnet Port Terminals to the desired reliability of 90% versus the current 85%. To improve the reliability of the Rubber-Tyred Gantry Crane (RTG) fleet, a ramp-up plan has been finalised to move from an average of 20 RTG Cranes to 28 RTG Cranes, within the next 24 months.

15 April 2021 - NW578

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What criteria were used to identify the 700 000 ha of state land that is currently available for lease, (b) who were responsible to draw up the final list and (c) what communication was sent out to farmers currently on some of the land parcels?

Reply:

a) There was an elaborate process that culminated in a narrow criterion, determining whether the property was vacant or underutilised (partially vacant). The process involved a desktop spatial analysis; physical verification; desktop agricultural potential analysis; verification of land restitution claims; and final verification utilising local departmental knowledge. Each one of these steps contain detailed activities that can be outlined should that be considered necessary. The focus, for purposes of this question, will be restricted to the desktop spatial analysis.

The desktop spatial analysis included the identification and sourcing of data sets; definition of the terms vacant and partially vacant (underutilised); defining the parameters to identify vacant and partially vacant agricultural state land; mapping agricultural state land; and performing a desktop Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis on the data.

Identification and Sourcing of Data

The datasets listed below were identified and obtained from the identified data custodians:

  • Cadastral data from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development;
  • Deeds Registration data from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development;
  • Land parcels identified as vacant by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure;
  • National Land Cover for the year 2017 from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development;
  • South African Protected Areas Database for the year 2018 from Environment, Forestry and Fisheries;
  • Indigenous Forests Inventory from Environment, Forestry and Fisheries;
  • Land Capability (Terrain Capability) from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development; and
  • Traditional community boundaries from Traditional Affairs.

Definition of Terms and Parameters for determining Vacant Land

  • The term vacant refers to a piece of land that is not occupied or not being used for any specific purpose whilst the term partially vacant refers to a property when only parts of it have been classified as vacant.
  • The 2017 Land Cover dataset, which was used, is a national land cover classification generated using multispectral satellite imagery with a multi-temporal analysis technique, produced by National Geospatial Information within Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development.
  • The table below shows the selected land cover classes from the national land cover data which were utilised to identify agricultural land as vacant or not vacant.

Selected Land Cover Classes, 2017

No

Land Cover Class

Classification

1

Natural wooded

Vacant

2

Shrubland

Vacant

3

Grassland

Vacant

4

Waterbodies

Not vacant (depending on coverage)

5

Wetlands

Not vacant (depending on coverage)

6

Barren land

Vacant

7

Cultivated

Not vacant

8

Built-up

Not vacant

9

Mines and quarry

Not vacant

10

Planted Forest

Not vacant

  • Indigenous forest dataset was used to classify properties located in indigenous forest as not vacant.
  • The Protected Areas Database was used to classify properties located within these areas as not vacant.
  • Although terrain capability is one of three building blocks (soil, climate and terrain) for land capability, only terrain capability was used in this analysis. Terrain capability includes aspects such as slope gradient, slope direction, slope shape, ground roughness, altitude and streams (drainage network). Land with a terrain capability value between “Very Low and Low to Moderate” was subtracted from vacant and partially vacant land.
  • Land that is located within traditional community boundaries was regarded as not vacant.
  • State land acquired in terms of the Pro-active Land Acquisition Strategy (PLAS) and by the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights, was regarded as not available for redistribution.
  • Land that is claimed in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act was regarded as not available for redistribution, depending on the phase of the claim and options selected by the claimants.

Criteria Used

  • In view of what has been explained above, the ultimate criteria that was determined is that:
          • The land cover class is either grassland, barren land, shrubland or natural wooded;
          • the property is located on suitable terrain capability;
          • the property is less than 10% within an indigenous forest;
          • the property is less than 10% within a protected area;
          • the property is not located in an area which is likely being used for communal grazing;
          • the property is not part of Pro-active Land Acquisition Strategy (PLAS) land or State land acquired by the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights for settlement of claims;
          • the land parcel is not un-registered;
          • the aggregated vacant or partially vacant land available per property is bigger than 50 hectares; and
          • The property is not claimed in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act.

b) The final list was a product of collaboration amongst various business units of the Department in the manner outlined in the table below:

Desktop Spatial Analysis:

Chief Directorate: Property Management and Advisory Services

Desktop Agricultural Potential Analysis:

Directorate: Land Use and Soil
Management

Verification of Land Restitution Claims:

Commission on Restitution of Land Rights

Final Verification utilising local departmental knowledge

Provincial Shared Services Centres

c) No personal communication was sent out to farmers, however there were media briefings that were generally accessible to the public.

15 April 2021 - NW285

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) specifications of the Travel With Flair tender, (b) date on which the tender was awarded, (c) total value of the tender, (d) total costs spent against the tender from commencement of the contract to date, (e) notice of any deviations processed in order to procure personal protective equipment from Travel with Flair, (f) legislative prescripts upon which the deviation relied, (g) notice of approval of the deviation and (h) contract value of the deviation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) The tender specification of Travel With Flair (TWF) is attached as Annexure A.

(b) The tender was awarded to Travel with Flair on 16 October 2017.

(c) & (d) From the commencement date of the tender until to date the department paid R401 113 751.00. This is a total amount spent inclusive of local accommodation provided, international accommodation provided, local air transport, international air transport, local land transport, community events management, conferences, seminars, departmental functions, information sessions, training sessions, departmental management meetings (away from department’s offices and usually with other spheres of government), travel agency service fees, travel agency back office processing fees and travel agency conference and events management fees.

(e) to (h) There were no deviations processed. The personal protective equipment paid for were part of the costs of community events the company coordinated or managed on behalf of the department. This was to ensure that the events comply with requirements of the guidelines issued by the Department of Health and SAPS as well as the disaster management regulations on Covid-19 issued by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs,

 

15 April 2021 - NW973

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) Given the continued closure of determination and retention of citizenship services in his department, what number of (a) determination applications and (b) retention of citizenship applications were processed before the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 was declared in the 2019-20 financial year; (2) What number of staff who receive determination and retention of citizenship applications (a) have been working in front offices of his department as at 11 March 2021 and (b) are currently not sick but have been at home due to COVID 19 restrictions as at 11 March 2021; (3) Given that the number of determination and retention of citizenship requests are a fraction of other types of civic services, on what medical, scientific and/or COVID-risk evidence are these services remaining closed; (4) Whether determination and retention of citizenship services will only be opened after the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 is over; if not, on what date will determination and retention of citizenship services be opened; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) 35 795

(b) 1875

(2)(a) 120

(b) 0

(3) This is as a result of the observation by the Department of a high number of staff being affected in the wake of the second wave of the COVID-19 variant, followed by front offices being temporarily closed due to decontamination and sanitising thereof. This then necessitated and made it imperative for the Department to reduce some of its operational services as part of an attempt to reduce the number of clients who visit our offices who may further exacerbate the spread of Covid-19 among clients and staff.

The Department thereby made a determination to prioritise key services and to offer critical and mandatory enabling documents such as registration of births, death and identity documents. This strategy would not perpetuate high client volumes with the enduring queues, hence the COVID-19 administrative protocols applied as a containment measure to limit the further spread of the virus.

(4) The Department will from time to time conduct a review and consult with relevant structures including the National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC). When the situation improves, a determination will then be made to resume pending services including determination and retention applications, in a phased approach and will then be pronounced, as a result.

END

15 April 2021 - NW705

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)When last did his department conduct oversight of the (a) academic programmes offered to and (b) living conditions of students studying in the Republic of Cuba as part of the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme; (2) whether his department made any changes to the programme over the past five academic years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what number of (a) students enrolled in the programme in every academic year since its inception and (b) the specified students graduated with a medical degree after completion of the programme?

Reply:

In order to respond to this Question, information must be sourced from the provinces. The Department is still in the process of sourcing this information and as soon as all the information is received, the Minister will provide the response to the Question.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW660

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the annual amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) and (b) will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (i) contractors involved in the production of the television, (ii) the terms of agreement and (iii) any contractual documents between the SABC and the specified department with regard to the screening of the BNG television show?

Reply:

a) The amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcast Corporation (SABC) was R11 417 699.00 for the 2020/21 financial year.

No

Description

Amount (Rands)

 

SABC 2 Airtime through GCIS

7,335 199.00

 

BNG TV Production through GCIS

4,082 500.00

 

TOTAL

11, 417 699.00

(b) Tsalena Media was appointed through the Government Communication Information System (GCIS). The terms of the agreement can be obtained from GCIS.

15 April 2021 - NW828

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the provision of water for the residents of the Driefontein Complex in the Uthukela District of KwaZulu-Natal by way of the Driefontein Complex Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme, what are the details of the plans for the long-term provision of bulk potable water supplies, including (a) total costs, (b) funding allocations, (c) source of funding for the construction of a bulk raw water pipeline, (d) proposed period of construction, (e) completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline, (f) the source of raw water and (g) proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water; (2) what are the details of the expenditure on water distribution infrastructure for this project from its inception up to 31 January 2021; (3) what are the details of the current sources of bulk water for the water distribution infrastructure already constructed in the Driefontein Complex; (4) what are the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year?

Reply:

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

1. Phase 1 of the Driefontein Scheme was implemented by uThukela District Municipality and is now complete, whilePhase 2 is in progress. Phase 3 (i.e. Spioenkop-Ladysmith Scheme) consists of both economic and social components and requires contributions from beneficiaries of the project who are able to pay for services. As the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) does not cover costs pertaining to the economic component, the municipality had to come up with about R1 billion co-funding.

The municipality entered into negotiations with Umgeni Water with the aim to secure assistance with co-funding and the implementation of the project. After conducting due diligence, Umgeni Water decided to conduct further detailed feasibility studies on the project. To this end, Umgeni Water has appointed a professional service provider to undertake the pre-feasibility study. The detailed feasibility study of the uThukela DM Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme (uTDM RBWSS) will include:

  • Water resource modelling for the Upper uThukela Catchment,
  • A pre-feasibility analysis to identify options for supply
  • A detailed Feasibility Study of the most appropriate option for future bulk water supply to uThukela District Municipality.

(a) The total costs for the project can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded because the information required to calculate costs will be obtained from the outcomes of the study.

 

(b-c) The funding allocations and the source of funding will be determined from information generated during the implementation readiness study. The implementation readiness study is dependent on conclusion of the detailed feasibility study will be determined once the total costs have been determined.

(d-g) The information on the proposed period of construction, including completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline and the source of raw water and proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded.

(2) The expenditure on water distribution infrastructure from inception up to 31 January 2021 is R102 400 021.

(3) The sources for the bulk distribution network are nine (9) production boreholes. The boreholes are being used as an interim source until long-term sustainable bulk water resource has been developed.

 

(4) The Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year are as follows:

Financial year

Allocations

2010/11

R 11 470 200

2011/12

R 22 302 100

2012/13

R 16 308 355

2013/14

R 56 726 749

2014/15

R 80 977 114

2015/16

R 20 801 030

2016/17

R 64 000 000

2017/18

R 28 000 000

2018/19

R 45 000 000

2019/20

R 10 000 000

2020/21

R 39 399 000

Total

R394 984 548

15 April 2021 - NW919

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that her department has just bought more than 20 water tankers worth R26 million for the Amathole District in the Eastern Cape, what are her long-term plans to resolve the water crisis in the specified district?

Reply:

The 20 water trucks (tankers) referred to by the Honourable Member were procured through Amatola Water as part of the Drought Intervention Programme for the entire Eastern Cape Province.

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is currently implementing a number of long-term projects that seek to resolve the water crisis in Amathole District Municipality that are funded through government conditional grants, including the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) as well as Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG).

Projects that are funded under RBIG are:

  • The Xhora Bulk Water Supply Scheme which includes a number of components, namely; the raw water supply system (river weir, pump stations and off-channel dam), the Xhora water treatment plant, and the treated water supply system. To date, 21 500 people have access to water. An additional 12 500 residents should have access to clean water in the next 3 months when the next phase is commissioned.
  • The Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme Phase 5A, referred to as the Butterworth Emergency Water Supply Scheme, will transfer raw water from the Tsomo River to the upper reaches of the Xilinxa River Dam catchment to augment the water supply to Butterworth. The existing water treatment works (WTW) downstream of the Xilinxa Dam will be used to supply treated water to Butterworth. This project will then be integrated into the Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme (RWSS) and will be used to distribute potable water once the Tsomo WTW has been commissioned. The contractor has established the site and construction has commenced. The anticipated completion date is 23rd of September 2023

District Wide Refurbishment projects that include a variety of refurbishment work of water treatment works, waste water treatment works, sewer pump stations, boreholes and bulk infrastructure in the towns of Adelaide, Bedford, Butterworth and Idutywa are as follows:

  • Bedford & Adelaide Town - Refurbishment of Adelaide & Bedford WTW currently under construction. The project is 50% complete and the anticipated completion date is 30th June 2021
  • Butterworth Town - Augmentation of Butterworth Water supply from Teko Kona Boreholes currently under construction. The project is 90% complete and the anticipated completion date on the 30th of June 2021.
  • Idutywa Town - The Amathole District Municipality will be equipping boreholes for the Augmentation of water supply around iDutywa area. The projects are to commence in 2022/23
  • Water Conservation and Demand Management (WCDM) teams have been established to deal with the implementation of various WCDM strategies aimed at reducing non-revenue water within Amathole District Municipality. The Water Loss Reduction Programmes are being implemented in the Amahlathi, Great Kei, Mbashe, Mnquma, Ngqushwa and Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipalities. The projects include:
  • Monthly billing analysis,
  • Retrofitting of internal plumbing
  • Leak Detection and repairs
  • Reservoir repairs
  • Dam repairs
  • Meter Installations and replacements
  • Water Balance Reports, and
  • Pressure Management and Water Restrictions
  • District Wide Water Supply which entails the provision of bulk water supply and reticulation with standpipes and/or drilling and equipping of boreholes and refurbishment of existing infrastructure.
  • West Victoria East Water Supply phase 3 - The project is for the provision of water supply extension to all the local villages.
  • Rural Household Sanitation for Provision of basic sanitation services - 218 Ventilated Pit Latrines to be provided in order to address the sanitation backlog within the Municipal area of Mnquma ward 11 and 4. To date, 121 VIP structures have been constructed in the villages of Mnquma, Ward 11.
  • There are also Drought Intervention Projects which include projects for siting, drilling and testing of boreholes and ad-hoc emergency drought related works such as equipping of boreholes, refurbishing of pumps and generators throughout the District (Mnquma LM, Mbashe LM, Raymond Mhlaba, Adelaide, Bedford and Hogsback). Progress in this regard is as follows:
  • Equipping of Goshen Borehole = 100% complete
  • Construction of Butterworth Water Treatment Works Backwash recovery system = 70% complete
  • Equipping of Wartburg Borehole = 45% complete

The Projects that are funded under WSIG drought funding, rolled over from the 2018/19 financial year are:

  • Butterworth Water Supply - Water Treatment works backwash water recovery.
  • Butterworth Water Supply - Augmentation of bulk water to Ibika from Teko Kona boreholes.

The table below shows the breakdown of the allocations per programme for 2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial year allocation to ADM:

Programme

2018/19 Allocation

2019/20

Allocation

2020/21

Allocation

RBIG

R 66 500 000

R 99 694 000

R106 366 000

WSIG

R100 000 000

R102 000 000

R 80 000 000

WSIG Drought

R 64 000 000

R 64 000 000

-

Total

R230 500 000

R201 6294 000

R186 366 000

15 April 2021 - NW820

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to the report of the joint oversight visit of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans to Kinshasa and Goma in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) from 25 to 29 March 2018, consideration was given to the concerns raised by the soldiers of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) as reported by the Portfolio Committee regarding the very poor quality of (a) combat boots and (b) uniforms; if not, why not; if so, what measures were taken to significantly improve the quality and suitability of both combat boots and uniforms; (2) whether (a) she, (b) her department and (c) a certain company (name furnished) have considered the recommendations for local procurement of certain items within the regulations of the Mission Area, based on the direct feedback on the ground in the DRC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the recommendations that have been implemented?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)

Yes consideration was given to concerns raised not only by the Portfolio Committee but previously by the Minister and the Defence Force Service Commission.

Combat Boots

The SA Army engaged the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) on the improvement projects of uniform and combat boots. The boot project of Special Forces was revived and improved as it was found to be suited for use by the SA Army. Development of the proposed boot for the SA Army with wearer trials of the new combat boot commenced on 01 December 2020.

The new boot roll-out will commence from 01 July 2021 to all SA Army members within the SANDF with priority given to operationally deployed Units and Individuals, replacing the current combat boot. This roll-out is pending the availability of funding to support and implement this project.

(1) (b): Camouflage Uniform

The improvement of the textile used for the cut, manufacture and trim of camouflage uniform is also being done in collaboration with the CSIR.

The first concept uniform designs will be presented to the SA Army Council by 30 March 2021 for approval.

Wearer trials for the new uniform design will commence from end June 2021 and a phased full roll-out is scheduled from December 2021 pending the availability of funding for this project.

A well-deserved funding injection of the budgetary allocation to the SA Army will aid in addressing the replacement of the current combat dress system with the quality available within the market through collaboration with the CSIR.

15 April 2021 - NW906

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What steps has her department taken since May 2019 to ensure that there is sufficient housing for the residents of Marikana in the North West?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that it has purchased suitable land for human settlements development through the Housing Development Agency (HDA). Regrettably, after the HDA completed its valuations of some land parcels with a potential for human settlements development, some of the private landowners became be reluctant to sell, while others are charging exorbitant amounts for identified portions of land. It is for this reason that the Provincial Department has approved the expropriation process which is currently underway. The Provincial Department continue to engage with private landowners to persuade them to sell portions of their land to be incorporated into an integrated housing development within the Greater Marikana Area.

The process of township establishment is currently being undertaken for those portions of land acquired through the HDA. The target is to complete the planning phase for these land portions and the expropriation process by March 2022.

15 April 2021 - NW704

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of students from each province currently participate in the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme; (2) what are the details of the (a) current budget allocated to each student to complete their medical studies in full, (b)(i) full amount and (ii) breakdown of the full amount each student received for study fees, accommodation fees, living expenses, travel expenses, stipends and any other expense covered by the programme (aa) in each of the past five academic years and (bb) since 1 January 2021 and (c) total cost of completing a medical degree in this programme for each student in each of the specified academic years; (3) who or what entity in the Republic of Cuba (a) receives the funding from our Government to be disbursed to the students and (b) is responsible for disbursing the funding to the students?

Reply:

In order to respond to this Question, information must be sourced from the provinces. The Department is still in the process of sourcing this information and as soon as all the information is received, the Minister will provide the response to the Question.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW711

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Noting that the Ndlambe Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape is suffering from a debilitating drought and that several communities are totally without water for days at a time, what action is her department taking to assist the municipality to resolve its bulk water supply issues; (2) what actions are being taken by the Amathole Water Board to provide alternative sources of water supply to the communities of (a) Bathurst, (b) Alexandria and (c) Port Alfred; (3) whether there has been any investigation into sourcing water from the Fish River; if not, why not; if so, what is the status of such investigation; (4) whether she has found that these alternative sources would be a viable option to provide water to the municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what would be the (a) cost and (b) timelines for such a project

Reply:

1. Honourable Member, as you have correctly indicated, the challenges in the Ndlambe Local Municipality (LM) are as a result of a debilitating drought in that area of the Eastern Cape. The Department of Water Sanitation (DWS) is engaged in ongoing efforts to assist the municipality with challenges relating to the provision of water. To this end, there are ongoing bilaterals with the municipality through a Joint Operations Committee (JOC) and Project Steering Committee (PSC).

The DWS has provided financial support of R80 million to the municipality to alleviate the impact of the drought for the following projects which are expected to be completed by June 2021:

  • Construction of a 2Ml/day Sea Water Reverse Osmosis Plant (SWRO)
  • Construction of a 3Ml/day Waste Water Reclamation (WWR) plant next to the current Waste Water Treatment Works in Port Alfred.

Further, the DWS has allocated R5.19 million for the supply and delivery of standby generators at strategic points to lessen water interruptions when there are power failures in the area. The funds will be utilised for:

    • Retrofitting and plumbing at households to try and minimize the water losses
    • installation of zonal water meters
    • installation of valves and pressure regulating valves that are to do water balances and pressure regulation which will also lessen water losses
    • Construction of a 4.4km pipeline WTW emergency water supply scheme for Bathurst

A further amount of R30 million has also been allocated to finish the work on the Brackish Water Reverse Osmosis (BWRO) plant in Port Alfred which was designed to purify the brackish water from the Sarel Hayward Dam as well as to complete the work on the pipelines from Cannon Rocks to Alexandria which will assist in pumping more water to Alexandria.

It is important to note that in addition to funding received from the DWS, the Ndlambe LM also receives funding through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG). The municipality is implementing a separate project to refurbish Alexandria’s current well field resources and to construct a BWRO plant at Cannon Rocks which will augment Alexandria’s water by 1Ml/day.

2. Amatola Water was appointed as an Implementing Agent by the Ndlambe LM to construct and complete the BWRO plant, and the pipelines from Cannon Rocks to Alexandria. The Water Board has not been appointed to do augmentation of water resources and they are not doing any work on Bathurst. The entity is providing water to Bushmans River and Kenton on Sea by means of well fields and a Sea Water Reverse Osmosis Plant (SWRO) plant located at the Bushmans River.

The Amatola Water Board has approached the DWS to initiate a feasibility study for water augmentation throughout the Ndlambe LM area of jurisdiction, which is still under consideration. The Water Board is also implementing a Rapid Response Project in Alexandria utilising drought funding allocated by the DWS. The aim of the project is to find additional ground water for Alexandria and to connect it to the water distribution system.

3. An investigation was done in 2004, which considered sourcing water from the Fish River as part of a holistic study, the Albany Coast Situation Assessment. The recommended option was for the Glen Melville (Fish River) to be considered as a last resort, and only in the long term when local resources have been fully exploited, and also only if sea water desalination is not economical at that stage. Therefore, the current plan is to consider other alternative possible water sources for Ndlambe Local Municipality.

4. As indicated above, the DWS is currently funding the construction of the Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) and Waste Water Reclamation (WWR) plant to augment water supply to Port Alfred and Bathurst.

The construction of the WWR plant is a pilot project for future water resources for the rest of the province of the Eastern Cape. At least two thirds of the water augmented by a municipality should reach the Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW’s) and be reclaimed, and be purified to acceptable quality for domestic use. The cost of reclamation and purification of waste water is far less than the cost of purification of sea water. If this pilot project proves to be successful it may be implemented at all the towns within the Ndlambe Local Municipality.

(a) A Waste Water Reclamation plant costs about R7 per 1ml/day and the running cost is in the order of R7/m³. Therefore, the total cost depends on the size plant needed.

(b) The design and tender processes may take up to 6 months and the construction time estimation is 4 to 6 months, depending on the size of the plant and where it is situated; which would add up to an estimated 12 months for the whole process.

15 April 2021 - NW483

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans on 8 July 2020, wherein it was revealed that the Department of Defence paid costs of R8,000,000 and R22,000,000 related to the COVID-19 pandemic for the flights and accommodation of Cuban health specialists, why was it required of her department to pay such costs while it was reported that the Department of Health and the respective beneficiary provinces will carry the costs related to the Cuban health specialists; (2) whether her department has made any efforts to recover the costs from the (a) Department of International Relations and Cooperation and (b) Department of Health; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Commander in Chief requested medical support from the Republic of Cuba to assist in curving the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. In response to the Commander in Chief’s request, the Cuban Government offered a team that consisted of a Medical Health Care Brigade. The Department of Defence (DOD) was allocated with military health care professionals. The South African National Defence Force (SANDF) chattered an aircraft to transport the Cuban medical practitioners, who arrived in South Africa on 27 April 2020.

In adherence to the World Health Organisation COVID-19 regulations, the DOD established a quarantine centre for personnel entering the borders of the Republic of South Africa (RSA). The Cuban Medical Health Brigade was quarantined at the identified centre. On completion of the quarantine, there was a delay in securing accommodation in the different Provinces due to the Level 5 national lockdown.

Consequently both military and the civilian Medical Health Brigade from Cuba were transported in the SANDF chattered aircraft at the cost of R8, 227, 060. 00, and on arrival they were accommodated and quarantined at the identified quarantine centre at the cost of R22, 000, 000.

2. The DOD chattered an aircraft to transport the Cuban Medical Brigade in order to assist with the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic within the SANDF. Therefore with the pandemic having affected the whole country, the department carried the cost. In the interest of the national objective to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, the DOD paid for accommodation, chattering and quarantine.

15 April 2021 - NW492

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the (i) name, (ii) telephone number and (iii) email address of the Chief Information Officer for the Housing Development Agency, (b) are the reasons that the Promotion of Access to Information Requests directed to the Housing Development Agency are not responded to and (c) remedial action will she take in this regard to ensure the entity complies with the prescripts of the relevant legislation?

Reply:

I have been informed that the Housing Development Agency responded to a request for information by the Honourable Member on 9 April 2021.

 

15 April 2021 - NW627

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) By what date does she intend to appoint permanent board members for all the water boards in the Republic and (b) what is delaying her from making the specified appointments?

Reply:

(a) There are permanent boards for the Amatola Water, Bloem Water, Mhlathuze Water, Overberg Water and Rand Water. The terms of these Water Boards are indicated in the table below:

Water Board

Term of office of the Board

Amatola Water

Appointed in 1 March 2021 with term ending at the end February 2025

Bloem Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Mhlathuze Water

Appointed in December 2018 with term ending at the end of November 2022

Overberg Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Rand Water

Appointed in October 2018 with term ending in September 2022

(b) The selection processes of members of permanent Boards for Lepelle Northern Water, Magalies Water, Sedibeng Water and Umgeni Water are underway. It is envisaged that the appointment processes will be finalised by the end of June 2021, should Cabinet concur with the recommendations tabled before it. The current status of the interim boards and selection processes of permanent boards is indicated below:

Water Board

Current Leadership Status

Measures in place to appoint permanent Boards

Lepelle Northern Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Magalies Water

Interim Board was appointed in July 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Sedibeng Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Umgeni Water

Interim Board was appointed in August 2020.

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

15 April 2021 - NW977

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to all the vaccines that have been procured by the Government, (a) what is the cost of each specified vaccine and (b) on what date will the (i) first and (ii) second phase roll-out of each vaccine (aa) begin and (bb) end; (2) whether transportation costs were charged for the delivery of each vaccine; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The agreements with manufacturers contain a confidentiality clause which precludes the sharing of contract terms. This includes the price of the vaccines. We have approached manufacturers to highlight the transparency requirements as enshrined in our constitution for the purposes of oversight. We hope that our representation would allow the Department to be released from the non-disclsoure clauses of the agreement.

(b) the first phase of the programme involves healthcare workers and commenced on the 17 February 2021 while the second phase is scheduled to start on the 17 May 2021. The groups targeted in each phase may be vaccinated in subsequent phases hence nobody will excluded from vaccination.

2. Transport costs are dependent on the Incoterms contained in the contract. In these contracts the manufacturers will be responsible for transportation of vaccines to South Africa. Once in the country, the Department of Health is responsible for warehousing and distribution costs of vaccines.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW979

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What is the current backlog on the issuing of birth certificates as at the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) What (a) total number of births have not been registered with his department to date, (b) number of the unregistered births are (i) South Africans and (ii) foreigners and (c) is the breakdown for each province?

Reply:

1. Birth certificates are issued on the spot therefore the Department does not have a backlog on the issuing of birth certificates.

2. (a), (b)(i)(ii) and (c)

The Department is mandated to do civil registration only and Statistics SA (StatsSA) as well as the Department of Health are mandated to produce official vital statistics from the civil registration system and to register birth occurrences at health facilities respectively.

END

15 April 2021 - NW284

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a)(i) full names and (ii) details of the position of the National Procurement Officer according to the Government Gazette No 464 that was published on 15 April 2020 and (b) details of the (i) recruitment and (ii) selection process followed in the appointment process of the National Procurement Officer; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the said Regulations do not make provision for a National Procurement Officer.

Rand Water was appointed to provide programme management for the provision of water tanks, water tankers and augmentation of water resources such as the equipping of boreholes as part of the COVID-19 intervention. Rand Water utilised its internal staff for the procurement of all goods and services for the implementation of the COVID-19 Intervention Project on behalf of the Department of Water and Sanitation. Further, Rand Water’s emergency procurement processes were applied for the procurement of goods as per the Disaster Management Act, 2002 and the Water and Sanitation Emergency Procurement Covid-19 Disaster Response Directions issued in terms of Regulation 10(8) of the Regulations issued under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002). The Government Gazette containing the Directions referred to is attached as Annexure A.

15 April 2021 - NW974

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) With reference to his department’s war on queues, what total numbers of the officials of his department were allocated front offices, who are not on sick leave but are off work due to restrictions related to COVID-19 as at 11 March 2021; (2) Whether any of the specified officials will be allocated to manage queues outside of Home Affairs front offices; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The total number of the officials of the department that were allocated to front offices, who are not on sick leave but are off work due to restrictions related to COVID-19 as at 11 March 2021 are 108.

(2) No, these officials all fall within the category of persons with one or more of the underlying commonly encountered chronic medical conditions that are not well controlled. Assigning such officials to manage queues may heighten exposure and place them at a higher risk of complications or death than other employees if infected with COVID 19, considering the environment and observation of physical distancing protocols in queues.

The Department however deploys other officials as well as Supervisors and Office Managers to assist with queue management. COVID-19 Compliance officers are appointed in writing to manage the queues as well as Immigration Officers who add to the capacity to manage the queues. Furthermore, strategies including utilisation of different channels have been developed by the Department to put measures in place to deal effectively with long queues in Home Affairs offices country wide. Officials are thereby deployed to health facilities, banks and mobile units to reduce long queues. Some offices are assisted by the municipalities with (Expanded Public Works Programme) EPWP staff to assist DHA in managing the queues.

END

 

15 April 2021 - NW433

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What is the full package of assistance that her department has provided to farmers since the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 in 2020 and (b)(i) what total number of black farmers have benefited from the specified assistance and (ii) for what total amount did they benefit?

Reply:

a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development supplied 400 000 disposable masks, 200 000 reusable masks and 400 000 bars of soap for farmworkers.

(b)(i) The total number of black farmers who benefitted is unknown as the masks and bars of soap were mainly given to Organised Agricultural formations to distribute to farming operations irrespective of the race of farmers involved.

(ii) The expenditure was as follows: R13 700 000.00 – Masks.

R4 052 000.00 – Bars of soap.

15 April 2021 - NW917

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

How does her department intend to resolve the issues of raw sewerage and pollution at the eMfuleni Local Municipality?

Reply:

The pollution of the Vaal River System is a consequence of poor maintenance of sanitation infrastructure by a number of municipalities located along the Vaal River including the Provinces of Mpumalanga, Gauteng, Free State and North West. The Emfuleni Local Municipality (LM) contributes a significant amount to this pollution. The water and sanitation infrastructure challenges in the Emfuleni LM which the provincial and national government interventions are focusing upon are as follows:

a) Operations and Maintenance

b) Refurbishment

c) Upgrade

The Honourable Member will be aware that the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) published its report titled “Final Report of the Gauteng Provincial Inquiry Into the Sewage Problem of the Vaal River” on 17 February 2021. Immediately thereafter we started consultations with the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the Water Services Act.

I have had meetings with my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, the Premier of Gauteng and the Gauteng MEC of COGTA as well as the Emfuleni Local Municipality to solicit inputs that will be incorporated into the intervention plan. 

A task team comprising senior officials of the Department of Water and Sanitation, Water and Sanitation Advisory Panels, NRRTT and other technical experts have been established to manage the implementation of the intervention plan.

I shall be approaching Cabinet to brief it on the SAHRC Report and to present the intervention plan for support and approval as soon as the necessary consultations are completed.

15 April 2021 - NW934

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) names of, (b) number of packages, (c) proof of receipt of all persons who are (i) councillors, (ii) government officials, (iii) National Rapid Response Task Team Members and (iv) Advisory Committee Members who were given packages of personal protective equipment that were purchased by a certain company (name furnished) which was awarded contracts by her department to distribute at the various events (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member there were no packages of personal protective equipment given to (i) councillors, (ii) government officials, (iii) National Rapid Response Task Team Members and (iv) Advisory Committee Members at the community outreach events.

 

15 April 2021 - NW911

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total (i) number of cases of medical negligence have been submitted to his department over the past five years and (ii) amount has it cost his department to settle the specified claims and (b) has he found are the root causes of the proliferation of the cases of medical negligence?

Reply:

In order to respond to this Question, information must be sourced from the provinces. The Department is still in the process of sourcing this information and as soon as all the information is received, the Minister will provide the response to the Question.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW933

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) nature and purpose, (b) full cost of each event, (c) total number of persons in attendance, including the attendance register, (d) all invoices for all the costs incurred, (e) photographs of distribution activities, (f) photographs of original events prior to distribution events, (g) agenda of each original event, (h) agenda of each distribution event, (i) name of the Master of Ceremonies of each original event and (j) list of speakers for events which took place as per the Procurement of Personal Protective Equipment from External Service Providers Presentation sent to Members of the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation on 7 September 2020 after which personal protective equipment was distributed (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) Nature and purpose of vents:

Honourable Member community outreach engagements are part of our work, each Member of Parliament is accountable to the public. These sessions are meant to raise awareness and afford us an opportunity to account directly to our communities. The Community Outreach drive is done in partnership with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to raise awareness on Informal Settlements Upgrading, Emergency Housing, and the COVID-19 pandemic and its implication on affected communities throughout the country.

(b) Full cost of the events:

Event

Total Costs

Wilgespruit

R487 735.00

Batsumi Projects

R431 710.00

240 Justice Mohamed street

R496 715.20

Winterveld

R272 005.00

Mamelodi Hostels

R492 595.00

Clayville, Palmridge Affrivillage, Elijah, Obed Mthombeni & Mpumelelo

R199 105.00

(c) Total number of persons in attendance, including the attendance register:

Based on a headcount by members of the South African Police Services (SAPS) and our Security Management, the number of community members gathered varied between 50 and 100. The figures varied based on the number of people allowed as per the different Gazetted COVID-19 Lockdown Levels.

(d) Invoices for all the costs incurred – Please refer to table above

A copy of the report tabled at the Portfolio Committee has been attached.

(e) to (j) The information requested by the Honourable Member is available on the departmental website, and is public information. Further, alerts are sent out before events and media statements are issued afterwards. The Honourable Member is encouraged to join us to have first-hand information of the work we do. We also publicise our work, including events, in our Breaking New Ground (BNG) Journal.  

15 April 2021 - NW396

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that early in January 2021 a total number of 202 communities in KwaZulu-Natal served by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality had no water for nearly a week, and in view of the fact that although water has been restored, there are reports of civil action to be taken against the specified municipality, what immediate action will be taken to rehabilitate ageing water infrastructure considering the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic and the urgent need for water security?

Reply:

I have been informed by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality that the main cause of the water outages in eThekwini in early January 2021 was the lack of capacity within the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality to deal with mechanical and electrical failures. There was a delay in the awarding of the maintenance contracts which are now in the final stages of procurement and should be awarded within the next month.

I am further informed that electricity outages result in a shortage of supply when there is load shedding. Therefore, the unit that deals with electricity issues in the municipality has been approached to find a way of excluding Wiggins and Durban Heights Waterworks from load shedding. I have been advised that it has now been agreed that the two works will be excluded from load shedding when ESKOM imposes levels below Level 3 load shedding.  

15 April 2021 - NW848

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the percentage of posts currently vacant in State hospitals and (b) is the current recovery rate of COVID-19 patients with comorbidities in each province?

Reply:

(a)​  The overall percentage (%) rate for vacant posts in State Hospitals is 13%. The table below indicates the (%) rate of vacant posts in State Hospitals per Province as at end February 2021.

Province

% Vacant posts in Hospitals

Eastern Cape

13%

Free State

21%

Gauteng

11%

KwaZulu Natal

14%

Limpopo Province

7%

Mpumalanga

12%

North West

14%

Northern Cape

17%

Western Cape

15%

Overall Total

13%

(b) The recovery rate of COVID-19 patients without comorbidities reported as at 14 April 2021 is as below, please note that the comorbidities indicator is not covered as the current reporting classification does not include it:

 

PROVINCE

TOTAL RECOVERIES

 

14 April 2021

Eastern Cape

184,064

Free State

79,579

Gauteng

405,110

KwaZulu-Natal

319,830

Limpopo

60,970

Mpumalanga

74,225

North West

61,631

Northern Cape

33,215

Western Cape

268,249

Total

1,486,873

END

13 April 2021 - NW875

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of learners who (a) are registered with her department do not have birth certificates and (b) do not have birth certificates have parents who are (i) South African citizens and (ii) foreign nationals in each province?

Reply:

(a)(b) (i)(ii) Refer Annexure A

13 April 2021 - NW658

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the burglary and theft of weapons at the TEK Base in Thaba Tswane, which was reported in December 2019, what is the total number of non-SA National Defence Force staff members who were charged; (2) whether the specified members have appeared in a court of law; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Mr Mooketsi an employee of the Department of Education, Gauteng who was out on bail for an unrelated armed robbery case was arrested  in Springs in possession of an R4 Assault Rifle and 3 x empty R4 magazines. 

2. Mr Mooketsi was charged and appeared at the Springs Magistrate Court on February and April 2020 respectively.  He was remanded in custody pending his next court appearance on 04 May 2020.  The case was then postponed to 20 August 2020 for trial.  The accused was found guilty and sentence to 6 years imprisonment.”

12 April 2021 - NW574

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What are the reasons that the court order in Case No 22232/2017, Clark v Director-General of Home Affairs and Others in the Western Cape Division of the High Court on 12 March 2018, has not been complied with fully and (b) by what date will the court order be fully complied with?

Reply:

The Department, through the Acting Chief Director: Legal Services, is in constant communication with Mr Tjad Clark to obtain certain information related to the application required in order to implement the judgment. Thus far progress has been made and the relevant section is tracing the application as per clarification received from Mr CLark.

END

12 April 2021 - NW915

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What total number of (i) Directors-General and (ii) provincial Heads of Department have signed their performance contracts and (b) how does he intend to hold the specified officials to account should they fail to meet the agreed upon performance standards?

Reply:

a) All the DGs and HoDs who were required to sign performance agreements for the 2020/2021 performance cycle have submitted.

(i) Out of the 54 national departments and Offices of the Premier, 39 DGs were required to and signed performance agreements. The remainder of the DGs comprises of 13 acting DGs and two (2) newly appointed. These officials only have to sign performance contracts three months after assumption of duties.

(ii) The 68 HoDs who were required to sign performance agreements have submitted it. At the provincial level, 24 were acting HoDs, three (3) newly appointed, one (1) on special leave and one (1) on precautionary suspension.

b) In terms of section 7(b) of the Public Service Act 103 of 1994, each individual Executing Authority has all the necessary powers to manage performance in their respective departments.

End

12 April 2021 - NW519

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) Whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. a) No employee of the Department of Public Service and Administration performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to their work in the past five financial years.

b) The functions and performance of all employees are governed by their Job Descriptions, Employment Contracts, Performance Agreements and regular Performance Assessments as per applicable Directives, laws and policies.

b. (i) Zero (0);

(ii) Not applicable.

2. No such requests nor approvals were made by any employee as the Department does not have such a policy.

a) The Department does not have a policy that requires employees to perform work outside of normal working hours additional to their responsibilities as this would be irregular and violates the principles of fair labour practice.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

End

12 April 2021 - NW970

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What total amount was spent on public service announcements at (a) eNCA, (b) SABC 2, (c) SABC 3 and (d)(i) print and (ii) digital media platforms for COVID-19 awareness campaigns in the period 1 March 2020 and 1 March 2021?

Reply:

The GCIS did not spend any funds for the flighting of PSA’s. The Public Service Announcements were flighted by all major media houses free of charge both on TV and on Radio.

a) ENCA flighted 11 spots and the total value of the PSA’s was R125 250.00

b) SABC 1, 2 & 3 flighted a total of 14 spots and the value of the PSA’s was R300 750.00. The cost breakdown per station is not available.

c) Same as above.

d) (i) No PSA’s were placed

(ii) Digital media platforms

The GCIS received ad grants from Facebook, Twitter as well as Google for use in COVID-19 awareness campaigns. This was a global campaign from the platform owners to assist Governments across the world in sharing COVID-19 information

Facebook: 4 ad grants totalling US$ 88 031 or roughly R1,3 million to use on GovernmentZA page. Spent to date: R680 000

Twitter: received ad grants from Twitter totalling R381 000 - Spent to date: R381 000

Google: Initial grant for the search campaign totalled US$5,5 million that was set to expire on 31 December 2020. This was extended until 31 December 2021. An addition grant of US$2,5 million was received in March 2021. Total grant: US$7,5 million or roughly R115 million. Spent to date: R77 000 000

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW223

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What is the duration of the suspension of a certain person (name and details furnished); (2) whether the specified person has been transferred and/or seconded to another position in The Presidency; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the position which the person currently holds and (b) for how long will the person be in the specified position; (3) whether the person has retained all the previously allocated privileges and benefits such as salary, security detail, electronic equipment such as a cell phone and a laptop; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the reasons for this and (b) total amount has the person been paid in salaries since the suspension?

Reply:

(1)  Ms Khusela Sangoni has been placed on precautionary suspension with effect from 02 February 2021 pending an investigation. The investigation is mandated to be completed within 60 days from date of inception.
 
(2) As stated in 1 above, Ms Khusela Sangoni has been placed on precautionary suspension until the finalisation of the investigation. She has not been transferred or seconded to any other department.
 
(3) Ms Khusela Sangoni has retained all her allocated privileges since the precautionary suspension

a) Her suspension is in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 2.7(2) of Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook, with full pay. The precautionary suspension does not constitute a punishment.

b) She receives her salary at the end of the month, where she will be paid her salary in full.

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW307

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether he has been informed of reports that certain public sector unions are demanding wage increases of up to 10% during the upcoming round of wage negotiations (details furnished); (2) (a) what are the full details of all the various demands that have so far been tabled by public sector unions in relation to the upcoming round of wage negotiations and (b) will he furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a list consisting of the (i) name of each labour union and (ii) demands they have tabled; (3) Whether it is the position of his department that a wage increase of 10% is considered a reasonable demand; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) can only respond to formal demands tabled by labour in the Public Service Coordinating Council (PSCBC). At the time of this reply, the unions to the PSCBC had not formally tabled their demands as per Council processes. Therefore the MPSA has not been informed of any wage increase demand of up to 10% during the upcoming round of wage negotiations.

(2)(a) The union parties to the PSCBC tabled their demands in relation to the upcoming round of wage negotiations on first March 2021 and they are attached as annexure to this reply.

(2(b)(i)(ii) The information requested is not available for the reasons indicated above.

(3) The process of engagement between parties in the PSCBC on wage negotiations occurs under the purview of the PSCBC. The employer will negotiate on the basis of fairness, equity, sustainability and affordability.

End

12 April 2021 - NW224

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What total number of (a) staff members and (b) political appointees in (i) senior management and (ii) middle management in (aa) The Presidency and (bb) his Office have submitted their financial disclosures by 21 January 2021; (2) what (a) total number of employees including their (i) names and (ii) positions failed to submit their disclosures and (b) actions has been taken in respect of each individual who failed to submit financial disclosures by 21 January 2021?

Reply:

The 2019/20 Financial Disclosure Period:

1. By 31 August 2020, The Presidency had a [1]100 % compliance level in terms of all staff members submitting their financial disclosures.

The Breakdown is per financial disclosure category:

a) Members of the Senior Management Service - All 58 submitted their financial disclosures by 30 May 2020.

b) Members in the Middle Management category (MMS12) – all [2]27 submitted their financial disclosures by 31 July 2020.

c) Members in the Middle Management category (MMS11) – all 51 submitted their financial disclosures by [3]30 August 2020.

d) Members in the OSD12/Higher category – All 12 submitted their financial disclosures by 31 July 2020.

2. All designated employees submitted their financial disclosures. Please note that the report is on employees’ compliance to the timelines of the Financial Disclosure Framework and not the content/Financial information that was disclosed.

Thank you.

  1. The 100% compliance level pertains to all employees who were employed by The Presidency during the official disclosure period and not employees who joined The Presidency after the disclosure period. All employees who submitted their financial disclosures are employed in terms of the Public Service Act, thus, in all categories there is no definition of a ‘political appointee’.

  2. A member who joined The Presidency in July 2020, submitted his disclosure in August 2020. So in total all 28 MMS12 members submitted their financial disclosures.

  3. Please Note that the Financial Disclosure Framework indicates that a newly appointed designated employee should disclose his/her financial interest 30 days after assumption of duty. An employee became part of MMS11 in October 2020, meaning that currently The Presidency has 52 MMS11 members. The Ethics Office could not register the employee on the Financial Disclosure System in 2020 due to intermittent problems with the system and not due to failure by the employee to disclose his financial interest.

12 April 2021 - NW489

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What number of public servants have taken early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at (i) national and (ii) provincial level and (b) will he furnish Dr M M Gondwe with the breakdown of the relevant number in each government department and (c) what number of these public servants were (i) teachers and (ii) nurses?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) The number of public servants who took early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at national level was 2 879.

(1) (a) (ii) The number of public servants who took early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at provincial level was 2 005.

(1) (b) The breakdown of the relevant number of early retirements in each government department is depicted in the table below:

 

Number of Public Servants that retired early by department from 27 March 2020

National/Provincial department

Total

Total

4,884

Eastern Cape

Total

322

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

8

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

2

 

Education

215

 

Health

54

 

Office of the Premier

3

 

Provincial Treasury

4

 

Roads and Public works

6

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

20

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

2

 

Transport

8

Free State

Total

135

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

3

 

Education

105

 

Health

10

 

Police, Roads and Transport

7

 

Social Development

10

Gauteng

Total

207

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

1

 

Economic Development

4

 

Education

87

 

Health

107

 

Human Settlements

6

 

Social Development

2

KwaZulu-Natal

Total

502

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

15

 

Arts and Culture

1

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

2

 

Education

368

 

Health

101

 

Office of the Premier

2

 

Public Works

2

 

Social Development

3

 

Transport

8

Limpopo

Total

360

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

5

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

5

 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

1

 

Education

283

 

Health

48

 

Office of the Premier

1

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

11

 

Social Development

3

 

Transport and Community Safety

3

Mpumalanga

Total

139

 

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

5

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

1

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

2

 

Education

93

 

Health

28

 

Provincial Treasury

2

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

7

National

Total

2,879

 

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

30

 

Basic Education

4

 

Correctional Services

382

 

Employment and Labour

7

 

Energy

2

 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

1

 

Government Communication and Information System

2

 

Health

2

 

Higher Education and Training

110

 

Home Affairs

36

 

Human Settlements

2

 

International Relations and Cooperation

8

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

45

 

Military Veterans

2

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

4

 

National Treasury

9

 

Office of the Chief Justice

9

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

2

 

Police

2,127

 

Public Service and Administration

2

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

44

 

Social Development

1

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

4

 

Statistics South Africa

3

 

Water and Sanitation

41

North West

Total

106

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

1

 

Arts, Culture, Sports and Recreation

3

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

4

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

2

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

1

 

Education

69

 

Health

20

 

Provincial Treasury

1

 

Public Works and Roads

5

Northern Cape

Total

34

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

1

 

Education

26

 

Health

4

 

Roads and Public Works

1

 

Social Development

1

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

1

Western Cape

Total

200

 

Agriculture

1

 

Community Safety

1

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

1

 

Education

119

 

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

2

 

Health

60

 

Provincial Treasury

7

 

Social Development

6

 

The Premier

3

(1) (c) (i) The number of teachers who took early retirement during this period was 1 274

(1) (c) (ii) The number of nurses who took early retirement during this period was 214

The information indicated above was obtained from PERSAL as on 1 March 2021.

End

12 April 2021 - NW225

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the reasons that The Presidency has not fired a certain person (name and details furnished) for failure to submit financial disclosures and embarrassing The Presidency through the person’s involvement in the contract (details furnished), given the President’s stated mission to fight corruption?

Reply:

In the course of the investigation into the affairs of the Gauteng Department of Health concerning irregularities in the appointment of a service provider to supply Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) informed The Presidency that a senior Presidency official may have committed misconduct in violation of the Public Service Act, 1994.

The SIU consequently recommended the instituting of disciplinary proceedings against the official. In terms of possible misconduct identified by the SIU, the official has been placed on precautionary suspension in accordance with paragraph 2.7 (2), Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook, pending an internal investigation into the official’s alleged misconduct. The outcome of the internal investigation will determine the cause of action to be taken by The Presidency in compliance with the law.

Thank You.