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26 May 2016 - NW1382

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a)What are the reasons for naturalised citizens being prevented from applying for new Smart ID cards at this stage, (b) what plans are in place to allow naturalised citizens to apply for the specified cards in the future and (c) by what date does he envisage that naturalised citizens will be allowed to apply for the specified cards?

Reply:

(a-b) The naturalised citizens will be allowed to apply for the new Smart ID cards on completion of the National Identification System which would enable the online validation of the naturalisation certificates. Currently the certificates are validated manually.

(c) The date to allow naturalised citizens to apply for Smart ID Cards will be determined once the National Identification System is implemented.

24 May 2016 - NW1395

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

No, the security nature of Home Affairs and Government Printing Works business is not geared towards development programmes for small business and cooperatives but we do provide direct contractual work to small business where applicable.

10 May 2016 - NW1217

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) In which media did the Independent Electoral Commission advertise for the voter registration held on (i) 5 and 6 March 2016 and (ii) 9 and 10 April 2016 in each province and (b) what total amount was spent in each province on the specified advertisements for each registration weekend in each medium; (2) whether any of the specified advertising was placed in community print media; if not, why not; if so, (a) in which community print media were the specified advertisements placed for each of the specified registration weekends and (b) what were the costs in this regard; (3) whether any of the specified advertising was placed on community radio stations; if not, why not; if so, (a) on which community radio stations were the specified advertisements placed on each of the specified registration weekends and (b) what were the costs in this regard?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i-ii) The following media channels formed part of the Electoral Commission’s registration communication initiatives in all nine provinces: Outdoor media (billboards), print media (newspapers, magazines, community newspapers and other publications), radio (including community, regional and national stations), television (including SABC, eTV, a variety of DSTV stations and community channels), digital media, social media and internet advertising). It must be noted that the media planning and implementation to promote registration during both the March 2016 and April 2016 registration weekends were identified and selected based on a variety of factors including target audience (especially aimed at eligible voters under 30 years old), available budget and cost efficiency, as well as the distribution of eligible voters around South Africa as informed by the Electoral Commission’s own databases and those of the media.

(1)(b) Electoral Commission does not segment its media purchases, planning or expenditure according to provincial boundaries. Most media transcend provincial boundaries (especially television, radio and digital/social media). It is therefore not possible to provide accurate data regarding the provincial split of media usage or expenditure per province as provincial expenditure is not tracked.

.However, the total spend on all media in all provinces to promote the two registration weekends in March and April 2016 was as follows: (Inclusive of VAT)

  • Television: R28 552 505
  • Radio: R21 581 577
  • Print: R6 195 149
  • Digital media: R17 964 903
  • Outdoor media: R4 312 827

(2) Community print was used extensively to promote the first registration weekend in March 2016. A four-page guide to the 2016 Elections was published in six languages and 8.306 million copies were inserted into 325 community newspapers based in all provinces.

(2)(a) See attached list marked Annexure A of community newspapers used.

(2)(b) R4 683 622 (Inclusive of VAT)

  1. Community radio stations (which included student radio stations) were included in the media plan for both registration weekends.

(3)(a) See attached list marked Annexure B of community radio stations used

(3)(b) R2 231 002 (Inclusive of VAT)

ANNEXURE A: PQ 1217 on IEC

(2)(a) List of community newspapers used:

   

African Reporter

Midweek Review

Alberton Record

Midweek Potch Herald

Alex News

Mmega District News

Aliwal Weekly

Mogol Post

Al-Qalam

Mopani Herald

Amanzimtoti Fever

Mossel Bay Advertiser

Athlone News

Mpumalanga Mirror

Atlantic Sun

Mpumalanga News

Barberton Times

Mpumalnga Commuter

Bedfordview & Edenvale News

Mthatha Express

Benoni City Times

Nelspruit Post

Berea Mail

Newcastle & District Advertiser

Bloemfontein Courant

Newcastle Express

BloemNuus/News

Newcastle Sun

Blouberg Today

Ngoho News

Boksburg Advertiser

Noordelike Nuus

Bolander

Noordkaap

Bonus

Noordwester Die

Bosveld Review

Noordwester/Oewernuus

Brakpan Herald

North Coast Courier

Breederivier Gazette

North Coast Times

Brits Pos

North Eastern Tribune

Bua Sedibeng News

North Eyethu

Bugle The

North West Independent

Bullein

North West Journal

Bulletin

Northcliff & Mellville Times

Cape Flat News

Northern Bulletin

Capricorn Voice

Northern News (Bellville/ Durbanville)

Carletonville Herald

Northern News (Goodwood/Parow)

Centurion Sun

Northern News (Kuilsriver/ Brackenfell/ Kraaifontein)

Chatsworth Rising Sun

Northern Star

Chatsworth Tabloid

Northglen News

Chiawelo Urban News

Ons Kontrei

City Vision Link

Onze Nuus

Coastal Weekly

Orange Farm News

Comaro Chronicle

Orange Farm Poortjie Indaba

Community Focus

Orlando Urban News

Constantiaberg Bulletin

Oudtshoorn Courant

Corridor Gazette

Our Times

Cosmo City Chronicle

Overport Rising Sun

Cosmos News

Overvaal

Courier

Paarl Post

CXPress

Parys Gazette

De Aar Echo

PE Express

Die Courant Swartland & Weskus

PE Express Indaba

Die Daller

People's Post Link

Die Ghaap

Phalaborwa Herald

Die Hoorn

Phoenix Tabloid

Die Pos

Pimville Urban News

Diepkloof Urban News

Pinetown & Hammarsdale Izindaba

Dikelethu News

Plainsman

District Mail

Platinum Weekly

Dobsonville Urban News

Polokwane Express

Drakenstein Gazette

Polokwane Observer

Dumelang News

Pondo News

Durban North News

Potchefstroom Herald

Eagle Eye News

Pretoria Record Central

East Griqualand Fever

Pretoria Record Centurion

Eastern Cape Mirror

Pretoria Record East

Eastern Cape Today

Pretoria Record Mamelodi

Eastern Free State Issue

Pretoria Record Moot

Echo Maritzburg Central

Pretoria Record North

Edendale Echo

Pretoria Record Noweto

Edendale Eyethu

Pretoria Record West

Eikestad Nuus

Protea Urban News

Ekasi News

Public Eye

Ekurhuleni News

Public Eye PMB

Eldorado Park Urban News

Queensburgh News

Eldorado Times

Randburg Sun

Estcourt & Midlands News

Randfontein Herald

eThekwini Times

Recorder

Excelsior News

Rekord – Nigel & Heidelberg

Express Eastern Free State

Reporter, The

Express Free State (Mangaung)

Richmond Times Group

Express Northern Cape

Ridge Times

Eyethu Amajuba

Roodepoort Northsider

Eyethu Bay Watch

Roodepoort Record

Eyethu Edendale

Rosebank Killarney Gazette

Eyethu Ilembe

Rustenburg Herald

Eyethu Intshonalanga

Sandton Chronicle

Eyethu Ugu

Sasolburg Ster

Eyethu Umlazi

Sedibeng Ster

Eyethu Umngeni

Seipone

Eyethu Uthukela

Sentinel News

Eyethu Zululand

Somerset Budget & Pearston Adv.

False Bay Echo

Sosh Times

Fordsburg & Mayfair Rising Sun

South Cape Forum

Fourways Review

South Coast Fever

Frankfort Herald

South Coast Herald

Free State Sun

South Coast News

Gemsbok

South Coast Sun

George Herald

Southern Courier

Germiston City News

Southern Mail

Glenwood Weekly Gazette

Southern Star

Go! & Express East London

Southern Suburbs Tatler

Graaff Reinet Advertiser/Karoo Nuus

Southlands Sun

Greater Alex Today

Soweto Express

Greenstone Guide

Soweto Times

Greytown Gazette

Springs Advertiser

Grocotts Mail

Standerton Advertiser

Harrismith Chronicle

Standerton Ibis

Hazyview Herald

Stanger Weekly

Heidelberg Nigel Heraut

Steelburger Inc. Lydenburg News

Heilbron Herald

Stellalander

Helderberg Gazette

Stellenbosch Gazette

Herald The, (Middelburg)

Streeknuus

Hermanus Times

Swartland Gazette

Highlands Panorama

Tabea News (Vaal Times)

Highveld Gazette

Tabletalk

Highveld Tribune

Talk of the Town

Highvelder/Hoevelder

Tame Times - Leseding News Bojanala

Highway Mail

Tame Times

Highway News (Pinetwon and Hammersdale Izindaba)

Tame Times Limpopo

Hillcrest Fever

Tame Times: Alberton, Bedfordview, Edenvale,Germiston, Johannesburg South and Boksburg

Hoedspruit Herald

Tembisan

Horizon

Thaba Chweu News

Ilembe Eyethu

The Beat Community Newspaper

Impact 24/7 News

The Cape Towner

Intshonalanga Eyethu

The Echo

Isolomzi Express

The Representative

Jabavu Urban News

The Soweto Bulletin

Jeffreys Bay Courant

Theewaterskloof Gazette

Joburg Eastern Express

Times of Ladysmith

Kalahari Bulletin

Tongaat/Verulam & Phoenix Sun

Kathu Gazette

Township Times

Kempton Express

Triangle Courier

Klerksdorp Midweek

Tshwane Sun Attridgeville

Klerksdorp Record

Tshwane Sun Central

Knysna Plett Herald

Tshwane Sun Hammanskraal

Kokstad Advertiser

Tshwane Sun Mamelodi

Kormorant

Tshwane Sun Soshanguve

Kouga Express

Tshwane Sun West

Kroonnuus

Tygerburger

Krugersdorp News

UD News

Kwêvoël

Umlazi Eyethu

Ladysmith Gazette

Umlazi Times

Ladysmith Herald

Umvoti Light

Laudium Sun

uPhongola News

Lenasia Rising Sun

Uvo Lwethu Express

Lenasia Times

Vaal Weekblad

Lentswe

Vanderbijlpark Ster

Leseding News - Bojinala

Vereeniging Ster

Letaba Herald

Victoria West Messenger

Life & Style

Village Talk

Limpopo Mirror

Vista

Lowvelder/Laeveder

Vryheid Herald

Mabopane Sun

Vrystaat

Mafikeng Mail

Vukani

Makhulu News

Weekend Review

Maluti

Weekly Gazette

Mangaung Issue

Weslander

Maritzburg Sun

West Side Urban News

Meadowlands Urban News

Westville Weekly Gazette

Meander Chronicle

White River Post

Merebank Rising Sun

Winelands Echo

Messenger

Witbank News

Mid South Coast Mail

Witzenberg Herald

Mid South Coast Rising Sun

Worcester Standard

Middelburg Observer

Your Money

Midlands News

Zeerust News

Midrand Reporter

Zola Urban News

Midvaal Ster

Zoutpansberger

 

Zululand Observer

  • END -

ANNEXURE B of PQ 1217

(3)(a) List of community radio stations used:

   

Aganang

Radio Alpha

Alfred Nzo

Radio Atlantis

Alx FM

Radio Botlokwa

BayFM

Radio Bushbuckridge

Bok Radio

Radio Eden

Bush Radio

Radio Islam

East Rand Stereo

Radio Kangala

EK Fm

Radio Kanyamazane

Ekhephini FM

Radio Khanya

eMalahleni Community

Radio Khwezi

Energy Fm

Radio Mafikeng

Forte FM

Radio Mafisa

Gamkaland

Radio Mohodi

Giyani FM

Radio Moletsi

Greater Lebowakgomo

Radio Moretele

Greater Middelburg

Radio Mosupatsela

Greater Tzaneen FM

Radio Moutse

Highway

Radio Naledi

Hlanganani

Radio Newcastle

Inanda FM

Radio Riverside

Inkonjane

Radio Rosestad

Izwi Lomzansi

Radio Sekgosese

Jozi FM

Radio Soshanguve

Karabo

Radio Sunny South

Kasie FM

Radio Takalani

KC

Radio Teemaneng

Koepel Fm

Radio TUKS

Kopanong

Radio Turf

KovsieFM

Radio Tygerberg

Lekoa

Radio Unitra

Lentswe Stereo

Radio Univen

Lephalale FM

Radio Vukani

Lethlabile

Radio Zibonele

Lukhanji

Sedibeng FM

Makhado FM

Setsoto FM

Malamulele FM

SKFM

MAMS FM

Star FM

Maputaland Radio

Thetha FM

Mdantsane FM

TshwaneFM

MFM

Tubatse

Mix FM

TUT Radio

Mmabatho

UCT Radio

Modiri FM

Umgungundlovu

Mogale FM

Valley FM

Motheo FM

Vibe FM

Mozolo

Village FM

Musina

Voice of the Cape

NFM

VOW

Nkomazi FM

VUT

Nkqubela Radio

Zebediela

Overvaal Stereo

Zululand

PE FM

 

Phalaborwa

 

PukFM

 

Qwa Qwa Radio

 
  • END -

03 May 2016 - NW1007

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department issued citizenship to any members of a certain family (name furnished) residing in South Africa in accordance with the provisions of the SA Citizenship Act, Act 88 of 1995; if so, (a) on what date was citizenship granted in each case and (b) what conditions of the Act were met in order for the citizenship to be granted in each case?

Reply:

Yes, citizenship was granted to 4 members of the Gupta family residing in South Africa as follows:

Gupta V, Date of birth (d.o.b) 14 July 1986

  1. application approved 24 November 2015
  2. section 5(1) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No 88 of 1995)

Gupta K, d.o.b 19 August 2015

  1. application approved on 03 March 2016
  2. section 5(4)(minors) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No. 88 of 1995)

Gupta A, d.o.b 30 December 1945

  1. application approved on 27 July 2015
  2. section 5(9) (exceptional circumstances) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No. 88 of 1995)

Gupta S, d.o.b 10 May 1970

  1. application approved on 27 July 2015
  2. section 5(9) (exceptional circumstances) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No. 88 of 1995)

03 May 2016 - NW976

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) Why are the (i) Cape Town and (ii) Port Elizabeth refugee offices showing new applications received when they are not officially mandated to do so, (b) what is the total backlog of rejected refugee status appeals in the country and (c) what are the plans to address this situation, given that only 12% of the appeals for the 2015-16 financial year have been processed so far; (2) what are the main unfounded reasons given by Zimbabwean nationals when applying for asylum; (3) (a) has the demand for refugee identification documents been consistent each year during the past five financial years, (b) has supply always been around half of those requested in each financial year and (c) what is the related backlog in this regard

Reply:

(1)(a)(i-ii) The new asylum applicants relate to family joining. In the main there are two categories of those joining the files of existing asylum seekers, namely: new-born babies and also dependents who were declared by the principal applicant when applying before the closure of the office and they have now made the move to South Africa to join their principal applicants under section 3(c) of the Refugees Act.

(1)(b) The number of backlog cases as reported to the UNHCR in 2015 is 144 233. At the time 80 315 cases were active on the system. Since the July 2015 report shared with UNHCR, the Department is undergoing a process to properly audit and undertake a project to deal with this backlog. The outcome of the audit, on completion, will confirm the appeal backlog.

(1)(c) The Department, working with the UNHCR, has put together a planning team that is developing a project plan for the appeal backlog. Such planning is being conducted in parallel with the file auditing process mentioned above to inform the plan.

(2) Most unfounded claims relate to the political climate in Zimbabwe. Most applicants with this type of decision cite persecution on the grounds of political affiliation and perceived failure by the government to deal with such persecution and harassment of political opponents.

(3)(a) The overall number of applications for refugee identification documents has been consistent throughout the indicated period. However, during the 2012/2013 and 2013/14 financial years, a backlog began to build up because of limited capacity and was eventually cleared in late 2014/15.

(3)(b) As indicated above, capacity challenges affected the percentage of applications being processed within the stipulated time frames. However, such challenges do not mean that the other 50% of applicants do not receive their identity documents. Instead, it means that they receive their documents but outside the stipulated turnaround time.

(3)(c) Currently there is no backlog in the processing of both refugee identity documents and travel documents.

26 April 2016 - NW1009

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

How many nationals from the African continent have been granted (a) permanent residence, (b) work and (c) business visas and (d) South African citizenship (i) in (aa) 2012, (bb) 2013, (cc) 2014 and (dd) 2015 and (ii) since 1 January 2016?

Reply:

Nationals from the African continent that have been granted:

(a) Permanent residence:

(i)(aa) 2012 = 209

(i)(bb) 2013 = 5984

(i)(cc) 2014 = 13594

(i)(dd) 2015 = 3565

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 398

(b) Work Visas:

(i)(aa) 2012 = 684

(i)(bb) 2013 = 616

(i)(cc) 2014 = 419

(i)(dd) 2015 = 1707

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 393

(c) Business Visas:

(i)(aa) 2012 = 474

(i)(bb) 2013 = 839

(i)((cc) 2014 = 1203

(i)(dd) 2015 = 51

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 2

(d) South African citizenship

(i)(aa) 2012 = 397

(i)(bb) 2013 = 846

(i)(cc) 2014 = 526

(i)(dd) 2015 = 570

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 129

 

26 April 2016 - NW1008

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

How many Chinese nationals have been granted (a) permanent residence, (b) work and (c) business visas and (d) South African citizenship (i) in (aa) 2012, (bb) 2013, (cc) 2014 and (dd) 2015 and (ii) and since 1 January 2016?

Reply:

Chinese nationals that have been granted:

(a) Permanent residence:

(i)(aa) 2012 = 19

(i)(bb) 2013 = 538

(i)(cc) 2014 = 1341

(i)(dd) 2015 = 542

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 127

(b) Work Visas:

(i)(aa) 2012 = 592

(i)(bb) 2013 = 1016

(i)(cc) 2014 = 909

(i)(dd) 2015 = 485

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 9

(c) Business Visas:

(i)(aa) 2012 = 109

(i)(bb) 2013 = 321

(i)(cc) 2014 = 328

(i)(dd) 2015 = 18

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 127

(d) South African citizenship:

(i)(aa) 2012 = 4

(i)(bb) 2013 = 16

(i)(cc) 2014 = 6

(i)(dd) 2015 = 5

(ii) Since 1 January 2016 = 1

26 April 2016 - NW1006

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) Where were the interviews held of the Independent Electoral Commission’s vacancy selection panel and (b) what were the costs associated with conducting the specified interviews in terms of (i) travel, (ii)(aa) accommodation and (bb) catering costs, (iii) remuneration of any persons and (iv) any other specified costs?

Reply:

(a-b) The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) has indicated that it is the Constitutional Court who arranged and conducted the interviews and incurred costs in this regard.

26 April 2016 - NW918

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

(1-2) No.

19 April 2016 - NW738

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether his department was using any sustained intelligence driven investigation to uncover corrupt officials in his department who were working in cahoots with criminals and organised syndicates to (a) steal identities and (b) breach security devices built into Smart ID cards; if not, why not; if so, (i) what has been the rate of success for each office during the period 1 January 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (ii) to what extent is the specified problems being eliminated; (2) whether his department has a dedicated office that is staffed by specialists where persons who have had their identity stolen can go in order to have their nightmare ended without being shunted from pillar to post year after year; if not, why not; if so, where is the specified office(s) situated?

Reply:

  1. Yes. The department does have sustained intelligence driven integrated efforts with the Law Enforcement Agencies aimed at detecting corrupt practices by officials of the department who collude with criminals and organised syndicates to defraud DHA systems and processes.

The cases of identity theft that were dealt with by the department were isolated incidents, for instance, the Metro police official who was arrested for misrepresentation of the Late Registration of birth process by furnishing false details and acquired a RSA ID, following which he was appointed as a traffic officer. The Late Registration of Birth is a process that is afforded to people who could not have registered birth at an early stage for whatever reason. To this date, there has been no breach of the security devices built into the Smart ID Card.

Detection mechanisms and process reviews are conducted regularly in the areas of Asylum Seeker Management, ID Smart Card, Supply Chain Management, IT Modernisation and Permitting with the view of identifying corruption and security loopholes and developing mitigating strategies to address these shortfalls.

During the 2015/ 16 financial year, forty two (42) arrests were carried out for fraud and corruption. Officials constitute 57% of the arrested while non-officials make 43%.

(2) As part of government‘s Minimum Anti-Corruption Capacity requirement, the department has a dedicated anti-Corruption Unit where fraud and corruption is reported and investigated. Reporting mechanisms are the National Anti-Corruption Hotline: 0800701701 and email address: report.corruption @dha.gov.za.

29 March 2016 - NW717

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether his department has a special section that deals effectively and expeditiously with every case of stolen identity, as well as with living persons erroneously and wrongly being declared dead through some criminal act or failures within his department; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many such cases had his department dealt with during the period 1 July 2009 to 29 February 2016, (b) how long did it generally take for such cases to be resolved and (c) how many cases have remained unresolved after a period of 90 days; (2) Whether he will make a statement on (a) the extent of the specified problems and (b) how his department was efficiently solving them?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the department has specialised units which investigate and deal effectively with identity theft resulting from illegal activities within the department and erroneous or fraudulent death registrations.

(1)(a) The number of cases of fraudulent or erroneous death registrations during the period for which statistics are available were 6113.

In the case of identity theft and fraud resulting from an identity document being lost or stolen whilst in the owner’s possession, this is a criminal matter and it is recommended that this specific question be referred to the South African Police Service, which handles these criminal investigations.

(1)(b) The turnaround time required to resolve cases is six to eight (6-8) weeks dependent on the nature of the submission by the citizen concerned and all required supporting documents to expedite the department’s investigation.

(1)(c) All reported cases where full supporting documents were furnished were concluded within 90 (ninety) days.

(2)(a) The department issues media statements and uses various forms of media to address the scourge of problems within the department and to inform the public accordingly. Some are addressed through print media (newspapers) or direct interviews on media shows. The department also uses this medium to inform and sensitise the public on matters such as identity theft and false death registrations.

(2)(b) The department is in the process of modernising its systems to curb the issues of identity theft (through the rollout of the Smart ID Card) and fraudulent death cases (through more stringent Registration procedures).

15 March 2016 - NW451

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether he will (a) enquire into the situation of a certain person (details furnished) that was declared undesirable through no fault of his own and (b) advise on (i) if and (ii) how the status of undesirable can be reversed?

Reply:

(a) I will ensure the department looks into this matter.

(b)(i) The status of undesirability can be reversed by appealing against the decision.

(b)(ii) The appeal can be sent to Overstayappeals@dha.gov.za.

15 March 2016 - NW450

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

1)Whether with reference to the urgent plea of a certain mother whose baby had been criminalised after he could not be furnished with the necessary permits (details furnished) he has been made aware of the mother’s urgent plea for assistance; if so, 2) whether his department has investigated the circumstances of this matter; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (3) whether his department will conduct an investigation and assist the mother on a way forward; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) I have now been made aware of this matter.

(2) The department has not as yet conducted any investigation.

(3) The department will conduct an investigation into the circumstances surrounding this matter and will inform the client of the outcome.

15 March 2016 - NW445

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department is proactively ensuring that in accordance with the ruling of the Constitutional Court the Electoral Commission will be in a position to draw up voters’ rolls for the local government elections this year where the valid addresses of all registered voters will appear as required; if not, why not; if so, what steps are being taken by his department, in conjunction with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, to ensure that wards in informal settlements in particular have identifiable and officially recognised street names and house numbers?

Reply:

The order of the Constitutional Court directs the Electoral Commission to provide a voters’ roll with addresses to political parties contesting elections where such addresses are available. This order affirms a standing statutory provision in section 16 (3) of the Electoral Act (27 of 1998) which provides as follows:

“…………………., the chief electoral officer must, on payment of the prescribed fee, provide copies of the voters’ roll or a segment thereof, which includes the addresses of voters, where such addresses are available, to all registered parties contesting the elections.”

Therefore the judicial and statutory dependency to the provision of a voters’ roll with addresses to contesting parties is where such addresses are available.

The Electoral Commission has nonetheless, taken a decision to proactively procure addresses of voters where such are not on their records. In this regard, a number of initiatives are either underway or about to be implemented. I presented below some of these initiatives:

  • A communication campaign was initiated in the period leading up to the voter registration weekend of 5-6 March 2016, for all voters to inspect the voters’ roll with a particular focus on the address details and providing same necessary;
  • Re-focusing the communication campaign for the second registration weekend on the 9-10 April to highlight the need for voters to furnish addresses at the registration stations;
  • Procuring address data from a variety of data sources such as municipalities, other state agencies and commercial providers;
  • Changing the response message on the Short Message System (SMS - 32810) to indicate to voters to furnish address details where such are not on the records of the Electoral Commission; and
  • Conducting a voting district based field work to visit persons whose addresses details are not on record.

15 March 2016 - NW437

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) How many officials of his department across the country were suspended due to allegations of (i) fraud and (ii) corruption in the 2013-2014 and 2014-15 financial years and (b) (i) from which offices were the specified officials and (ii) which positions did they hold; (2) how many officials of his department across the country had their employment contracts terminated due to fraud and corruption in the specified financial years?

Reply:

(1)(a-b) For 2013-2014 financial year 52 officials were placed on precautionary suspension whilst allegations of fraud and corruption were investigated. The table below indicates the offices and the rank (positions) held.

Office

Rank (Position)

BRAKPAN

2

Front Office Clerk

2

BVR

1

Senior Admin Clerk

1

CALEDONSPOORT

6

Control Immigration Officer

1

Immigration Officer

5

CARLETONVILLE

1

Local Office Manager

1

JEPPE'S REEF

2

Control Immigration Officer

1

Immigration Officer

1

KING WILLIAMS TOWN

1

Front Office Clerk

1

MARABASTAD REFUGEE RECEPTION CENTRE

4

Immigration Officer

1

Refugee Status Determination Officer

3

O R TAMBO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

12

Control Immigration Officer

1

Immigration Officer

11

OSHOEK

2

Immigration Officer

2

PHALABRWA

1

Senior Admin Clerk

1

POLOKWANE REGIONAL OFFICE

1

Immigration Officer

1

PORT ELIZABETH REGIONAL OFFICE

1

Control Immigration Officer

1

PORT ELIZABETH REFUGEE RECEPTION CENTRE

10

Refugee Reception Officer

5

Refugee Status Determination Officer

2

Refugee Status Determination Manager

1

Senior Admin Clerk

1

SECURITY OFFICER

1

PRETORIA: LARGE OFFICE

1

MOBILE TRUCK DRIVER

1

PROSPECTON

1

Front Office Clerk

1

TIRRO REFUGEE RECEPTION CENTRE

1

Refugee Reception Officer

1

VANDERBIJLPARK

1

Immigration Officer

1

WITBANK

3

Immigration Officer

3

ZULULAND LOCAL OFFICE

1

Front Office Clerk

1

Grand Total

52

For 2014-2015 financial year 22 officials were placed on precautionary suspension whilst allegations of fraud and corruption were investigated. The table below indicates the offices and the rank (positions) held.

Office

Rank (Position)

BRAKPAN

2

Front Office Clerk

2

CHIEF DIRECTORATE: EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

1

Director

1

KING WILLIAMS TOWN

1

Front Office Clerk

1

KOKSTAD

2

Immigration Officer

2

MARABASTAD REFUGEE RECEPTION CENTRE

1

Immigration Officer

1

O R TAMBO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

5

Immigration Officer

5

OSHOEK

2

Immigration Officer

2

PRETORIA: LARGE OFFICE

1

Mobile Truck Driver

1

PRETORIA:LARGE OFFICE

2

Immigration Officer

2

SASOLBURG

1

Chief Admin Clerk

1

WITBANK

3

Immigration Officer

3

ZULULAND LARGE OFFICE

1

Front Office Clerk

1

Grand Total

22

(2) For the 2013-2014 financial year, 57 employees were dismissed for fraud and corruption related misconduct. For the 2014-2015 financial year, 45 employees were dismissed for fraud and corruption related misconduct.

14 March 2016 - NW225

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Has his department awarded any contracts to companies indirectly or directly owned by certain persons (names furnished) in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, in each specified financial year, (i) how many times were such contracts awarded and (ii) for what amount?

Reply:

(a-c) The department has not awarded any contracts indirectly or directly to companies owned by certain persons in the 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 financial years.

(i-ii) Falls away

02 March 2016 - NW244

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether he and/or his department has bought advertising space in The New Age in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) what number of times and (ii) for what amount in each specified financial year?

Reply:

The information is tabulated hereunder:

 
  1. 2012-13
  1. 2013-14
  1. 2014-15

(i)

O times

Two adverts - once

One advert - once

(ii)

R0

R 521,887.44

R 126,840.96

The placement of the adverts on the New Age Newspaper for the respective years was on the following matters:

2013-14:

  • Duplicate ID Case Resolution Campaign
  • Government Plan on the Extension of Working Hours During Festive Season at Ports of Entry.

 

2014-15:

  • Multimedia Campaign to intensify Communication on the National Population Registration Campaign (NPRC).

It, however, must be noted that the department has similarly also bought advertising space on the above matters in other newspapers such as The Star and Beeld during the respective 2013-14 and 2014-2015 financial years.

01 March 2016 - NW5

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Khubisa, Mr NM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What measures does he intend putting in place to alleviate the difficulties at some offices of his department where well over 500 citizens queue up from as early as 04:00 am in order to obtain their unabridged birth certificates and are turned away at 16:00 due to his department not being able to process the certificates?

Reply:

In general there is no high influx of clients seeking unabridged certificates (UBC) at our offices. No long queues are experienced solely for the purposes of UBCs at any of our offices in the provinces. The only exception was during the past festive season and we envisage the same during holidays/ peak travel season. However, letters in lieu of Unabridged Birth Certificates are issued to clients who applied and did not receive the Unabridged Birth Certificates for travelling purposes within our turnaround time.

Applications taken are captured daily to improve turnaround time. All the queries received, including those for Unabridged Birth Certificates, are attended to on the spot and clients are not turned away due to this department not being able to process their certificates.

26 February 2016 - NW200

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Nkomo, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his Ministry has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant?

Reply:

(a) There are no vacant posts in the Ministry.

(b-c) Not applicable.

 

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Mkuseli Apleni Malusi Gigaba, MP

Director-General Minister of Home Affairs

Date: Date:

25 February 2016 - NW85

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether he has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr. Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019; if not, why not; if so, (a) which key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement, (b) how many performance assessments has he undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed, (c) what progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets from the MTSF, (d) what are the key obstacles to implementation and (e) what is the plan to address such obstacles?

Reply:

Yes, the Minister of Home Affairs entered into a performance agreement with President JG Zuma for the 2014-2019 term of office.

a) The following key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement:

  • Establish the Integrated Border Management Agency (BMA).
  • Develop an Over-arching Strategy to defend, protect, secure and ensure well-managed borders and ensure it is fully implemented by 2018/19.
  • Ensure that registration at birth is the only entry point for SA to the new national identity system (NIS):
  • By 2018/19, 90% of total births registered within 30 calendar days as prescribed by law (approximately 950 000 births to be registered by 2018/19).
  • Ensure that systems are in place to enable the capturing of biometric data of all travellers who enter or exit SA legally:
    • All designated ports of entry equipped with biometric systems capable of processing 100% of travellers (for ports equipped with EMCS) by 2018/19.
  • Reduce regulatory burdens and reduce the time required for importing requisite skills for the economy and for investment, including by introducing a “one stop shop” at government level: 
    • Changes to subsidiary legislation on immigration to facilitate the importation of economic important skills and for workers as identified by economics and infrastructure departments, SOCs and producers.
  • Maximum period for approval to import required skills:
    • 3 months approval from application to approval for import of skills for productive investors and SOCs.
  • Improved feedback opportunities for citizens and other service users:
    • Improvements in facilities based on repeat monitoring and feedback.

b) No formal performance assessments have been undertaken but the MTSF indicators and targets in the agreement are monitored through departmental reports to clusters, cabinet memoranda and through Minister’s bilateral with the President

c) Refer to attached table marked Annexure A for progress against MTSF priorities.

d) The environment and the complexity of issues within which the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) has to function in the implementation of key priorities such as the immigration policy and Border Management Agency is a highly contested one. Also the perception is that the DHA is a purely administrative department. Without recognising the need for the DHA to function within a highly secure environment this can be an obstacle. This has also exacerbated the historical under-funding of the DHA over time.

e) In order to address some of the challenges the Department will be developing a business case to reposition the DHA as a highly secure, professional and modern department. Some of the key priorities include the following:

  • Completion of the Modernisation Programme with the main deliverables being integrated digital systems and re-engineered processes managed and protected by the required compliment of effective professionals.
  • Upgrading of key ports of entry focusing on the piloting of a new model with significant improvements in respect of infrastructure, processes and leadership.
  • Comprehensive review of the Immigration Policy culminating in the approval of a Green Paper and White Paper and new comprehensive legislation drafted.
  • Improving client experience through leadership – the Moetapele programme.
  • Improved stakeholder consultation and forging of partnerships with the private sector to deliver on key departmental priorities, for example signing of memoranda of understandings with the banking sector for issuance of smart ID cards and passports.

24 February 2016 - NW147

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

When does he envisage that naturalised citizens will be able to apply for the new smart ID card?

Reply:

The rollout of smart ID cards by the Department has been implemented in phases. The first phase focuses on South African born citizens and those born abroad from South African parents. The second phase will be based on other categories including naturalised citizens as there is a need to verify their records.

Currently records for naturalised citizens are archived in manual paper form. The Department is to set up a mechanism to digitise such records first to enable verification of naturalised citizens with ease. An announcement will be made by the Department once such process is concluded.

10 December 2015 - NW3204

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether Cage Africa has appealed to the Government to grant (a) political asylum and (b) a new home to Guantanamo Bay detainees; if so, what are the details of the (i) appeal and (ii) financial implications for (aa) her (sic) department and (bb) the Government?

Reply:

The Department of Home Affairs does not have information about this alleged appeal. A request from an organisation such as Cage Africa to the South African government should follow proper channels and be submitted through the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO).

10 December 2015 - NW4087

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is being done to address the lower than expected voter turnout in future national elections and particularly in the upcoming 2016 local government elections?

Reply:

It is the duty of the political parties to ensure that their voters turn out to vote on Election Day.

 

07 December 2015 - NW4085

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What kind of processes should his department put in place to ensure that better performance records are kept, particularly in the Immigration Branch?

Reply:

The ideal would be for the department to have an electronic Document Management System. An electronic system for all applications for visas, permits and refugee IDs and travel documents would obviate the need to keep paper applications since applications would be scanned. All applications would be electronically available for processing and used when needed. This will also alleviate filing space constraints currently a problem at head office.

In line with the above vision, the department has recently introduced an electronic application process for visas and permits, which allows for applications and supporting documents to be scanned and be available in electronic format, thus easing the process of retrieval of records. It also facilitates obtaining statistics on operations and performance. Whilst there are some implementation glitches, which are being addressed as and when they occur, the department expects the system to be fully embedded during the next financial year. 

07 December 2015 - NW4190

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What (i) is the total number of appeal applications pending a decision at the Refugee Appeals Board and (ii) are the causes of the delay in the adjudication of these appeals and (b) by when does he envisage that the backlog will be cleared?

Reply:

(a)(i) According to the National Immigration Information System (NIIS) system there are around 144 200 appeal cases defined as backlog, and around 80 315 of these cases appear to be active on the system.

(a)(ii) The causes of the delay in the adjudication of appeal cases is as follows:

  • Presently there are five Refugee Appeal Board Members, including the Chairperson, serving five Refugee Reception Offices (Pretoria, Musina, Durban, Port Elizabeth and Cape Town) in the whole of South Africa. Most of the applications from these offices are rejected as unfounded and they end up at the Refugee Appeal Board.

 

  • In the past members of the Refugee Appeal Board (RAB) used to seat as single members for each appeal hearing. However, following a number of judicial review applications challenging composition of the Board members in the appeal hearing, the RAB is now compelled to seat as a quorum for hearings. Being five members of the Board, three members must be seated to constitute a quorum for each appeal hearing.
  • It is also not helping that previous RAB decisions, back-dating before the Western Cape High Court case of Harerimana in December 2013, are challenged on the quorum issue and end up being settled out of court on condition that they are reheard before a properly constituted quorum, and there are many such cases.

- Present legislation (the Refugee Act 130,1998) does not make provision for appointment of part time Board Members, so it is not legally possible to appoint part-time Board Members for backlog projects.

- As much as the Board makes efforts to adjudicate appeals already heard, there is also a high number of appeals scheduled to be heard by the Board. The RAB tries to balance the number of cases it hears with those that are adjudicated.

- The decision making process requires extensive research on latest possible country of origin information, International Refugee Law and Case Law because of the complexity of most cases that have to be adjudicated and it is not always easy to get access to these sources of information.

- The RAB decisions need to be carefully constructed because sensitive human rights issues are being dealt with; some of which in their nature are matters of life and death. The RAB has to apply its mind to the facts of each case in compliance with Public Administrative Justice Act, The Constitution, The Refugee Act, International Refugee Law and other Human Rights Instruments before coming to a particular decision.

(b) It is presently not possible to provide a time-frame because the appeal cases dealt with differ in terms of their profiles and complexity. Some appeal cases are simple and straightforward and some are high profile and complicated cases that require in-depth research and legal consultation.

However, during the RSA-UNHCR High Level Bilateral Meeting in Geneva, in July 2015, the two parties agreed to development of a backlog project to address the outstanding appeal cases pending with the RAB. Provided enough human capacity and financial resources are made available, the backlog could be cleared by financial year end in March 2019.

07 December 2015 - NW4082

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether any reasons have been given by his department as to why ministerial commitments in terms of improving audit findings are still in progress when they were due at the end of March 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Ministerial commitments are ongoing in nature. The assessment as to whether these commitments were implemented or are still in progress is done by the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA). Until such time as the department obtains a clean audit outcome, the AGSA is likely to report that these ongoing Ministerial commitments will remain work in progress. Clearly the onus rests on the department to convince the AGSA that it has improved its asset management, accountability of reporting from the regions, leadership, financial accountability, record keeping and has implemented proper financial management processes and credible action plans before the AGSA will agree that these commitments were fully implemented.

07 December 2015 - NW4083

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, what are the (a) reasons and (b) details of the significant increases in irregular expenditure from previous financial years?

Reply:

(a) The amount of irregular expenditure incurred by the Department of Home Affairs increased from R730 000 in the 2013/14 financial year to R1 809 000 in the 2014/15 financial year. The reasons for the increase in the amount disclosed as irregular expenditure are:

  • Use of single quotation without approval for a deviation;
  • Motivation for a deviation was considered not justifiable by the Auditor General;
  • Failure to incorporate local content component in the bid for the office furniture; and
  • The controls that have been introduced by the department to effectively detect and report all irregular expenditure. In this regard, it should be noted that the department itself identified 50% of the irregular expenditure disclosed in the 2014/15 financial year.

(b) Details of the irregular expenditure for 2014/2015 financial year are attached as Annexure A.

07 December 2015 - NW4086

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Why has the matter of the irregular expenditure related to the Riverside Office Park in Centurion, Gauteng, not been finalised, in view of the application to the High Court in July 2014 and the National Treasury report on the matter in December 2014; (2) what is the progress on the disciplinary action that was recommended for officials indicated as involved in the flawed lease agreement at the specified Office Park; (3) what alternative accommodation is being planned for the Independent Electoral Commission’s Head Office if the courts set aside the lease for the specified Office Park?

Reply:

1. The Riverside Office Park lease contract was determined to be irregular in the year ended 31 March 2011 and the rental and operating costs relating to the lease for the year then ended were disclosed in the annual financial statements for that year. In terms of the rules relating to irregular expenditure however, the expenditure needs to be incurred before it can be determined to be irregular, and as the lease is a 10 year agreement further irregular expenditure will be incurred and disclosed in each year until such time as the lease expires or is set aside. Each year, as is required, National Treasury is notified of the irregular expenditure incurred.

2. In line with the recommendations as contained in the Public Protector’s Report, a disciplinary process was instituted against the implicated officials. The respective officials sought to review the rulings of the Chairperson of the disciplinary committee made at the commencement of the disciplinary enquiry.

The review was heard in the Labour Court on 15 September 2015 and on 1 October 2015. The officials’ application was dismissed with no order as to costs. The disciplinary proceeding was then scheduled to be continued from 9-13 November 2015. However, the officials filed an application for leave to appeal the judgment of 1 October 2015. Lawyers have been instructed to oppose the application for leave to appeal and have done so.

The officials’ lawyer in the appeal papers requested the judge to consider the matter in chambers, but prior thereto, furnish the parties with dates by when the parties’ heads of arguments must be filed. The parties now wait for directions from judge.

3. The Commission seeks relief for review and set aside of the lease agreement and addenda thereto. The Commission also seeks to institute a new procurement process to conclude a new lease for the premises and to suspend the existing one (assuming the court finds the procurement process was flawed) upon finalisation of a new procurement process.

The Commission is further addressing this matter through its Risk Management Committee.

02 December 2015 - NW4077

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Why were some (a) vacant and (b) advertised management positions at the Government Printing Works put on hold in order to be re-advertised?

Reply:

(a-b) There were no vacant management posts that were advertised and put on hold in order to be re-advertised. The Director: Security Services was advertised and as no suitable candidate was identified, the post was re-advertised. The General Manager: Strategic Management position was advertised and as some of the shortlisted candidates were no longer available, the post will be re-advertised. Advertised management posts will only be put on hold in the event of changes in functions and/or re-advertised in the event a suitable candidate was not identified.

01 December 2015 - NW3927

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is the total number of uncollected new Smart ID Cards at his department in each province, since the introduction of the specified cards; (2) What steps are being taken to issue the specified cards before the local government election that is scheduled for 2016? NW4792E

Reply:

  1. The total number of uncollected Smart ID Cards at the department in each province as at 10 November 2015 is as follows :-

Free State : 12 832

Eastern Cape : 27 151

Kwazulu-Natal : 29 324

Western Cape : 20 027

Limpopo : 22 838

Gauteng : 43 476

Northern Cape : 7 071

North West : 13 456

Mpumalanga : 11 335

Gauteng (Banks ) : 289

Total : 187 799

2. In order to ensure that Smart ID Cards which have already been issued are collected, applicants are informed when their Smart ID Cards are ready for collection via the SMS system utilised by the Department. An SMS is forwarded to confirm receipt of the Smart ID Card at the office of application for collection by the applicant.

Two follow-up reminder SMSs are also forwarded should the Smart ID Card not be collected by the applicant.

During izimbizo and outreach campaigns, citizens are also reminded to collect their Smart ID Cards.

01 December 2015 - NW4079

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Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Why, with regard to improved operating profit and reserves at the Government Printing Works (GPW), does the GPW not report any major interest earned?

Reply:

The Government Printing Works (GPW), as a government owned business, and a Government Component, must seek permission from National Treasury at the end of each financial year to retain surpluses generated from its operations during that financial year. Once permission is granted the GPW is compelled to bank that surplus in the Paymaster General’s Account, which does not generate interest. It then uses those surpluses in subsequent years to fund the renovation of its facilities, and the purchase of new printing equipment.

01 December 2015 - NW4078

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Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Why has the total number of pages of printed Gazettes by the Government Printing Works not declined significantly since the introduction of the e-Gazette service in 2012?

Reply:

The electronic gazette (E-Gazette) services that the Government Printing Works has introduced focus on two elements of distributing government information. These are:

(i) Electronic processing of notices that the various government departments as well as other private advertiser submit for consolidation into published gazettes, through an E-Gazette system. The size of the gazette is determined by the number of submitted notices – and the increased number of pages in the published[1] gazettes indicates the growth in the notices submitted for publishing.

(ii) The electronic access of gazettes online enabling interested parties to download them from Government Printing Works’ website.

The Government Gazette statistics reported in the Annual Report are of the published editions vs printed copies.

The number of published gazettes’ pages has indeed not declined; and this is due to the increase in notices submitted.

 

 

 

 

  1. Published refers to the consolidated electronic gazette before it is printed into hard copies

01 December 2015 - NW4076

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Has there been any developments in the promotion of the services of the Government Printing Works to other countries in Africa, or does increased domestic profitability make this less of a priority?

Reply:

Expanding the security printing services of Government Printing Works (GPW) to other African countries remains a priority for GPW. The Chief Director for Marketing and Stakeholder Relations is responsible for this work and actively seeks out and applies for tenders for security printing such as printing of ballot papers for other African countries. The only current contract the GPW has for such work is the printing of the African Union passport.

01 December 2015 - NW4075

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether, with reference to the draft State Printers Bill and Government Printing Works' transition to a state-owned company, there are any alternative procedures available to develop its facilities without depending on the Department of Public Works; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Government Printing Works (GPW) is a Government Component, and as such is obliged, according to the Government Immovable Asset Management Act No 19, of 2007, to use the Department of Public Works to purchase or lease buildings and to conduct improvements to State property.

01 December 2015 - NW4080

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What has been done to address the lengthy payment times of creditors by the Government Printing Works (GPW) and (b) how does this impact on the GPW’s finances?

Reply:

  1. During the 2014/15 financial year, the Government Printing Works (GPW) took on average less than 25 calendar days to pay its creditors, including suppliers from abroad. There are no lengthy payment cycles.

2. The GPW pays its suppliers during the normal course of business and thus there is no negative effect on its finances.

01 December 2015 - NW4081

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is the nature of the intangible assets for which inadequate financial records are being kept and which has been an audit qualification for his department since the 2013-14 financial year?

Reply:

The intangible assets for which inadequate financial records were found, as per the audit findings, are kept electronically in the form of the master register in line with the Electronic Communications and Transaction (ECT) Act 25 of 2002. This is in conformance with paragraph 17(1) under production of document or information which states that subject to section 28 where a law requires a person to produce a document or information, that requirement is met if the person produces, by means of data message, an electronic form of that document or information”.

The intangible assets refer to software applications acquired from external service provider(s), that evinced financial implications for the department during 2013-2014 financial year. The asset register submitted to the auditors excluded professional services and software licences, as the department deemed these to be expenses and therefore should not be capitalised. However the auditors advised otherwise as they regarded these as professional services and developmental costs that must be capitalised.

The qualification audit report is based on the inclusion of the professional services and software licences as per the advice of the Auditor General, whilst the department felt that it should have been excluded due to the irrelevancy in terms of them no longer being in use.

These inclusions meant that the closing balance will be adjusted to reflect the amendments.

11 November 2015 - NW3866

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What is the total number of cases of duplicate identity documents (IDs) that were reported in (a) 2011, (b) 2012, (c) 2013, (d) 2014 and (e) since 1 January 2015; (2) how many of the specified cases have been resolved; (3) (a) how many cases are still pending resolution and (b) what is the cause of the delays in resolving these cases; (4) what (a) reason(s) has his department identified in respect of the duplication of IDs that are issued and (b) measures are being implemented by his department to prevent this from happening in the future?

Reply:

(1) There are two categories of duplicate cases, namely where one person

has multiple identity numbers and multiple persons sharing one identity

number.

(1)(a) The total number of cases that were reported in 2011 in each category

were ( opening balances ):

  • one person with multiple identity numbers : 460 000
  • multiple persons sharing one identity number : 49 233

(1)(b) The total number of cases that were reported in 2012 in each category

were ( opening balances ):

  • one person with multiple identity numbers : 100 701
  • multiple persons sharing one identity number : 38 318

(1)(c) The total number of cases that were reported in 2013 in each category

were ( opening balances ):

  • one person with multiple identity numbers : 65 523
  • multiple persons sharing one identity number : 27 639

(1)(d) The total number of cases that were reported in 2014 in each category

were ( opening balances ):

  • one person with multiple identity numbers : 13 349
  • multiple persons sharing one identity number : 12 420

(1)(e) The total number of cases that were reported since 1 January 2015 to

date in each category were ( opening balances ):

  • one person with multiple identity numbers : 3 609
  • multiple persons sharing one identity number : 9 908

(2) The total number of the specified cases which have been resolved in

each category are as follows :-

one person with multiple identity numbers : 558 853

multiple persons sharing one identity number : 40 494

(3)(a) The number of cases which are still pending resolution in each

category are:

  • one person with multiple identity numbers : 12 464
  • multiple persons sharing one identity number : 8 739

(3)(b) The causes of delays in resolving cases are:

 

  • Clients not lodging applications in offices.
  • Delays by clients in submitting the required supporting documents;
  • Non-submission of supporting documents in cases of identity numbers that were acquired fraudulently ;
  • Complexity of cases results in time-consuming investigations.

(4)(a) The reasons identified for the duplication of identity numbers have

been identified as:

  • Mis-identification of fingerprints during the previous manual verification process;

 

  • The swapping of fingerprints;
  • The theft of birth certificates for children who have not yet applied for an identity document.

(4)(b) The measures put in place by the Department to prevent the

duplication of identity numbers in the future are:

  • The introduction of HANIS (Home Affairs National Information System) in 2007 to digitise all good quality manual fingerprint records;

 

  • The introduction of the live capture system where clients’ fingerprints are captured live ;
  • The introduction of unabridged birth certificates where both parents are linked;
  • Registration of birth at an early stage i.e. within 30 Days.

30 October 2015 - NW3726

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Has his department implemented a special dispensation for minors from the Kingdom of Lesotho whereby they do not need to produce an unabridged birth certificate on entrance to the Republic of South Africa as long as they have a letter from a learning institution stating that they are in possession of the original unabridged birth certificate; if so, (a) on what date did the specified dispensation come into effect, (b) which (i) piece of legislation and/or (ii) regulation empowers his department to institute the specified dispensation, (c) on (i) what date and (ii) under what Government Gazette notice was the specified dispensation published and (d) what is his department’s definition of learning institution?

Reply:

No, therefore (a-c) falls away.

(d) The Immigration Regulations, 2014 defines a "learning institution" as-

(a) an institution of higher education established in terms of the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No. 101 of 1997); or

(b) a college established in terms of the Further Education and Training Colleges Act, 2006 (Act No. 16 of 2006), but does not include-

(i) a school offering further education and training programmes under the South African Schools Act, 1996 (Act No. 84 of 1996); or

(ii) a college under the authority of a government department other than the Department of Higher Education and Training; or

(c) a school contemplated in section 1 of the South African Schools Act, 1996 (Act No. 84 of 1996);

13 October 2015 - NW3632

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) What is the total number of South African citizens who hold more than one passport who are currently residing in the country, (b) how was the specified numbers arrived at and (c) how up to date is that information; (2) does his department have a breakdown in terms of exactly which countries the numerous second passports have been issued from; if so, which countries have issued the highest numbers of second passports to South African citizens?

Reply:

(1-2) The department is unable to provide the information as its obligation extends only to keeping record of the number of documents it issues to its citizens and not that of the foreign countries.

13 October 2015 - NW3686

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 3272 on 18 September 2015, why (a) did his department not supply the requested information as other departments have done and (b) transactions are not recorded according to the Standard Chart of Accounts format as prescribed by the National Treasury Regulations?

Reply:

a) The Department uses LOGIS system for travel which does not provide field for recording purpose of trip as it is a procurement system.

b) Transactions are fully recorded on LOGIS as required by Standard Chart of Accounts as prescribed by National Treasury. There is no field that caters for the purpose of the trip.

06 October 2015 - NW3125

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 2519 on 19 August 2015 (a) what is the estimated time frame for the specified Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) on Immigration Regulations to complete its work and (b) what authority will the IMC have to implement changes on the visa regulations?

Reply:

The Cabinet has tasked the Office of the Deputy President to deal with all Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) related matters, including the possible unintended consequences of the visa regulations. I, therefore, recommend that such matters be referred to Deputy President’s Office.


END

06 October 2015 - NW3324

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

(1-2) The total amount used on travel by the department for Minister and Deputy Minister is made available on 2014/15 Annual Report tabled in Parliament in September 2015.


END

02 October 2015 - NW3518

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Has his department detected any cases of (a) fraud and/or (b) corruption in the roll-out of the new Smart ID cards; if so, (i) how many cases have been detected thus far, (ii) how did the perpetrators of the fraud and/or corruption infiltrate the Smart ID system and (iii) what measures has his department put in place to prevent the issuance of further fraudulent Smart ID cards?

Reply:

(a-b) No, the Smart ID Card remains the most highly secured form of identification ever produced with sophisticated security features that are not corruptible. No corruption cases have been detected during the roll out of Smart ID Card process.

i) None.

ii) Not applicable.

iii) The department does not issue fraudulent Smart ID Cards.

 

02 October 2015 - NW3411

Profile picture: Nkomo, Ms SJ

Nkomo, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)How many South Africans currently hold dual citizenship; (2) which are the top five countries to which our citizens claim dual citizenship; (3) (a) what is the total number of South African citizens that relinquished their citizenship over the past five years and (b) how many of the specified citizens relinquished their citizenship because they were acquiring foreign citizenship of a country that does not allow dual citizenship?

Reply:

(1) According to available information, there are 16 353 South Africans for the period 2011 to 2015.

(2) The top five countries are Australia, Britain, Canada, Ireland and United States of America.

(3)(a) 2032

(3)(b) 2032

22 September 2015 - NW3149

Profile picture: Robinson, Ms D

Robinson, Ms D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

How many (a) cases of human trafficking did immigration officials on the borders of (i) Lesotho and (ii) Swaziland detect in the (aa) 2010-11, (bb) 2011-12, (cc) 2012-13, (dd) 2013-14 and (ee) 2014-15 financial years and (b) of the specified instances involved female victims?

Reply:

(a)   (i-ii) The immigration officials working on the borders of Lesotho and Swaziland have not reported any cases specifically relating to human trafficking in the mentioned financial years.


END

18 September 2015 - NW3227

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) How many South African citizens lost their citizenship in terms of section 6 of the South African Citizenship Act, Act 88 of 1995, in the (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2014-15 financial years, (b) from which countries did the specified persons acquire citizenship and (c) what attempts are being made to inform citizens who are abroad about the specified provision of the Act; (2) have immigration departments in other countries been briefed in order to inform South African citizens in those countries about the implications of acquiring citizenship of another country?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) 2010-2011 - 619

(1)(a)(ii) 2011-2012 - 540

(1)(a)(iii) 2012-2013 - 364

(1)(a)(iv) 2014-2014 - 509

(1)(b) A majority of cases relate to citizens taking up citizenship in Australia, Western Europe, Canada, United States of America and other countries.

(1)(c) The website of the department was updated in relation to the Citizenship Act, as it is the responsibility of each citizen to familiarise themselves with the Act, prior to taking up other country’s citizenship.

(2) No, the onus is on the individuals and those receiving countries.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3228

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What measures has his department put in place to address significant underspending on (a) building maintenance and (b) computer hardware and software resources in its various offices in the country?

Reply:

(a-b) The department is not significantly underspending on its budget allocations and continues to face serious budget pressures that constrain it from properly maintaining and improving its current office accommodation and expanding its footprint. These budget pressures also limit the department from refreshing its hardware and computer infrastructure on a planned basis. In this regard, it should be noted that the department utilised its full appropriation of R7,223 billion (100%) in the 2014/2015 financial year. This is an improvement on the expenditure outcome in the 2013/2014 financial year when 99,99% of the full appropriation of R6,994 billion was spent. National Treasury is engaged constantly to address the budget pressures the department faces. Treasury has in the past provide budget relief in the form of self-financing.


END

18 September 2015 - NW3229

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)How many visa processing centres does his department have on the (a) European, (b) Asian and (c) South American continents? (2) What is being done to address the shortage of visa facilitation service centres in terms of the Medium Term Strategic Framework target to import economically important but scarce skills from abroad; (3) (a) What level of training have staff or officials of the (i) visa facilitation service centres and (ii) Home Affairs received on the implementation of the new Immigration Regulations of 2014 and (b) at what frequency has this training taken place since 1 June 2014?

Reply:

 

(1)(a) European continent: 3

(1)(b) Asian continent: 13

(1)(c) South American continent: 0

(2) The Department is in the process of developing an ePermit system with an intention to roll it out in all South African Missions abroad and also extend the visas facilitation services (VFS) centres in countries where we receive mostly skilled persons for our economy.

(3)(a)(i-ii) VFS staff and officials received training in March 2014 before the publishing of the amended Immigration Regulations. Another training session took place in February 2015. Another training workshop has been scheduled for September 2015. At VFS centre level, there is regular refresher training conducted as and when there are new developments or departmental directives on the interpretation and application of the Immigration Act and the Regulations.

(3)(b) Home Affairs Officials receive regular training on operations, interpretation and application of the Immigration Act. Officials were trained by the Department’s Learning Academy on the new changes in the Act and its Regulations. Regular on-the-job training also takes place during staff meetings where officials share good practices and interpretation and application of the Immigration Act and the Regulations.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3230

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

When will all South Africans, not only pensioners and individuals during their birth months, be able to make applications for the new Smart ID cards?

Reply:

I will make a determination once all offices have sufficient capacity to handle the volumes of applicants for Smart ID cards. Currently office managers were given permission to apply their own discretion and accept other categories of citizens based on the volumes in their offices.

 

 

END

18 September 2015 - NW3272

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What (a) total amount did his department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that his department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

The Department’s records system on travel does not separate the different categories of business for trips and destinations. The department can however disclose/provide the total travel expenditure for 2014/2015, per category of air travel and car hire.

(1) (a) The department spent a total amount of R27 739 532.51 on various air travel in the 2014/15 financial year.

(1) (b) The total number of trips undertaken for the year 2014/2015 to/from various areas/destinations throughout the country are 9 986.

(2) (a) The total amount spent on accommodation in the 2014/15 financial year is R39 138 312.70.

(2) (b) The total amount spent on car rental is R6 586 431.57 for 2014/2015.