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19 March 2021 - NW668

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

1. The Supported Employment Enterprises (SEE) has its Head Office in Silverton and shares the same premises with the Pretoria Factory. There are 13 Factories in total and all of them use private security companies to guard the premises.

No.

Factory Location

(i) Name of Security firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration

(v) Appointment date

1

BLOEMFONTEIN

G4S SECURE SOLUTION

SECURITY SERVICES

R380 611.32

12 months

01 JUNE 2020

2

DURBAN

IQ SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R391 440.00

12 months

01 MARCH 2020

3

EAST LONDON

SEKHUSELEKILE SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R496 200.00

12 months

1 AUGUST 2020

4

EPPING

CENGANI SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R449 983.20

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

5

JOHANNESBURG

BRAVE MOUNTAINS SECURITY

SECURITY SERVICES

R414 987.60

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

6

KIMBERLEY

BHUBA SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITTY SERVICES

R298 020.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

7

NDABENI

CENGANI SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R489 600.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

8

PIETERMARITZBURG

UVIKELA SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R420 141.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

9

POTCHEFSTROOM

TJ PROTECTION SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R295 200.0

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

10

PORT ELIZABETH

MKHWAZE SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R418 394.52

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

11

PRETORIA

KE NNA MALOBISE SECURITY

SECURITY SERVICES

R453 678.36

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

12

RAND

JM SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R497 352.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

13

SESHEGO

DINIKO MONYELA SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R473 999.76

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

TOTAL VALUE: R5 479 607.76

2. PRODUCTIVITY SA

Productivity SA does not make use of any private security firms. The entity has is rented office premises where the landlord is responsible for security obligations.

3. NEDLAC:

Name of firm

Purpose

Contract value

Duration of contract

Tiya Security Services

Security Guards - 24 Hrs

R 303 600

12 months

ADT

Alarm monitoring and armed Response

R 33 672.38

36 months

4. COMPENSATION FUND

No, Compensation Fund did not make use of any private security firms in the current financial year.

There was no need for these resources within the Fund.

5. The Unemployment Insurance Fund

Name of firm

Purpose

Contract value

Duration of contract

G4 Security

Cash delivery and collection

R154,671.97

19 June 2018 and will expire on 18 June 2021

6. CCMA

NO

REGION

NAME OF SERVICE PROVIDER

START DATE

END DATE

AWARD AMOUNT

PURPOSE OF USAGE

1

Durban

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Jun-18

31-May-21

R1 242 858.81

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

2

Richards Bay

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Dec-17

28-Feb-21

R349 149.87

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

3

Port Elizabeth.

Metro Security (Pty) Ltd

01-Nov-18

31-Mar-21

R509 359.23

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

4

Johannesburg

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Sep-18

31-Aug-21

R4 220 298.59

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

5

Ekurhuleni

Fidelity Security Services

01-Jan-19

31-May-21

R1 411 439.98

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

6

Kimberley

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Feb-19

31-Mar-21

R341 671.90

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

7

Rustenburg

TJ Protection Services

01-May-19

31-Aug-21

R317 600.00

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

8

Port Elizabeth

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Jun-19

31-Mar-21

R267 609.62

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

9

Vryburg

Papa Mike Protection Services

01-Sep-19

31-Aug-22

R461 103.91

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

10

Vaal

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

17-Apr-20

31-Mar-24

R1 187 301.19

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

11

Welkom

Khensani Security Services and Trading

01-Jun-20

31-May-21

R284 556.00

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

12

George

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

01-Jul-20

30-Jun-21

R145 395.08

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

13

Cape Town

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

01-Jul-20

30-Jun-21

R280 074.98

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

14

Polokwane

Papa Mike Protection Services

01-Dec-20

31-Oct-21

R448 822.00

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

15

Secunda

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

30-Nov-25

R1 475 646.68

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

16

Pietermaritzburg

Royal Security CC

01-Dec-20

31-Mar-24

R947 593.94

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

17

Port Shepstone

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

31-Oct-25

R1 463 978.09

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

18

Emalahleni

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

31-Mar-22

R880 635.96

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

19

Newcastle

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

30-Jun-22

R250 650.18

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

20

Mbombela

Jubzin Security

01-Dec-20

30-Apr-21

R125 522.50

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

21

Tshwane

Eldna Security Services

01-Jan-21

31-Dec-23

R2 725 336.47

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

22

East London

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Feb-21

31-Jan-22

R135 710.38

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

23

Richards Bay

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Mar-21

31-Mar-22

R119 451.24

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

19 March 2021 - NW440

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What are the reasons that her department has not tabled the 2019-20 Annual Report and Financial Statements in accordance with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and National Treasury Regulations guiding time frames and (b) by what date will the specified report be tabled in Parliament?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the annual report referred to was tabled on 09 March 2021.  

The reasons for the late tabling of the 2019/20 Annual Report of the Department of Water and Sanitation are set out in my letters to the Speaker and were subsequently referred to the Portfolio Committee for deliberation. For ease of reference, I have attached the parliamentary paper referred to Announcements, Tabling’s and Committee Reports (ATC), wherein my letters were published.

19 March 2021 - NW537

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) (a) On what date was the SA Trade Policy and Strategy Framework last revised and/or updated and (b) what are the relevant details thereof; (2) whether he has found that the SA Trade Policy and Strategy Framework accurately reflects the nature of the current South African economy and global economy at large; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department has a trade policy review mechanism in place, with clear terms of reference; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details thereof?

Reply:

The Trade Policy and Strategy Framework (TPSF) document was published in 2010 and represents South Africa’s broad approach to trade policy and strategy, following extensive consultations between government and stakeholders in NEDLAC. An update was issued in November 2012, largely focused on updating trade data. The DTIC website now contains regularly-updated and comprehensive trade data on a monthly basis, the latest reflecting the position as at January 2021, which includes trade import and export values for all trading partners.

The TPSF is premised on objectives set out in the National Development Plan to promote and accelerate economic growth along a path that generates sustainable, decent jobs in order to reduce the poverty and extreme inequalities that characterise South African society and economy. It outlines how trade policy and strategy in South Africa can make a contribution to meeting the objectives of upgrading and diversifying the economic base in order to produce and export increasingly sophisticated, value added products that generate employment. Trade policy should support industrial policy.

The TPSF aims to ensure that we preserve the policy space to pursue national objectives while leveraging the benefits of more integrated regional and global markets. This has also informed our approach to a range of trade-related policy areas.

The TPSF recommended strengthening the institutional arrangements for trade policy making in South Africa. Ongoing efforts have been undertaken to improve coordination and consultation within government and between government and stakeholders in Parliament, NEDLAC, research institutions and academia. This work is ongoing.

The TPSF is broadly framed in policy and strategy terms. While there have been changes in the value of trade and rankings amongst trade partners as well as changes in the content of bilateral trade, the strategic thrust and overall orientation of the TPSF to support industrial development in SA remain relevant. The core principles and approach set out in the TPSF continue to offer importance guidance in approaching international trade from an industrial development and transformation perspective.

Application of trade policy needs to be agile, taking account of changes in the trade and policy environment – for example, the position of the previous US Administration on trade matters, the decision of the UK to leave the European Union, the opportunity to expand trade with the rest of the African continent and the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on SA national priorities. The policy is reviewed regularly internally and the manner in which it is applied and adjusted are set out from time to time by statements made by the Executive Authority, including in Budget Votes, other statements in Parliament and at the World Trade Organisation. The following trade interventions illustrate how the Trade Policy and Strategy Framework is applied and adjusted to circumstances.

  • 2011: Negotiations of the SACU-MERCOSUR Preferential Trade Agreement (entered into force in December 2018)
  • 2011: Adoption of modalities at the Tripartite Free Trade Agreement Summit to promote regional trade between SADC, EAC and COMESA.
  • 2014/15: Engagement and agreement with US and SA on poultry quotas and its relationship with continuation of AGOA benefits by SA
  • 2015: Decision to launch negotiations leading to the conclusion of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA).
  • 2015: Engagements with the US Trade Representative on the extension of AGOA (followed with annual Ministerial meetings of the AGOA Forum in 2018 and 2019).
  • 2017: Trade negotiations initiated with the UK in July 2017 following the UK’s decision to exit the EU.
  • 2018: Review of the SACU-EFTA Free Trade Agreement
  • 2018: Signing of AfCFTA agreement and ratification by SA Parliament
  • 2015: Conclusion of negotiations with the EU to update trade arrangements (the agreement that flowed from this, the SADC-EU EPA, entered into force in September 2016).
  • 2019: Negotiations on a new Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) concluded with the UK in September 2019 at which time a Ministerial Statement was delivered in the National Assembly. The new EPA entered into force on 1 January 2021.
  • 2019: Review of outcomes and issues in SA-US trade relationship - bilateral Ministerial meetings held with the United States Trade Representative (USTR) and the US Department of Agriculture in December 2019 on broad trade policy issues and bilateral trade challenges and opportunities.
  • 2019: Development of integrated approach at sector level on trade, competitiveness and procurement matters for poultry industry and clothing, textiles, footwear and leather products
  • 2019/20: AfCFTA: Development of a country approach on specified Rules of Origin and SA submission (through SACU) of offer on tariff reduction
  • 2020: Trade policy adjustments to take account of Covid-pandemic: trade-related regulations issues; and proposal submitted at the WTO for a Waiver of specific provisions of the Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights to overcome shortfalls in the equitable supply of affordable COVID-19 vaccines.
  • 2021: integrated approach between trade and a range of policy areas, including industrialisation, transformation, building a capable state and local economic development set out in the DTIC Annual Performance Plan for 2021/22 tabled in Parliament in March 2021.

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW583

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether the general public is able to view the locality of applications, rights and permits made and/or held in terms of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002, via his department’s South African Mineral Resources Administration System; if not, (a) why not and (b) for how long has the View South Africa Geographic Information System facility not been available; if so, what are the relevant details? NW639E

Reply:

a) The general public can view the locality of applications. Members of the public will need to register as a user of the system, select relevant province and commodity/ies to able to view.

b) The South Africa Geographic Information System facility has always been available.

19 March 2021 - NW524

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1) Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors? [NW580E]

Reply:

1. (a) I have been advised that departmental records reflect that there were no employees of the then Department of Trade and Industry who performed work outside normal working hours, in addition to the responsibilities, related to their work in the past five (5) financial years.

(b) (i) In 2017, the dti had two (2) applications declined by the Head of Department as conflict of interest was determined.

In 2021 one (1) application was declined by the HoD as conflict of interest was determined.

(ii) The above applicants are employed in the Industrial Financing Branch.

2. No approval was granted for the applicants as conflict of interest was identified.

(a) According to Public Service Regulations, 2016; Regulation 24 states that “An application by an employee to perform remunerative work outside his or her department shall be in accordance with the process determined by the Minister and in the form issued by the Minister”. No employee at the dti/c is allowed to perform other remunerative work without approval.

(b) The HoD of the dtic is responsible for approving other remunerative work applications as delegated by the EA.

(c) There were no contraventions as all applications were declined by the HoD.

(d) N/A

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW712

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1.What is the total number of applications in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, Act2 of 2000, (PAIA), that (a) her department and (b) the entities reporting to her have received since 1 January 2015; 2.what number of the PAIA applications that were received (a) have not been replied to at all,(b) were replied to, but without answering the questions and (c) were replied to comprehensively with all the information required by the PAIA?

Reply:

The total number of applications in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, Act 2 of 2000, (PAIA) received:

THE DEPARTMENT:

TOTAL PAIA APPLICATIONS RECEIVED

FINANCIAL YEAR

53

2015/2016

50

2016/2017

58

2017/2018

68

2018/2019

67

2019/2020

89

2020/2021

Find here: Entities

19 March 2021 - NW689

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether (a) his department and (b) any entity reporting to him make use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

  1. Yes, as set out below:

i. Name of Firm

ii. Purpose

iii. Value in Rand of Contract

iv. Duration of contract

Dibakoane Security (Pty) Ltd

Physical Guarding Security of Block G to protect Government assets and all occupants of Block G.

Total Value

R3 467 444.05

3 years.

Procurement through a bid process

Rainprop (RF) (Pty) Ltd

Physical and monitoring security of the dtic campus and perimeter to protect the campus and all occupants of the dtic campus.

Monthly payment:

R678 839 as at Feb 2021 (a service element of monthly PPP unitary payment charge)

25 years

In terms of the Public-Private Partnership (PPP)

(b) and (per public entity responses): Yes, as set out below:

No.

Entity

(b)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)

(b)(iv)

1.

B-BBEE Commission

The B-BBEE Commission does not make use of any private security firms. It currently operates the dtic campus and the dtic is responsible for security of the campus. The B-BBEE Commission has employed only one (1) security official on its structure for the daily security requirements for its staff and offices

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

2.

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

The CIPC does make use of a private security firms

CIPC SSC Cape Town

Royal Security

Private security firms at CIPC SSC safeguarding of CIPC assets and personnel within the office and also includes access control in duties terms of the ‘Control of Access to Public Premises and Vehicle Act, 1985 (Act 53 of 1985) Monday to Friday 06h00 to 18h00

R1 129 676.55

Three (3) years

     

CIPC SSC JHB

Kgaogelo Motau General Trading

Private security firms at CIPC SSC safeguarding of CIPC assets and personnel within the office and also includes access control in duties terms of the ‘Control of Access to Public Premises and Vehicle Act, 1985 (Act 53 of 1985) Monday to Friday 06h00 to 18h00.

R466 800.00

One (1) year

     

CIPC SSC Pretoria

Mabuzitha Security

Private security firms at CIPC SSC safeguarding of CIPC assets and personnel within the office and also includes access control in duties terms of the ‘Control of Access to Public Premises and Vehicle Act, 1985 (Act 53 of 1985) Monday to Friday 06h00 to 18h00.

R465 651.72

One (1) year

3.

Companies Tribunal (CT)

The CT does not make use of any private security firms but shares the security officers deployed on the dtic campus, who are under contract with the dtic

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

4.

Competition Commission

The Competition Commission does make use of a private security firm

Mafoko Security Patrols

The Commission has appointed a private security firm that has been responsible for providing security services and guarding the institutions premises

R2 424 868.00

R368 098.00

April 2020 to January 2021

February 2021 to April 2021

5.

Competition Tribunal

The Competition Tribunal does make use of a private security firm

The Tribunal signs an annual memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the Competition Commission (Commission) for shared services, which includes security services. The Commission contracts directly with the security firm, Mafoko Security. The Tribunal pays 27% to the Commission in terms of the MOA for the cost of the security services

The said security firm has been appointed to safeguard Block C on the dtic campus occupied by the Tribunal and the Commission on a 24-hour, 7 days a week-basis.

R206 416.00

The Tribunal signs an annual MOA with Competition Commission

6.

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

The ECIC does make use of a private security firm

Selkirk Security Services (Pty) Ltd (Reg. No. 2014/019174/07)

Provision of physical security and guarding services

R748 788.00

Twelve (12) months (1 Nov 2020 – 31 Oct 2021

7.

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited (IDC)

The IDC does make use of a private security firm

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd with Company Registration no: 1997/013274/07

The IDC as an organisation is exposed to potential security risks, threats and vulnerabilities which necessitate the need for a security structure responsible for safeguarding of property assets (office buildings), human lives (staff, visitors and service providers), personal belongings and information.

It is for this purpose that the IDC appointed a security firm that provides 24-hour security and guarding services to the IDC, covering Head Office in Sandton and Provincial Offices.

R43 087 225.40

5 years which commenced on 01 July 2019 and will expire on 30 June 2024.

8.

International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC)

The ITAC does not make use of private firms, as there has not been any need for security firms services

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

9.

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

The NCC does not make use of any private security. The NCC is a tenant of the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) who provides security services

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

10.

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

The NCT does make use of a private security firm

Jalesca Technologies

The main purpose of this contract was concluded to ensure the provision of armed response services to the NCT

R25 700.00

The contract commenced on 1 October 2020 and will end 30 September 2022

11.

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

The NCR does make use of a private security firm

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise cc (sub-contractor is Fidelity Security)

Providing guarding and electronic security services

R4 689 713.59

Three years, contract ending on 13 February 2022

12.

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

The NEF has previously procured security services for the Head Office. The NEF has resolved to insource the security personnel with effect from 01 April 2021. The NEF will therefore not be using any private security firm going forward.

Marshal Nights Security

Security Services for the National Empowerment Fund Head Office

R7 897 183.57

1 June 2017 to 31 March 2021

13.

National Gambling Board (NGB)

The NGB does make use of a private security firms

Ubomi Technologies (Pty) Ltd,

Fidelity ADT (Pty) Ltd

Security guarding service for office premises

Alarm system linked to armed response for office premises

R370 530.00

R20 311.05

12 months

36 months

14.

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

The NLC does make use of a private security firm

Titanium Security Services

Provision of physical security services Head Office

R3 562 712.00

3 years

     

Rise Security Services

Provision of physical security services Northern Cape

R792 167.00

3 years

     

KRA Security and Projects

Provision of physical security services Free State

R1 757 257.00

3 years

     

HM Security and Armed Response

Provision of physical security services Mpumalanga

R432 000.00

1 year

     

Ensemble Trading 2366

Provision of physical security services Western Cape

R 2 133 105.00

3 years

       

Provision of physical security services Eastern Cape

R2 065 045.00

3 years

     

Amazim-Zim Security Services & Private Investigations

Provision of physical security services Kwa-Zulu Natal

R301 533.00

13 months

     

Katlego Security

Provision of physical security services North West

R464 999.00

1 year

     

The Lady Boss Security Services

Provision of physical security services Limpopo

R462 000.00

1 year

15.

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

The NMISA is a tenant of the CSIR within the CSIR campus both in Cape Town and Pretoria. In terms of the lease agreement between NMISA and the CSIR, the CSIR as landlord provides security for leased buildings NMISA occupies

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

16.

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

The SABS does make use of a private security firms

Bughatti Security Services

Provision of physical security services Cape Town

R455 999.96

1 February –31 July 2020

     

Joritans Logistics

Provision of physical security services Port Elizabeth

R405 999.00

1 February –31 July 2020

     

Results Security Services

Provision of physical security services Bloemfontein

R440 000.00

1 February –31 July 2020

     

Tikedi Security Services

Provision of physical security services Cape Town

R488 266.66

1 August 2020 - February 2021

     

Fidelity Security Services

Provision of physical security services Port Elizabeth

R249 018.20

1 August 2020 - February 2021

     

Vice Grip Security Services

Provision of physical security services Bloemfontein

R389 515.14

1 August 2020 - February 2021

     

Mupo Weshu Environmental Consultant

Provision of physical security services Bloemfontein

R399 000.00

1 March 2021 – 31 August 2021

     

Venus Security International (Pty) Ltd

Provision of physical security services Port Elizabeth

R432 000.00

1 March 2021 – 31 August 2021

     

Matome and Moloto Protection Services

Provision of physical security services Cape Town

R439 530.00

1 March 2021 – 31 August 2021

17.

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

The SABS does make use of a private security firm

Bidvest Protea Coin (Pty) Ltd

The main objective is for Bidvest Coin (Pty) Ltd to protect all SABS property and staff, to provide access control for staff, tenants, visitors and contractors at the following premises:

        • Groenkloof Campus, Pretoria
        • NETFA, Olifantsfontein
        • Secunda premises
        • East London Office
        • Durban Office
        • Cape Town Office
        • New Castle premises
        • Richards Bay premises

R45 846 360.00 (including VAT) for 36 months however savings of R1 454 644.80 (including VAT) were negotiated and realised in the 2021 financial year, due to revisions in contract as a result of COVID 19

The national contract was issued for a three (3) year period and currently the contractor is month 16 of the contract

18.

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

The SANAS does make use of a private security firm

Titanium Security Services

National Security and Fire

24 Hour Security and Monitoring of Office

Alarm response and Monitoring of the Office

R923 717.71

R 28,330.08

Three (3) Years

Three (3) Years

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW432

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In view of the recurring management problems at the Makana Local Municipality, leading to its inability to provide basic services such as clean water to its residents, what steps has she taken to ensure that the specified municipality is able to guarantee access to clean water for its residents?

Reply:

Makana Local Municipality, which forms part of the Sarah Baartman District Municipality in the Eastern Cape Province governs the town of (Makhanda) as well as the towns and villages of Alicedale, Seven Fountains, Riebeeck East and Fort Brown. The Municipality has been slacking in the provision of basic service for several years, and this has been aggravated by persistent drought conditions that has been prevalent for over five years to date. The drought is by far the worst droughts in history, resulting in very low dam levels which led to the town experiencing various water crisis.

There have been several challenges pertaining to service delivery in Makhanda especially the provision of clean water to the residents, however the municipality has several projects in place that seek to address these challenges. It must be noted that for the provision of "clean water" by Makhanda; a number of matters have to be addressed through interventions. There was the identification of the problems’ source first, then interventions were / are being implemented to address the problems, and that is addressing the matter of ensuring the provision of clean water.

This response highlights the interventions that the Municipality undertook, and or is undertaking to provide clean water; the interventions therefore translate to the projects that are aimed at addressing:

  • Aging Infrastructure issues (leakages, overflows from reservoirs. etc, to avoid wastage and ensure that the clean water supply demand is met).
  • The capacity of the existing infrastructure issues (the need to meet existing and future demand).
  • The issue of the sufficiency of the available clean water supply (balancing demand versus supply).
  • The need to identify and provide future potential water sources (to augment clean water supply for future growing demand).

The interventions listed below highlight the projects that were implemented over the years to ensure consistent water supply to Makhanda residents, as well as ensuring that the current and future resources and infrastructure support the goal of supplying clean water to the Makhanda communities.

1. WORK DONE TO GUARANTEE ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER.

The Municipality is in the process of responding to the water infrastructure challenges and therefore the development of a comprehensive Infrastructure Asset Management Plan has already commenced. Projects that will ensure increased water supply capacity to meet the demand have also commenced, as well as the development of a comprehensive Water Conservation and Water Demand Management Strategy.

​1.1 Water Conservation Demand Management Projects:

      1. Makana embarked on a water loss management study (meter audit and pressure control study), which has identified problem areas and solutions. The solutions include prioritization of new meters, replacement of old meters and billing system database cleansing.
      2. Water Conservation & Demand Management projects resulting in meter replacement; repairs to leaks; refurbishment of pumps; management of water supply.
      3. Capital funding was secured from the Department of Water Affairs for the bulk water supply (James Kleynhans) amounting to R150 million. The project is being implemented by Amatola Water Board and there is satisfactory progress on site. Upon completion, the project will increase James Kleynhans Water Treatment works capacity from 10ML to 20ML/day. A tender was awarded in December 2020 for the supply of 2 electric motors. The electric motors were delivered on the 25th of February 2021; and that boosted the number of standby motors at the JKWTW.
      4. The reservoir and water pipeline for ward 12 (Rhodes University and Monument) was constructed at a cost of R4.7 million;

The projects in the table below are currently at different stages of implementation:

Name of the project

Amount

% complete

Refurbishment of Riebeek East WTW

6 955 044

100%

Refurbishment of Jameson and Milner Dam

10 000 000

100%

Refurbishment of Alicedale WTW

10 147 495

100%

Purchase James Kleynhans Pump Set

1 220 000

100%

Fencing of Bothas Hill Reservoirs

1 301 739

100%

Feasibility Study of investigation of water supply to Makhanda West from James Kleinhans WTW

1 421 079

100%

Replacement of Asbestos pipes in water reticulation network in Grahamstown

4 007 617

Contractor appointed

Waainek Bulk Water Supply Refurbishment (Multi-year Project)

8 932 226

33%

Groundwater Development (Boreholes)

  1. 798 857

100%

2.. Water Crisis Disaster Management Projects:

      1. Water loss management through leak repairs (Mobisam), zone and domestic meter installation, in a bid to realise revenue enhancement.
      2. Repair or replacement; upgrading and expansion of telemetry system at reservoirs (Tantyi and Bothas Hill).
      3. Upgrading of SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition), computer system used for monitoring and control of infrastructure, (all, excluding Seven Fountains).
      4. Refurbishment and or replacement of pump sets and equipment (i.e. pumps, motors, electricity supply, inlet screen, valves, etc.) at pump stations; (new motor from ACTOM (motor no. 4) was procured, and the pump (Pumps No.3 and No.4) were refurbished at James Kleynhans Pump Station.
      5. Cleaned, refurbished and secured two reservoirs (Reservoir No.1 and Botha’s Hill).

3. SUPPORT BY MISA AND NATIONAL COGTA

MISA is providing technical support in terms of civil work on infrastructure and the electrical engineer is normally on site at the James Kleynhans Water Treatment Works. MISA also provides funding for the rehabilitation and maintenance of Grahamstown CBD road, Somerset, Hill and New Road.

The support is also given to municipality on MIG Projects planning, implementation and monitoring processes as well as ensuring the development of response plan to service delivery challenges.

National Cogta has allocated MIG funding to deal with all the persistence service delivery challenges including Water and Sanitation.

19 March 2021 - NW445

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What steps has he taken to prevent cases of identity fraud from happening and (b) how much of this practice has he found is due to corruption by Home Affairs officials?

Reply:

a) Counter Corruption and Security Services has been established within the Department with a revised mandate to conduct constant research, analysis, implementation and monitoring with a view of preventing corruption and raising awareness around fraud and corruption. However the Department has partnered with the Department of Health (DoH) to ensure that each child is allocated with a birth certificate on the spot, by registering birth at health facilities. This will curb identity theft from the onset as an ID number gets allocated and remains with the child for life. The primary purpose is to ensure a credible population register, not vulnerable to theft and fraud.

With live capture the Department is able to identify applicants through online verification which has a direct interface with our Home Affairs National Identification System (HANIS) to identify persons through biometrics. Furthermore, during collection of Smart Identity cards, online verification is also performed to ensure that the correct enabling document is handed over to the appropriate clients. Moreover, the South African Smart ID card and passport have enhanced security features. The Department is moving away from paper to a paperless environment. The Department is thereby progressively phasing out the manual application process.

In addition, in terms of the Departments’ Information Security Policy, a model was built around proactive risk assessment and risk management where all users responsible for registering and capturing births and identity related applications within the domain of the organization, are assigned with biometric fingerprint authentication, to detect and hold users accountable for fraudulent activities.

b) Processes are evaluated by Branch Counter Corruption and Security Services to identify security breaches, vulnerabilities and loopholes and reports drafted and send to relevant sections to implement recommendations. However, each time Branch: Civics (CS) improve systems to close loopholes, criminals also changes their Modus Operandi against what has been put in place to prevent Identity Fraud. As they change their methods, Counter Corruption also found ways to identify those gaps and CS will implement by closing gaps where possible.

Identity Fraud does in most instances start from Birth Registration, especially Late Registration of Birth (LRB), where birth is registered after 30 days of even later than that.

In that regard, committee were composed or formed in Provinces to sit and interview applicants in categories in order verify where and when did that birth occurred and in that case that is where in most cases foreign nationals “buy parents” to assist them obtain birth certificates and then Identity documents.

From the beginning of financial year 2020 – 2021, 33 cases of Identity fraud were investigated divided as follows:

• Quarter One (1) 14 cases were investigated

• Quarter Two (2) 5 cases were investigated

• Quarter Three (3) 8 cases were investigated

• Quarter Four (4) 6 cases were investigated

Finalised cases are not yet reported but will be reported by the end quarter 4.

END

19 March 2021 - NW473

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What Public Service and Administration regulations does she rely on to make appointments external to approved staff establishments within the national Department of Human Settlements; (2) whether appointments made external to approved staff establishments in the national Department of Human Settlements need to be competitively advertised; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The appointment of personnel additional to the establishment is done in accordance with Section 14 of the Public Service Act of 2007 and the Public Service Regulations of 2016.

2. No.

19 March 2021 - NW616

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Given that air quality monitoring stations (AQMS) are essential for a country like South Africa that relies heavily on fossil fuels, (a) how often does her department inspect the condition of the AQMS and (b) what measures are in place for her department to react to any adverse measurements at the AQMS?

Reply:

 

There are a total of one hundred and thirty-five (135) Air Quality Monitoring Stations (AQMS) owned by provinces, municipalities and the South African Weather Service (SAWS). While the department provides support to provinces and municipalities on AQMS operations and maintenance, the department does not own the AQMS.

  1. The conditions of AQMS are inspected in line with established standard operating procedures for AQMS operations and management. For routine services, the stations are inspected every two weeks by AQMS technicians. These inspections are guided by checklists which contain a list of activities that should be undertaken by the technicians. The checklist includes physical inspection of the AQMS environmental conditions, the general conditions of all instruments, power supply and air conditioner status, as well as detailed instrument diagnostic checks. The station inspections are documented and reported in line with standard operating procedures. During these inspections, if instruments failures are identified, the instruments are repaired onsite by technicians, where possible. Otherwise, if the technicians cannot repair the instruments because of major faults, the equipment is removed from the AQMS for further repair and maintenance.

In addition to the biweekly visits, every three months, comprehensive inspections are conducted to ensure that data collected from all instruments are credible and accurate. In these visits, the technicians undertake the general inspection and also calibrate and assess the performance of instruments. These visits are regarded as separate quarterly AQMS visits, and there are four visits per station per year.

There are also those situations when the AQMS might stop operating due to unforeseen circumstances such as power failure disruptions on instruments. In these situations, the AQMS are inspected as soon as is possible whenever an incident is identified on the South African Air Quality Information System (SAAQIS) as a disruption in data.

  1. Information from the AQMS is a major driver in air quality management decision making. When adverse measurements are observed at the AQMS, different jurisdictions have tailor-made interventions designed in air quality management plans or other strategic government programs to identify sources contributing to adverse measurements, and to implement necessary air pollution reduction measures. With the regulated air pollution sources such as industries, these interventions include enhanced compliance monitoring and enforcement through the atmospheric emission licencing command and control regime. For non-regulated pollution sources, such as veld-fires, transport, waste burning or residential fuel burning and others, air quality management interventions are designed to target those pollution sources, towards progressive realisation of air that is not harmful to the health and well-being of the public.

 

19 March 2021 - NW465

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). On what date last has each building under the care of the Iziko Museums of South Africa been painted and (b) how regularly does the five-year plan suggest that the specified buildings should be painted?

Reply:

a) The exterior of the Iziko Koopmans de Wet Museum was painted in 2010, the Iziko Slave Lodge was painted in February 2020 and the façade of the Bo-Kaap Museum was painted in October 2020. The Custodian (DPWI) of state-owned buildings funded only the painting of the exterior of the Iziko Slave Lodge and did not fund the painting of any other buildings over the past ten years.

b) The Five-year Conservation and Maintenance Plan states that the paint and decorative finishes of the external walls require a complete repaint every five years. The external woodwork should be repainted every three to five years.

19 March 2021 - NW644

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether any recent (a) interventions and/or (b) oversight activities have been actioned by her department in order to facilitate the safe removal of toxic mercury waste substances from the shutdown of a certain chemical factory (name and details furnished); if not, what (i) interventions and/or (ii) oversight processes will immediately be put in place in order to ensure that such substances do no further harm to the surrounding environment; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) b) The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) is currently in the process of facilitating the movement of the mercury containing waste materials from Cato Ridge, KwaZuIu- Natal to Switzerland where it is being treated prior to its safe disposal. Since April 2020, 1082 (one thousand and eighty-two) tonnes of this waste has been removed from the Cato Ridge site in 57 (fifty-seven) sea freight containers.

In order to ensure strict regulatory oversight during the extraction, repackaging and transporting of this material, the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment, with the support of the political heads of the Department of Water and Sanitation; the Department of Labour; KwaZulu- Natal: Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs and the Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality formed an Intergovernmental Task Team in order to ensure strict compliance with, amongst others, the following:

On site health and safety by evaluating the outcomes of the biomonitoring that is done on all the employees involved in the extraction and repackaging of this material. Furthermore, and to the extent that it relates to onsite health and safety, a detailed Environmental Monitoring Programme was designed to identify the risks associated with each aspect of the removal process;

Ensure compliance to road transport regulations; and Monitor compliance with the Basel Convention which regulates the transboundary movement of hazardous waste.

There is also further work being undertaken to build a water-related inventory which will enable the authorities to make objective findings relative to the analysis done by the land owner. This information will be used to inform the Terms of Reference for the appointment of the services of an independent specialist to provide an independent recommendation around whether further remediation work is required after the waste is removed from this property.

There is an ongoing risk of theft of this material from the property, despite the many security measures that are being implemented. These incidents are reported to the South African Police Service as and when they occur, and have been elevated to the Minister of Police in order to request additional assistance, given the inherent risks associated with this material. It is anticipated that the removal of this waste will be finalised by June 2022.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

19 March 2021 - NW650

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

NATIONAL ASSEMBL1. (a). How long has the Bertram House been closed, (b) what are the reasons for the closure and (c) on what date will it reopen; 2. on what date will the marks on the Koopmans De Wet House indicating water leaks since October 2020 be attended to; 3. whether there has been proper inspection to see if there are indeed leaks; if not, why not; if so, (a) who conducted the inspection and (b) on what date? QUESTION NO. 650-2021 FOR WRITTEN REPLY INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.06- 2021: Date of publication – 05 March 2021 “Mrs V van Dyk (DA): to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture” (a). How long has the Bertram House been closed, (b) what are the reasons for the closure and (c) on what date will it reopen; on what date will the marks on the Koopmans De Wet House indicating water leaks since October 2020 be attended to; whether there has been proper inspection to see if there are indeed leaks; if not, why not; if so, (a) who conducted the inspection and (b) on what date? NW768E REPLY: (1).(a). Iziko Bertram House (IBH) has been closed since August 2015. (b). The closure was as a result of a health and safety hazard, where part of a ceiling dislodged making it unsafe for the public and staff. (c). It is scheduled to reopen Iziko Bertram House in April 2021. (2). The marks on the wall is as a result of a roof leak. In terms of the DPWI Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 5.2; repair work to roofs and waterproofing must be attended to by the DPWI. The DPWI conducted inspections and scheduled a Contractor for week of 15 March 2021 to attend to the leak. (3)(a). An inspection was conducted by Architects with heritage expertise. (b). On 7 and 21 October 2020 the Iziko Security Health and Safety Officer conducted the inspection and the Architects conducted inspections on 12 and 13 November 2020.

Reply:

(1).(a). Iziko Bertram House (IBH) has been closed since August 2015.

(b). The closure was as a result of a health and safety hazard, where part of a ceiling dislodged making it unsafe for the public and staff.

(c). It is scheduled to reopen Iziko Bertram House in April 2021.

(2). The marks on the wall is as a result of a roof leak. In terms of the DPWI Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 5.2; repair work to roofs and waterproofing must be attended to by the DPWI. The DPWI conducted inspections and scheduled a Contractor for week of 15 March 2021 to attend to the leak.

(3)(a). An inspection was conducted by Architects with heritage expertise.

(b). On 7 and 21 October 2020 the Iziko Security Health and Safety Officer conducted the inspection and the Architects conducted inspections on 12 and 13 November 2020.

19 March 2021 - NW683

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

a) I have been informed by the Department that:

The DPWI has contracted the following security service providers to safe-guard vacant properties as well as occupied office buildings:

(a)(i) Name of the contracted security service provider

(a) (ii) Purpose of the service:

Physical Security Guarding Services & access control

(a)(iii) (Value of contract

(a)(iv) Duration of contract

Sedima Security & Cleaning Services

251 AVN Building

R496 800.00

04 months

1st Respond Security

25 Soutpansberg

R492 000.00

06 months

Maahlo Protection Service

261 D F Malan Drive

R359 993.70

06 Months

Blueprint Associates

1025 Kruger Avenue

R367 999.97

06 Months

Siyaqhuba Business Trading

Centre for Advanced Training (CAT) – Lotus Gardens

R496 800.00

06 Months

Motheo Mateane Trading

Thabatshwane Golf Course Sewage

R498 900.00

06 Months

Phikama M Projects

Toitskraal Sewerage

R498 499.20

06 Months

Gesmeg Trading

31 Fiddures Bronkospruit

R355 200.00

06 Months

Simaledi Holding

600 Church

R359 973.00

06 Months

Botladaka Cleaning & Security

Salvokop Land

R496 998.00

06 Months

Securi24 Investments

Thaba Tshwane Sewerage Plant

R498 209.94

06 Months

Great Minds Network

94 Tom Jenkins Drive

R340 860.00

06 Months

Mkhontubomvu Projects Services

70 Paul Kruger Street

R378 000.00

06 Months

Mochide Trading & Projects

Vlakplaas

R495 000.00

06 Months

Heaviest Trading & Projects

127 Magarita Street

R369 000.00

06 Months

Ianjus & Trading Projects

287 Albert Street

R349 140.00

06 Months

Good Purpose Construction

205 Sterlizia Street

R356 400.00

06 Months

Heaviest Trading

SAPS Bonaccord Road

R496 000.00

06 Months

Salane Trading

Radio Uitkyk

R490 800.00

06 Months

Kingslead Security Services

38 Church Street

R352 800.00

06months

Mupowashu Environmental Consultants

No 9 Bryntirion

R353 400.00

06 Months

Wakanda Consultant

Wallmansdall Sewage Plant

R498 630.00

06 Months

Security 24 Investments

Telkom Towers A

R497 900.00

01 Month

Good work Security

237 Carina Street

R353 280.00

06 Months

Dikgabo Dikopane Trading

Union Building

R499 000.00

02 Months

NSSD Security

386 Bosman Street

R358 524.00

06 Months

Mpetha Investment

39 ARC Riet Fontein

R482 400.00

06 Months

Sakhowethu Security

159 Church Street PWH

R497 000.00

02 Months

Simaledi Holdings

326 Magalies Kruin

R350 154.72

06 Months

Selane Security

Zonderwater Waste Treatment

R494 730.00

06 Months

Kharitende Business Trading & Projects

125 Pretorius Street

R497 750.00

06 Months

Khabs Security Services

270 Delphinus

R342 000.00

06 Months

Mafelelong Security

1016 Kruger Avenue

R364 320.00

06 Months

Ebenezer Security

115 Minaar Street

R498 525.00

06 Months

Cardura Trading Enterprise

692 Bodel Street

R360 180.00

06 Months

Khakhakha Trading & projects

18 Rooth Street

R357 000.00

06 Months

Forwex Services

54 Kordaat Street, Die Wilge Pretoria

R364 999.92

06 Months

Silver Trading (PTY) LTD

213 Matroesburg Street

R364 800.00

06 Months

Xileketsi Construction & Projects

322 Rigel street Waterkloof

R358 296.66

06 Months

Ebukhosini TP Security

12 Anselia street

R351 600.00

06 Months

GJJ Construction & Projects

590 Madiba street

R495 396.00

06 Months

Mmetla Group

375 Lawley street

R359 999.76

06 Months

Touhg Security Services

05 Adina street

R346 800.00

06 Months

Umusa Security & Cleaning Services

421 Ulundi street

R348 000.00

06 Months

Emanzini Construction & projects

600 Church

R392 260.00

06 Months

Great Minds Network

94 Tom Jenkins Drive

R340 860.00

06 Months

No turning Back Security

18 Rooth Street

R357 000.00

06 Months

SNK Security

598 Bombani Street

R360 318.00

06 Months

Step Up Business Solutions

157 Stapelia Waterkloof

R355 500.00

06 Months

Senior Quality Protection & Projects

Custom house Cape Town Regional Office

R360 020. 96

2 months

Senior Quality Protection & Projects

Parliamentary Towers

R255 793. 20

3 months

Vhakula Trading & Project (Pty) Ltd

Nieuwemeester Parking

R240 070.99

3 months

BC Security Solutions

Hope Street Parking

R398 136.12

6 months

Striving Mind Trading 519cc

Fernwood Recreational Centre

R414 111. 30

6 months

Striving Mind Trading 519 cc

St. Helena Bay building

R398 773.84

6 months

Mokato Security

Pepper Bay Saldahna Building

R272 624.82

3 months

Senior Quality Protection & Projects

Oudtshoorn Workshop

R405 041.86

6 months

BC Security Solutions

21 Almain Road vacant house

R497 206.72

6 months

Mokato Security

Farm 352, Jonkershoek

R219 530.06

3 months

BC Security Solutions

Dennehof Resort vacant houses and Buildings

R399 319 .51

6 months

Maile Consulting

Kimberley Regional Office building and Workshop

R9 051 478.64

3 years

Vhakula Trading & Projects

Vacant house at 3 Hoof Street, Ritchie, Kimberley

R431 050.04

12 months

Vuyani & Monwabisi Investments

Vacant house at 12 King Street, Springbok

R452 602.53

12 months

Sputulwana Trading and Projects

Vacant house at 8 Kemp Street, Hartswater

R337 343.00

10 months

Tugela Risk Management

Vacant house at 60 Vlamboom Street, Kathu

R404 934.85

12 months

Onalenna Security

Water Treatment Plant, Louisvale; Upington

R443 981 .54

12 months

Amathuba Security and Cleaning Services

Vacant house at 31 Rossouw Street, De Aar

R374 826.12

12 months

Mzansi Protection

Alberton Police Station

 R 220,000.00

3 months

Izwelethu Protection Services

No 19 Duplessis Avenue: Kempton Park, vacant house

R 423,200.00

08 Months

D Emandleni

No 126 Boeing Road: Bedfordview, vacant house

R 423,200.00

08 Months

Prosisec Security Group

No 79 Hendrik boom & Dromedaries, vacant house

R 378,000.00

08 Months

Tshapuks Trading

No 257 Cumberland Road: Kensington, vacant house

R 420,243.26

08 Months

Ianjus Trading &Projects

No 112 Commissioner Street: Boksburg, vacant house

R 435,597.28

08 Months

Dibakoane Security Services

No 55 Jordan Street: Heidelberg, vacant house

R 485,346.64

08 Months

Vhakula Trading & Projects

No 249 Cumberland Road: Kensington, vacant house

R 339,072.16

08 Months

OKS Investment

No 05 Birch Road Petit :Benoni , vacant house

R 386,860.00

08 Months

Kabela Trading

No 21 Unie Street:Heidelberg, vacant house

R 387,615.04

08 Months

MMNT SECURITY SERVICES

No 18 Van Riebeck: Alberton, vacant house

R 396,070.70

08 Months

Svoboda Security Services

No 48 Aida Street: Cyrildine, vacant house

R 495,789.47

08 Months

Bongiza Security Services

No 38 Best Street: Sophiatown, vacant house

R 430,790.00

08 Months

Matlharani Security Trading

Maraisburg Single Quarters

R 404,800.00

08 Months

Arise and Shine

No 15 Market Street: JHBC, vacant house

R 476,323.51

08 Months

Prosisec SECURITY SERVICES

No 42 Alida Street: De Deur, vacant house

R 368,000.00

08 Months

Kukanya Security Services

No 91 Main & Steyn Street: RANDFONTEIN, vacant house

R 432,759.04

08 Months

Sbu & Sbo Security Services

No 37 Frederick Street: Observatory, vacant house

R 476,470.71

08 Months

Victra Group of Companies

No 23 Wittenberg Street: Florida, vacant house

R 411,524.83

08 Months

Bongiza Security Services

No 54 Daniel Street: Debonair Park, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

PATKEY

No 78 Dave Street: Westonaria, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

Tolo Security Services

FAMILY COURT:JHBC

R 160,000.00

2 months

PATKEY

No 3 & 5 END STREET

R 160,000.00

2 months

Mushoma Security Services

ELSBURG Police Station

R 160,000.00

2 months

Tshaphuks Security

No 223 Berrymead: Ridgeway, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

MMNT Security Services

No 46 ALIDA STREET :DE DEUR, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

Dibakoane Diomonds Trading

Cnr Juta & Rissik street :JHBC,vacant building

R 160,000.00

2 months

Jugephaphi Construction

CNR Webber & Power Street: GERMISTON, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

Lungelo Protection Services

No 08 Helio Street: Naturena, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

KMT Security and Events Management

Safe-guarding and access control of 2 Polokwane Regional Office Buildings

R5 600 000.00

24 months

Livhu na Mashudu Security Services

Safe-guarding and access control of Kareebase workshop

R483 540. 00

12 months

Uncommon Favour Consulting and Trading

Safe-guarding and access control of Bloemfontein Regional Office Building

R6 498 083.52

36 months

Uncommon Favour Consulting and Trading

Safe-guarding and access control of Bloemfontein Nursery

R3 190 200. 12

36 months

VMR Trading Enterprise Pty

Safe-guarding and access control of Bloemfontein Regional workshop

R3 060 000.00

36 months

Senzwa Security Services

Safe-guarding of property at 45 Don Thompson Drive, Fortgale, Mthatha

R267 293.52

06 months

Mpompo Security

Safe-guarding and access control of Mthatha Regional Office Building

R134 100.00

03 months

Nomandla Security Services 247 cc

Safe-guarding and access control of Durban Regional Office main Building and workshop

R11 176 344.00

36 months

Landa Agricultural & Construction

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 7 Hooper lane, Yellow wood Park

R370 715 .52

12 months

Maphuphu Security

Safe-guarding of DPWI owned vacant house, Weenen House, Retief Street

R222 650.04

12 months

Maphuphu Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 25 Carlton road, Ladysmith

R309 027. 96

12 months

The Greater 77

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 33 Marshall street, Pietermaritzburg

R278 400.00

12 months

Siyanqoba Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 9 Golf street house, Ladysmith

R300 164.76

12 months

Manciza Civil Contractor

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at Melmoth

R348 462.96

12 months

Echle Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 45 Bell street, Howick

R261 692.40

12 months

Echle Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 238 Pine street, PMB

R276 739.68

12 months

Silver Solutions Security

Safe-guarding the cancelled SAPS tender construction site in Queenswood

R96 267.90

01 month

Silver Solutions Security

Safe-guarding of protected site (Greydel Farm Forest Area)

R1 991 747.00

04 months

Silver Solution Security

Safe-guarding and access control of PE Regional Office Satellite Office in East London

R32 089.30

01 month

Msitwa Security

Safe-guarding and access control of PE Regional Office Building and the workshop

R993 200.00

04 months

HM Security &Armed Response

Safe-guarding and access control of Nelspruit Regional Office Building

R 1 958 400.00

12 months

Xilota Projects & Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned sawmill in Sabie, Mpumalanga

R1 833 468.00

12 months

Prosper 74 Trading & Projects

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house in Ermelo

R450 000.00

12 months

Sky Rocket Trading PTY (LTD)

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house in Bethal

R330 000.00

12 months

Makgobistad Security

Securing Old Labour Office Accommodation in Klerksdorp

R157 300.00

Two months

Kakapi Mushi Trading

Securing Lehurutshe DHA Old Building

R153 065.00

Two months

Best Enough Security

Securing Vrybug State House

R408 000.00

6 Months

Dibereki Trading

Securing Vrybug State House

R156 000.00

Two months

Dibereki Trading

Securing Vrybug State House

R156 000.00

Two months

Briliance Security

Securing Lichtenburg State House

R432 000.00

6 Months

BLTN Group

Securing State House in Mafikeng

R159 720.00

2 Months

Legend Security

Securing State house at 29 Gordon Street, Mafikeng

R158 139.46

2 Months

Sinike Trading

Securing State House in Mafikeng

R157 904.00

2 Months

Minatlou security

Securing State House in Mogwase

R158 026.00

Two Months

Androm Security

Securing State House in Schweizereneke

R154 880.00

Two Months

Sinike security

Securing State House in Wolmaranstad

R158 000.00

Two Months

Best For All Security

Securing State House in Brits

R158 752.00

Two Months

Best Enough Security

Rendering of Security Services at PC pelser Klersdorp

R1 416 000.00

24 Months

Makgobistatd

Renedering of Security Services at Mmabatho R/O Dada Motors Building

R178 000.00

Two Months

Red Neo Security

Renedering of Security Services at Mmabatho R/O 810 Albert Luthuli, Unit 3 Building

R240 000.00

Two Months

(b) Response in respect of Entities:

Agrément South Africa

Agrément South Africa does not make use of any private security company. The entity’s security is covered as part of the lease agreement with Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). The CSIR-appointed Security Company on the Campus where the entity is accommodated, services the tenants as well.

Council for the Built Environment

The Council for the Built Environment does not have contracts with private security firms.

1. Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB)

The CIDB (b) makes use of private security firms, as follows:

 

i) Name of each firm

ii) Purpose

iii) Value

iv) Duration

1

MAHLATJI MMETJI CLEANING AND SECURITY

Physical guarding

R440 334,67

6 months

2

RESTOCOM

Physical guarding

R499 500,00

6 months

3

DONALD MOGALE HOLDINGS

Physical guarding

R510 278,36

6 months

2. Independent Development Trust (IDT)

Yes, the IDT makes use of private security firms, as follows:

 

i) Name of each firm

ii) Purpose

iii) Value

iv) Duration

1

At its National Office, the IDT makes use of the services of Madiali Security and Projects CC

Provision of security services to primarily protect office assets and employees.

R531 780.74

Thirteen (13) and half months (15 days).

2

Limpopo regional office, the IDT makes use of the services of Mokato Security

Provision of security services to primarily protect office assets and employees.

R93 481.06

Six (6) months.

19 March 2021 - NW466

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What total amount has the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) spent on (a) advertising placement and/or (b) media over the past 10 financial years; (2) what (a) are the names of the media houses and/or publications in which the NLC have purchased advertising placements and (b) relevant annual amounts were spent on each specified media house and/or publication over the specified time period; (3) what was the NLC’s marketing budget in each financial year?NW522E

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

Ms Mampane’s reply is as follows:

1. The NLC provides the content to the media houses and therefore advertising and media buying are packaged together. It is therefore not possible to identify individual amounts spent for advertising placement and media buying. The total amount spent in the various years for the advertisement placement and media buying is:

FY

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

R’000

965’

676’

2 181’

8 039’

9 610’

23 017’

5 396’

12 422’

16 968’

28 337’

 

2. NLC has used the following suppliers over the 10 years and the total related expenditure spent on each supplier specified in the below table. Annexure A has been attached which highlights the suppliers paid each year over the 10-year period and the related amount

3.

FY

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

R’000

Information unavailable

31 819’

23 085’

40 075’

22 825’

29 179’

30 652’

59 121’

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW585

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with the audited financial statements of Volleyball South Africa for the 2014-15 financial year; if not, why not; if so, (2). Whether his department has a stable relationship with Volleyball South Africa; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details of the relationship?

Reply:

Volleyball South Africa in its response provided us with the following;

1). Yes, the Audited Financial Statements for Volleyball South Africa for 2014 – 2015 financial year is attached.

2). Yes, the Department has a stable relationship with Volleyball South Africa. Through the support provided by the Department, Volleyball’s focus has been providing opportunities for participation in Volleyball in rural, local, district, provincial and national levels. The specific focus areas have been in the following:

a) Development of administrators, coaches and referees. (Indoor and Beach Volleyball)

b) Developing women’s’ participation at all levels of volleyball. (Indoor and Beach Volleyball)

c) Developing volleyball for people with disabilities.

d) Developing and encouraging youth participation.

19 March 2021 - NW520

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De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) I have been informed by the Department that there were 168 employees who applied for remunerative work in the Department over the past 5 financial years. Through investigation, 2 employees were found to perform remunerative work without approval.

(b) 1 April 2014 to date is more than 5 financial years and the legislation changed with the implementation of the amended Public Service Regulations, 2016.

(i) The list of employees below applied for approval for RWOPS per financial year:

Financial Year

Number

2016/2017

8

2017/2018

11

2018/2019

70

2019/2020

58

2020/2021

21

ii Employees per category per financial year:

Financial Year

Category

Number

2016/2017

SMS

Below SMS

3

5

2017/2018

SMS

Below SMS

1

10

2018/2019

SMS

Below SMS

8

62

2019/2020

SMS

Below SMS

7

51

2020/2021

SMS

Below SMS

3

18

*The 2 employees that did not have approval: 1 SMS and 1 below SMS.

2. Approval was obtained for 168 employees to perform other remunerative work outside the Public Service.

a) Approval was granted in line with the Public Service Act Section 30, Public Service Regulations, 2016, the Directive on other remunerative work outside the employee’s employment in the relevant Department, Directive on conducting business with an organ of state and recently in 2020 the Department of Public Service and Administration also issued a guide on the management of other remunerative work in the Public Service.

b) The Director-General approved levels below Senior Management and the Minister Senior Managers.

c) None of the 2 employees that were in contravention were brought to the attention of National Treasury.

d) Verbal and Written warnings were issued to the two affected employees.

19 March 2021 - NW586

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

With reference to the statements by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, regarding hydrogen fuel cell technology and deployment in line with the Hydrogen South Africa Strategy, (a) which schools and hospitals are currently using hydrogen fuel cell technology to provide electricity, (b) what amount of electricity is generated in each case and (c) what are the future plans and timelines for implementation of hydrogen fuel cells at other government facilities? NW642E

Reply:

a) As part of government’s response to combating the COVID-19 pandemic, a temporary fuel cell system was deployed at 1 Military Hospital in Gauteng, which is utilised to support the Department of Defence. There is also one installed at the Science Center in Comimvaba (Eastern Cape).

b) The Seven Hydrogen Fuel Cells temporarily deployed at 1 Military Hospital has a total installed capacity of 35kW. The fuel cells deployed at a Science Centre in the Eastern Cape has a capacity of 5kW.

c) Post July 2021, the fuel systems currently at 1 Military Hospital will be redeployed as follows:

  1. One fuel cell system will remain at 1 Military Hospital for use by the Department of Defence (DOD) for training purposes;
  2. One fuel cell system at Mandeni Local Municipality, ILembe District in KZN, with a connection to the Youth Centre and Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) Stalls;
  3. One fuel cell system at MINTEK with a connection to the Home Affairs offices in Randburg;
  4. One fuel cell system at Masia Village in Limpopo;
  5. One fuel cell system at the Department of Science and Innovation;
  6. One fuel cell system at the Trevenna Building, Department of Mineral Resources and Energy.

There is also ongoing work to incorporate the deployment of fuel cells in public buildings through the existing policy instruments, which include Energy Efficiency and Demand Side Management (EEDSM) grant programme and the Public Works and Infrastructure Green Building Policy.

19 March 2021 - NW636

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he has done any compliance assessment with the provisions of the National Minimum Wage Act, Act 9 of 2018, since it became effective; if not, why not; if so, what (a) sectors has he found are not complying with the national minimum wage and (b) steps has he taken to ensure that they comply?

Reply:

The Department has compliance assessment to determine compliance with the provisions of the National Minimum Wage Act 9 of 2018. For the 2019/20 a total number of 134 964 inspections were conducted

a) The following sectors were found not have complied with the provisions of the National Minimum Wage:

• Community

• Wholesale & Retail

• Hospitality

• Private Security

• Domestic

(b) Those not complying were issued with the statutory non-compliance notice (undertaking/compliance orders). Those that did not comply with the terms of the compliance notices were referred for prosecution, at the expiry of the notice.

19 March 2021 - NW641

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to his pronouncements in May 2020 that he intends to publish regulations aimed at introducing sectoral targets for the employment of foreign nationals, (a) what progress has his department made in finalising the process which was announced 10 months ago, (b) which sectors will be regulated and (c) by what date will the regulations come into effect?

Reply:

(a) We have done a lot since the announcement and given the complexity of Labour migration, there is still more work that must be done.

We have initiated a process to develop a National Employment Policy on 31st March 2020 that has a number of Sub-themes such as Labour Migration Policy, Fourth Industrial Revolution, Employment Schemes targeting vulnerable groups etc. The Sub-theme on Labour Migration has been prioritized given its urgency and related activities include the following:-

(1) A Draft Labour Migration Policy has been developed and is currently being revised to a final policy.

(2) The President established an Inter-Ministerial Committee that I co-chair with the Minister of Home Affairs and we have since tabled our first report to Cabinet during December 2020. We were subsequently directed to address a number of other aspects.

(3) A number of short term interventions to address labour migration challenges were introduced such as stricter Border Management controls; increased joint inspection and collaboration in addressing and enforcing various migration aspects.

(4) Legal Teams have been appointed and are busy with a Draft Employment Services Amendment Bill that incorporates aspects contained in the Draft Labour Migration Policy recommendations that include introduction of quotas etc. The Amendment Bill will also contain or clarify labour provisions that were contained in the Immigration Act and other amendments that we intend introducing.

(b) Legislation will affect all sectors of the economy. We are putting more emphasis on those sectors that continue to employ low level skilled workers when we have many unemployed people locally that can work in mining, agriculture, construction, security, domestic, hospitality and tourism.

(c) The Regulations will only follow once the Amendment Bill is passed by parliament and we do not have a date as yet.

19 March 2021 - NW615

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Given that during the term of the 5th Parliament the forestry branch undertook to provide evidence of the value of our forests, by what date will the specified report be published?

Reply:

 

The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) calculates the fair value of biological assets on a quarterly and annual basis in terms of the Accounting Policy. The Chief Financial Officer of the DEFF discloses an input of the calculated biological asset report in the Financial Statements (interim Financial Statements and Annual Financial Statements) of the Department quarterly and annually as per the requirements of the Modified Cash Standards. The biological asset valuation report is not published, however, it is submitted to the office of the Auditor-General at the end of each financial year for auditing purposes. For the 2019/20 financial year, the value of the Biological Assets was R775,694,044.00. The Department is in a process of calculating the value for the 2020/21 year for disclosure in the Annual Financial Statements.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF, FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: .18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW595

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Given that the African Growth and Opportunity Act, popularly known as the AGOA, which allows most sub-Saharan African countries duty-free access to the American market for almost 7,000 products is due to expire in 2025, and the fact that South Africa’s preferential market access to the United States of America is under review, what measures has he put in place to ensure that the outcomes of the discussions between South African officials with their American counterparts are favourable to the South African market?

Reply:

The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), enacted by the US Congress in 2000, extends preferential market access to the US market for around 5 235 products from eligible countries in Sub Saharan Africa. South Africa is a beneficiary country under AGOA. AGOA has been extended twice in 2008 and again in 2015 and the current term of AGOA continues until 2025. A decision to extend, adjust or finally terminate AGOA is expected to be decided by the US Congress in 2025.

Country eligibility for AGOA is subject to annual reviews, the last one of which was initiated in May 2020. Eligibility criteria include requirements that a country has established or is making progress toward establishing a market-based economy, the rule of law, political pluralism, the right to due process, amongst other things. South Africa participated in the AGOA review and submitted responses at public hearings to questions raised by several interested parties. The review process was concluded in November 2020 and South Africa remains a beneficiary under AGOA.

The South African and US Governments are in ongoing interaction on a range of trade and investment issues of mutual interest. The last Ministerial in-person bilateral engagement was held in December 2019 in Washington DC shortly before the Covid-19 pandemic, followed by virtual engagements at bilateral and multilateral level, including by trade officials.

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW639

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the name change process of Port Elizabeth, King William’s Town, Uitenhage and MaClear in the Eastern Cape, what is the total projected cost on (a) national, (b) provincial and (c) municipal level to implement the name changes to (i) Gqeberha, (ii) Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu respectively; 2. whether provision has been made for the specified name changes in the respective budgets on the three levels of government; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 3. whether any impact study was conducted on the cost of the name changes for local businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a). No cost is projected at the national level to implement the name changes to (i) Gqeberha (ii) Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu, respectively. The Department has a national programme to transform South Africa’s heritage landscape through the transformation of colonial and apartheid symbolism reflected in statues, monuments and place names all over South Africa.

The cost of this national programme is budgeted for within the departmental allocations from the national fiscus. There are no extra funds allocated to any sphere of government to fund these name changes specifically.

(b). The provincial government in the Eastern Cape funds the programme of the transformation of its naming landscape from its share of the provincial treasury allocations, including implementing the name changes to (i) Gqeberha (ii)Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu, respectively.

(c) Municipal authorities responsible for implementing the name changes to (i) Gqeberha (ii) Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu, respectively will fund activities relating to the changed names from their existing budget allocations.

19 March 2021 - NW510

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2)Whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors

Reply:

(1)(a) There were employees that performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to their work, outside normal working hours.

(b) The employees performed work outside their normal work for the period 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015.

(i) Sixteen (16).

(ii) Senior Management Services, Administration Clerks, Immigration Officers, Deputy Directors and Assistant Directors.

(2) Approval was not obtained. All the employees were subjected to disciplinary process for violating policy.

(a) Policy requires that employees should apply for permission prior to engaging in any work outside the public service.

(b) Applications are considered and approved by the Director General as per the delegation by the Executing Authority.

(c) Employees identified by the Auditor General (b) (i) were the only ones reported to the National Treasury.

(d) The transgressors were subjected to a disciplinary process in which they were found guilty and a sanction of Final Written Warning was imposed on all of them. Where sanction was not issued, application was declined and the official did not perform outside work the department.

Financial Year

Number of Employees

Approved/Nor Approved

Work Categories

Action Taken

14/15

16

Not Approved

SMS,MMS,Admin Clercks,Immigration Officers, Assistant Directors

Did not perform outside work

15/16

33

Not Approved

SMS, Immigration Officers, Assistant Director and Administration Clerks.

Did not perform outside work

16/17

31

Not Approved

SMS,Deputy Directors, Immigration Officers, Administration Clerks

Did not perform outside work

17/18

38

Not Approved

SMS,MMS,Admin Clercks,Immigration Officers, Assistant Directors

Did not perform outside work

18/19

39

Not Approved

SMS,MMS,Admin Clercks,Immigration Officers, Assistant Directors

Did not perform outside work

19/20

27

Not Approved

Deputy Director, Administration Clerks and Immigration Officers.

Did not perform outside work

Employees identified by the Auditor General

Financial Year

Number of Employees

Work Categories

Action Taken

2014/15

6

SMS

Final Written Warning

2015/16

19

SMS, Administration Clerks and Immigration Officers.

Final Written Warning

2016/17

11

SMS, Deputy Director, Administration Clerks and Immigration Officers.

Final Written Warning

2017/18

6

Assistant Director, Administration Clerks and Immigration Officers.

Final Written Warning

2018/19

12

Deputy Director, Administration Clerks and Immigration Officers.

Final Written Warning

2019/20

8

Deputy Director, Administration Clerks and Immigration Officers.

Final Written Warning

END

19 March 2021 - NW523

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2).whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. (a). Yes, the Department had staff who undertook Remunerative Work Outside the Public Sector.

(b)(i) and (ii) Approval for Remunerative Work is valid for a period of 12 months; awareness is conducted that no work should be done without the approval of the Executive Authority, in line with the Public Service Code of Conduct, and Public Service Regulations of 2016. The CIPC database is checked to identify all companies aligned to officials via their identity number. The Central Database at National Treasury (CDNT) is checked for active companies aligned to officials.

(b)(i)

Financial Year

Total

2014-15

0

2015-16

1

2016-17

8

2017-18

15

2018-19

11

2019-20

19

(b)(ii)

Financial Year

Job Category

a) 2015-16[01 April 2015-30 March 2016]

Director: Heraldry

2015-16 Total [1]

a) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Admin Clerk

b) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director: Design

c) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director: Executive Liaison/ Support

d) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director: Preservation

e) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Director: Cultural Development

f) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Director: Terminology Coordination

g) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

ASD: EAP

h) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director Touring Ventures-MGE

2016-17 Total [8]

a) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director- Heritage Promotion [ Ex-DAC employee]

b) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director Corp Service[DDG's Office] - [Ex-DAC]

c) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director Human Resource Development

d) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Administration Officer

e) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director- Language Planning

f) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director - Language Planning

g) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director- Institutional Policy

h) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Assist Director- Employee Wellness

i) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director - Finance Admin [ Ex-DAC]

j) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director: Terminology Coordination

k) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Principal Archivist [ ASD]

l) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Ambassador International Relations - EX- DAC

m) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Registration Clerk

n) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Ministry- Consultant [Ex-DAC]

o) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director - Cult Development

2017-18 Total [15]

a) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Bureau of Heraldry

b) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Admin Officer

c) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Terminology Coordination

d) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Registration Clerk

e) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Internal Audit

f) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Deputy Director: Corporate Services Support

g) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Deputy Director Human Resource Development

h) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Cultural Development

i) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Principal Archivist

j) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Deputy Director: ACPD

k) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Language Planning

2018-19 Total [11]

Financial Year

Job Category

a) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Chief Language Practitioner

b) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Chief Language Practitioner

c) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Admin Officer

d) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

e) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

f) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director: Preservation

g) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

h) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Chief Language Practitioner

i) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

j) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director : Craft

k) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director Human Resource Development

l) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Archivist

m) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Director : Language Planning

n) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Director: Terminology Coordination

o) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Assistant Director Employee wellness

p) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Director Cultural Development

q) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director: Infrastructure Support

r) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Registration Clerk

s) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director: Forensic Audit

2019-20 Total [19]

(2). Yes, approval was granted for all listed officials.

(a). The policy requires that written approval is granted by the Executive Authority.

(b). The immediate superior reviews and endorses the approval, the application is referred to the Ethics Committee, recommendation to approve are sent to the Accounting Officer, who then provides final recommendation to the Executive Authority.

(c). One, the matter was resolved.

(d). The official resigned as a Director of the company, after a letter to institute disciplinary action was issued to her.

19 March 2021 - NW436

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether he has taken any steps to deal with the alleged racism in South African cricket since the revelations by a certain person (name furnished) on the manner that he was treated while playing for the South African national team; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, I have engaged Cricket South Africa on the alleged racism in South African cricket. To this end Cricket South Africa has indicated that it is taking restorative steps towards ensuring that all issues of discrimination brought up by former cricket players will indeed be attended to.

The Interim Board of Cricket South Africa has endorsed the rollout programme of the Social Justice and Nation Building Project and Mr. Makhaya Ntini remains an integral part of the rollout of this programme and the specific issues that he raised will be handled as part of the processes of the office of the ombudsperson.

Once ready, the Social Justice and Nation Building Project rollout process will begin with public hearings, which will culminate to a report and action plan by the Independent Cricket Ombudsman.

19 March 2021 - NW405

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether there is a plan to house the illegal occupiers of the Woodstock Hospital in Cape Town who have refused to vacate the premises until they are provided with an alternative housing solution; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The matter raised by the Honourable Member falls within the ambit of the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality, hereinafter referred to as the City.

Nevertheless, I have been advised that the City has approached the High Court for an application that consists of three phases:

  • to conduct a survey to establish the profile and circumstances of the occupiers as well as the total number of occupiers that are currently residing at the property unlawfully. 
  • to engage with those occupiers that will be rendered homeless should they be evicted and to determine a solution for them.  
  • the final phase will be the eviction of those unlawful occupiers who do not qualify for emergency accommodation and refuse to vacate the property to be relocated elsewhere.   

The purpose of the survey is to determine the number of illegal occupants, their identities, monthly income and eligibility for state-subsidised housing and whether any illegal occupants fall within the vulnerable groups as stated in Section 4 of the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from Unlawful Occupation of Land Act No. 19 of 1998 (‘Pie Act’)

I am informed that the City is aware of its constitutional obligations in this matter, hence it launched Part 1 of the application to survey the illegal occupants, because Section 26 of the Constitution provides that “everyone has a right to access to adequate housing”. Section 26(2) confers a duty upon the State to progressively facilitate access to adequate housing within its available resources.

The issue of alternative accommodation will be addressed once the survey has been completed, as the results of the survey will be a consideration in the eviction proceedings.

19 March 2021 - NW649

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What is the total number of the Iziko Museum (a) board members who have actual knowledge and qualifications in arts and (b) buildings that have reopened after they were closed following the COVID-19 lockdown? NW767E

Reply:

a) nAdvocate Rod Solomons – Advocate focussing on constitutional; human rights; corporate governance and corporate matters. Previous Head of Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport in the Western Cape that included being in charge of museums, he was instrumental in forming various public entities in the arts & culture sector; served on the National Film & Video Foundation council.

Advocate Judith Leshabane – Advocate focussing on labour relations, human rights issues, policy, contracts and refugees. Chairperson of the National Museum in Bloemfontein Council.

Mr Dumisani Dlamini – Chartered Accountant and previous CFO of the National Arts Council and current CFO of SANPARKS and appointed to the Accounting Standards Board. Expertise in governance, turnaround strategies, risk management, financial management, asset management and tourism.

Professor Pitika Ntuli – 2 Post Graduate Degrees in Fine Arts, he is an accomplished expert in the arts and culture arena and served on various bodies and structures in this field

Mr Krishna Govender – Chartered Accountant; he was previous a CFO of Supersport, expertise in strategy, business process improvement, financial modelling and policy reviews and process-engineering.

Ms Sijabulile Makhathini – Chartered Accountant; expertise in governance, risk management, financial management.

Ms Magdalene Moonsamy – Lawyer; Deputy Chairperson of the African Peer Review Mechanism and previous Chief Operations Officer of the National Youth Development Agency.

Mr Popo Masilo – Lawyer; Chairperson of the William Humphreys Art Gallery, Kimberly.

b) 10

19 March 2021 - NW464

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). What total number of curatorial positions in the various collections are vacant at present at the Iziko Museums of South Africa and (b)(i) how long have the specified positions been vacant and (ii) what has he found to be the reason(s) for this?

Reply:

a) There are 20 curatorial positions. There are 5 vacancies

b) (i) One position since 2016 and four since 2020 to date

(ii) There have been retirements and resignations. The institution was in the process of filling some of these positions with the limited funding it had but the global pandemic struck and financial austerity measures were imposed by National Treasury. This has severely affected the recruitment of staff at the Iziko Museums of South Africa.

19 March 2021 - NW686

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract? (NW804E)

Reply:

a) Yes my Department makes use of private security firms as outlined below:-

(i)Name

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv)Duration

Pristo Response Trading

Provision of a twenty-four hour security service at four Departmental sites.

R43 071 939.83

Three years – 29 June 2018 – 30 May 2021.

       

Cardura Security

Provision of a twenty four hour security service at Regent Place.

R4 176 000.00

Three years –

1 March 2019 – 28 February 2022.

       

(b). Yes Entities under my Department makes use of private security firms as outlined below-:

i) ENTITY

ii) NAME OF FIRM

iii) PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

iv) VALUE

v) DURATION

Iziko Museums of South Africa

Fidelity Security Services

Guarding services at the various Museums.

R113 168.54 per month

Month to month basis

 

ADT

Alarm monitoring and response services at buildings occupied by Iziko Museums.

R15 371.86 per month

Month to month basis

A tender for the services has been concluded and an agreement will be signed between the preferred service provider and Iziko Museums.

Ditsong Museums of South Africa

Senegal Security CC.

To meet all requirements of DMSA in terms of physical security access control. The purpose

of access control is to prevent the unauthorized access and egress of persons/vehicles and

the bringing in of any dangerous objects onto DMSA premises in order to safeguard the

people, the property, assets and buildings.

R 49 185 196

Thirty-Six (36) Months with effective from 1 November 2019.

Afikaanse Taalmuseum en monument

Drakenstein Security Services and CCTV Room (Pty) Ltd

Security guards for the Taalmonument and Amphitheatre for night shift

R 1 985 688

3 years

Expired on 31 December 2020

 

Baruch Security Services

Security guards for the Taalmonument and Amphitheatre for night shift

R 1 336 209

3 years

Active from 1 January 2021

Freedom Park

Elihle/Titanium Security Services

General access control and guarding services

R 12 755 026.

3 years (effective from 01 December 2019 to 30 November 2022

Kwazulu Natal Museum

Delta Force Security

To provide security at the Old St Anne’s Hospital property. The property is the site earmarked for the new KZN Museum building. Outsourced security is required while the project is at the planning and design stage. Security arrangements will change as soon as the site is handed over to a building contractor.

R9 016.00 per month.

Month to month contract.

National Museum

National security

Provision of armed response, monitoring of emergency services and annual maintenance

R 392 462.34

5 years

1 August 2019 to 31 August 2024

 

Stallion

Guarding services for the museum

R 1 765 060.16

3 years

1 February 2021 to 31 January 2024

Nelson Mandela Museum

Tyeks Security Services

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control in the museum

R 8 000 018.07

 

3 year fixed contract

uMsunduzi museum

Siyejabula Security Solution cc

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control is in place

R 1 270 980.00

3 years

 

ADT

To provide Alarm monitoring and armed response.

  R69 386.37.

24 Months

 

Sizowakha Security and Cleaning Services cc

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control is in place.

R1 113 133,41

3 years

War Museum of the Boer-Republic

Fidelity Security Services

To provide 24-hour guard on ground and guard in the museum when open

R 356 524.68

7 Months

William Humphreys Art Gallery

Gate to Door Security

To monitor the building

R 70 392.00

2 years

Luthuli Museum

Siyajabula Security Services

To provide security to the organisation

R 1,474,483.32

3 years

Robben Island Museum

G4S Security Services

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501, including Cash Collection

R10 291 783.49

2 years

 

Khuselani Security & Risk Management

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R19 673 535.09

5 years

 

Prosec security services

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R19 673 535.09

2 years 9 months

 

City security cc

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R15 022 224.00

3 years

         

South African Heritage Resources Agency

ADT

Alarm installation, monitoring and armed response to Paarl office and buildings

R 3 030.00 p/m

Month to month

 

BC security solutions

Farm patrol

R 456 000.00

24 months

 

Security SA

On-site physical security for securing of vulnerable building structures

R504 576.00

12 months

 

Qamata Trading projects

Security services at Old Resi-dency in King Williams Town

R 414 000,00

24 months

 

Suidpunt Sekuriteit

Alarm installation and moni-toring of Struisbaai units

R 321.00/Per month

Month to month

 

Bokwe’s security services

Service Provider to provide physical security services at SAHRA Head Office

R778 073,76

36 months

South African Institute

for Drug Free Sport

No private security appointed

The South African Drug Free Sport Institution has no private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

Pansalb

No private security appointed

The language Board does not use private security the Landlord provide for the service

N/A

N/A

Boxing South Africa

No private security appointed

The Boxing South Africa has no private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

AMAZWI South

Museum of Literature

Hi-Tec Security

Monitoring of intruder security system, armed response and Monitoring of fire alarms

Approximately R50 000.00 per year.

Ongoing contract

NLSA

Eldna security services

Provision of security services at Pretoria campus

R 7 583,263.30

3 years

 

Eldna security services

Provision of services at Cape Town campus

R 5, 690,038.44

3 years

South African Library for the Blind

The Library do not have private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

N/A

National Arts Council

Khokhotiva General Services (Pty) Ltd

To provide 24 Hour Protection Service at the council

R398 600,00

12 Months

National Film video and Foundation

Satenga Security Services (Pty) Ltd

The company provides security services which include monitoring access control into the premises where the NFVF rents office space.

R321 540.00

12 Months

National Heritage

The Council do not have private security at its premises the landlord provide for that service

N/A

N/A

N/A

PACOFS

Ignite security

Provision of security services. 

R4 640 400 for a period of three (3) years

3 years

South African State Theatre

Cardura Trading Enterprise

Security provision

R13,634,348.13

36 months

The Playhouse Company

Excellerate Services (Pty) Ltd

To safeguard employees, patrons, service providers, movable assets and property at The Playhouse Company buildings.

R 9 926 139 for the 3 year contract

3 years

ARTSCAPE

Afri Guard (Pty) Ltd

To provide security at the premises

R 12 186 334.08

3 years

The Market Theatre Foundation

Rise Security

To provide general security for the premises

R6 312 017.66

3 years

 

Fidelity ADT

To provide with armed response to the premises

R81 900.00

3 years

19 March 2021 - NW709

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) Whether, with reference to the proposed new nuclear build, his department conducted any (a) feasibility studies and/or (b) business or financial case studies for new nuclear generation in the past two years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details; 2) In view of the fact that the Integrated Resource Plan 2019 (IRP 2019) makes no provision for the procurement of new nuclear generation as indicated on table 5 on page 42 of the gazetted IRP, on what basis has he committed to procure 2500MW of new nuclear generation by 2024 in his Ministerial Performance Agreement; 3) Why is he prioritising nuclear power generation ahead of other generation solutions despite ESKOM’s admission that nuclear energy is neither a least-cost, nor a short-term solution to the electricity crisis in the Republic? NW828E

Reply:

1. Whether, with reference to the proposed new nuclear build, his department conducted any (a) feasibility studies and/or

The Department has in the past, conducted at least 13 feasibility studies towards a framework for the realisation of the Nuclear New Build Programme. These include amongst others the International Atomic Energy Agency’s peer review expert mission on Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review. As result of this, a number of studies and strategies were developed to address identified issues raised for preparation toward procurement of the 9600MW nuclear programme previously. These feasibility studies provided the necessary foundation from which to prepare for the procurement of the 2500MW nuclear new build programme. Some of the relevant feasibility Studies included:

  1. Study on comparative analysis of Shale Gas to power versus Nuclear Power in SA
  2. Benchmark of Procurement Framework
  3. Cost of Nuclear Power
  4. Owner-Operator and Financing Structures
  5. Finance Options Models Solutions
  6. Economic Impact of Localisation of Nuclear New Build Programme

(b) business or financial case studies for new nuclear generation in the past two years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details;

Having those relevant studies as a basis, following the IRP2019 call for the smaller capacity of 2500MW the Department sought to update its information with the latest developments in the nuclear industry by testing the market appetite for the deployment of the Nuclear New Build Programme in South Africa. In June 2020, Department went out to test the market by issuing a non-binding Request for Information (RFI) for the 2500 MW of nuclear capacity. The process of finalising the RFI assessment is underway and this will culminate to into the implementation strategy, roadmap and procurement framework.

2. In view of the fact that the Integrated Resource Plan 2019 (IRP 2019) makes no provision for the procurement of new nuclear generation as indicated on table 5 on page 42 of the gazetted IRP, on what basis has he committed to procure 2500MW of new nuclear generation by 2024 in his Ministerial Performance Agreement;

The Department has been implementing the IRP2019 since it was promulgated in 2019 to provide sustainable energy mix to address the country energy needs with various energy technologies that are being rolled out. The IRP does not pronounce on procurement. It is a plan for electricity that is based on least cost calculations and policy adjustments. There are a number of steps in the IRP development process, one of the final steps is policy adjustment. The policy adjusted decision of an approved Integrated Resource Plan of 2019, Decision 8 states: “Commence preparations for a nuclear build programme to the extent of 2500 MW at a pace and scale that the country can afford because it is a no-regret option in the long term”. The Minister’s Section 34 Determination in terms of the Electricity Regulations Act No. 4 of 2006, as amended, is where provision for procurement of electricity generation is made. The policy Decision 8 of the IRP2019 provides the basis upon which the Minister has committed to procure 2500MW of new nuclear generation by 2024 in his Ministerial Performance Agreement;

The preparations leading to the procurement in 2024 have already started taking into account:

  1. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in the DMRE 2020-2025 Strategic Plan and the Annual Performance Plan
  2. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in Policy Position 8 of the IRP 2019
  3. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in the Performance Agreement of the Minister.
  4. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in the 2019-2024 MTSF Priorities.

The preparation for nuclear power plant is long lead-time infrastructure project and takes up to about 12 years from the planning until the commission power plant to the grid to generate electricity. These preparatory activities include but are not limited to design, siting, procurement, construction and commissioning of the nuclear power station beyond 2030. Most of the baseload coal fired power plants will be decommissioned beyond 2030 and based on the long lead times for a nuclear programme, starting the process early will yield a no regret option taking into account that nuclear is a clean baseload source of power.

3. Why is he prioritising nuclear power generation ahead of other generation solutions despite ESKOM’s admission that nuclear energy is neither a least-cost, nor a short-term solution to the electricity crisis in the Republic? NW828E

The Department has a responsibility to implement the approved IRP in totality to ensure security of energy supply for the country. It is not true that nuclear is being prioritised. Since the promulgation of the initial IRP 2010-30 and the subsequent revised IRP 2019, the only other technologies to be commissioned in line with these plans have not included nuclear. We have procured more renewable energy technologies and we continue to do so and nuclear has not been one of those. Even with the section 34 determinations following the IRP 2019, Nuclear energy is being subjected to a robust public participation process prior to NERSA’s concurrence. It is therefore not true to imply that nuclear is brought in as short-term solution despite it having policy adjusted into the IRP post the modelling process. It must be noted that the IRP does not factor in a number of issues such as hidden costs including the grid costs, balancing costs, systems costs, job creation, local industry development, geopolitics, labour movement dynamics and other related aspects. In addition, the IRP modelling process used the average capital cost of nuclear projects as US$5000/kWe whilst unlike other energy sources, nuclear projects have shown to have a wide range from as low as US$2000. After testing the market, we may arrive at a cost far lower than any other energy source possible, and this is the reason why it will be prudent to move forward with procurement of nuclear power. In addition, unlike most other energy sources which have lifetimes and loans suit limited private investor positions of short-term returns, nuclear power plants have lifetimes exceeding 60 years. Koeberg is a prime example of this and has shown to be the cheapest of all energy sources currently on the grid. Even after 20 years when a nuclear plant has been paid off (due to market limitations on loan durations), the plants will continue to generate electricity at the lowest operational cost. Each energy source must be looked at for its merits, and hence a balanced energy mix of all sources is good for South Africa.

19 March 2021 - NW589

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, with reference to a celebrated settlement agreement more than two years ago after the landmark class-action suit against nine gold mining companies that were ordered to compensate miners who suffered from insidious respiratory diseases like silicosis, he intends to intervene to ensure that the miners who still have not been paid out are paid out; if not, why not; if so, what are the full details outlining time lines? NW645E

Reply:

The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy is responsible for the regulation of the mining industry through the Mine Health and Safety Act (MHSA), No 29 of 1996. The Department of Health (DoH) governs the compensation of the mine employees diagnosed with Occupational Lung Diseases through Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act (ODMWA) 78 OF 1973 regulated by the Medical Bureau for Occupational diseases (MBOD).

Tshiamiso trust has been established to carry out the terms of the settlement agreement reached between amongst six mining companies and claimants to compensate current and ex-mineworkers for silicosis and TB. The trust works together with the MBOD in certification of mineworkers who have lodged claims. The certification process to identify ex-mineworkers with silicosis was apparently hampered by Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 as lung function tests could not be carried out because of the risk of increasing exposure to COVID-19 infection. Outreach programmes are reported to be carried out to cater for outstanding compensations in areas like the Eastern Cape.

19 March 2021 - NW511

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b) According to the records of the Department of Human Settlements (DHS), there are three (3) officials who performed other remunerative work since 2014 to date, after their applications were duly approved by the Executive Authority.

2. (a) The Department uses the “Guide on Managing other Remunerative Work in The Public Service” which, amongst others prescribes a form to be used for applying to perform other remunerative work outside the Public Service. It further prescribes that no Public Servant will be allowed to perform business with the State and that approval to perform other remunerative work will be valid for one year.

b) The Minister, guided by the recommendations of the Ethics Officer, makes a decision on the applications.

c) None

d) Not applicable.

 

19 March 2021 - NW677

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract? NW795E

Reply:

ENTITY

(b) entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms

(i) name of each firm,

(ii) purpose

(iii) value

(iv) duration of each specified contract?

CEF (SOC) Ltd

CEF, iGas and SFF do not make use of private security firms.

PetroSA and AEMFC utilise the services of private security firms.

PetroSA: Quattro Security (Bloemfontein and Tzaneen depots); Fidelity Security Services (Parow Offices)

Excellerate Security Services at the GTL Refinery and surrounding sites in Mossel Bay

AEMFC: Protea coin t/s Bidvest Security

PetroSA is making use of private security guards armed and unarmed in its Depots (Bloemfontein and Tzaneen), GTL Refinery and its surrounding sites in Mossel Bay and Parow (Head Office).

PetroSA:

Quattro Security (Bloemfontein and Tzaneen depots) – R1,243,371,41

Fidelity Security Services (Parow Offices) – R,414,893,84

Excellerate Services (GTL Refinery and sites around Mossel Bay) – R70 000 000.00

AEMFC: R 25,847,324.00

PetroSA:

Quattro and Fidelity – 01 October 2018 – 30 September 2021

GTL Refinery and surrounding sites in Mossel Bay – 15 January 2021 – 14 January 2024 with an option to extend for one year.

AEMFC: 01 December 2020 – 30 November 2023

NECSA

The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (NECSA) does not make use of private security firms.

N/A – NECSA uses in-house security

N/A

N/A

N/A

CGS

Yes.

The Council for Geoscience has established an in-house security capacity in Head Office, Donkerhoek Core shed and Bellville regional office through mass in-housing process, whilst other regional offices are still protected through contract security

Polokwane regional office:

Field Security Services

 

Upington regional office: ADT Fidelity Security Services

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

Peter Security Services

 

Polokwane Regional Office:

24/7 Security guarding services – one grade C armed guard during the day shift and similar during the night shift.

Upington regional office: Providing armed response services only– alarm monitoring services

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

Providing armed response services only – alarm monitoring services

Polokwane Regional Office: R345, 000.00

Upington regional office:

R88,252.04

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

R19, 297.80

Polokwane Regional Office: 26 September 2020 – 26 September 2021

Upington regional office: 01 December 2020 – 30 November 2023

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

01 October 2019 to 30 September 2022

MINTEK

Mintek utilizes the services of three (3) companies for their security

  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise
  • Fidelity Security Services
  • MI 7 Security Group
  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise: General security services at Mintek Campus (24/7)
  • Fidelity Security Services:

Protection of Mintek’s Technology demonstration plant (Savmin) at Sibanye Gold Randfontein

  • MI 7 Security Group: Tactical, Surveillance and protection services for derelict/ownerless holings closure (open shaft). These open shafts are used by illegal miners and syndicates to pursue Illegal mining activities.
  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise: R375,898 p/m
  • Fidelity Security Services: R R39,930 p/m

MI 7 Security Group: R19m (total contract value. Payment based on use)

  • Services are only used on adhoc basis as and when required
  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise: 4 year contract
  • Fidelity Security Services: month-to-month contract
  • MI 7 Security Group: 3 year contract

MHSC

The MHSC does not make use of Private Security firm

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

NERSA

Yes

Imvula Security Services (Sub-contracted by AFMS Group)

Building Security

R2,347,538

2 years

NNR

Yes

RAMS Fire, Security and Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

Building security

R5 268,218.20

01 May 2018 – 30 April 2021

NRWDI

NRWDI does not make use of private security firms.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

SDT

Yes

Rise Security Services (Pty) Ltd

For the provision of armed guarding services for its diamond premises, and to provide access control services

R38 934.36 monthly, VAT inclusive

Three (3) years (1 September 2018 to 21 August 2021)

SADPMR

Yes

Fidelity Securities

EOS Empire All System

Fidelity Securities:

Armed response and static guard services

EOS Empire All System: Maintenance of security equipment

Fidelity Securities: R1,284,126,.72

EOS Empire All System: R70 000 plus R345.00 call out, excluding travel claims

Fidelity Securities: 12 months

EOS Empire All System: 6 months

SANEDI

SANEDI does not make use of the services of a private security firm.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

19 March 2021 - NW622

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Given that departmental entities are stuck in litigation matters that were started by persons who are no longer in his department and have never been held accountable, what (a) is the (i) breakdown of all legal matters against the various entities of his department and (ii) cost to the taxpayer in each case and (b) are the reasons that his department has not, to date, used its own internal processes against those individuals who offset the specified cases, such that they are personally liable for the specified legal costs? NW738E

Reply:

ENTITY

what (a) is the (i) breakdown of all legal matters against the various entities of his department

(a)(ii) cost to the taxpayer in each case

(b) are the reasons that his department has not, to date, used its own internal processes against those individuals who offset the specified cases, such that they are personally liable for the specified legal costs

NECSA

On or about 12 August 2019, Mr Vusi Malebana, erstwhile Necsa Chief Legal Advisor filed an urgent application seeking a declaratory and interdicting order setting aside his suspension and stopping the disciplinary proceeding against him. The Labour Court ruled that the suspension of Mr. Malebana by the South Africa Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa) was declared to be unlawful and constitutes an occupational detriment.

Necsa was ordered to pay the costs of Mr. Malebana in pursuing the urgent application, which costs were to include the costs of two (2) counsel. The bill of costs as per the Taxing Master certificate were R352 486.14 which Necsa honoured in full in January 2021.

Following the court interdict, Mr. Malebana was subjected to a disciplinary hearing and eventually dismissed. He took the matter to the CCMA whereby the CCMA ordered that his dismissal was procedurally and substantively unfair and awarded six months compensation amounting to R679 444.86.

Mr Malebana subsequently served Necsa with a Notice of Motion together with the founding affidavit on 12 December 2020 in essence outlining his intentions to review the arbitration award issued by CCMA on 26 October 2020. 

CGS

The Council for Geoscience has no pending legal matters emanating from the scenario outlined in the question.

N/A

N/A

MINTEK

Mintek does not have any litigation matters that were started by persons who are no longer at the company. The only legal matters currently active relates to labour issues such as unfair dismissal and unfair labour practice.

N/A

N/A

NNR

No outstanding litigation against NNR

N/A

N/A

NRWDI

The National Radioactive Waste Disposal Institute (NRWDI) is not involve in any litigation matters and therefore the questions are not applicable to NRWDI.

N/A

N/A

SDT

The SDT has no litigation matters at present. No such matters were dealt with in the past. Consequently, the entity has incurred no costs in this regard.

N/A

N/A

SADPMR

The SADPMR has no former or current employees who were involved in any litigations of which the Regulator was responsible for paying their legal costs.

N/A

N/A

SANEDI

SANEDI is currently opposing one labour relation matter

R253,998.25

Matter is still pending

CEF (SOC) and its subsidiaries, NERSA and the MHSC responses listed separately below:

CENTRAL ENERGY FUND AND SUBSIDIARIES

ENTITY

what (a) is the (i) breakdown of all legal matters against the various entities of his department

(a)(ii) cost to the taxpayer in each case

(b) are the reasons that his department has not, to date, used its own internal processes against those individuals who offset the specified cases, such that they are personally liable for the specified legal costs

CEF (SOC) Ltd

CEF SOC Ltd and SFF jointly handled the stock rotation litigation matter

R11, 922, 752.15.

After the A&O Report, Application was made for a declaratory order declaring that the sale of strategic stock was invalid.

SFF

Stock Rotation already reported as stated above.

Krone is suing SFF for payment, which they allege, is due in terms of the contract. Krone was required to install a metering system, which was aimed at improving accuracy levels of measuring of oil volumes.

In the recovery of proceeds for the sale of diesel to Line Petroleum, a default judgment was granted in favour of SFF,

R4 500 685.00

R 43, 400.43

SFF is withholding payment on the grounds of non-performance under the contract.

A legal opinion is being sought because Line Petroleum does not have attachable assets in South Africa.

iGas

No litigation to report on.

N/A

N/A

PetroSA

PetroSA is claiming damages from Odjfjell for the pipeline damages.

PetroSA has instituted liquidation proceedings against Two Oceans for failing to honour payments for product sold

PetroSA has obtained judgment against Fantastic View and a writ of execution has been issued

R 11,462, 280.93

R 1,457,266.26

R 738,755.57

Judgment is pending

AEMFC

The supplier being Innovent was found to have misrepresented AEMFC on registration with the Financial Service Board.

AEMFC concluded a settlement agreement with NUM in 2017 at the CCMA which was made an Arbitration award and amongst the item agreed upon was that AEMFC will pay the 13th cheque each December. In 2019 there was another agreement which states that it supersedes all the previous agreements and a new bonus scheme which was performance bonus was introduced. Bargaining employees in 2019 as per the new agreement received 50% of their CTC as performance bonus and the 13th Cheque was not paid. NUM has now obtained an Arbitration award against AEMFC demanding the 13th Cheque for December 2019. Persuant to the Arbitration award, NUM applied for enforcement order of R2.9M which was granted and AEMFC property was attached by the sheriff. AEMFC has applied to the Labour Court to stay the enforcement order pending the rescission of the of the Arbitration award. The argument by AEMFC is that, the 2017 agreement was superseded by the 2019 agreement and further that the 13th Cheque must be from the employee’s salary and not at employers costs.

An AEMFC former Senior Employee concluded a collecting Agreement with NUM in terms of which AEMFC will pay the risk allowance to employees who worked during the lockdown. In terms of the AEMFC LOA the collective agreement must be recommended by EXCO to the board for approval. The submission to the board by the former employed did not disclose that a collective agreement is already signed but created the impression that AEMFC must make a once off payment of R2.6 million for 5 weeks lockdown. AEMFC made a once off payment and the union lodge a grievance with the CCMA to enforcement the collecting agreement signed with the former employee. AEMFC disputed the validity of the collective agreement since it was not approved by EXCO and board and an urgent court application was filed to interdict CCMA to proceed with the matter pending review of the decision by AEMFC former employee to sign a collective agreement without authority.

R 241 016.43

R 192, 510.00

R 283,496. 62

The contract was classified as Irregular expenditure by National Treasury.

NATIONAL ENERGY REGULATOR OF SOUTH AFRICA (NERSA)

No.

  1. Type of Litigation Matter
  1. Breakdown of Legal Matters
  1. Related Costs
  1. Reasons for not using own internal processes

1.

Judicial review

ESKOM- Case arises from the decision of the Energy Regulator approving the MYPD3 RCA5 and Eskom is unhappy with the outcome. Eskom has taken the decision on judicial review.

R1 750 000.00

Only lawyers in the practising roll can appear in court. Despite NERSA legal advisors are all admitted attorneys/advocates, they cannot appear in court.

2.

Judicial review

AFGRI/PHILAFRICA- The judicial review case arises from the decision of the Energy Regulator not to amend or revoke the distribution licence of Maluti a Phofung Local Municipality licence.

2 900 000.00

Only lawyers in the practising roll can appear in court. Despite NERSA legal advisors are all admitted attorneys/advocates, they cannot appear in court.

3.

Judicial review

Drakenstein Local Municipality. The judicial review arises from the decision of the Energy Regulator not to approve some of the tariffs of the municipality during 2019/20 because of the impact that it would have had on the customers.

R2 200 000.00

Only lawyers in the practising roll can appear in court. Despite NERSA legal advisors are all admitted attorneys/advocates, they cannot appear in court.

4.

Judicial review/ Implementation of order pending appeal/ leave to appeal

Eskom- The appeal follows the judgement of the Pretoria High Court to substitute the decision of the Energy Regulator on the Eskom MYPD4 Year 3. This case has already had three judgements (review judgement, leave to appeal judgement and implementation of review judgement pending appeal judgement)

R7 400 000.00

Only lawyers in the practising roll can appear in court. Despite NERSA legal advisors are all admitted attorneys/advocates, they cannot appear in court.

5.

Judicial review

Sunrise- the matter arises from the judicial review brought by Sunrise against what they call improper formulation and reading of the Petroleum Pipelines Operating licence issued by NERSA to Avedia

R2 200 000.00

Only lawyers in the practising roll can appear in court. Despite NERSA legal advisors are all admitted attorneys/advocates, they cannot appear in court.

MINE, HEALTH AND SAFERY COUNCIL (MHSC)

what (a) is the (i) breakdown of all legal matters against the various entities of his department

(a)(ii) cost to the taxpayer in each case

(b) are the reasons that his department has not, to date, used its own internal processes against those individuals who offset the specified cases, such that they are personally liable for the specified legal costs

Investigation into allegations of financial misconduct

1 006 475,00

The matter is not finalised

Dispute at the Labour Court between employer an employee

233 770,00

Recovery if any will be based on outcome of the labour court

Challenging the recruitment process of the HR head at the Labour Court

45 007,55

Recovery if any will be based on outcome of the labour court

Termination of the Contract and recovery due to non performance

456 046,00

The matter is not finalised

Dispute at the Labour Court between employer an employee

301 357,44

Recovery if any will be based on outcome of the labour court

Dispute at the Labour Court between employer an employee

86 766,63

Settlement paid by MHSC

Dispute over employment Contract

153 060,00

Assessment still to be done pending the outcome of disciplinary hearing- employee on suspension

19 March 2021 - NW427

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What action has he taken to discourage seabed mining, as bulk sediment mining of the deep seafloor is likely to have a severe and negative impact on sensitive seabed habitats and the ecosystem services that they provide, and given that the competency to consider and approve mining licences lies with his department? NW482E

Reply:

Although the primary aim lies along advancing development premised on the principles of sustainable development, where any proposed mining along and within seabed could potentially pose severe and/or irreversible damage to ecosystem in question even with mitigation measures in place such application cannot be granted or approved.

The provisions of section 48 of the MPDRA which list out area over which prospecting or mining is prohibited. If the area constitutes such an area as per the assessment made, the Minister can invoke the provisions of section 49 of the MPRDA and restrict or prohibit mining over such relevant seabed.

19 March 2021 - NW358

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What total number of police stations in the Republic have outstanding service accounts in terms of (i) water and (ii) electricity usages; b) in which provinces are the specified stations located; and c) what are the relevant details of the outstanding amounts with regard to each of the stations?

Reply:

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) is responsible for paying municipal services (electricity, water, refuse and sanitation) on behalf of client departments, including the South African Police Services (SAPS). The municipal accounts that DPWI has with various municipalities across the country are in the name of DPWI. On a monthly basis, DPWI receives the municipal accounts, verifies the accuracy of the property listed, confirms if it was not paid before, after which the invoices are processed. At the end of the month, a report is drawn from the system for all payments made on behalf of client department and invoices are issued against client departments, such as SAPS, to pay DPWI within 30 days. It takes an average of over 90 days for client departments to settle their invoices with DPWI as part of recovery on payments made on behalf of clients departments.

a) & b) I have been informed by the Department that the total number of police stations in the Republic that have outstanding current service accounts in terms of water and electricity usage and the provinces that they are located are captured in the table below:

Regional Office

Province

Number of Police Stations

Outstanding Water Service Accounts

Outstanding Electricity Service Accounts

Polokwane

Limpopo

109

R 170 791.32

R 1 818 618.59

Bloemfontein

Free State

49

R 716 341.79

R 5 406 809.17

Cape Town

Western Cape

315

R 985 000.00

R 755 545.00

Kimberley

Northern Cape

116

R 272 708.55

R 1 640 572.88

Mmabatho

North West

118

R 471 522.39

R 3 848 218.12

Nelspruit

Mpumalanga

87

R -

R -

Umtata

Eastern Cape

70

R 799 411.66

R 1 185 471.82

Durban

Kwa-Zulu Natal

23

R 12 878.44

R 534 412.98

Johannesburg

Gauteng

139

R 638 451.11

R 1 043 972.70

Pretoria

Gauteng

40

 R 1 936 990.52

R 1 828 873.53

Port Elizabeth

Eastern Cape

18

R 187 370.34

R 189 966.47

Grand Total

1086

R 6 191 466.12

R 18 252 461.26

c) There are other services being rendered by DPWI such as refuse, sanitation and property rates that are being serviced and paid on a monthly basis by the department. Payments of invoices to suppliers and service providers including municipalities on services rendered remains key deliverables for DPWI and the Ministry.

In some instances, the outstanding accounts include certain charges where some municipalities have levied interest on certain accounts as a result of, what they believed, were overdue accounts while in actual fact payments were made and not timeously allocated by municipalities.

DPWI continues to have regular sessions (including remote sessions) about timeous allocations of monies paid and corrections of incorrect billed services with municipalities. The persistent challenge experienced by the department is where some municipalities do not have adequate ICT infrastructure to remotely connect and be able to address some queries raised by the department related to incorrect statements and/or outstanding amounts.

DPWI’s commitment to ensure that all valid invoices are settled within 30 days on receipt of statements and invoices, or the agreed period with stakeholders, remains unwavering, hence the improved trajectory over the past couple of months of settling invoices within 30 days.

19 March 2021 - NW700

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) was the (i) annual income of the Table Mountain National Park (TMNP) (aa) in the 2019-20 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2020 and (ii) breakdown of each sector of income from (aa) access fees at Cape Point and Boulders Beach, (bb) the Aerial Cableway company, (cc) permits and Wild Cards, (dd) picnic sites, and/or (ee) any other specified forms of income and (b) total amount of this income is reinvested into the TMNP?

Reply:

 

(i) (aa) In the 2019/20 financial year, the Table Mountain National Park generated R371657 366 in revenue.

(bb) Since the start of the 2020/21 financial year, the Table Mountain National Park

generated R23 531114 in revenue.

(ii) The detailed breakdown of each section of income is provided on the table below:

Table 1. Table Mountain National Park Revenue streams

Question

Income Description

2019-20

2020 - 21

   

Apr 2019 Mar 2020

(12 months)

Apr 2020 – Feb 2021
(11 months)

(a)(ii)(aa)

Cape Point

R216 960 043

R 7 496 115

 

Boulders

R90 502 407

R 2498 787

(a)(ii)(bb)

Table Mountain Aerial Cableway

Concession

R39 795 627

R 5 217 361

(a)(ii)(cc)

My Green - and My Activity Card

R3 374 628

R 2 643 888

(a)(ii)(dd)

Picnic Sites

R2 757 167

R 1 251 262

(a)(ii)(ee)

Tourism Income

R7 588 972

R 2 868 400

 

Other

R10 678 522

R 1 555 301

Tourism income includes Accommodation, Recreational Permits, Trail Fees, etc.

 

Other includes the other Filming, Rent Received, etc.

   

Total Revenue

R371657 366

R 23 531 114

  1. The amount re-invested in operations for the 2019/20 financial year was R99 481 040. In the 2020/21 financial year, R74498 832 has been reinvested into operations.

Table 1. Table Mountain National Park Revenue streams

Question

2019•20

Apr 2019 - Mar 2020

Income Description

2020-21

     

(a)(ii)(aa)

Cape Point

 
 

Boulders

 

(a)(ii)(bb)

Table Mountain Aerial Cableway

Concession

R39 795 627

R 5 217 361

(a)(ii)(cc)

My Green - and My Activity Card

R3 374 628

R 2 643 888

(a)(ii)(dd)

Picnic Sites

R2 757 167

R 1 251 262

(a)(ii)(ee)

Tourism Income

R7 588 972

R 2 868 400

 

Other

R10 678 522

R 1 555 301

Tourism Income includes Accommodation, Recreational Permits, Trail

Fees, etc.

 

Other includes the other Filming, Rent

Received, etc.

   

Total Revenue

R371657 366

R23 531 114

b) The amount re-invested in operations for the 2019/20 financial year was R99 481 040. In the 2020/21 financial year, R74 498 832 has been reinvested into operations.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: .18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW475

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)Whether, with reference to the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), and the requirement that member states should complete their tariff reduction schedules and finalise essential rules of origin by July 2021, (a) the Republic has submitted the tariff reduction schedule and (b) will she furnish Mr MJ Cuthbert with a copy of the tariff reduction and rules; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2) whether the Republic has submitted its position on rules of origin to the (AfCFTA) Secretariat; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the Republic has pledged any funds to the AfCFTA Secretariat; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount has been pledged and (b) for what purpose?

Reply:

1.(a) SA, together with Members of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), has submitted a tariff offer to AU Members. The SACU offer is conditional on receiving a reciprocal offer from AU trading partners as required by the AU Summit Decision of 5 December 2020. A copy of the offer may be accessed at http://www.thedtic.gov.za/wp-content/uploads/LSec-CE-TA-2020-072December2020.pdf

2. South Africa, together with Members of SACU, has negotiated and reached agreement on applicable rules of origin with AU Members for 81.5% of all products specified under the World Customs Organisation Harmonised System (HS) classification at a six digit level.

3) SA contributes to the budget of the AfCFTA Secretariat through its normal contributions to the African Union Commission.

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW463

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

In light of the Annual Report of the Iziko Museums of South Africa (Iziko) wherein it was stated that R9,5 million was spent on plans from an architectural firm to provide Iziko with five-year plans, (a) on what date was the specified amount paid and (b) what annual amount was spent on the buildings under Iziko`s care since the specified date?

Reply:

a) Payments were made according to the project plan in the contract with the appointed Architectural firm from 2016/2017 financial year to date.

b) Since 2016/2017 the Iziko Museums of South Africa spent R2 004 651 on day to day maintenance. Iziko has spent R 7 996 395 on the Conservation Maintenance plan to date.

19 March 2021 - NW638

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the name changes of Port Elizabeth to Gqeberha, King William’s Town to Qonce, Uitenhage to Kariega and MaClear Town to Nqanqarhu, what (a) total number of representations and/or comments were received by (i) the Geographical Name Change Committee tasked with the name change process and (ii) his Office following the advertisements of the name changes as required by legislation during the different stages of the process, (b) number of the specified comments were (i) in favour of and (ii) against the specified changes and (c) are the reasons that the comments against the name changes were not taken into account?

Reply:

(1) The Eastern Cape Provincial Geographical Names Committee conducted public hearings as followings:

  1. Raymond Mhlaba Sport Centre on 13 November 2018
  2. Port Elizabeth City Hall 14 November 2018
  3. Uitenhage Town Hall 20 November 2018
  4. Chatty Community Hall 21 November 2018
  5. Nangoza Jebe Hall 22 November 2018
  6. Maclear Town Hall 27 February 2019
  7. King Williamstown Town Hall 19 November 2019
  8. Berlin Town Hall 21 November 2019
  9. East London City Hall 26 November 2019.

During these public consultations the name Nelson Mandela and Bhayi were also proposed for Port Elizabeth. However, the name Bhayi was disqualified as it was argued that it was just a translation of the word Baai. The name Nelson Mandela was disqualified as it was argued that it was overused in South Africa and the President Mandela never resided in the city. The counting of objections was never carried out as the sessions were not treated as referenda.

(1 and 11) The department has received twelve objections at the time this reply was being written from the public following the gazetting of the name changes on the 22nd of February 2021.

(b) on the number of comments for and against the name change. Section 10 of the South African Geographical Names Act 118 of 1998 provides for objections to the gazetted names but not for those who support the name changes hence no details of those who support the name changes were collected.

(c) As stated above the reasons given for the disqualification of the name Nelson Mandela was that the name was overused in South Africa and that President Mandela never lived in Port Elizabeth. The name Bhayi was disqualified because it was argued that the name Bhayi is a translation of the Afrikaans word Baai referring to any bay.

 

19 March 2021 - NW394

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of her department’s most recent available Annual Report 2018-19 on its official website, which indicates that her department employed 35 professionals and managers who were foreign nationals, what (a) total number of foreign nationals currently fill the positions and (b) are the reasons that the roles are not filled by South Africans?

Reply:

Department of Human Settlements:

(a) Only one foreign national is employed by the Department of Human Settlements and the appointment was done in terms of Regulation 66(1) (a) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016.

(b) The official was recommended on consideration of her previous working history. The official has the requisite expertise, experience and reliability required for the post.

Department of Water and Sanitation

(a) As of the end of the 2019/20 financial year, the total number of foreign nationals within the Department of Water and Sanitation was 29.

(b) Reasons for the department to employ the employees referred to in (a) include:

  • Scarcity of qualified and experienced persons available locally or they are available but do not meet the applicable employment criteria
  • Technical areas of work in the department for which persons require advanced knowledge in a specified subject area or science
  • The department has also entered into a bilateral agreement with the government of the Republic of Cuba on 6 February 2020 on cooperation in water resources management and water supply which will run up to 2024. The Cuban Specialists employed in various engineering and scientific disciplines are deployed in infrastructure operation clusters, regional offices and the Department’s Head Office. Among the areas of cooperation agreed upon by the parties are:
  • Capacity building through training and skills transfer to officials responsible for operation and maintenance of water infrastructure throughout the water value chain at national, regional and local government levels;
  • Operations and maintenance of water infrastructure in various clusters and provinces, where there is a dire shortage of technical skills.
  • Provision of training and mentoring to local candidate engineers and artisans

 

19 March 2021 - NW669

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

 

  1. Yes, the table below lists the security contracts by which the Department makes use private security firms:

(i) Name of Firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Contract Value

(iv) Duration Contract

SBU and SBO Protection

Services

Guarding Services to protect departmental assets

and personnel at 110 Hamilton Building Pretoria

R2 919 633.12

36 months

National Security and Fire (Port Elizabeth

Guarding Services to protect the departmental

assets and personnel at Port Alfred Office

R10, 050.00

10 months

ADT Security

Guarding Services to protect the departmental

assets and personnel at Port Elizabeth Office

R9, 132.00

36 months

(i) Name of Firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Contract Value

(iv) Duration of each Contract

Trident Security

Guarding services to protect the departmental assets and personnel at the Sea Point Aquarium

R187, 500.00

3 months

Royal Security

Guarding services to protect the departmental assets and personnel at Gariep ATDC offices

R272, 300.17

3 months

Bihlale Risk Protection

Guarding services to protect the departmental assets and personnel at Gariep ATDC offices

R435, 968.88

4 months

  1. Yes, the Entities (isimangaliso, SAWS, SANBI, SANParks) makes use of private security firms, and they are listed in the table below:

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration of Contract

ISIMANGALISO

Sizisizwe Security

To protect isimangaliso including its assets in

different parts of the Park.

R17 251488

36 months

Nkalavasi Security

To protect isimangaliso including its assets in

different parts of the Park.

R17 013 888

36 months

Let2Kuphepha

To protect isimangaliso including its assets in

different parts of the Park.

R13 809 888

36 months

SOUTH AFRICAN WEATHER SERVICES (SAWS)

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration

of Contract

Maemo Security

Services

Security services to protect SAWS’ assets

and personnel at the Eco-Glades Head Office in Eco Park, Centurion.

R2 219 634.28

31 months

 

Security services to protect SAWS’ assets

and personnel at the Irene Weather Office situated in the Agricultural Research Council (ARC) Campus.

R2315 351.91

36 months

 

Security services to protect SAWS' vacant

land at Part 264 of Garsfontein 374 JR (Waterkloof Heights); Pretoria.

R2 925 287.03

36 months

Fidelity ADT and

Technical

Video alarm monitoring system at Three

Rivers Air Quality Monitoring Station

R36 505.80

24 Months

       
 

24hrs Monitoring and Armed Response on Radar Sites at: East London, Mthatha, Durban, Ottosdal, Bethlehem and Polokwane.

R767 893.01

36 Months

Astron Alarms

24hrs Monitoring and Reaction for De Aar

weather Office

R4 560.00

12 Months

BAI Security

Services

24hrs Monitoring and Reaction for Calvinia

Weather Office

R2 052.00

12 Months

Suidekruis Security Services

24 Hour Monitoring and Reaction for George

Weather Of ce

R5 070.00

12 Months

RQ Alarms

24 Hour Monitoring and Reaction for

Springbok Weather Office

R3 900.00

12 Months

Highbury

Community Development Trust

MoU concluded 5* July 2006 with the

Highbury Community in Mthatha to provide security at Mthatha Radarsite

R159 313.30 for

2020/21 FY, with annual CPIX escalation.

5th July 2005

till either party terminates the MoU

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE (SANBI)

 

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration of Contract

G4S Secure

Solutions

Renter security services and cashier services

through alarm monitoring, access control, guarding, patrolling, armed response, cashier and customer services at Karoo Desert National Botanical Garden

R2,226,287

5 Years

Selkirk Security

Services

Security guarding, patrol duties and access

control at Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden

R7,777,879

5 Years

Gobizazi Security

Security and cashier services at the

KwaZulu-Natal National Botanical Gardens

R3,379,059

5 Years

Selkirk Security

Company

Campus security, access control, customer

and cashier services, patrolling, alarm monitoring and response at the Pretoria National Botanical Garden

R12,707,681

5 Years

GnG Security

Services

 

Guarding services at the Walter Sisulu

National Botanical Garden

R12,038,026

5 Years

Mmaketse Project

Management Services

 

Guarding and cashier services at

Thohoyandou Botanical Garden

R2,902,395

5 Years

Afri-Guard

 

Security and cashier services which includes

guarding, access and exit control and cash

management for the Free State National

Botanical Garden

R2,444,279

5 Years

Metro Security

 

Security, access and armed response

services at the Harold Porter National Botanical

Garden

R2,528,772

5 Years

Phepha MV

Security Services

 

Guarding, cashier services and armed

response at Lowveld National Botanical Garden

R6,460 255

5 Years

ELDNA Security

Services

Guarding Services to protect SANBI’s

asserts, animals and personnel at SANBI’s

National Zoological Gardens, Pretoria.

13 448 572.36

36 months

Sun Rise Security

Guarding Services to protect SANBI’s

asserts, animals and personnel at SANBI’s

Mokopane Biodiversity Centre.

154 907,27

6 months

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL PARKS (SANParks)

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration

of Contract

Tyeks Security

Services

Guarding services to protect SANParks

assets and personnel at Addo Elephant National Park

R990, 553.37

6 months

Raite Security

Services and Consulting

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Augrabies Falls National Park

R182, 413.44

4 months

Tyeks Security

Services

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Camdeboo National Park

R4, 068, 092.00

60 months

South Cape Security

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at Garden Route Scientific Services

R28, 060.00

36 months

RRA Trading CC

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Groenkloof National Park

RS, 269, 714.20

36 months

Jen Foods

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Karoo National Parks

R470, 744.44

18 months

All Sound Security

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

Knysna Lakes

R30,728.05

36 months

Bangilizwe

Security and T. Centre

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Mountain Zebra National Parks

R336, 000.00

12 months

SmhaRSecuity

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

Tsitsikamma National Park

R33, 200.00

4 months

Bamogale

Security Solutions

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Tsitsikamma National Park

R1, 250 334.00

36 months

Shelfplett 40

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Tsitsikamma National Parks

R382, 800.00

12 months

Darling Security

Service

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at West Coast National Parks —

Langebaan Gate and R27 Gate

R461,725.00

12 months

AR 24

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

West Coast National Parks — Langebaan Offices and Mooimaa/r Facilities

R139, 566.00

36 months

Bamogale

Security Solutions

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Wilderness National Parks

R3, 162, 000.00

5 years

M-Sec Security

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

Wilderness National Parks

R52, 653.57

36 months

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW598

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What total number of (a) applications for the South African Film and Television incentives has his department received since the reopening in August 2020 and (b) the specified applications have been granted? [NW654E

Reply:

a) I have been advised by the department that sixty-six (66) applications were received under the South African Film and Television incentives since the reopening in August 2020.

b) Twenty-seven (27) compliant applications have been adjudicated and thirty-one (31) non-compliant applications were returned back to clients in line with the scheme guidelines. Eight compliant applications are ready for adjudication at the next committee meeting.

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW643

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she will provide a status update with regard to the Republic's signature and endorsement of the Leaders’ Pledge for Nature, recently adopted at the United Nations Summit on Biodiversity in September 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) advantages and (b) disadvantages of South Africa's signature and endorsement thereof?

Reply:

 

  1. and (b)

Please draw your attention to the Department’s response to parliamentary question 2298, dated 30 October 2020. The Department’s position in this regard has not changed.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 17/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW673

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

(a) Department of Home Affairs

 

(i) NAME OF SERVICE PROVIDER

(ii) PROVINCE/SITE

(iii) CONTRACT VALUE

(iv) CONTRACT PERIOD

MODISE PROTECTION SERVICES

LIMPOPO

R 51 487 678.38

36 MONTHS

MODISE PROTECTION SERVICES

HEAD OFFICE

R 11 491 104.68

29 MONTHS

MODISE PROTECTION SERVICES

MPUMALANGA (x10 OFFICES)

R 10 757 845.57

29 MONTHS

INTENSE PROTECTION & TOURISM SERVICES

KWAZULU/NATAL

R 61 587 719.24

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

NORTH WEST

R 23 957 448.54

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

GAUTENG

R 59 182 035.70

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

MPUMALANGA

R 19 318 448.54

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

EASTERN CAPE

R 52 065 886.02

36 MONTHS

BAMOGALE ENTERPRISE

WESTERN CAPE

R 32 340 481.29

29 MONTHS

BAMOGALE ENTERPRISE

NORTHERN CAPE

R 13 382 827.05

36 MONTHS

MAFOKO SECURITY SERVICES

FREE STATE

R 18 851 637.24

36 MONTHS

a) The Electoral Commission

(i.)Name of firm

(ii.) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) duration

Fidelity Security Service National Office

Guarding services

R11,715,374,96

54 months

Mafoko Security service Northern Cape

Guarding services

R5 549 538,24

36 months

Huibidu Group North West

Guarding services

R4 871 417,75

36 months

Vimstire Security

Free State

Guarding services

R3 289 522,92

36 months

Khayalami Security Service

Limpopo

Guarding services

R2 326 347,90

36 months

Rise Security Services Kwazulu Natal

Guarding services

R9 055 266,08

48 months

Tykes Security Services

Gauteng

Guarding services

R2 131 100,25

36 months

Mafoko Security service Western Cape

Guarding services

R270 019.70

36 months

Shumelahaya Security Service

Mpumalanga

Guarding services

R4 475 328,77

36 months

Likunga Security Services

Eastern Cape

Guarding services

R5 039 987,52

36 months

(i.)Name of firm

(ii.) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) duration

Red Alert Security Eastern Cape

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R44 712.00

36 Months

National Security and Fire

Gauteng

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R39 856.32

36 Months

National Security and Fire

Mpumalanga

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R73 237.80

60 Months

African Urban Security

Limpopo

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R54 000.00

60 Months

National Security and Fire

National office

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R36 712.80

36 Months

Securiforce

Free State

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R48 300.00

60 Months

Defensor Security

Northern Cape

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R59 048.40

60 Months

Mzanzi Fire and Security

Kwazulu Natal

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R51 414.00

60 Months

Xpanded Security Solutions

North West

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R49 200.00

60 Months

National Security and Fire

Western Cape

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R32 400.00

36 Months

Gauteng (Local office)

Nokeng tsa Taamane

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R27 000.00

60 Months

(b) Government Printing Works

GPW has appointed a private security service provider, for the provision of physical security guarding services, in order to complement a total of 52 internally appointed security officers.

(i) Name of the firm: Mahlatje Mmetji Cleaning and Security (Pty,) Ltd

(ii) Purpose: the company serves to protect and secure assets, people and resources both in head office and regional offices located in Gauteng, North West, Limpopo and Eastern Cape provinces.

(iii) Value: The monetary value for provisioning of security services on the current arrangement is R 353, 050.00 (VAT inclusive) for each month.

(iv) Duration: For the months of February and March 2021 (2 months, renewable), whilst the organisation plans to procure and contract security services on a 3 years basis, to assist complement the internally appointed officials. The contracted service provider would focus on the non-core areas whilst the internal officials would secure the cores areas of GPW, in order to manage security risks and breaches.

END

19 March 2021 - NW614

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What steps has his department taken to ensure that Engen is held liable for the damage caused to homes and loss of property in Wentworth after the explosion at its oil refinery in Durban South in December 2020? NW730E

Reply:

The matter referred to in the question should be addressed to the Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries who handle Environmental impact issues, as well as the Department of Employment and Labour as the responsible Department for the investigation of industrial accidents.

19 March 2021 - NW648

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

1.(a). Who is supposed to maintain the Rust en Vreugd gardens and (b) how regularly is the maintenance done; 2. whether there are any window panes missing; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date will the window panes be fixed? NW766E

Reply:

1.(a). Iziko Museums maintain the gardens

(b). Iziko’s Maintenance team attends to daily garden maintenance. A Service Provider specialising in tree felling is scheduled quarterly to cut the trees.

2. There is one window pane missing at a height of more than 4 metres at Iziko Rust en Vreugd (IR&V). In terms of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 4.3, any infrastructural services/ work three metres above the ground cannot be executed by the User Department. A Contractor is being appointed to perform repair and maintenance of the exterior of IR&V, so the broken window pane will be repaired as part of the project. The Contractor will be appointed by the end April 2021.

19 March 2021 - NW487

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What plans does he have in place to prioritise the beneficiaries of the SA Social Security Agency who are awaiting their applications for birth registration and/or identity documents to be finalised by his department?

Reply:

1) The Departments of Home Affairs and Social Development signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Identity Management and Social Welfare matters. This MOU is affected through a standing committee comprising of DHA, DSD as well as SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) representatives where matters of mutual concern are discussed. This MOU makes provision for the sharing of information that will facilitate the smooth execution of social welfare service delivery matters, where SASSA will provide information about citizens who require either birth registration services and/or identity documents.

2) Birth registration is the building block of the National Population Register (NPR). The Department prioritised birth registration and has partnered with the Department of Health to ensure that every birth that occurs is registered prior to them being discharged from health facilities.

3) Mobile Units are also deployed to assist in registering births in areas where there is no infrastructure to register birth.

4) Mothers who are unable to register birth at health facilities are referred to front offices to register such births.

END