Questions and Replies

Filter by year

13 July 2020 - NW1357

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) was the amount of the tender that her department has awarded for the refurbishment of the Bedfordview High School in Gauteng in the 2016-17 financial year and (b) amount of the specified tender was spent; (2) (a) why was the project never finished and (b) on what date will the project commence for finalisation?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Gauteng Department of Education for a response and will be provided as soon as the response is received.

13 July 2020 - NW1180

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What options will her department provide parents who (a) are unable to provide their children with home schooling, (b) are too afraid and refuse to send their children to school due to the threat of contracting Covid-19 and (c) do not have means to continue with online learning at home?

Reply:

(a)The Department has put measures in place for parents to contact the Circuit or the school to make arrangements for learners to be supported while they are at home. Parents are therefore advised to contact the school to receive such support. 

(b) Response same as in (a) above.

(c) Response same as in (a) above.

13 July 2020 - NW1339

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will declare Early Childhood Development an essential service; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?                        `

Reply:

The Early Childhood Development function still legally rests with the Department of Social Development; and the Department of Basic Education has no legal standing to make such a declaration. That said, the South African courts have encouraged a restrictive interpretation of ‘essential services’, and the Essential Services Committee has previously ruled that education should not be deemed an essential service. The Department of Basic Education will apply these same principles to Early Childhood Development practitioners.

13 July 2020 - NW1266

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of (a) educators have declared that they suffer from comorbidities since 1 June 2020 and (b) the specified educators are currently working from home; (2) what are the details of the work that the educators who are working from home are conducting; (3) whether she will take any steps to address the vacancies left by the educators who cannot teach from home; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1(a) As at 23 June 2020, 16 168 educators had declared co-morbidities. The processing of applications is ongoing, and therefore the numbers are not final.

 (b) The number of educators who work from home, will be finalised once the process of approving and granting all concessions has been completed. Collective Agreement 1 of 2020 provides for a concession for educators employed in terms of the Employment of Educators Act, 1998 (Act No.76 of 1998), (EEA), who are at risk in terms of the listed COVID-19 risk factors. The concession provides for measures to accommodate such educators in the workplace or working from home.  Therefore, not all educators will  work from home.

2. The work that the educators working from home perform, depends on the nature of work and the availability of resources or tools of trade. Therefore, the work could range from conducting classes remotely to basic level preparing lesson plans, all within the official job description of the educator.

3. A substitute will be provided where needed. Provision of a substitute and the type of a substitute provided, will depend on the extent of work the educator at home is able to accomplish. This may range from a fully qualified substitute to fully replace an educator at home to a teacher aid or assistant that will act under the guidance of the educator at home, or another educator present at  school.        

                                                   

13 July 2020 - NW1265

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of learners have benefited from and/or used online learning that was provided by various schools during the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus; (2) whether online learning is an option to be used going forward; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how will it be implemented?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) does not keep a record of learners accessing Online Learning, as different approaches are employed by providers of Online Learning. 

(2) Yes. Education systems across the world, have adopted remote learning as an approach.  The DBE, Department of Communication and Digital Technologies (DCDT), and the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) are in the process of establishing a Virtual Classroom solution that will provide online learning. This process is still at the initial stage.

13 July 2020 - NW1355

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)Whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a list of legal service providers who have rendered legal services on a consultancy and/or other basis to the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) over the past five financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a list of lawyers and/or law firms that are part of the NLC’s selection panel of legal practitioners that are regularly used for legal matters involving the NLC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether a certain firm and/ or person (names furnished) has ever rendered services to the NLC in any of the above specified capacities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1725E

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission, which is reproduced below.

Reply by the National Lotteries Commission, Ms Thabang Mampane:

  1. “The panels for the past financial years (2015/16 to date) were established following a supply chain process as prescribed by the Public Finance Management Act (No.1 of 1999 as amended) (“PFMA”), National Treasury Regulations- Practice Notes, Instructions, Circulars and Letters, Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (No. 5 of 2000) (“PPPFA”) and Regulations, 2011, Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment Amendment Act (No. 46 of 2013, amongst other legislation, as well as NLC’s Supply Chain Management Policy. The NLC’s panel of attorneys list for the past financial years (2015/16 to date) are detailed as below. The NLC did not have a panel prior to the years depicted herein.”

Table 1:

Bid Number

Name of Legal Firm

Duration

End-Date

RFP/2013-4HL

M.L Mateme Incorporated (PTY) LTD

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Gildenhuys Malatji Incorporated

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Routledge Modise Attorney (T/A Hogan Lovells)

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Rooth and Wessels Incorporated (PTY) LTD

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Maponya Inc

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Denga Incorporated (PTY) LTD

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Poswa Incorporated

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Adams & Adams

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Ngeno & Mteto Inc

36 Months

1-May-17

RFP/2013-4HL

Malebye Incorporated

36 Months

1-May-17

Table 2:

Bid Number

Name of Legal Firm

Duration

End-Date

NLC/2017-3

Raphela Inc Attorney

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Padi Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Nozuko Nxusani Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Morare Thobejane Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Moche Attorneys

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Malebye Motaung Mthembu Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Manong Pilane Mokotedi Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Diale Mogashoe Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Ndobela Lamola Inc.

36 Months

22-Aug-20

Table 3:

Bid Number

Name of Legal Firm

Duration

End-Date

NLC/2019-2

Malatji Kanyane Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Spoor & Fischer

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Moeti Kanyane Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Gildenhys Malatji Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Cheadle Thompson & Hayson Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Ramushu Mashile Twala

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Mfenyana Attorneys

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Lannard Paul Cowen

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Mathopo Mashimane Mulangaphume

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Poswa Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Hogan Lovells

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Maphosa Attorneys

36 Months

31-Aug-22

2. “The NLC’s panel of attorneys regularly used for legal matters involving the NLC depends on their areas of expertise/legal scope and/or availability including urgency, where applicable. The issue of capacity and/or resources are considered while an attempt is made to reach as many as possible. On the list below, all but two law firms have done work for the NLC. Since this is a panel, the NLC endeavours’ to ensure that as many law firms as possible are allowed the opportunity to do work, though this is not a guarantee. The details are as follows:”

Table 4:

Bid Number

Name of Legal Firm

Duration

End-Date

NLC/2017-3

Raphela Inc Attorney

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Padi Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Nozuko Nxusani Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Morare Thobejane Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Moche Attorneys

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Malebye Motaung Mthembu Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Manong Pilane Mokotedi Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Diale Mogashoe Inc

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2017-3

Ndobela Lamola Inc.

36 Months

22-Aug-20

NLC/2019-2

Malatji Kanyane Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Spoor & Fischer

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Moeti Kanyane Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Gildenhys Malatji Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Cheadle Thompson & Hayson Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Ramushu Mashile Twala

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Mfenyana Attorneys

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Lannard Paul Cowen

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Mathopo Mashimane Mulangaphume

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Poswa Inc

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Hogan Lovells

36 Months

31-Aug-22

NLC/2019-2

Maphosa Attorneys

36 Months

31-Aug-22

“All the Legal Firms that are on the panel were utilized by the NLC, with the exception of Ramushu Mashile Twala and Mathopo Mashimane Mulangaphume.”

(3) “Ramulifho Inc. or Lesley Ramulifho is not on the NLC panel of attorneys. Ramulifho Inc. has rendered legal services for labour related issues to the then National Lotteries Board now the NLC. This was approximately around 2014, prior to the advent of the panel of legal service providers.”

-END-

13 July 2020 - NW1089

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether any determination has been made of the (a) full cost of running a public ordinary school that is considered adequately resourced with regard to teaching and non-teaching staff, infrastructure, school furniture and equipment, (b) funding supplied by the provincial departments to run such a school and (c) shortfall in funding which must be covered by the school and the school community; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether such a determination will be made; if so, on what date; (3) whether any determination has been made of the (a) ability of no-fee schools to cover such a shortfall in funding to achieve adequate resourcing and (b) situation in schools where it has not been possible to cover the shortfall; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) (a) which natural or juristic person bears the responsibility for fundraising at a school and (b) how is performance by principals and other employees from the provincial department formally recognised in this regard (5) whether she has any plans to encourage school communities to assist with the funding of schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Whether any determination has been made of the (a) full cost of running a public ordinary school that is considered adequately resourced with regard to teaching and non-teaching staff, infrastructure, school furniture and equipment, (b) funding supplied by the provincial departments to run such a school and (c) shortfall in funding which must be covered by the school and the school community; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case;

    (b) The schools are funded as follows for the current year for the Non-Personnel Non-Capital (NPNC):

PROVINCE

NO FEE PER LEARNER ALLOCATION

FEE PAYING PER LEARNER ALLOCATION Q4

FEE PAYING PER LEARNER ALLOCATION Q5

Gazetted Target per learner amount

R 1 466

R 735

R 254

EC

R 1 466

R 735

R 254

FS

R 1 466

R 735

R 254

GT

R 1 466

R 735

R 735

KZN

R 955

R 522

R 179

LP

R 1 466

R 735

R 254

MPU

R 1 370

R 692

R 240

NC

R 1 134

R 765

R 354

NW

R 1 466

R 735

R 254

WC

R 1 466

R 1 200

R 395

 

The above table indicates the affordability levels of Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) against the approved national targets for funding of public ordinary schools.

(c) It should be noted that KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), Mpumalanga (MP) and Northern Cape (NC) are not funding at the required levels of funding.

Schools are mandated to draw-up their budgets in terms of section 38 of the South African Schools Act (SASA), 1996 (Act No. 84 of 1996) each year, taking into account all available sources of funding. This would mean that schools would then take into account the funding by the Department, even if it is not at the national target, as well as any funding source that is available to the school like school fees, donor funding etc. it therefore, cannot be said that schools operate on a shortfall, all plans that could not be accommodated in one year, are deferred to the following year.

It should also be indicated that no fee schools that are underfunded, have a right to charge compulsory fees in terms of paragraph 163 of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding (NNSSF); and to date, there is no record of a school that acted on this right.

2. Not applicable for the Non-Personnel Non-Capital (NPNC) costs.

3. Not applicable for the NPNC

4. (a) The School Governing Body is responsible for fundraising at their respective schools, in terms of section 20 (1) h & (2) and 36 of the SASA; (b) The DBE does not keep such information.

5. The Department has guidelines which encourages parents to contribute towards the running of schools. See attached

10 July 2020 - NW1444

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department requested the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) to assist Grade 12 learners by providing locally-produced 32-inch television sets which saw the USAF-IDTV/01/2020 tender being put out; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why was the specified tender cancelled only to be put out again under a different reference number; (2) why did USAASA deem it fit to provide TV sets to learners instead of other technological devices such as laptops and/or tablets; (3) which areas in the seven provinces are earmarked to receive the TV sets; (4) by what date does USAASA envisage to complete the whole process from the bidding to the delivery of the TV sets to households; (5) (a) what total number of Grade 12 learners have applied to receive a TV set and which schools are the learners from, (b) which company and/or companies won the bid to supply the TV sets to Grade 12 learners and (c) for what total amount, including the relevant breakdown of costs, was the tender awarded to?

Reply:

(1) - (5) The Department of Basic Education is a beneficiary to a project initiated and implemented by USAASA, an agency of the Department of Communication and Digital Technologies. All the administration and the rollout of the project rest with USASSA. The Honourable Member is therefore advised to direct the question to the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies, which may have all the answers to the questions.

09 July 2020 - NW601

Profile picture: Sindane, Mr P

Sindane, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of evictions took place from housing provided by her department in the Republic since the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, announced the official lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus and (b) where did each eviction take place; (2) whether all evictions were legal with clear court orders indicating the date on which the order to evict was granted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she will take action against all municipalities or persons who conducted the specified evictions since the evictions constitute the deliberate violation of the lockdown regulations?

Reply:

(1) My department has advised me, after consulting with all provincial Human Settlements Departments that since the commencement of the national lockdown on 26 March 2020 to date, no evictions were executed against persons and or households who are beneficiaries of houses that have been provided by the National Department of Human Settlements.

(2) & (3) Fall away

 

09 July 2020 - NW1169

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer or Questioning and Intersex (LGBTQ+) tourism, (a) what processes are in place to grade LGBTQI+ tourist and hospitality establishments, (b) what strategy does her department have in place to attract the LGBTQI+ as tourists to the Republic, (c) how is the strategy being monitored, (d) what results have been yielded from the strategy in the 2016-17, 2017- 18 and 2018-19 financial years and the remainder of this financial year and (e) what economic growth has the strategy yielded in the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years and the remainder of this financial year?

Reply:

a) What processes are in place to grade LGBTQI+ tourist and hospitality establishments

Properties owned and operated by LGBTQ+ individuals are graded using the identical process to all other hospitality establishments. All properties, irrespective of category, are treated equally and are required to provide the same service to all patrons irrespective of sexual orientation in line with the Constitutional foundational value of equality. It was for this reason that, after much consideration, no specific LGBTQ+ differentiator was introduced when the new grading system was implemented on 01 April 2019.

b) What strategy does the department have in place to attract the LGBTQI+ as tourists to the Republic

SA Tourism currently does not have a dedicated strategy for the LGBTQI+ as this segment is part of the already existing priority segments used by SA Tourism to target high affluent travellers in the identified markets. The segments are:

  • A younger segment, or “Wanderluster”: Wanderlusters traditionally are considered to be avid travellers between the ages of 25 and 40. These are adventure seekers and fully immerse themselves in the country’s culture and fun related experiences. They are digitally-savvy, looking for and booking holidays online. They tend to be Free Independent Travellers (FIT).
  • An older segment, or “Next Stop South Africa” (NSSA): The NSSA segment on the other hand, are wealthier, experienced international travellers, usually between the ages of 40 and 60. They typically look for natural beauty and authentic cultural experiences. They prefer independent or small group travel and look for luxury and comfort as part of their experience and Safari is a big draw when travelling to South Africa.

The targeting of the LGBTQI+ is driven largely through strategic tactical hosting programmes, that offers immersive experiences of the destination. The marketing efforts are focused on opportunities provided by this niche segment to drive growth without losing track on other consumers.

From 2017-2019, SA Tourism has partnered with the International Gay and Lesbian Travel Association (IGLTA) through its affiliated media houses and hosted over 30 of key LGBTQI+ travel writers, freelancers, bloggers, and influencers in SA for first-hand experience of our destination. During and post-hosting programme, the hosted groups would share their personal curated experiences and provide believable endorsement for SA as a LGBTQI+ friendly destination, thus encouraging their social followers to visit SA. The hosted groups are from key markets i.e. Australia, US, Germany, Switzerland, Brazil and Japan.

c) How is the strategy being monitored

The return on investment on the programme is monitored through the number of media coverage, social media mentions resulting from hosting the travel writers, freelancers, bloggers, and influencers. Furthermore, the market intelligence gathered through the hosting provides valuable insights for the adjustment of messaging in order to deploy tactical and targeted marketing programmes going forward.

d) What results have been yielded from the strategy in the financial years:

It is currently not possible to make a direct link as tourist arrivals statistics are sourced from the Department of Home Affairs and cannot provide background data on tourists’ sexual orientation in line with the Constitutional foundational value of equality.

The tactical hosting programme that SA Tourism deployed focused on driving awareness and positivity about South Africa as a LGBTQI+ friendly destination. Through this platform the hosted writers, freelancers, bloggers, and influencers, drove destination content throughout their networks.

e) What economic growth has the strategy yielded in the financial years:

It is currently not possible to make direct link; however, our overall global marketing efforts have yielded growth year on year in foreign direct spend, injecting R75 billion (2016/17), R82 billion (2017/18) and R87,4 billion (2018/19) in the SA economy.

09 July 2020 - NW1340

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) On what date was the Maths, Science and Technology special unit established, (b) who (i) were the members of the specified unit since it was established and (ii) are the current members, (c) what are the details of the results of the tasks to develop a system to have updated (i) profiles of teachers competences, (ii) qualifications and (iii) equipment needed to support more effective teaching of technology and (d) which (i) programmes were teachers advised to participate in and (ii) teachers participated in each province to date?

Reply:

(a) The MST Office was established on 01 April 2014.

(i) The members were Ms EM Khembo, Mr DL Silman, Mr T Mokoena, Mr S Mokale.

(b) (ii) Current members are Ms EM Khembo, Mr DL Silman, Mr T Mokoena, Mr S Mokale, Mr N Mathiba, Ms C Patrick, Mr M Mkhwanazi.

(c) The details of the results of the tasks to develop a system to have updated data as per the question are that an electronic data collection tool (the system) was developed and used to collect the required information regarding:

(c) (i) training needs; and

(c) (ii) training qualifications; and    

(c) (iii) equipment needed in support of effective teaching of all MST subjects including Technology.

EVIDENCE  refer to Excel document attached “EXAMPLE Dinaledi - MST  schools PED Needs Analysis Results” and MS Word document “ Audit instrument for Technical subject teachers”.

EMBEDDED IN TABLE and attached separately

(d) (i) and (ii)

Programmes in support of more effective teaching of Technology, including related Mathematics and Science offerings, have been provided as follows as per identified needs and NDP considerations.

 

 

Problem Statement

(NDP Targets)

Planned Activities to Solve the Problem:

Summary of progress from August 2014

All schools offer Mathematics as a subject, and that the number of learners doing Mathematics Literacy is reduced significantly, in order to offer learners a chance in their future careers;

  • Implemented Circular S13 of 2014 to ensure that all schools offered Mathematics and to strengthen the offering of Mathematics and Physical Sciences and not Mathematical Literacy

 

  • On 18 February 2016, MOU signed between DBE and TeachSA to increase the supply of Mathematics teachers in Grade 10
  • In 2016, 97 Ambassadors (target 100), placed in provinces to teach Mathematics
  • In 2017, placed 125 Ambassadors (Target 100), (54 in Eastern Cape alone.)
  • Quality of learner performance in NSC significantly improved in schools where Ambassadors were placed.

Increase the number of

learners eligible for

bachelors programme to

300 000 by 2024:

  • 350 000 learners who pass Mathematics and
  • 320 000 learners who pass Physical Sciences.
  • Increase the number of Grade 12 learners who pass Mathematics and Physical Science through targeted programmes

Through Subject Committees:

  • MST Subject Profiles were mediated to provinces and districts, including quantitative and qualitative analyses and provincial, gender and race breakdown for targeted interventions.

 

  • Diagnostic Reports and Subject Improvement Plans were mediated to provinces and districts. This report provides detailed errors and alternative conceptions identified in learner responses and technical suggestions for improvement in teaching and learning at a classroom-based level.
  • The number of learners enrolled for Mathematics  in the NSC Exams has increased from 229 888 Learners in 2014 to 276 084 Learners in 2017
  • The number of learners who enrolled for Physical Sciences has increased from 171 549 Learners in 2014 to 191 960 Learners in 2017
  • The number of learners who obtained 50% and above in Mathematics has increased from 13.4% in 2014 to 22,2% in 2017.
  • The number of learners who obtained 50% and above in Physical Sciences has  increased from (22,5%) in 2014 to (26,9%) in 2017

 

 
  • Train all subject advisors in Euclidean Geometry and Probability
  • Trained all Provincial Coordinators and Subject  Advisors in Grade 10-12 on Euclidian Geometry and Probability
  • Developed  ATPs and Teacher Guides for Physical Sciences (Grade 10-12), to develop Lesson Plans
  • Developed Lesson Plans for Mathematics Grade 4-9 to improve the teaching and Learning in senior Phase
 
  • Improve 2016 NSC Mathematics and Science Results towards achieving NDP targets

 

 

2017 NSC Results Achievements:

  • The percentage of candidates that passed Mathematics increased from 49.1% to 51.9% in 2017
  • The number of candidates that passed Mathematics at 40% increased from 70 050 (35,1%) Learners in 2014 to 86 098 (35,1%) Learners in 2017
  • The percentage of candidates that passed Physical Science increased from 61.5% in 2014 to 65.1% in 2017
  • The number of candidates that passed Physical Science at 40% increased from 62 032 (36,9%) learners in 2014 to 75 736 (42,2%) Learners in 2017

Improve the average

performance of Grade 3,6

and Grade 9 learners in

Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Implementation of Annual National Assessments in Grade 1-9 Mathematics to improve performance

 

  • Printed and distributed over 140 million Grade R – 9 maths workbooks to 24 000 public schools since 2012.
  • Overall achievement of learners in Grade 3 in the ANA 2014 was 55.5%, with only Gauteng (60,7%) and Western Cape (60,5%), having reached the 60% average mark, with Free State in third place with an average mark of 58,5%.
  • Achievement of learners in Grade 6 in the ANA 2014 was at an average of 43,1% in the ANA 2014, with provinces showing improvement from the ANA 2013; with Gauteng leading at 51,1%, followed by Western Cape at 50,9% and Free State at 47,7%
  • The levels of learner performance in Grade 9 ANA were unacceptably low in 2013 and 2014. The national average performance 13.9% and 10.8% respectively. In 2013, NW, NC, MP and LP performed below the national average of 13,9%. In 2014 KZN, LP, NC and NW performed below the national average of 10,8%.
 
  • Improve TIMSS & SACMEQ scores (2011) towards achieving NDP targets
  • TIMSS Grade 5 Mathematics (376 points), Grade 9 Mathematics (372 points) and Grade 9 Science (358 points)
  • SA showed the highest improvement of 87 points in Grade 9 Maths from 2003 to 2015
  • SA showed the highest improvement of 90 points in Grade 9 science from 2003 to 2015
  • 3.2% of SA learners scored high levels of grade 9 maths achievements
  •  In Grade 5 Maths SA is the only country amongst the lowest performing countries in which learners were benchmarked at the “Advanced” level (scoring above 625 points). 1.3% of SA learners scored above 625 points
 
  • Implement 1+4 Intervention Model in all provinces to improve curriculum coverage and Mathematics performance in the Senior Phase (Grade 8&9)
  • 5524 Teachers received Grade 8&9 Lesson Plans and Annual Teaching Plans (ATPs); and
  • A Diagnostic Report was developed from analysing Pre/Post-tests)
   
  • In 2017 Term 1, Provinces ran Grade 8 and 9 Quarterly Maths Workshops for teachers at the beginning of the term

Maths, Science and Technology Conditional Grant to promote Mathematics and Physical Science and Technology teaching and learning and improve teachers’ content knowledge of Mathematics and Physical Science.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Recapitalise 200 Technical Schools and Resource 500 Dinaledi Schools
  • 200 Technical schools recapitalised
 
  • Resource 500 Dinaledi Schools with Mathematics and Physical Sciences equipment, including Laboratory consumables and tools
  • 500 Dinaledi schools were resourced with Mathematics and Physical Sciences equipment
 
  • Reconfigure the Dinaledi and Technical Schools Grants into MST Grant for support to 1 000 schools (200 Technical, 500 Secondary, 300 Primary)
  • Reconfigured the Dinaledi and Technical Schools Grants into MST Grant in 2014
  • In 2015: Supplied resources to 1 000 schools; Trained 1 500 teachers; and Supported 90 000 learners
   
  • A total of 4.2 million Grade 10 and 11 Siyavula Maths and  Science textbooks printed and distributed to all schools since 2012
  • MST grant - support 34,765 learners (8,754, 22,370 and 3,641 learners participated in Eskom Expo and Maths Olympiad and other competitions including study camps focusing on Maths and Science);
  • MST Grant - Maths and Science kits were delivered to 689 schools with the support of the MST
  • MST Grant - 3 131 Teachers and Subject advisors trained in the new Technical subject specializations
  • MST Grant - Trained 228 and 133 teachers in Technical Mathematics in Grades 10 and 11 respectively;
 
  • Hosted a CAPS for Technical Schools Roundtable on 04 December 2015:
  • To create an opportunity to share with stakeholders the strategic direction of government and the sector;
  • To evaluate progress made in preparing for the implementation of CAPS for Technical High Schools;
  • To create an opportunity to evaluate the appropriateness of Technical Mathematics and Physical Science;
  • To generate ideas on strengthening the South African Three Stream Model of Basic Education;
  • To make an effort to strengthen strategic partnership between government departments, quality assurance bodies, South African Qualifications Authority, Private sector, NGOs, Business, Labour, NEDLEC, National and International donors;
  • To reaffirm the role of Monitoring Evaluation and Research in measuring impact, tracking progress and informing best practice
  • Task team established between DHET – TVET and DBE on the alignment of curriculum and Concept paper on curriculum alignment developed between DHET – TVET and DBE
  • MOU with merSETA signed for all the specialisations
  • Partnership with DHET includes advocacy on Decade of the Artisan; alignment of Curriculum on TVET Colleges
  • CAPS for Technical Schools implemented in Grade 10 in 2016 and Grade 11 in 2017
  • Appointed Project Manager to facilitate relationship between DBE and Industry to increase Apprenticeships and Artisans
 
  • Promulgate Gazette No. 39435 regulating the introduction of the new Technical subjects curriculum  including Technical Maths and Sciences in 1007 Technical Schools in 2016-2018 in Grade 10-12
  • The number of learners from 585 schools offering Specialisations has increased to 37 093 in Grade 10 in 2016
  • 1007 Technical schools supplied with CAPS Policy Documents for Technical Schools for implementation in Grade 10-12, in 2016, 2017 and 2018 respectively
  • Versioned CAPS documents into

 

  • In 2015: Trained 1660 Grade 10 Subject Advisors and Teachers on Specialisations at Skills Training Centres; and Technical Maths (223) and Technical Sciences (203)
  • In 2016: Trained 1 471 Grade 11 subject advisors and teachers in Specialisations at Skills Training Centres; and
  • Trained 345 Grade 11 Subject Advisors in Technical Maths & Sciences
   
  • Implemented Circular S6 of 2016 with Interim Guidelines to ensure compliance with CAPS Policy and Gazette No, 39435 on implementation of new curriculum

The sector has not fully leveraged on Partnerships to support government in improving performance in MST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • DBE Hosted an MST Roundtable (2014) with the recommendations from Cabinet to establish a Steering Committee between DBE, DST and DHET.
  • 10 meetings were held wherein a Draft MST Integrated Framework was developed with 26 key deliverables in short, medium and long-term action to 2030.
  • A reviewed Draft MST Strategy with Implementation Plan was developed
 
  • Refinement of the MST Strategy developed by DBE/DHET and DST in collaboration with JICA
  • MST Strategy refined and consultations completed with PEDs, Unions, Universities and Professional Associations

 
  • Draft agreement and manage the process leading to the formal recognition of the DST,DBE DHET MST Trilateral protocol of Implementation of the MST Strategy
  • Changes to the document were made as directed by DBE Legal Services.
  • Submission requesting DG approval was sent to ODG in June 2017.
 
  • Hosted the 3rd  MST Roundtable (19 March 2015), to strengthen the National Mathematics, Science and Technology Strategy Plan to improve participation and success rate in MST
  • Framework partnerships developed with NECT
  • MOU signed with TeachSA and 97 Ambassadors placed in provinces in 2016 and 125 in 2017
  • MOU signed with British Council to pilot the IRIS Connect professional development of teachers being implemented focusing on teacher reflection
 
  • Maths Indaba hosted on 12-14 Dec 2016, to develop a South African pedagogical-content knowledge approach that will inform the teaching and learning of Mathematics,

The integration of assessment into the teaching and learning of Mathematics; and 

The writing of Mathematics textbooks; and

The initial teacher education Programmes

  • A Task Team was appointed by the Minister that will  develop a Framework for Mathematics that will inform the central tenets of the teaching and learning of key Mathematical competencies, from Grade 1 through to Grade 12 (14 members)
  • On 19 March 2018, Minister approved the Framework
  • To be implemented in 2019, January
 
  • Implement the DBE-CHINA Agreement
  • Two DBE officials attended a Seminar on Engineering Education and Management for Developing Countries held (March 10– March 29, 2016  for 20 days) at Tsinghua University, China; and 
  • Launch of Planetarium  donated by CEIEC on 7 March 2016, at Sci-Bono Centre
 
  • To implement DBE-JICA Agreement
  • 192 schools in EC and NW participated in the pilot where learners’ performance in Mathematics problem solving has significantly improved and SMT played their role as curriculum managers in the In School Support Programme.
   
  • 12 Foundation Phase and Intermediate Phase Subject Advisors from Eastern Cape and North West provinces from 09 November to 10 December 2016, trained in Maths at Naruto University, Japan
 
  • Implement the DBE-TEACHSA MOU
  • MOU signed in February 2016
  • Placed 97 Ambassadors in GP & KZN schools to improve participation and performance in Mathematics and Physical Sciences
   
  • 179 Ambassadors underwent two week residential induction programme in January 2017
  • Allocation of Ambassadors is currently underway: 13 to be placed in Limpopo DoE.
  • E Cape DoE requested 79 ambassadors.
 
  • Implement the DBE- British Council MOU
  • MOU signed to implement  the IRIS Connect - a teacher reflection platform pilot programme  introduced in 6 schools in Ekurhuleni South District, Gauteng
 
  • Implement the DBE - Bright Media Collaboration
  • 45 workshops conducted reaching 2 375 Maths Literacy teachers, with no less than 15 000 teachers reached since the project’s inception in 2007.
   
  • Funding secured by Bright Media to develop Technical Maths & Science workbooks for teachers in 2017
  • Currently workshops for Technical Maths being run in provinces by Bright Media
 
  • Implement the DBE-SAASTA Collaboration
  • 109 Grade 12 Life Sciences teachers were trained by Life Sciences experts over a 3 day period on Content and Methodology on Evolution Genetics, Human Impact on the environment and Human Reproduction
   
  • 413 educators trained and supplied with Technology Toolkits to Grade 7-9 schools and Life Sciences Content Training.
 
  • Train all Grade 11 and 12 teachers and subject Advisors in Delphi for implementation in Grade 11 and 12 in 2016 and  2017
  • 102 teachers and 9 Subject Advisors in KZN, NC, WC trained by Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) & ITHEMBA LABS in Delphi
 
  • Implement the DBE-MERSETA MOU

 

 

  • MOU signed with DBE and PEDs involving R50 Million to Technical Schools to promote Artisanship in 10 schools for 210 learners.
   

Names of 10 Schools in the merSETA project (2017):

  • Emmang Mmogo (NC)
  • Badiredi (NC)
  • Isikhoba Nombewu (EC)
  • Justice Nxumalo (KZN)
  • Bellville Technical School (WC)
  • Hazyview Comprehensive (MP)
  • Pax Technical High (LP)
  • Barnard Molokoane Technical (FS)
  • Soshanguve Technical (GP)
  • Tlhabane Technical High (NW)

 

  • Implementation and management of South Korea - DBE MoU - Volunteer teacher project. (Maths, Science IT teachers and subject specialists.)
  • ICT resources procured by the Korean Government (60 laptops) were provided delivered to school in Mamelodi.
  • Following positive assessment of the first six teacher’s performance in 2017, a further seven were due to be despatched to serve in Teacher’s Centre in Queenstown and rural schools in the Eastern Cape in 2018.  

 

 

09 July 2020 - NW1397

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her department’s presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development on 4 June 2020, from which budget did her department get extra funding to be able to settle more land claims than planned in the Third and Fourth Quarters of the 2019-20 financial year; (2) What number of land claims (a) that were settled by her department in the 2019-20 financial year were as a result of court judgments and (b) did her department refer to courts in each province in the specified financial year?

Reply:

1. Additional funding was obtained from Programme 1: Administration (R18.9 million), Programme 2: National Geomatics Management Services (R15.9 million) and Programme 5: Land Reform (R95.1 million).

2. (a) 42

(b)

Province

Referral

EASTERN CAPE

1

FREE STATE

0

GAUTENG

0

KWAZULU NATAL

3

LIMPOPO

2

MPUMALANGA

1

NORTHERN CAPE

0

NORTH WEST

1

WESTERN CAPE

0

TOTAL

8

END

09 July 2020 - NW1414

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How will the expenditure on personal protective equipment for Covid-19 compliance be funded by (a) her department and (b) each provincial department for the (i) 2020-21 (ii) 2021-22 and (iii) 2022-23 financial years?

Reply:

(a) (i)  Funded by the reprioritising the 2020/21 budget from low-spending items like subsistence and travel to procurement of PPE

     (ii)  Funded by the reprioritising the 2021/22 budget from low-spending items like subsistence and travel to procurement of PPE

     (iii) Funded by the reprioritising the 2022/23 budget from low-spending items like subsistence and travel to procurement of PPE

(b) (i)  Will be funded by each province form their 2020/21 equitable share allocations; and where applicable from conditional grants allocations as per the revised conditional grant frameworks.

     (ii) Will be funded by each province form their 2021/22 equitable share allocations; and where applicable from conditional grants allocations as per the revised conditional grant frameworks.

     (iii) Will be funded by each province form their 2022/23 equitable share allocations; and where applicable from conditional grants allocations as per the revised conditional grant frameworks.

09 July 2020 - NW1388

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether there has been any progress in the introduction of coding and robotics in Grades R to 3 in 200 schools so far; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

The implementation of Coding and Robotics in 2021 in Grade R-3 was to be preceded by piloting of the curriculum in 2020, starting March 2020. The pilot was interrupted by Covid-19, and has been moved to 2021.  

09 July 2020 - NW1232

Profile picture: Myeni, Mr ET

Myeni, Mr ET to ask the Minister of Tourism

Given the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, how does the future of start-up businesses within the tourism sector look post Covid-19?

Reply:

How does the future of start-up businesses within the tourism sector look post Covid-19.

The COVID 19 has created a crisis from which many tourism businesses will not recover. Many will also be forced to scale back operations. However, global recovery benchmarks indicate that tourism is typically resilient in the face of pandemics and is able to rebound strongly. Widespread business failures coupled with a fast rebound could create supportive conditions for start-up businesses.

Gaps and opportunities will exist all along the tourism value chain and it is important that entrepreneurs and aspiring entrepreneurs are supported in their efforts to capture these opportunities. It is for this reason that the recovery plan recommends the launching of an investment and market-entry facilitation programme to stimulate capital investment, sector transformation and product diversification.

Ultimately, the sector must work to attract investment through the recovery cycle in order to create sufficient supply capacity, but also to support the product diversification and unserved market needs that are likely to accompany renewed growth. Changing traveller preference and behaviours will also create new opportunities that may not previously have existed.

A concerted focus on investment-led economic rejuvenation is therefore required and this should be formalised under a collaborative investment promotion and market-entry facilitation programme. Strategies should evaluate value chain weaknesses and seek to re-introduce competition, facilitate revitalisation and encourage investment in unserved niches. Done right, this general approach can be highly supportive of transformation, inclusion and diversification objectives if it is underpinned by a focus on enhancing SMME visibility, mobilising multi-stakeholder collaboration, developing community assets and transforming spatial and ownership patterns.

09 July 2020 - NW1198

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she appointed any advisors since she assumed office on 30 May 2019; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the name of each advisor, (b) on what date was each advisor appointed, (c) what are relevant the details of the remuneration package of each advisor and (d) what are the relevant details of the advisory services that each advisor renders?

Reply:

Yes.

a) Mr I I Ka-Mbonane

b) 16 June 2019.

c) Full-time, Grade IV, First Package

d) Performance Agreement attached as Annexure A.

09 July 2020 - NW1363

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

With reference to the Services Sector Education and Training Authority Services (SETA) Programme on Plumbing and Bricklaying running in Aberdeen that undertook to pay a stipend of R2,500 per month until September 2019 and thereafter R3,500 per month, what action can be taken against the service provider who has failed to meet the services SETA payment obligations for the months of July 2019 to December 2019 and from March 2020 onwards and for underpaying in January 2020 and February 2020 to one specific learner (name and details furnished) who despite numerous attempts at resolution, continues not to perform in this regard?

Reply:

The explanation received from the Services SETA is that the payment of stipends is based on attendance registers submitted by the training provider and/or host employer.  Accordingly, Mr Lizo April was paid as follows:

Period: July 2019 – December 2019

The learner was paid a stipend for each month, except for the months of September 2019 and November 2019 where attendance could not be confirmed by way of the attendance register.

Period: January 2020 and February 2020 

The Services SETA sent a communique to all stakeholders in December 2019 directing them to ensure that learners should only return to classes on 1 February 2020 and that no stipends would be paid for the month of January 2020, as learners were not expected to attend classes or workplaces in January 2020. It should be noted that learners were paid their full stipends in December 2019 although classes ended by or before 15 December 2019.   

The Services SETA did not receive the learner’s attendance register for the month of February 2020 from the host employer/training provider.

Period: March 2020 onwards

Attendance registers for the month of March 2020 was used as a basis to pay learners during the period of the lockdown.

The Services SETA did not receive the learner’s attendance register for the month of March 2020 from the host employer/training provider.

Action taken against a provider who fails to meet the payment obligations

In instances where a training provider repeatedly fails to meet the obligations as provided for in the service level agreement between the parties, the SETA investigates the non-compliance and where necessary institutes a legal process through either litigation or termination of the agreement in part or in full. The course of action is determined by the nature of the obligation breach.

Stipend amount of R2 500

The Services SETA pays an amount of R2 500 as a stipend to learners undertaking an apprenticeship. Any additional amount paid to the learner would have been from the training provider or host employer.

09 July 2020 - NW1428

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 733 on 11 May 2020, (a) why is she unable to provide information on construction undertaken and/or commissioned by her department and (b) by what date will she provide the requested information?

Reply:

(a) The project is implemented by the Gauteng Department of Education and not by the Department of Basic Education; and on receipt of the question, it is referred to the relevant implementing department for a response. 

(b)  The response received from the Gauteng Department of Education is attached

08 July 2020 - NW1160

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; 2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the further relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Joint Ops:

1. The Joint Operations Division has done purchases of less than R500 000,00 with respect to support for COVID-19 (Op NOTLELA). The Joint Operations Financial System does not indicate where procurement is done as transactions are done via the Joint Support Base Garrison procurement system.

(a) The specified goods are as follows:

Ser

Description

Amount

Company

Unit

 

a

B

c

d

1

Cleaning and Polishing Compounds

R42,888,00

NALEDI CHEMICALS

Northern Cape

2

Individual Equipment

R90,000,00

SIB DIVISION (PTY) LTD

J OP HQ

3

Toiletry and Paper Products

R18,675,00

PROMED TECHNOLOGIES

Northern Cape

4

Oils/Gas, Greases and Lubricants

R50,000,00

WO Fuels and oils CC

Northern Cape

5

Packaging and Packaging Materials

R115,350,00

YOKOGAZA WT ENTERPRISE

Eastern Cape

6

Fuels and Solids

R482,500,00

Alakha Trading

Eastern Cape

7

Oil and Grease

R27,588,00

Piston Power Chemicals

Western Cape

8

M & R D-Vehicle BMJ824M

R6,383,00

 

Western Cape

9

Cleaning and Polishing Compound

R24,420,00

Aristocraft

North west

10

Cleaning and Polishing Compound

R43,592,00

Promotha Mechanical Engineering

Limpopo

11

Diesel

R786,000,00

   

12

Oils and greases; Cutting, Lubricant

R163,185,00

 

Limpopo

13

Storage Tanks

R11,280,00

AMP Services

Limpopo

14

Food Cooking, Baking and service

R31,305,00

RINE SUPPLIERS AND PROJECTS

Limpopo

15

Food Cooking. Baking and service

R34,320,00

MM and MA GENRAL TRADING

Limpopo

16

M & D: D-Vehicles BMJ834M

R12,351,00

   

17

Toilet Paper Products

R44,270,00

Lifhasi Group

Limpopo

18

Petrol 93 ULP

R82,860,00

Valspar Petroleum

North West

19

Photocopy Papers

R14,600,00

GOMOLEMO TRADING AND PROJECTS

Gauteng

20

M & R D-Vehicle

R13,200,00

KHOKHO'S TECH ENGINEERS

North West

21

M & R D-Vehicle

R6,312,00

KHOKHO'S TECH ENGINEERS

North West

22

ADP Supplies

R11,774,00

IPT

Free State

23

Household and Commercial Utility

R22,360,00

EXODEC 60CC

Gauteng

24

ADP Supplies

R85,999,00

EXODEC 60CC

Gauteng

25

Brooms, Brushes and Mops

R10,250,00

 

Western Cape

26

Brooms, Brushes and Mops

R10,250,00

LA TOLO

Eastern Cape

27

Cleaning and polishing compound

R35,301,00

Jipalayo Trading

Gauteng

28

Cleaning and Polishing Compounds

R64,300,00

Qhaphelu (PTY) LTD

Eastern Cape

30

Bags and Sacks

R8,990,00

SINEMIHLE ENTERPRISE

Eastern Cape

31

Toilet Paper Products

R32,992,00

Glycoless

Free State

32

General Building maintenance

R32,657,00

KOTIPULA BUSINESS ENTERPRICE

Limpopo

33

Batteries Non Rechargeable

R18,125,00

LAMDALE TRADING

KZN

34

Office Supplies

R56,859,00

SC AEROTECH

KZN

35

Cleaning and Polishing Compounds

R38,337,00

Umtapo General Dealer

KZN

36

Bags and Sacks

R29,250,00

NASMO MARKETING

KZN

37

Toilet Paper Products

R82,480,00

Glycoless

KZN

38

Toilet Paper Products

R18,540,00

Promed Technologies

Eastern Cape

39

Diesel

R558,400,00

   

40

Diesel

R116,480,00

   

41

Diesel

R307,120,00

   

42

Diesel

R156,970,00

   

43

Paper and Paper Board

R32,400,00

HAMBANATHI FOODS

KZN

44

Sanitation and Plumbing work

R875,778,00

INGELOS PROJECTS

Western Cape

45

Toilet Paper Products

R118,590,00

EMU MEDICAL SUPPLIES

Gauteng

46

Paper and Paper Board

R23,760,00

EXCEL ENTERTAINMENT

Gauteng

47

Sanitation and Plumbing Work

R116,840,00

KOPANO EVENT

Gauteng

2. A deviation occurred when 200 reflector jackets were procured for the Joint Tactical Headquarters (20 per J Tac HQ).

(a) This was an emergency procurement after a member of the SANDF lost his life whilst performing road block duties. A decision was then taken that all J Tac HQs must be issued with reflector jackets for as PPE.

(b) Proper emergency procurement processes were followed to procure the items. This matter was submitted for urgent consideration to the Joint Operations COVID-19 Procurement Logistics Cell and three Companies were invited.

a. SIB DIVISION (PTY) LTD R 90 000.

b. GROUP EFFORT WORX R 100 200.

c. MOTHUSI BUSINESS ENTER PRICE R 100 000.

3. All companies were selected form CSD data base and they conform to treasury regulations, and procedures. The lowest company was selected. This are the only items that were procured with deviation of procurement, the rest of the items were procured through procurement processes via the e-Procure system.

SA Army:

1. The SA Army has not directly purchased any good and/or services below R500 000 connected to the COVID-19 pandemic. All equipment procured were obtained through either SAMHS or Logistics Division.

2. Not applicable. (See answer above)

3. Not Applicable. (See answer above)

4. No comment.

SAAF:

1. Everything that was procured in support of COVID-19 was under the amount of R500 000. All spending in the item segment of SCoA is recorded against the various appropriate FMS Item Codes depending on the use for the items or services procured. The SAAF has spent R616,018 to date on COVID-19 related goods and/or services (see Appendix A):

(a) The SA Air Force utilised a total of 117 regional suppliers in order to proceed with purchasing.

(b) The products that were procured are: thermo-scanners, cloth masks, surface disinfectant, sanitising dispensers.

2. There were no deviations from the standard Supply Chain Management procedures in the transactions. All procurement whether Government Order or Petty Cash were executed according to prescribed procurement prescripts.

3. Suppliers were approached that are supplied by the official Central Suppliers Database (CSD), where companies register themselves on the National Treasury database to be suppliers of specific items or can supply a service of a specific nature. If requirements were under R2 000 local suppliers within the local community were approached.

4. N/A

SA Navy:

1. Yes. (a)(b)(c) See Appendix B

2. No.

(a) Not Applicable.

(b) Not Applicable.

3. Not Applicable.

SAMHS:

1. The SAMHS did purchase goods and services below R500 000.

a) The companies that were utilised are reflected in Appendix C.

b) The amounts of all transactions are reflected in Appendix C.

c) The products and services procured are reflected in Appendix C.

2. Standard supply chain management processes were followed. Except for Price Quotations standing government contracts were utilised. When the contracted entity could not provide due to the national requirements other companies were requested to provide quotations in a comparative process, as prescribed. The Surgeon General is not in a position to express opinion on the process followed in terms of the two orders processed by the SA Army (order prefix 1H).

3. The rationale for the supplier utilised is premised on the following reason codes as indicated in Appendix A:

  1. RT refers to National Treasury Transversal Contracts.
  2. HP refers to Health Pharmaceutical Contracts.
  3. HM refers to Treasury Contracts.
  4. ROCD refers to Propriety Contract (Roche Diabetics).
  5. RT COVID-19 refers to Treasury Contract.
  6. AICC refers to Adcock Ingram Critical Care (This was a Price Quotation).
  7. PQ refers to Price Quotation.
  8. Del 3.2 refers to SA Army procurement entity.

Human Resources Division:

1. The HR Division expenditure on goods/services that were purchased connected to COVID-19 pandemic are as follows:

S/No

Description

Cost

Name of Supplier

Reason for Purchase

 

a

b

c

d

1

Medicated Cosmetics and Toiletries( Hand Sanitizer)

R7 460.00

Mr First Aid (Pty) Ltd

24-28th Avenue

Edenvale

Medical Supplies - the only supplier who had stock in hand to supply hand sanitizer with the correct alcohol content in March 2020 and delivery at short notice.

2

Clothing, Special Purpose(Cloth Masks)

R5 989.00

MTKP Designs(Pty) Ltd

Pierre van Rheyneveld

Pretoria

Purchase cloth masks for members on 05 May 2020 with delivery on short notice after announcement of Level 4 Lockdown.

 

Total

R13 499.00

   

2. The above goods were cash purchases Personal Protective Equipment (hand sanitizers and cloth masks) by the different HR Division entities following the announcement of the Lockdown Level 5 State of Disaster declared by the State President in terms of the Disaster Management Act.

3. It can be confirmed that no deviation on standard supply chain management procedures occurred.

Logistics Division:

1. The Logistics Division did purchase goods and services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic. See the attached list (Appendix D) for the companies utilised for the purchasing of the specified goods and services, together with the amount of each transaction and the service and/or product that each company rendered.

2. With the purchasing of the goods and services the Logistics Division followed the process as stipulated in National Treasury Instruction No. 8 of 2020/21 (paragraph 3.7.6).

3. The purchasing of specified goods and services from the awarded companies was based on the availability of stock and the turnaround time of delivery from these companies.

Defence Intelligence:

1. Defence Intelligence (DI) procured goods below the amount of R500 000, 00 in order to implement Occupational Health and Safety measures iro COVID-19. The total amount for COVID-19 related procurement to date is R325 579, 30. The procurement (breakdown is reflected in Appendix E) was prior to the central distribution of Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs).

2. The reason for procuring from the respective companies was due to the fact that they were the most cost effective ito quotations provided.

CMIS Division:

  1. CMIS Div did not purchase any goods or service referred to in the letter and therefore submit a nil return.

Defence Reserves:

1. (a) The office of Defence Reserves purchased protective equipment in the beginning of the lockdown process on 20 April 2020.

(b) For the amount of R1 818.00 from Resuduac Bakrier Technology (Pty) Ltd.

(c) It is confirmed that the service/product was rendered.

2. There was no deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the transactions.

3. The company was selected by the Department.

4. Not applicable.

Special Force:

1. South African Special Forces did purchase goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic (see Appx F).

2. There were no deviation from the standard supply chain as three (3) quotations were obtained from the Suppliers that were approved by Chief Logistics.

3. A list of suppliers which have transversal contract with National Treasury and their address were provided to the Headquarters and were utilised.

Defence Corporate Communication:

1. One Touch Global - R5000,00 - Sanitizers, surgical masks and gloves.

Purple Square Media - R5000,00 – Sanitizers, surgical masks and gloves.

MJ Multimedia – R5000,00 – Sanitizers, surgical masks and gloves.

Valhalla Pharmacy – R3750,00 – 3 Layer cloth masks.

2. No deviation.

3. Names were from database and best value for money as per PFMA requirements.

MP Division:

  1. (a, b & c) – 2020

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

S/N

Company

Amount

Product/Service

Remarks

 

a

b

c

d

1

FKJ Consultants

R 1 998.00

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

2

S&S Dienste

R16 000.00

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

3

Budget Shop

R 3 930.00

Surgical Gloves and Face Masks

Product Rendered

4

A’ Africa Pest Prevention

R 1 794.00

Thermometer

Product Rendered

5

A’ Africa Pest Prevention

R 2 185.00

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

6

G Fox (Pty) LTD

R 4 918.21

Surgical Gloves, Face Masks, Face Shields & Eye Protections

Products Rendered

7

Clicks Humewood

R 1 999.99

Thermometer

Product Rendered

8

Conquest Cleaning Chemicals

R 1 975.00

Disinfectant

Product Rendered

9

Conquest Cleaning Chemicals

R 1 966.00

Face Masks

Product Rendered

10

Dischem

R 1  499.00

Thermometer

Product Rendered

11

Ronette Sanitizer, Dischem, Ukhamba Lobuntu, Offtek Wonderboom

R 15 722.75

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

12

Makro

R 4 500.00

Surgical Gloves

Product Rendered

13

Aruzest T/A// Nizams

R 2 000.00

Spray Bottles

Product Rendered

14

Makro

R 1 999.00

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

15

Super Hygiene

R 1 512.00

Batteries for Thermometer

Product Rendered

16

Valhalla Genaral Dealer

R 3 960.00

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

17

FKJ Consultants

R 4 200.00

Surgical Gloves

Product Rendered

18

FKJ Consultants

R 4 200.00

Dusk Masks

Product Rendered

19

Phi Development

R 23 104.00

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

20

Noko Health Care

R 707.25

Thermometer

Product Rendered

21

Moonflower/The Reeds

R 1 990.00

Thermometer

Product Rendered

22

Moonflower/The Reeds

R 1 897.00

Dusk Masks

Product Rendered

23

Moonflower/The Reeds

R 1 897.00

Dusk Masks

Product Rendered

24

Moonflower/The Reeds

R 1 900.00

Face Screens

Product Rendered

25

Moonflower/The Reeds

R 1 963.00

Dusk Masks

Product Rendered

26

Tahie Decor

R 1 990.00

Dusk Masks

Product Rendered

27

Tshinetisi General Trading

R 1 800.00

Sprayer (16lt)

Product Rendered

28

Tshinetisi General Trading

R  950.00

Foot Dispenser

Product Rendered

29

Tshimetisi General Trading

R  950.00

Foot Dispenser

Product Rendered

30

Hustleberg Holdings

R 2 000.00

Hand Sanitiser

Product Rendered

 

TOTAL

R 117 507.20

   

2 There was no deviation from the Supply Chain Management in any of the above-mentioned processes.

3. Goods were purchased from the specific Companies after proper procurement processes were followed and the Company that adhere to all the prescripts according to Quotations was chosen.

Defence HQ Unit:

The following table depicts the Department of Defence Headquarters Unit Covid 19 related purchases below the amount of R500 000.00:

S/No

NAME OF COMPANY

AMOUNT

ITEMS PROQURED

DIRECTORATE

01

Solanga Fashion Creations

R1 995.00

Cloth Masks

DFSC

02

One Touch Global

R5 000.00

Cloth Masks

DCC

03

WTC Belegings

R3 750.00

Sanitisers

VIS COMMS

04

MCB Designs

R4 680.00

Cloth Masks

SEC DEF

05

Zamatungwa

R936.00

Cloth Masks

SEC DEF

06

Seamstress Delights

R1 920.00

Cloth Masks

TRG COMM

07

All out Mask

R1 000.00

Cloth Masks

CMIS DIV

08

Clicks

R359.94

Sanitisers

DFSC

09

MJ Multimedia

R5 000.00

Sanitisers

DCC

10

Steel and Pipes

R1 800.00

Sanitisers

C FIN

11

Soap Chemicals

R3 240.00

Sanitisers

DOD HQ Unit

12

Zome chemicals

R1 920.00

Sanitisers

DOD HQ Unit

13

Group Shape

R1 818.00

Sanitisers

MP Division

14

Makro

R1 999.00

Sanitisers

DEF RES

15

Recevoir Trading

R5 000.00

Sanitisers

CDLS

16

The Promo Group

R4 988.00

Sanitisers

TRG COMM

17

Van Roma

R1 570.00

Sanitisers

HR DIV

18

Modern Packaging

R1 797.00

Sanitisers

HR DIV

19

Servest

R1 828.50

Sanitisers

HR DIV

20

West Pack Lifestyle Store

R4 500

Sanitiser Dispensers

DOD HQ Unit

2. There were no deviations from the standard Supply Chain Management Procedures in the transactions. The Petty cash process was used as all transactions complied with the Petty cash rules.

No statement will be made on this Parliamentary question.

08 July 2020 - NW1423

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1042 on 15 June 2020, she intends to brief the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and the Joint Standing Committee on Defence on the Islamic insurgency activities in northern Mozambique; if not, why not; if so, by what date; 2) whether she intends to request that the briefing is given in a closed meeting; if so, why?

Reply:

1. All matters pertaining to National Security of other countries, especially within SADC Member States are presented and discussed at the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) as and when required.

08 July 2020 - NW1028

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the motivation behind the amendment to the Meat Safety Act, Act 40 of 2000, to include threatened species in Schedule 1(2) for slaughter, consumption, sale and export?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) initiated and gazetted the draft proposed amendment to Schedule 1 of the Meat Safety Act, 2000 (Act No. 40 of 2000) hereinafter referred to as “the Act”, in order to curb unsustainable wildlife hunting for “bushmeat” and to ensure that where slaughtering or hunting for either consumption, or sale for local or export trade, happens in a regulated environment that would ensure food safety, feed safety and adherence to welfare prescripts.

The Act does not make any decisions on which animals are to be slaughtered but ensures that should an animal listed in the schedule be slaughtered, all requirements stipulated in the Act would have to be complied with.

A decision on which animals can be slaughtered lies outside of the mandate of the Meat Safety Act. Legislation under the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries, stipulates which wildlife animals are protected and endangered and therefore there is a regulatory framework on how to handle them, including their disposal and slaughter if that becomes a necessity. The slaughter of animals for human and animal consumption, as required under the Meat Safety Act is subject to permissions of relevant other legislation, including conservation, food control, environmental health and animal welfare legislations.

There may be instances where endangered animals have to be culled for conservation, animal welfare (e.g. injured), animal health (e.g. having a contagious non-zoonotic disease), environmental concerns (e.g., overgrazing) or other justifiable reasons, in line with provisions of all applicable legislation outside of the Meat Safety Act. In such instances, the products of such a culling operation, if intended for human consumption, would have been regulated under the Meat Safety Act and food hygiene would have been promoted and assured. The Act also controls the importation of meat and therefore the absence of a specific animal on the list; it means that the Meat Safety Act does not apply to meat and meat products of such an animal and therefore the Department does not have any regulatory control at the ports of entry for such products entering the country. In the absence of the listing of an animal under the Act, anyone can import such an animal without having to comply with provisions of the Meat Safety Ac

08 July 2020 - NW1322

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) average number of days taken to process (i) diagrammes, (ii) sectional plans and (iii) general plans within her department and (b)(i) current vacancy rate in the directorate responsible for the specified matters within her department and (ii) reason for the specified vacancy rate?

Reply:

(a) (i) 14 working days.

(ii) 14 working days.

(iii) 14 working days.

(b) (i) Vacancy rate as per PERSAL report is 11%.

(ii) Reasons for vacancy rate are:

    • resignations, retirement and dismissals;
    • lack of funding; and
    • shortage of specialized skills in the market.

 

08 July 2020 - NW1151

Profile picture: Breedt, Ms T

Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1)     Whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development purchased goods and services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the COVID-19 pandemic by means of price quotations and or transversal contracts.

(a),(b),(c) Please refer to Annexure A.

2. Yes.

(a),(b) Please refer to Annexure A.

3. Please refer to Annexure A.

4. No.

08 July 2020 - NW1199

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What number of (i) judgments and (ii) court orders were made against her department in the (aa) 2017-18 and (bb) 2018-19 financial years and (b) in each case, (i) what number of the specified judgments and court orders (aa) were implemented and (bb) await implementation by her department and (ii) what was the nature of the (aa) judgment and/or (bb) court order in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i),(ii) (aa) 2017-2018

- Agriculture: 3 judgments and 3 court orders

- Rural Development and Land Reform: 5 Judgments and 9 Court orders

 

(bb) 2018-2019

- Agriculture: 5 judgments and 6 court orders.

- Rural Development and Land Reform: 3 Judgments and 12 Court orders

 

(b) (i) (aa) Implemented

- Agriculture: All 8 judgments and 9 court orders implemented.

- Rural Development and Land Reform: 0 Judgements and 4 court orders implemented

(bb) Await implementation

- Agriculture: 0

- Rural Development and Land Reform: Please refer to Annexure B.

(ii) (aa),(bb) Please refer to Annexure A for Agriculture matters and Annexure B for Rural Development and Land Reform matters.

ANNEXURE A TO NA-QUESTION 1199 OF 2020

AGRICULTURE MATTERS

No

Case details

(i)(aa),(bb) Status of implementation

(ii)(aa) Nature of judgment

2017-2018 Judgments

1

B & B Properties (Pty) Ltd & others vs Dr Mcdonald Gayakaya

Implemented

Application to review and set aside the decision of the Director: Animal Health to test buffalos. The decision of the Director was reviewed and set aside.

2

Oluf Hendrik Erichsen N.O vs The Minister

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to take a decision on an application for export certification. The Minister finalised the matter by granting the certificate.

3

Eurosemillas S.A vs The Minister

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to instruct the Department to appoint a service provider who had been successful in the quote process. The Applicant succeeded and the Minister was ordered to instruct the Department accordingly.

2018-2019 Judgments

4

Lofty Du Bruyn N.O vs The Minister

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to register a right of way over the farm. The application was granted and the Minister approved the registration of the servitude.

5

Nanaga Property vs The Minister

Implemented

Application to review and set aside the decision of delegated authority to remove 10 Milkwood trees. The decision of the Minister was reviewed and set aside.

6

South African Veterinary Association vs the Speaker of the National Assembly and others

Implemented

Application to declare the amendment of the Medicine and Related Substances Control Act, 1995 (Act No.101 of 1995) unconstitutional. The Amendment was declared unconstitutional.

7.

HL Halls & Sons Properties and another vs The Minister and Others

Implemented

Application to review and set aside the decision of the Minister. The decision was referred back to the Minister for reconsideration.

8.

HL Hall & Sons Properties vs The Minister.

Implemented

Application to review and set aside the decision of the Minister. The decision referred was back to the Minister for reconsideration.

No

Case details

(i)(aa),(bb) Status of implementation

(ii)(aa) Nature of court order

2017-2018 court orders

1.

ALCARI 406 CC vs The Minister and others

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to finalise the appeal on a subdivision of land matter. The Court ordered the Minister to finalize the appeal.

2.

Zonnebloem Coal vs The Minister

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to finalise the appeal on a subdivision of land matter. The Court ordered the Minister to finalize the appeal.

3.

Meister Cold Store (Pty) Ltd vs The Minister

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to take a decision on an application for certification of a cold storage. The Court ordered the Minister to take a decision on the application for certification of its cold storage.

2018-2019 court orders

4

Xhalibile Kleinbooi Phindiso vs The Minister and others

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to sell specified land to the Applicant and others. The Court ordered the Minister to sell the land to the Applicant.

5

Federated Meats (Pty) Ltd vs The Minister

Implemented

Application of semi-urgency requesting an order to declare that the Applicant is entitled to use any approved laboratory to meet the statutory and the regulatory obligation for the testing of imported meat. The court ordered that the Applicant can use any approved Laboratory.

6

Sofiline (Pty) Ltd vs The Minister.

Implemented

Application to review and set aside the decision of the Minister not to grant approval for the subdivision of agricultural land. The court ordered the Minister to grant the application for subdivision of land.

7

TD Mashinini vs The Minister and others.

Implemented

Applicant made an application to Court for an order to compel the Minister to transfer specified property to him. The parties’ agreement for transfer of the farm to the Applicant was made the order of the court.

8

Maxrae Estates vs The Minister

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to take a decision on the appeal lodged for the subdivision of agricultural land. The court ordered the Minister to take a decision within sixty days (60).

9

Petrus Laubscher Coetzee & Others vs the Minister & Others

Implemented

Application to compel the Minister to transfer three portions of agricultural land into the names of the Applicants. The court ordered the Minister to transfer the three portions of land to the Applicants.

ANNEXURE B TO NA-QUES 1199 OF 2020

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM MATTERS

No

Case details

(i)(aa),(bb) Status of implementation

(ii)(aa) Nature of judgment

2017-2018 Judgments

1

Felicity Audrey Stirling vs td

Respondent 2: The Registrar of Deeds: Pretoria

Respondent 3: Jose Luis Crujela Alvares

Orders complied with.

Full amount paid by the Branch Deeds Registration, of which an attempt will be made to recover 50% from the third respondent. State Attorney requested to initiate recovery proceedings against third Respondent.

The Registrar of Deeds was found to be negligent in its transfer of the property and was ordered, jointly and severally with the third Respondent to pay the First Respondent R3 830 397.58 together with interest in lieu of damages and legal costs.

2

Applicant: The Forum of Concerned Residents of the Naledi & Dr Ruth S Mompati Districts vs Minister and others

Subsequent to the settlement agreement reached by the parties, the Branch Deeds Registration embarked on a project to develop the Electronic Deeds Registration System, during which public consultation was undertaken.

Once the EDRS is ready to be implemented, the status quo in the Vryburg deeds registry can change.

Simultaneously, the Branch Deeds Registration intends opposing Part B of the application (to review and set aside the Minister’s decision to transfer the land parcels from Vryburg to Kimberley, to reduce the jurisdiction of the Vryburg deeds registry and to establish a deeds registry in Mahikeng).

Part B still pending.

As part of the alignment of the jurisdiction of deeds registries in South Africa, the Minister intended to transfer land parcels from the Vryburg deeds registry to the Kimberley deeds registry, as they are situated in the Northern Cape Province. The Applicants brought an urgent application interdicting the Minister from transferring the property (Part A) and that Minister’s decision to transfer the afore-mentioned properties be reviewed and set aside.

3

Graham Robert Herbert No and 4 others v Senqu Municipality, Registrar of Deeds and Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

A wholistic amendment of the Upgrading of Land Tenure Rights 112 of 1991 will be undertaken in due course.

The Court ordered that section 25A is unconstitutional in so far as it does not extend the application of section 3 of the Act to the entire Republic. The court ordered that section 25A from 22 August 2019 must be read as if it makes no reference to section 3 of the Act.

4

Patrick S Mpaka v KSD Municipality &Minister of Police & the Minister

Land remains vacant and a subject of a Land Claim.

The Municipality sought to use a court order which was obtained in 2011 to effect evictions to illegal occupations which happened in 2017. The 2017 illegal occupants applied for an interdict in that the 2011 order did not apply to them. Interdict was granted.

5

Mopet 259
Trading CC vs
The Minister of DRDLR case No 541/2015

None

The Plaintiff issued summons against the Department claiming a sum of money allegedly for services rendered. The Court ordered absolution from the instance (Plaintiff failed to prove its case.)

2018-2019 Judgments

1

Nieuco properties 1005 (Pty) Ltd

Nieuco Properties must still refer the case to the North Gauteng High Court for the determination of the quantum.

Veld fire claim instituted against the Department in terms of the National Veld and Forest Fire Act, Act 101 of 1998 where a private farm was damaged by veld fires that started on a state owned farm. The case was initially decided in favour of the Department by the North Gauteng High Court however, Nieuco Properties lodged an appeal which was heard by the SCA on 31 August 2018 and judgment delivered in favour of Nieuco Properties on 21 September 2018.

2

Applicants: Pretoria Attorneys Association & 12 others vs The Minister and others

The Branch duly complied with the settlement agreement.

The Minister subsequently halted / terminated this process, following a legal opinion to the effect that the process followed may have been flawed.

Minister instructed that the re-alignment process be re-initiated, in accordance with all applicable legal strictures (including the provisions of PAJA).

The parties agreed that the Minister will not proceed with the alignment initiative in the Gauteng province until the Minister takes the decision to align the deeds registries in Gauteng in accordance with the prescripts of PAJA.

3

Hlekani Dudu Mukansi & Others vs Minister of RDLR Case Number 67142/2017

None

Matter received on 01 November 2017. Mr Mukansi brought an application in the High Court Pretoria for an order to compel the Dept, amongst others, to do whatever is necessary to process his application for a Township Development on, Pnt of Farm Greater Giyani 32.7395 Ha, 30,000 Ha, 150. 0000 Ha. Minister approved that matter be defended on 26 April 2018.

The application was dismissed.

No

Case details

(i)(aa),(bb) Status of implementation

(ii)(aa) Nature of court order

2017-2018 court orders

1.

Zuiping-Dithabaneng Community Traditional Council // Title Adjustment Commissioner & Oth

The designation of land and appointment of a Commissioner in terms of Act 111 of 1993 has been done and he is conducting a land rights enquiry in accordance with the Act.

The applicant required the appointment of the Commissioner in terms of Act 111 of 1993. The designation of land and appointment of a Commissioner in terms of Act 111 of 1993 has been done and he is conducting a land rights enquiry in accordance with the Act.

2.

M. M. Rahube // H. Rahube & Others

The Upgrading of Land Tenure Amendment Bill was introduced to Parliament on 6 May 2020. Parliament has until 30 April 2021 to enact the amendments.

On 30 October 2018 the Constitutional Court ordered Parliament to introduce a procedure for the determination of the rights of ownership and occupation of land to cure the constitutional invalidity of section 2 (1) of the Upgrading of Land Tenure Rights Act 112 of 1991. Parliament was given until 30 April 2020.

Subsequent to the 2018 order, the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development applied for and was granted an extension of the suspension of the Constitutional Court’s declaration of invalidity for a further twelve months until 30 April 2021.

3

Boy Phillip Mokoena v JS Farm Trust and Director General of the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (Case No LCC 191/17)

The Province is implementing the order. The matter is due to be presented to NLAACC for the acquisition of 60 Ha for the affected labour tenants.

Sub division of the affected land will be carried out before conveyancing is to occur.

The order is being observed in its entirety.

Boy Phillip Mokoena (plaintiff) is declared a labour tenant and awarded a portion of Farm Hamilberg;

DG ordered to ratify the settlement agreement.

4.

Hlalefo S Moshoeshoe v DPW and DRDLR

Conveyancers have been instructed and are currently busy with the transfer of the property.

The court ordered the transfer of the property to the Applicant.

5.

DRDLR vs Unlawful Occupiers of R/E & PTN 1 of Farm Nooitgedacht 11 JQ case no. 7212/2017

State Attorney to appoint sheriff to serve the court order.

The court ordered the eviction of the unlawful occupiers.

6.

Dept of Rural Dev & Land Reform // Mamahule Traditional Authority, Dr Matsaung.

Case Number CCT179/16

The Department decided against evicting the community and is considering transferring the property to the Municipality for township development.

The Court “declared that the Mamahule Communal Property Association, the Mamahule Community, the Mamahule Traditional Authority and Occupiers of the Farm Kalkfontein 1001 LS are unlawful occupiers of the farm”.

7.

Alfred Shongwe / The DG of DRDLR & Others

The Applicant has been relocated to portion 3 of the farm Vaalpoort, temporary houses were constructed for the family. The Department is in the process of transferring the subdivided portion of the farm to the Shongwe family.

Mr Shongwe approached the Court for a declaratory order as a Labour Tenant and for the Department to provide him with a suitable accommodation.

Mr Shongwe was declared a Labour tenant and the Department was ordered to assist him in looking for, identifying and acquiring suitable land for him.

8.

Mzayifane Hadebe & Others /Minister of RDLR & Others

The gravel road leading to the Hadebe settlement has been completed. Nine houses were about to be completed as the country went into lockdown. The fencing of the 250 hectares of land awarded to the Hadebes, preparation of arable and the transfer of land to them is ongoing.

Mr Hadebe approached the Court for an order to compel the Department to build his family a house, construct the road leading to his homestead and also for the Department to register a Communal Property Association for the benefit of his family.

The Court granted the prayers as requested by Mr Hadebe..

9.

Asla Construction (PTY) Ltd vs The Minister Of Rural Development And Land Reform & Exeo Khokela Civil Engineering Construction(pty) ltd.

Implemented

The decision of the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform taken on or about 13/02/2018 to disqualify ASLA Pty. Ltd. and award the tender to EXEO KHOKELA (Pty) Ltd was reviewed and set aside. The Department was directed to award the tender to ASLA (Pty) Ltd within 30 days of the date of the order. The Department was ordered to pay the costs in the application, such costs to include the cost of two counsel.

2018-2019 court orders

1

Bakgatla Ba Kgafela CPA vs DRDLR

Implemented

The court ordered that the DG should take all necessary steps to assist the CPA to hold the Annual General Meeting and monitor the election of the new executive committee. The CPA appealed the judgment at the constitutional court. The constitutional court dismissed the appeal.

2

Bhekindela Mwelase vs DG and Minister

The Special Master was appointed on 10 December 2019. On 29 May 2020, the Special Master submitted an implementation plan to the Land Claims Court and the Plan is under consideration by the Land Claims Court.

On 8 December 2016, the Land Claims Court issued an order in favour of the Applicants which ordered for the appointment of a Special Master.

The Department lodged an application for leave to appeal with the Land Claims Court and such was granted on 1 March 2017. The appeal was heard by the SCA on 13 March 2018 and the appeal was decided in favour of the Department on 17 August 2018. AFRA appealed to the Constitutional Court and on 20 August 2019, the court issued a judgment which re-instated the initial order of the Land Claims Court dated 8 December 2016.

3

JM Tshabalala vs DRDLR

Implemented

The applicants were seeking an order that the Minister and DG should acquire land on behalf of labour tenants and just and equitable compensation to be paid to the landowner.

4

Neels van Tonder Trust vs Mogabule (LCC04/2018)

The Order against the Minister could not be implemented because it was discovered that Mr. Magabole had alternative accommodation in Bronkholspruit and he moved there.

The applicant Mr. Van Tonder applied for eviction order against Mr. Magabole and his family.

Eviction Order was granted on 28/05/2018. The Department was ordered to provide alternative accommodation to Mr. Mogabodi in terms of section 4 of the Extension of Security of Tenure Act (ESTA).

5

Roodepoort Grondeienaarsvereeniging vs Roodepoort 63 Community (642/17 and 643/17)

The Department is in the process of complying with the court order in consultation with the City of Tshwane.

Rooderpoort Grondeinaarsvereening applied for an order to compel the City of Tshwane to evict the occupiers who has established a squatter camp in the City property which is adjacent to the applicant’s properties.

The High Court Granted the Order but the respondents took the matter on appeal and the decision of the High Court was overturned.

On appeal, the Supreme Court ordered the Minister to prepare and file a report with the High Court on the Department`s ability to provide the alternative accommodation as provided for in terms of section 4 of the Extension of Security of Tenure Act (ESTA).

6

Hlaniki Trust vs Daniel Sibanyoni (LCC59/2018)

Implemented

Hlaniki Trust applied for an eviction order against Mr. Sibanyoni who is an occupier.

During the proceeding, the Land Claims Court issued a directive order, ordering the Minister to submit a report on the Department’s ability to provide alternative accommodation in case of eviction.

7

Hupp Properties vs Moneni (308/2017)

The matter was heard and eviction granted. Mr Moneni moved into his RDP house.

The eviction order was granted against Mr Moneni and his family and the Minister was ordered to provide alternative accommodation for Mr. Moneni in terms of section 4 of the Extension of Security of Tenure Act (ESTA).

8

Land and Agricultural Bank

V CPAD Holdings PTY LTD, Alfred Mde, DRDLR and 4 Others

The Department has appointed a valuer to determine the value of the property so that it can satisfy the debt to Land Bank whilst retaining the property for purposes of Land Reform.

The Land Bank approached the court to vary a Forfeiture Order, which sought to transfer the property to the Department. This order was to include the protection of their interests as bondholders.

9

Anjucel & Another v Shadrack Bhekanini Ntshingila NO & others (Case no LCC 25/2019)

The Province is implementing the order. Approval for the acquisition of land in favour of the affected labour tenants is underway. A deed of sale has been signed and registration and transfer is due to occur soon.

The order is being observed in its entirety.

Shadrack Bhekanini (2nd resp) awarded a piece of farm Bloemhoek and registered in deeds office;

10

Makgari CPA vs DRDLR case number 5158/2018

Implementation is in progress

Matter received on 31 August 2018. Applicant, Makgari approached court, for the court to give a mandatory order directing the Department and Minister to register the applicant's CPA within 45 court days of the granting of the order. The Minister was ordered to register the CPA within 45 days of granting the court order.

11

M D Rakgase vs Minister of DRDLR case number 33497/2018

The land was sold to Mr Rakgase and transfer is under way.

Matter received on 13 June 2018. Mr Rakgase applied to the High Court to review the Minister's decision of refusing to sell to him Portions 0 (remaining extent and 1 of the Farm Nooitgedacht 11 JQ

The Minister was ordered to sell and transfer the farm to Mr Rakgase.

12

JC Prinsloo / The Minister of RDLR & Others LCC 177/16

The farm was acquired and is currently registered in the name of the State.

Default judgment was obtained against the Minister

State ordered to acquire portion 27 of the farm Welgekozen.

08 July 2020 - NW1277

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With regard to the Spatial Data Infrastructure Act, No 54 of 2003 (SDI Act), (a) why was the SDI Act omitted under the Legislative Mandates of her department’s 2020-21 Annual Performance Plan for Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development and (b) with no mention of the SDI Legislation under Part C: Institutional Performance Programme information and Programme 6: Land Administration making no reference to Spatial Data Infrastructure nor the statutory body appointed by her to deliver the South African Spatial Data Infrastructure, where does the South African Spatial Data Infrastructure function sit?

Reply:

a) The omission of the Spatial Data Infrastructure Act (Act 54 of 2003) in the 2020 / 21 Annual Performance Plan (APP), was due to an administrative oversight and is being rectified in the revision of the APP of the Department which is currently being finalized.

b) The administrative functions with regard to the Spatial Data Infrastructure Act (Act 54 of 2003) and the South African Spatial Data Infrastructure (SASDI) remains within the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development in the Branch Spatial Planning and Land Use Management.

08 July 2020 - NW1284

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What is the current vacancy rate of her department, (b) which programmes are mainly affected and (c) what measures has her department put in place to fill the vacancies and/or to ensure that service delivery is not hampered?

Reply:

a) 12.58 %.

b) Program 5 – Economic Development, Trade and Marketing.

c) The Department is in the process of finalising the merger of the former Department of Rural Development and Land Reform and the agriculture component of the former Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. A procedure is in place for Branches to approach the Minister for approval to fill posts identified as critical and essential as per DPSA Circular 19 of 2020.

08 July 2020 - NW1341

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to their official work in the (i) 2018-19 and (ii) 2019-20 financial years and (b) has been performing such work from 1 April 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what total number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether official approval for such work was obtained from her department in each case; if not, what are the relevant details; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved and (c) what (i) total number of contraventions of the policy were brought to the attention of her department in the (aa) 2018-19 and (bb) 2019-20 financial years and (ii) steps have been taken against transgressors?

Reply:

(1)

    (a) (i) 2018-19:  10 Officials performed work outside normal working hours.

    (a) (ii) 2019-20: 10 Officials performed work outside normal working hours.

 

    (b) (i)  As of 01/04/2020 the Department had ten valid permissions for other remunerative work.

    (b) (ii) The applicants comprised of 5 Senior Managers (3 Directors and 2 Chief Directors) and 5 Middle managers (1 Deputy Director and 4 Chief Education Specialists).

(2)

(a) Section 30 of the Public Service Act read with Regulations 13 and 24 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016, are applied in all instances.

(b) The Delegation for the approval of other remunerative work rests with the DG.

(c) (aa) 2018/19:  None

(bb) 2019/20:  2 officials have been identified. The investigation process is still in progress.


 

08 July 2020 - NW1326

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether the National School Nutrition Programme has been available for all qualifying learners since schools re-opened on 8 June 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what is the involvement of her department in the National Food and Nutrition Security Co-ordinating Committee?

Reply:

(1) Since 08 June 2020, the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) was availed to Grade 7 and 12  learners, in order to adhere to the necessary social distancing, health and safety protocols. Since 22 June 2020, provinces have extended the programme to all qualifying learners, including those not yet back at school. 

(2) The Department of Basic Education is a key stakeholder in the country’s food and nutrition efforts. Three (3) officials represent the Department in the National Food and Nutrition Security Coordinating Committee. The Department’s participation has been consistent, dating back to 2015, when Cabinet directed that government departments must devise a unified approach to food and nutrition challenges. This led to the development of the National Food and Nutrition Security Plan by a task team, inclusive of DBE officials.

07 July 2020 - NW1209

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of service contracts of doctors have not been renewed in each province in the period 1 January 2020 to 30 April 2020 and (b) are the reasons for not renewing the service contracts?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard.

Province

Contracts

Reasons

Eastern Cape

95

95 holders of the contracts were community service doctors whose statutory one year-contracts (non-renewable contracts) were completed.

Free State

67

36 holders of the contracts opted to transfer to other Provinces after the contract expiry period due to personal reasons. The remaining 31 holders were community service doctors whose statutory one year contracts (non-renewable contracts) were completed.

Gauteng

130

128 holders were community service doctors whose statutory one-year contracts (non-renewable contracts) were completed, and 2 were sessional doctors positions converted to permanent appointments

KwaZulu-Natal

0

The Province did not have medical officers whose appointment contract ended during the reporting period.

Limpopo

34

5 holders of the contracts opted to transfer to other Provinces after the contract expiry period due to personal reasons. The remaining 29 were community service doctors whose statutory one year-contracts (non-renewable contracts) were completed.

Mpumalanga

45

14 holders of the contracts were foreign nationals appointed on three-year contracts. At the end of contracts, they were not renewed because opportunities are first given to South African Citizens in terms of the Immigration Act of 2002. The remaining 31 were community service doctors whose statutory one year-contracts (non-renewable contracts) were completed.

Northern Cape

72

72 holders were community service doctors whose statutory one year contracts (non-renewable contracts) were completed.

North West

81

46 holders of contracts were not renewed as posts were converted to Permanent Posts to reduce the vacancy rate. The remaining 35 were community service doctors whose statutory one year contracts (non-renewable contracts) were completed.

Western Cape

54

39 were Medical Registrars that completed their training and are replaced with new registrations. The remaining 15 doctors’ contracts terminated at the end of contract after completing specific tasks as per agreements.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1255

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)In view of the fact that local service providers are being appointed in order to do deep cleaning at the clinics, (a) will he furnish Mrs M O Clarke with a list of the (i) service providers and (ii) clinics they are cleaning within the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) how often are the clinics being cleaned; (2) whether criteria have been put in place in terms of the deep cleaning process; if not, why not; if so, will he provide Mrs M O Clarke with the criteria that have been put in place?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) There is no list of the service providers that have been appointed in order to do deep cleaning at the clinics. Ekurhuleni Health District is using the Meridian Hygiene company to do deep cleaning at the clinics. A letter of appointment of Meridian Hygiene is attached as Annexure A.

(ii) Clinics they are cleaning within the City of Ekurhuleni are on the attached list (Annexure B)

(b) The clinics are fogged and deep cleaned each time there has been a positive case that has been reported in the facility. This is done in line with the guidelines issued by the Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC). The process of deep cleansing is being monitored by the Ekurhuleni Steering Committee Members and the Environmental Health Practitioners.

2. Yes. There are criteria that have been put in place in terms of the deep cleaning process guide. The attached document explains in detail the criteria that are being followed for deep cleaning. Please refer to part (iii) on the second page of Annexure B.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW969

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to his reply to question 398 on 12 May 2020, where he indicated that the Provincial Executive Council in the North West has resolved to intervene in the Madibeng Local Municipality by invoking section 139 of the Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, to impose a financial recovery plan in the municipality, (a) by what date will the financial recovery plan aimed at improving financial management in the specified municipality be completed and (b) what changes to the (i) municipality’s budget, (ii) revenue raising measures, (iii) spending limits and (iv) revenue targets will be effected?

Reply:

a) The preparation of the financial recovery plan for the Madibeng Local Municipality has not yet commenced. Due to the nature of the problems confronting the municipality, a multi-disciplinary team with experience in Financial Management, Human Resources, Legal Skills, Organizational Design and other competencies is required. Some of this expertise does not currently exist within the Municipal Finance Recovery Services Unit of the National Treasury and a process to recruit these skills externally is underway.

It is anticipated that a multi-disciplinary team will be on board by June 2020 and once imposed restrictions on travel are lifted and working conditions return to normal, the team will be able to assist the North West Provincial Treasury and the municipality in drafting a financial recovery plan. Alongside these appointments at National Treasury, the North West Provincial Treasury have also finalized a Terms of Reference for the appointment of specialists to provide assistance to the province in preparing financial recovery plans for the Madibeng municipality and other municipalities in the North West.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) In order to determine the changes required, a diagnostic assessment will first have to be undertaken by the multi-disciplinary team. Only once this assessment is concluded, will it be possible to determine the changes required in terms of the budget, revenue raising measures, spending limits and revenue targets.

07 July 2020 - NW1171

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of clinics have a shortage of ARV drugs in Ekurhuleni and (b) is the name of each clinic?

Reply:

a) According to the information available on the National Surveillance centre, there are three clinics in Ekurhuleni that have reported a stock-out of the first line ARV, Tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz (TEE).

TEE was reported out of stock at the following clinics:

  • Boksburg Civic Centre Clinic
  • Dawn Park Clinic
  • Palmridge Clinic

b) There is currently a supplier constraint with regards to TEE as the following suppliers have been unable supply the ordered quantities: Innovata Pharmaceuticals (Pty) Ltd and MacCleods Pharmaceuticals (Pty) Ltd. However, available stock in the district from other facilities has been allocated to these facilities based on expected patient numbers.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1134

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the fact that the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital management, after being questioned on how occupational therapy pediatricians were affected, raised that more delays on sessions with children are the case, (a) what measures will his department put in place to ensure that delays in occupational therapy for children in particular is not delayed as this will have adverse results in their development even in the long term and (b) how will parents of children who undergo occupational therapy be capacitated to carry out some of the exercises and receive support from hospitals and clinics?

Reply:

a) Occupational therapy (OT) services for children are still running at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital (CHBAH).

  • Children who are admitted to the wards are still receiving in-patient therapy services as required. During these sessions, caregivers are trained in carrying out exercises with their children to ensure carry-over to the home environment. On discharge from the wards, caregivers are given follow-up appointments for OT should this be required, or they are referred to their closest facility for out-patient OT services;
  • Out-patient OT services are still running as follows:
    • New patients who are referred to the OT department, are seen on the day of referral. During this session, caregivers are trained in carrying out exercises as well as given a home program to ensure carry-over to the home environment;
    • Caregivers of current patients are called telephonically and given the option of coming to the hospital for their appointment. Should they wish to attend their appointment, they are seen at the Hospital as normal. Should they not want to bring the child to the Hospital for their OT appointment, caregivers are given an option:
  • They can bring their child for OT the next time they are at the Hospital for a Doctor’s appointment (four to six monthly), scan, collection of medication, etc. and the child will be seen by OT;
  • The caregiver can attend without the child and bring their concerns (verbal or video) which will be addressed by OT (if the caregiver is at the Hospital for something without the child such as collection of medication);
  • If a child has not been seen by OT for a month, their caregiver will be contacted telephonically to follow up on the home program as well as the child’s progress;
  • Caregivers who have not brought their child to see OT for more than three consecutive months, are encouraged to bring their child in due to the rapid development of children so that they can be trained in new exercises and given a home program that is appropriate for their child’s current developmental level;

- Children who have sustained burn injuries receive follow-up with the doctors weekly at the Hospital. Should they require OT services, such as splinting or scar management, they are seen in the OT department weekly after their doctor’s appointment. Once they are discharged from the doctor’s clinic, they are followed up as above for scar management, ensuring that the child has the necessary pressure garments and resources (silicone, cream, etc.) to last them until their next appointment (every second month).

b) All caregivers of children who receive OT services, are encouraged to carry out exercises daily in their home environment as part of their home exercise program. To ensure efficient carry-over, during face-to-face contact sessions, caregivers are shown the exercises they will need to carry out with their child and then given a chance to practice these before they return home and are expected to carry out the program independently.

Pamphlets of different exercises have been developed and parents are given the relevant pamphlets as a reminder of the exercises they need to carry-out daily.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW915

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. No tenders were awarded
  2. Not applicable
  3. Not applicable
  4. Not applicable

07 July 2020 - NW1367

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What total number of field hospitals have been built in each province since 1 March 2020?

Reply:

The total number of field hospitals that have been built in each Province since 1 March 2020 have been provided in the table below. The construction of the field hospitals is at different levels of completion, from site hand over to the completion of the construction of the hospital, and also includes utilization of the hospital. Most of these are the modification of the space in the existing hospitals.

PROVINCE

FIELD HOSPITAL

COMMENTS

Total Number per province

Eastern Cape

Port Elizabeth VW field hospital

The hospital is 35% complete and the completed section is being used for COVID-19 admissions.

1

Free State

Intra-Health Care Facilities for Surge

a) Universitas has converted the underground management parking to create a space for 110 beds. The contractor is currently on site.

b) House Idahlia has been identified for 60 High Care Beds. The contractor is currently on site.

c) Pelonomi hospital has been approved for 296 beds. The contractor is currently on site

d) Bongani hospital Nurses has been identified for 150 beds. Waiting for the awarding of the contract.

e) Itumeleng CHC has been approved for 200 beds. Waiting for the awarding of the contract.

f) Manapo Hospital Hall has been approved for 53 beds. Waiting for the awarding of the contract.

g) Albert Nzula Hospital in Trompsburg has been approved for 95 beds. The contractor is on site

7 hospitals with

Gauteng

NASREC Field hospital

The department has approved and completed 500 beds and it is currently being used

1 with 500 beds

KZN

Royal Agriculture Showground field hospital

  • The field hospital in Pietermaritzburg is operational with 254 beds.
  • Ngwelezane hospital has been approved the construction of 113 beds, which are under construction.
  • General Justice Ginzenga Mapanza has been approved for 113 beds which are under construction.
  • Clairewood hospital has allocated 226 beds which are still under construction.

4 with 706 beds

Limpopo

 

Limpopo has not built any field hospitals as yet.

0

Mpumalanga

 

Mpumalanga has not built any field hospitals as yet

0

Northern Cape

 

Northern Cape has not built any field hospitals as yet

0

North West

Maseve Field hospital

This hospital has been approved for 200 beds in Rustenburg and it is 90% ready.

1 with 200 beds

Western Cape

 

a) CTICC has been approved for 870 beds and it is completed

b) Thusong has been approved for 68 beds and it is completed

c) Brackengate has been approved for 330 beds. The portion of the existing warehouse, design for the facility has been completed. Planned first patient admission will start on 7 July 2020.

3 with 1268 beds

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1256

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What processes did his department put in place in order to provide assistance to the clinics in terms of local screening and testing within each area in the City of Ekurhuleni?

Reply:

Ekurhuleni Health District has employed fifty-two (52) Tracer Teams and one thousand and ninety-eight (1098) Community Health Care Workers. These teams are under the leadership of the District Health Management Offices of Ekurhuleni Health District. These teams assist the clinics to conduct screening and testing in the hotspots areas such as malls, informal settlements and hostels on a daily basis throughout the whole of the City of Ekurhuleni.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1135

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(a) How does his department conduct training for health officials and personnel in tracing down contacts to be cognisant of stigmas that may arise, (b) what intervention does his department have in place to deal with the stigmatisation of Coronavirus and (c) how is the privacy of patients and contacts protected?

Reply:

(a) As part of training, healthcare workers and contact tracers were sensitized on how to assist cases and contacts to deal with stigma and its impact on their mental health and well-being. Stigma, as a major cause of discrimination and exclusion, affects people’s self-esteem, disrupts relationships and contributes directly to human rights abuses. Recognising the need for mental well-being during this period of Covid-19 pandemic, the National Department of Health has developed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) on contact tracing in SA, which also include section on mental and psychological support to community during the Covid-19 outbreak.

The following aspects were covered during trainings:

  • When referring to people with COVID-19, do not attach the disease to any particular ethnicity or nationality. Be empathetic to all those who are affected, in and from any country. People who are affected by COVID-19 have not done anything wrong, and they deserve our support, compassion and kindness.
  • As part of health education, contacts are requested to seek information only from trusted sources and mainly so that they can take practical steps to prepare and protect themselves and their loved ones, should anyone in the household test positive for Covid-19.
  • In other households, psychosocial support is offered to the family members who are not working and who need to take care of child or elderly dependents.

In addition to what is listed earlier in terms of combating stigma and discrimination, here is what the Department of Health has done to assist people to cope, in order to reduce anxiety, namely:

  • Protect themselves and be supportive to others. Assisting others in their time of need can benefit the person receiving support, as well as the helper.
  • Seek information updates at specific times during the day, once or twice. The sudden and near-constant stream of news reports about an outbreak can cause anyone to feel worried;
  • Gather information at regular intervals, from the Department of Health and NICD websites and local health authorities, in order to help you distinguish facts from rumours;
  • Honour caretakers and health care workers supporting people affected by the disease in your community. Acknowledge the role they play to save lives and keep your loved ones safe.

National Contact Tracing Guidelines are currently being revised to emphasise the following issues that are covered during training:

    • Contact tracing should not be used punitively;
    • Contacts should be provided with details of how their information will be used, stored, and accessed, and how individuals will be protected from harmful disclosure or identification;
    • Contact tracing and associated steps, such as quarantine of contacts and isolation of cases, should not be associated with security measures, immigration issues, or other concerns outside the realm of public health.

(b) Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how Covid-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths. Stigma can also make people more likely to hide symptoms or illness, keep them from seeking health care immediately, and prevent individuals from adopting healthy behaviors. This means that stigma can make it more difficult to control the spread of an outbreak. As part of training of healthcare workers and contact tracers, the National Contact Tracing Team help prevent stigma by ensuring that contact tracers in provinces and districts:

  • Always maintain the privacy and confidentiality of those seeking healthcare and those who may be part of any contact investigation;
  • Quickly communicate the risk, or lack of risk, from contact with products, people, and places;
  • Use of inclusive language and less stigmatizing terminology by sharing accurate information about how the virus spreads;
  • Use of social media to spread facts about how the new coronavirus disease is transmitted and treated, and how to prevent infection, including speaking out against negative behaviors and statements, including those on social media;
  • Engaging social influencers such as community leaders in prompting reflection about people who are stigmatized and how to support them, or respected celebrities to amplify messages that reduce stigma;
  • All health promotion materials show diverse communities being impacted and working together to prevent the spread of Covid-19 and do not reinforce stereotypes.
  • The use of news media and social media creates an environment in which the disease and its impact is openly and honestly discussed, to speak out against stereotyping groups of people who experience stigma;
  • Suggesting resources for mental health or other social support services for people who have experienced stigma or discrimination;
  • The contact tracers are expected to show empathy with those affected and make them understand the disease, and adopt effective practical measures to help keep themselves and their families safe.
  • The Department carefully communicates with the public on Covid-19 to aid public/community implementation of the preventive measures and to avoid fuelling fear and stigma.

(c) The privacy of patients and contacts is protected by the following:

 

  • Medical records of patients and contacts are subject to privacy and confidentiality. As part of training, healthcare workers and contact tracers are trained to better understand that patient information remains cordoned within the Prescripts of Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA). All health care workers know that they are not supposed to divulge any information, of any patient in any media platforms. When such arise, there are legal implications to deal with the person divulging the information;
  • The databases that are also used should be encrypted so that the information storage becomes secure. More work still needs to be done to ensure all data sources are aligned across all the provinces;
  • All health care workers and contact tracers are expected to comply with Regulations Relating to the Surveillance and the Control of Notifiable Medical Conditions as outlined in the National Health Act, 2003 (Act No. 61 of 2003). Covid-19 is a category 1 notifiable medical condition (Respiratory disease caused by a novel respiratory pathogen). Confidentiality, protection of health records, and offences and penalties are dealt with in Chapter 4 of the Regulation.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1132

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will respond positively to nurses in emergency and casualty wards at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital who are calling for danger allowances because of exposure to psychiatric patients waiting for beds; if not, why not; if so, on what date will mediation take place; (2) what measures has his department put in place to increase infrastructural capacity for psychiatric patients and wards (a) at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital and (b) other hospitals across the Republic as this is not stipulated in the annual Strategic Plan and Annual Perfomance Plan of his department?

Reply:

1. As the Minister of Health, one of my key responsibilities is to ensure the health and safety of all health workers. It is an obligation put on me not only by my conscience, but also by our own legislation regarding labour and occupational health and safety. We are also signatory to International Conventions on Labour, that underpin employee health and wellness management.

In terms of the Determination and Directive on Danger Allowance in the Public Service, dated July 2017 (PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2007 as amended by Resolution 4 of 2015) Part 2: PROVISION ON DANGER ALLOWANCE, employers pay standardized danger allowance to employees who in the course of their employment experience a genuine risk to their life because of exposure to psychiatric patients.

We are also fortunate as a country that over time we have established functional and effective structures and processes that involve both organized labour and employers whereby the labour and employment issues such as this call by the nurses should be presented and evaluated. In this regard I am confident that once presented to the Public Service Bargaining Council, the Department of Health will be advised accordingly.

2. (a) Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital currently has 165 acute gazette (approved) beds. The beds are sufficient for a Tertiary Academic Hospital. More beds need to be created in the Regional and District Hospitals and need to strengthen Community-based Psychiatric services.

(b) the Annual Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plan for the Department talked about 80 hospitals to be revitalized or constructed over the MTEF. All these hospitals will have a dedicated mental health ward.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1018

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to his reply to question 398 on 12 May 2020, where he indicated that the Provincial Executive Council in the North West has resolved to intervene in the Lekwa-Teemane Local Municipality by invoking section 139 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, to impose a financial recovery plan in the municipality, (a) by what date will the financial recovery plan aimed at improving financial management in the specified municipality be completed and (b) what changes to the (i) municipality’s budget, (ii) revenue-raising measures, (iii) spending limits and (iv) revenue targets will be effected?

Reply:

(a) The process to draft a financial recovery plan commences with a status quo analysis of the municipality after a formal request to draft such a financial recovery plan has been received by the National Treasury. To conduct the status quo analysis, a multi-disciplinary team is required with expertise in financial, legal, human resources and organizational development. The status quo is often conducted on-site as it is impossible to infer the extent of the problems in a municipality from an analysis of the financial statements only. As part of the process, interviews are conducted with key municipal officials and this is normally a week long process.

The COVID-19 pandemic regulations have placed restrictions on travel, thus delaying this particular process. To date, a multi-disciplinary team has been appointed by the National Treasury and assumed duties on the 1st June 2020. Once travel restrictions are lifted, an on-site status-quo assessment will be undertaken to commence with the preparation of the financial recovery plan for the Lekwa-Teemane Local Municipality.

In addition, the North West Provincial Treasury have also finalized Terms of Reference for the appointment of specialists to provide assistance to the province in the preparation of a financial recovery plan for the Lekwa-Teemane Local Municipality and other municipalities in the North West.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) Changes required to these measures will be determined once the status-quo assessment is finalized.

07 July 2020 - NW1368

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the Scooter Project that was launched by the Eastern Cape Department of Health meets the basic criteria of patient transport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether his department was consulted before the specified scooters were procured; if so, what brief was given to the province in this regard?

Reply:

1. No, the Scooter Project that was launched by the Eastern Cape Department of Health (ECDOH) does not meet the basic criteria for patient transport as an ambulance. The purpose of this project by ECDOH is mainly for widening access to primary health care and delivering of chronic medicine for the most remote areas of the Eastern Cape Province.

2. The National Department of Health was not consulted on specifications before procurement of the scooters. However, the Province has been advised that none of these scooters will be used as ambulances because they do not meet the specific requirements as provided for in the EMS Regulations, such as, minimum patient compartment space and equipment requirements.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1150

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 912 on 4 June 2020, his department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, the following tables reflect the details in this regard.

No.

(a)

(b)

(c)

1

Mobility Solutions

R208,725-00

Procurement of 300 Infra-red Portable Thermometers for all ports of entry to mitigate Covid-19 risks.

2

Unicore Holdings

R353,527-83

Procurement of 350 Infrared Portable Thermometers for screening at exit points at Ports of Entry.

3

Mabhelonke Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

R233,000-00

Printing of 800 000 Travel Health Questionnaires for Covid-19 screening at the Ports of Entry.

4

Vision Projects 2020

R230,000-00

Printing of 800 000 Health Questionnaires for Covid-19 screening at the Ports of Entry.

5

Moetswadi Trading Projects

R 35,000-00

Decontamination, cleaning and disinfection of 10 pool vehicles allocated to Port Health at OR Tambo International Airport.

2. Yes.

(a) The deviations were due to health emergency as a result of Covid-19 pandemic outbreak;

(b) Details in each case;

No.

Supplier Name

Amount

Description of goods or services

1

Tammy Taylor

R115,000-00

Procurement of 2000 cloth face masks for NDOH employees to ensure compliance to Covid-19 regulations.

2

ExecuJet Aviation

R142,760-99

Emergency procurement of a charter flight for 4 officials to travel from Lanseria to East London to conduct contact tracing, attend to epidemiological issues and PPE supply during the surge of Covid-19 in Eastern Cape.

3

Libera Management

R132,298.53

Procurement of various sizes of hand sanitizers for use at entrances, boardrooms and laboratories of the NDoH.

4

Tammy Taylor

R 46,000-00

Procurement 800 additional cloth face masks for NDOH employees to ensure compliance to Covid-19 regulations.

5

Libera Management

R 79,524.16

Emergency Cleaning Services at Forensic Chemistry Laboratory in Johannesburg due to Covid-19.

3. The following table reflects the details in this regard

No.

Supplier Name

Reasons that the goods and/ or services were from the specified companies

1.

Mobility Solutions

Due to Lockdown, most of suppliers were not open for business, as a result there was a limited access to suppliers. The Central Supplier Database (CSD) was used to identify the suppliers to render the required services.

2.

Unicore Holdings

 

3.

Mabhelonke Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

 

4.

Vision Projects 2020

 

5.

Moetswadi Trading Projects

 

6.

Tammy Taylor

Due to the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic most companies were not operating as a result of lockdown. This supplier was willing to provide the department with the quotation of cloth masks in preparation for return of employees as per requirements of Covid-19 regulations.

7.

ExecuJet Aviation

Only this supplier was urgently available to execute the urgent task at the time.

8.

Libera Management

Since this supplier is currently providing cleaning services In-house, they were requested to urgently procure the required items in line with Covid-19.

9.

Tammy Taylor

Due to the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic most companies were not operating as a result of lockdown. This supplier was willing to provide the department with the quotation of cloth masks in preparation for return of employees as per requirements of Covid-19 regulations.

10.

Libera Management

The supplier was approached on an emergency basis to disinfect Forensic Chemistry Laboratory in Johannesburg due to the fact they are currently contracted to provide the cleaning services for NDoH.

4. No there will be no statement.

 

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1170

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What measures did his department put in place in terms of screening and testing at schools in Gauteng?

Reply:

The joint Integrated School Health Programme Task Team (ISHP TT) between the Departments of Health and of Basic Education developed the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for COVID-19 Screening in South African Schools. This applies to all public and special schools in all provinces in the country.

The purpose of the SOP is to detect potential cases of COVID-19 and efficiently manage them to avoid further transmission and risk to other learners and school personnel.

There are four important aspects of the SOP:

  • To provide guidelines to the School Health Team, composed of a Professional Nurse and Enrolled Nurses, and the School Screening Team (non-clinical) staff comprising of Youth Brigades, the School Based Support Teams (SBST) are trained to screen learners and school staff for symptoms of COVID-19 including daily temperature monitoring;
  • To ensure that all learners who are identified as being symptomatic through screening are managed and referred appropriately;
  • To ensure that contact tracing is conducted for all those who test positive. It is the responsibility of the professional nurse and the School Health Team to liaise with the appropriate contact training team within the district;
  • The School Health Team and the School Screening team are required to work very closely with members of the SBST for co-ordination purposes within the school. If the school does not have an SBST, a member of the School Management Team should be nominated and designated to perform this role. Where there are insufficient school health teams to cover every school, a professional nurse from a local clinic may be nominated to provide support to the school (every school must have direct access to a named professional nurse).

All schools developed plans which were submitted to their District (Health and Education) to indicate readiness for school re-opening. These plans outline how they will manage the screening and testing including reporting and data management within the schools and districts.

Learner Health Questionnaires were also developed, translated into all official languages and distributed for parents to complete in order to identify children with comorbidities that put them at risk of contracting severe COVID-19. School principals are responsible to provide alternatives to face-to-face learning for these learners.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1136

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What measures has his department put in place to make quarantine facilities that he has earmarked for persons with Covid-19 infections fully compliant and ready to serve their purpose; (2) whether the specified quarantine facilities are equipped with (a) sufficient water, (b) electricity, (c) clean beds and bedding and (d) food; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the necessary inspections have been conducted to confirm that the quarantine facilities meet the minimum requirements of a quarantine facility; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) what is the total number of quarantine facilities earmarked for persons with Covid-19 infections and (b) where is each such facility located; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) The process for assessing and preparing quarantine facilities is properly defined in the approved Guidelines for Quarantine and Isolation Facilities. This process entails the identification of possible sites, the assessment thereof and the operationalisation of said sites. Apart from that, there are also a few state-owned facilities that were earmarked and prepared. This entailed basic maintenance to the sites, procurement of beds, linen and kitchen equipment and then the operationalisation of these sites again with staff, catering where necessary, PPE and medical waste management services;

(2) Yes. Sufficient water, electricity, clean beds, bedding and food is a prerequisite for a quarantine facility. Prior to activation, sites are inspected specifically related to the above and a list of criteria as contained in the approved guidelines. Where facilities were found to not comply to these requirements, they are decommissioned and will not be utilised again.

(3) Yes. Various inspections are done. There is the initial assessment to determine if a facility would meet the requirements as per the guidelines provided. All facilities need to be assessed for suitability. These assessments are done either by the National Department of Health, National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure or their provincial counterparts.

Once activated, there is a quality assessment that is done to determine if the operational side is in place and that subsequent infection control protocols are followed. This is a relatively new function and they are only now engaging in doing these on-site audits.

Where complaints have been received, various teams have been sent to these facilities and report on the status of these that were assessed.

(4) (a) The following quarantine facilities have been activated in the provinces:

(b) PROVINCE

  1. NO OF SITES

NO OF BEDS

Eastern Cape

19

662

Free State

5

313

Gauteng

21

6236

KwaZulu-Natal

48

1098

Limpopo

6

313

Mpumalanga

6

434

North West

6

188

Northern Cape

9

497

Western Cape

16

2537

GRAND TOTAL

136

12278

(5) Yes. A statement will be made on the matter as part of media statements to update the country on the outbreak.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1019

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Finance

By what date will the Lekwa-Teemane Local Municipality (a) complete and (b) submit the 2019-20 Medium Term Revenue and Expenditure Framework budget to the National Treasury, which they were advised to revise after the National Treasury had assessed it and found it to be unfunded and unsustainable?

Reply:

(a)(b) The Lekwa-Teema Local Municipality revised the 2019/20 Medium Term Revenue and Expenditure Framework as part of the Special Adjustments Budget process initiated by the National Treasury on 11 November 2019. Subsequent to the Provincial Treasury’s assessment, the municipality’s 2019/20 MTREF budget still reflected a negative cash position of R283.9 million from a negative balance of R313.5 million in the first year of the 2019/20 MTREF period.

Following the mid-year budget performance assessment in January 2020, the municipal council further adjusted the 2019/20 budget during February 2020 and adopted a short term financial plan.

However, it is important to note that all municipalities are now afforded a further opportunity to adjust their budgets in response to the changes in revenue and expenditure as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The deadline for this process is 15 June 2020.

07 July 2020 - NW1366

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of persons have died in each province since 1 February 2020 due to (i) natural and (ii) unnatural causes and (b) was the cause of death in each specified case?

Reply:

a) Mortality data from the Civil Registration and Vital Statistics system permit the production of mortality statistics on a continuous basis and contribute to the understanding of the burden of disease at national, provincial and local geographic levels. The registration of deaths in South Africa falls under the mandate of the Department of Home Affairs. It is governed by the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1992 (Act No. 51 of 1992). The Act has been amended several times, with the last amendment made in 2010 [Births and Deaths Registration Amendment Act (Act No. 18 of 2010)]. The principal Act states that after a death occurs, notice of death should be given as soon as practicable. To better enforce the registration of deaths, the 2014 regulations of the Act mandate the registration of deaths within 72 hours (three days) from date of occurrence. The principal Act further states that a medical practitioner should prescribe the cause of death if satisfied that the death was due to natural causes. However, if there is doubt that the death was due to natural causes, such a death must be reported to the police. After an investigation as to the circumstances of the death in terms of the Inquests Act, 1959 (Act No. 58 of 1959), the medical practitioner shall certify the cause of death. Upon completion of death registration, a death certificate is issued.

(i) Natural Deaths by Province

A total of 137 816 deaths form Natural causes were recorded for persons 1 year and older for the period, 1 February 2020 to 16 June 2020.

Province

Natural Deaths

Eastern Cape

22 241

Free State

8 817

Gauteng

26 941

KwaZulu-Natal

25 212

Limpopo

14 306

Mpumalanga

10 091

North West

8 711

Northern Cape

4 416

Western Cape

17 081

Total

137 816

Source: SAMRC

(ii) Unnatural Causes

A total of 13 866 Unnatural Deaths were recorded for the period, 1 February 2020 to 16 June 2020 at national level.

Province

Unnatural Deaths

Eastern Cape

2 173

Free State

662

Gauteng

2 946

KwaZulu-Natal

3 143

Limpopo

1 005

Mpumalanga

950

North West

628

Northern Cape

323

Western Cape

2 036

Total

13 866

Source: SAMRC

b) All death notification forms are collected by Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) from Department of Home Affairs bi-weekly for capturing, processing, assessment, analysis and dissemination of statistical reports and datasets on mortality and causes of death. The last report released by Stats SA reported on deaths was in 2017, citing technical challenges as the reason. SAMRC sources only natural and unnatural causes of death data from the basic demographic information for all deaths registered on the National Population Register on a weekly basis for purposes of monitoring trends on behalf of the Department of Health. However, SAMRC is also not allowed to access detailed causes of death because it is confidential; and as a result the cause of death in each specified case cannot be provided.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1408

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she has been informed about the report of an independent specialist group hired by the former Minister to investigate maladministration in her department in the previous term; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the key (a) findings and (b) recommendations in the specified report?

Reply:

(a ) Former Minister L. Sisulu commissioned two reports by Independent entities. One report looked at matters relating to irregular expenditure in the Department. This report was done by a company named Open Waters. A second report compiled by a panel led by former Justice Minister, B. Mabandla focused on matters related to organisational culture. This included looking at matters related to allegations of sexual harassment and allegations related to human resource management.

(b) The Open Waters report identified breaches in financial management but arrived at conclusions and recommendations that were not consistent with the findings. The second report made recommendations related to improving overall management and leadership in the Department. Based on the recommendations that were not aligned with the findings from the Open Waters Report, I will be appointing an external team to assess whether the findings in the report do not warrant further investigation, including a more thorough forensic investigation in some areas. The recommendations that will emanate from this report will allow me to complement measures related to improving leadership and management issues that emerged from the report compiled by the team led by Ms. Mabandla. This team will use the findings in the two reports mentioned above as the basis for further investigation and recommendations. The findings in both reports will have to be treated as draft findings at this stage given the need for further investigations. Given that these are draft finding, no action is proposed until the team that I will appoint completes the process initiated by my predecessor.

07 July 2020 - NW1133

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the fact that the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital currently has water shortage and requires assistance with reservoirs (details furnished), (a) how does his department receive and resolve issues of water shortage in clinics and hospitals around the country and (b) by what date will his department attend to the issue of water shortage at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital?

Reply:

a) Clinics and hospitals across the country receive water from the municipal water reticulation system. These facilities do however have back up water supply to assist when the municipality is unable to supply. A total of 2 908 (94%) clinics have piped water, and 2 568 (83%) have backup water supply in case of emergency. Those that do not have piped water and backup water receive water through municipal tanker supply system. All hospitals are connected to the municipal water reticulation system and also have backup water reservoir for the days that there is no supply from the municipality.

b) Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital does not have water shortage. It has the main Reservoir supplying Laundry and the Boiler and numerous tanks around the Hospital. There is, however, a need for two more reservoirs to be devoted to supply Maternity and Accident and Emergency Areas. The project for water reservoir to expand the water supply for the Hospital is planned for during this 2020/2021 financial year. Whenever there is a shortage of water from the municipality, the Hospital is able to supply the affected sections from its reservoir.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW970

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Finance

By what date will the Madibeng Local Municipality (a) complete and (b) submit the 2019-20 Medium Term Revenue and Expenditure Framework budget, which the National Treasury advised that it be revised after having assessed it and found it to be unfunded and unsustainable?

Reply:

(a)(b) The Madibeng Local Municipality revised their 2019/20 Medium Term Revenue and Expenditure Framework as part of the Special Adjustments Budget process initiated by the National Treasury on 8 November 2019. Subsequent to the Provincial Treasury’s assessment, the municipality’s 2018/19 MTREF budget reflected a positive cash position of R69 million from a negative balance of R209 million in the first year of the 2019/20 MTREF period while the two outer years showed marginal surpluses. These surpluses are reflective of the municipality’s strategy to prioritise arrear debt owed to bulk suppliers.

Following the mid-year budget performance assessment in December 2019, the municipal council did not deem it necessary to further adjust the 2019/20 budget.

However, it is important to note that all municipalities are now afforded a further opportunity to adjust their budgets in response to the changes in revenue and expenditure as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The deadline for this process is 15 June 2020.

07 July 2020 - NW1221

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How is his department working with the mines to conduct tracking and tracing in view of the increasing number of positive Covid-19 cases at the mines; (2) whether there is any training conducted for miners to properly assist them with social distancing?

Reply:

1. The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy has issued Government Notice No. 43335 on the 18 May 2020 covering the Mandatory Code of Practice on the Mitigation and Management of the COVID-19 Outbreak. As part of the code of practice, the mines have a contact tracing programme for contacts of COVID-19 cases identified on the mine and works with the district communicable disease coordinator on tracing of contacts beyond the mine. The National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) contact tracing protocol is followed. The mines submit weekly reports to the Minerals Council South Africa, the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy and the Department of Health, on the number of miners screened, tested, those who have recovered and contacts traced for the index case;

2. The mines have a comprehensive programme on the Covid-19 response including risk assessments and public health interventions including social distancing. Communication materials and training is provided to the miners on the Covid-19 response and social distancing by the mining companies.

END.

07 July 2020 - NW1172

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the fact that his department is erecting tents at Ekurhuleni to assist clinics with waiting areas to ensure social distancing criteria are in place, (a) which clinics in Ekurhuleni are being provided with the tents and (b) who got the tender as the service provider for erecting the tents?

Reply:

(a) The clinics in Ekurhuleni Health District Municipality which are being provided with tents are on the attached list (Annexure A)

(b) There was no tender that was awarded for the erection of the tents. These tents are erected by the Gauteng Provincial Infrastructure team, as part of the expansion of the space for the patients.

END.