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04 November 2015 - NW3817

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of financial aid was given to student organisations and societies by each university in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; (2) with regard to each university, (a) what is the source of the specified financial aid and (b) what percentage of the specified financial aid was sourced from state subsidies in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years; (3) (a) what formula is currently used to allocate financial aid to student organisations at each university and (c) who is responsible for allocating such financial aid at each specified university

Reply:

  1. All student clubs, societies and organisations apply to the Student Representative Council (SRC) for affiliation. Applications for affiliation are made as per provision of the Constitution of the SRC of an institution. Affiliation entitles a club, society or organisation to:
  • apply for a financial grant from the SRC;
  • use any premises on the University with approval from the respective University department;
  • use designated notice boards provided that those notices are signed by the SRC;
  • use SRC transport subject to the specified rules; and
  • use other resources incidental to its existence as a club, society or organisation subject to the specified rules of the University.

The Department does not have access to the financial records of the SRCs as they are governed by their (SRC) individual constitutions in terms of reporting and accountability to students. Furthermore, the allocation and management of funds by the SRC are done in line with the financial policy of the individual universities. The Student Parliament should, by a simple majority, recommend to the SRC, affiliation and budgets of student structures subject to specified criteria and the SRC making the final decision.

2. The source of budget of all SRC affiliated structures is made up of the allocation from the respective SRCs as well as donations that should be declared. SRC affiliates do not receive or source any funds directly from the state subsidy. All funds made available by the University for student governance is applied and managed in accordance with an approved budget and financial policies of the University. All affiliated structures submit annual budgets in prescribed form to the SRC.

3. In order to be recognised as a legitimate student organisation, and receive a financial grant from the SRC, a candidate-organisation must submit an application on the prescribed form and attach a founding declaration by a minimum of fifty (50) students (the number varies from one institution to the other) that they have committed to become members of an organisation. This declaration must contain the names, student numbers and signatures of these founding members, and a draft constitution for the new organisation, which includes at least the proposed name of the organisation, purpose and main objectives, management structure and the duties and responsibilities of its office-bearers. The club or society should also submit a programme of action to be considered by the SRC and the Student Parliament. Upon submission of all these documents, the SRC will consider for approval and affiliation of the new structure.

A newly affiliated organisation must present audited financial statements and an acceptable annual report at the Annual General Meeting held in the second semester of a year in which they receive recognition as an SRC affiliate (reporting differs from institution to institution). Failure to do so could result in the SRC withholding further use of the resources and/or penalising the organisation in the following year.

The Treasurer of the SRC is accountable for the budget of the SRC and affiliates, financial transactions and records, and fundraising in accordance with financial policies and rules of the University. Affiliated organisations shall receive funding as determined by the SRC budgetary guidelines which are approved by the SRC in consultation with the Student Parliament, but may approach the SRC for additional financial assistance if such is considered and justified in terms of their approved programme of activities for the current year.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3817 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

04 November 2015 - NW3849

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, in view of a report that he received in 2012 from a working group chaired by a certain person (name furnished), which he commissioned to investigate the possibility of fee-free university education, the specified report shows that a fee-free university education is possible; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) when will he release the specified report to the public?

Reply:

1.Yes, I have investigated the feasibility of providing free quality education for the poor and working class. In 2012, the Ministerial Working Group on Fee-Free Higher Education was established, to investigate and advise on the feasibility of making university education fee-free for the poor in South Africa. The responsibilities of the Working Group included the following:

a) determine the actual cost of introducing fee-free university education for poor people in South Africa; in other words, what would it cost South Africa to offer fee-free university education to cover people classified as poor;

b) suggest a working definition of poor people in South Africa, if necessary suggesting different categories and how all can be provided fee-free university education;

c) consider existing policy provision and broadly consult documentation of other task teams/working groups in the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) which deal or dealt with related fields;

d) examine various models and options of providing fee-free higher education for poor people used elsewhere in the world and make recommendations to the Minister; and

e) contemplate all possible implications and consequences of providing fee-free university education for the poor.

The Working Group acknowledged that at this point in time in the development of South Africa, a well-considered system of free university education for the poor could go a long way towards increasing both access to and the quality of higher education, and in so doing help to tackle unemployment and poverty, reduce inequality and deepen democracy. It concluded that free university education for the poor in South Africa is feasible, but will require significant additional funding for both the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and the university system.

The Ministerial Working Group on Fee-Free Higher Education advised that fee-free university education for the poor is feasible, if built on the current NSFAS cost sharing and recovery model. The implementation of fee-free university education is dependent on significant funding being made available, but the quantum of funding required varies depending on the range of parameters and policy decisions.

The report recommended that NSFAS be strengthened to implement the scheme and that a policy dialogue should be put in place to discuss the parameters and develop regulations for implementation. However, before the final policy and regulations are published, funding to support the scheme must be committed.

A Policy Dialogue comprising of the DHET, NSFAS, Universities South Africa, the University Council Chairs Forum, National Treasury, the South African Union of Students and the Council on Higher Education has been established to identify current and projected funding challenges and propose policy and legislative amendments in line with the recommendations of the Working Group on fee-free education, as well as the recommendations articulated in the National Development Plan that “all students who qualify for NSFAS must be provided access to full funding through loans and bursaries to cover costs of tuition, books, accommodation and living expenses”.

2. A copy of the report is available on the following link:

http://www.dhet.gov.za/SitePages/OrgUniversities.aspx

 

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3849 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

04 November 2015 - NW3456

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) has withdrawn any funding from the Amathole District Municipality (ADM) that had already been committed to municipal infrastructure work and in particular the Siyenza sanitation project; if not, (a) why has ADM not paid the sub-contractors employed under the Siyenza contract for work completed to date, (b) why has work been suspended on the project and (c) when can the sub-contractors expect to receive payment for work completed to date; if so, (i) on what grounds was the specified funding withdrawn, (ii) how does the ADM intend to refund the monies already expended on this project to DBSA and (iii) what contingency plans has ADM put in place to ensure the (aa) payment of its contractual obligations and (bb) completion of work by the contractors on site; (2) whether a certain company (name furnished) continues to be remunerated and/or employed in terms of this project; if so, on what grounds is the specified company selectively employed to continue operations; (3) (a) what are the reasons for the ADM’s move into the R200 million new offices, when it is unable to meet its financial obligations towards the contractors mentioned above and (b) how is this move being funded; (4) what is his position with regard to the alleged extravagance which does not directly contribute to service delivery; (5) Whether the funding should not instead be channelled into finishing the half- completed work on the sanitation project mentioned above?

Reply:

1. The DBSA has indicated that it has not withdrawn funding from Amathole District Municipality.

a)   The DBSA has indicated that it signed a loan agreement with Amathole District Municipality to advance a portion of its future MIG allocations for the accelerated sanitation programme, with the pledging period expiring on 30 June 2015. The total amount to be advanced as per the loan agreement was R631 million, with the first tranche of R286 million disbursed to the Municipality at the start of the programme (January 2015). Due to the fact that the programme was delayed, the Municipality could not draw the full amount of R631 million before the end of the pledging period. However, the loan availability is still active until 31 December 2016. This means the District Municipality may still apply to National Treasury for the extension of the pledging period. Regarding payment of subcontractors, this is a contractual matter between the Siyenza Group and the affected sub-contractors as the liability for the payment of these subcontractors rests with the Siyenza Group.

b)   The Amathole District Municipality has indicated to COGTA that it has terminated its contract with the Siyenza Group, which was carrying out the construction work. This is the reason why the work has stopped.

c) As indicated above, the payment of subcontractors is a matter between the Siyenza Group and the subcontractors concerned.

    i. As indicated above, the DBSA has indicated that it has not withdrawn funding.

    ii. As per the loan agreement between DBSA and Amathole District Municipality, the loan amounts are to be repaid to DBSA over the next two financial years (2015/16 and 2016/17), utilising a portion of MIG funding to the Municipality.

    iii. The Municipality has indicated that, should National Treasury extend the pledging period, the Municipality will, following required procurement processes, contract directly with as many of the sub-contractors as possible to complete the project.

2. As indicated above, the Municipality has indicated to COGTA that it has terminated its contract with the Siyenza group. Questions regarding the details of this termination and whether any further payments are due to the contractor should be referred to the Municipality.

3. (a) Reasons for own office accommodation

According to the Amathole District Municipality, the business case to acquire its own offices was prepared as far back as 2004. The ADM has over the years spent a substantial amount on rented office accommodation around East London from its operational budget. It was also felt that a single office structure to accommodate its head office staff was more beneficial than having departments and business units scattered around the city. It remains the aim of the ADM to own its own premises in order to house its office staff, rather than to carry on renting office space.

Reasons for relocation to Stutterheim

According to Amathole District Municipality, prior to 2011, the Buffalo City Municipality was one of the local municipalities situated within the jurisdiction of the ADM. According to the location of the ADM’s head office and seat of council in East London at the material time, were within its area of jurisdication:

However, after Buffalo City Municipality was established as a metropolitan municipality following the 2011 local government elections, it ceased to form a part of the ADM. This gave result in a situation where the ADM, which is a largely rural based municipality, having its head office outside its area of jurisdiction. Consequently it does not make economic sense for the ADM to rent property outside its boundaries.

Hence following the establishment of the BCMM, the Council of the ADM resolved that the head office and seat of the ADM must be relocated to within its own jurisdiction. Following a feasibility study, the town of Stutterheim was identified as a suitable home for the ADM.

(b) Possible Funding for office accommodation

A public private partnership process (PPP) was initiated. However, suitable private partners could not be identified to work with the ADM to develop suitable premises.

Currently, the ADM is exploring other funding models for the development of its head office in Stutterheim. Whilst it may be possible to secure funding amounting to R200 million for this purpose, for the ADM to commit itself to such a funding arrangement, would require the approval of National Treasury.

4. It would be imprudent for me to comment on a policy decision that is based on factors that are not within my knowledge. I suggest that the Honourable member should pose the question directly to the Amathole District Municipality for a direct reply.

5. The Policy considerations in this matter are peculiarly within the knowledge of the Municipal Council. I suggest that this question be directed to the Mayor of Amathole District Municipality.

We certainly agree that the maximum part of expenditure in the municipality should be spent on services for the public.

  1. BACKGROUND
    1. The DBSA signed a loan agreement with Amathole District Municipality to advance a portion of its future MIG allocations for the accelerated sanitation programme expiring in December 2015.The loan agreement was dependent on approval by National Treasury to allow Amathole District Municipality to use a portion of its future MIG to pay the DBSA for funds advanced to accelerate the sanitation programme. The loan agreement is valid till December 2016. However, National Treasury approval for the municipality to pledge its conditional grant had a validity period up to June 2015, with an additional grace period of three months thereafter. This meant that the municipality had until September 2015 to complete the programme. The total amount to be advanced as per the loan agreement was R631 million with the first tranche of R286 million disbursed to the Municipality at the start of the programme (January 2015). Due to the fact that the programme was delayed, the district could not draw the full amount of R631 million before the end of the pledging period as approved by National Treasury.
    1. However, the Municipality had submitted a further claim of R81 million to DBSA before 30 June 2015. As per the loan agreement signed between the parties, disbursements were to be made subject to the Municipality providing the Bank with confirmation of work done in the form of payment certificates. The payment certificates submitted with the claim of R81 million could not support work done and the parties acknowledged that it could have been caused by the fact that the contract with the main contractor was in the process of being cancelled. As such Amathole undertook to conduct verification using internal resources.
    1. The Municipality submitted the results of the verification in the form of happy letters signed by recipients of completed toilets to DBSA on 17 August 2015. The Bank and the Municipality assessed the happy letters as well as delivery notes of material on site and confirmed that 30,409 units had been completed and 15, 911 of uninstalled units have been delivered. There was, however, no onsite verification (verification that can confirm the existence of reported quantity, appropriate quality as well as compliance). The DBSA received a signed letter from the Municipal Manager to confirm this information. The DBSA is processing the payment of R92million based on the information provided. The rest of the balance is depended on approval of National Treasury for extension of the pledging period and extension of the loan availability by the DBSA.
  1. DISCUSSION

Amathole District Municipality is alleging that the reason the project has stopped is because National Treasury has refused to extend the pledging period beyond June 2015.

National Treasury has, however, indicated that it approved the Amathole Business case in August 2014 with a condition that the implementation of the project was going to happen over a nine (09) months period as indicated and motivated for by the Amathole District Municipality in their Business Case. This meant that implementation was to complete on 30 June 2015. Since approval was granted by National Treasury, Amathole District Municipality never approached National Treasury regarding the extension of the time on the pledge with the exception of the meeting dated the 30 July 2015 where a formal presentation was made to National Treasury by the Municipality. Further, in the business case that was approved, the Amathole District Municipality had indicated that they may require an additional three months to accommodate for unforeseeable circumstances. This meant that the implementation period could stretch until the end of September 2015. By virtue of the approval of the business case, National Treasury allowed the Amathole District Municipality the full twelve months of implementation time.

National Treasury indicated that, following the above meeting, National Treasury wrote a letter to the Municipality formally alerting the municipality to the fact that the pledge is lapsing as at the end of September 2015 and has asked for the municipality’s intention going forward. To date the National Treasury has not received any response from the municipality in this regard.  

MINISTRY

COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2015/3456

DATE OF PUBLICATION: XXXX 2015

Herewith a reply recommended by: Recommended by

MR NTANDAZO VIMBA DR SEAN PHILLIPSS

Executive Manager: Legal Services CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Date: DATE:

RECOMMENDED / NOT RECOMMENDED

MR V MADONSELA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

Date:

SUPPORT / NOT SUPPORTED

MR A NEL, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

Date:

APPROVED / NOT APPROVED

MR PRAVIN GORDHAN, MP

MINISTER

Date:

__________________________________________________________________________________________

R O U T E F O R M

RECEIVED AND RECORDED AT THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OFFICE ON:

DATE

NAME

SIGNATURE

1ST RETURN DATE

2ND RETURN DATE

3RD RETURN DATE

/ /2015

   

 

/ /2015

 

/ /2015

 

/ /2015

DOCUMENT CLASSIFICATION

URGENT

x

IMPORTANT

 

NORMAL

 

SUBJECT

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NO 2015/3456

DRAFTER

Mr Ntandazo Vimba

PORTFOLIO

 

DIRECTORATE

Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent

REFERENCE NO

2015/3456

TEL/CELL

(012) 8485317/ 0795055368

ROUTE

SIGNATURE

DATE

DATE RETURN

MR Ntandazo Vimba

Executive Manager

Vendor Services, Legal and Contracts Management

     

Dr Sean Phillips

Chief Executive Officer

MISA

     

MR V MADONSELA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

     

MR ANDRIES NEL, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE

     

PRAVIN GORDHAN, MP

MINISTER FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

     

INSTRUCTIONS / NOTES

 

THE MINISTER

REFERENCE NO: 2015/152

SUBJECT: PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NO 2015/3456

Date: 16 September 2015

03 November 2015 - NW3413

Profile picture: Esterhuizen, Mr JA

Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Who is paying for the consumption of 28,2% of electricity that is purchased and distributed by the City of Johannesburg and lost through illegal connections amounting to R2,5 billion in monetary value?

Reply:

The following information was provided by City Power Johannesburg:

The electricity distribution industry is characterised by distribution losses, and categorised into technical and non-technical losses.

Technical losses represent the energy lost when transmitted and distributed through overhead lines, transformers and cables to reach the customer, while non-technical losses represent losses due to theft of electricity, unbilled and incorrectly billed customers, Large Power Users illegally converted to pre-paid mode, vandalism and bypassing of meters and illegal connections.

The 28,2% losses with a monetary value of R2,5 billion refers to the 2013/14 financial year, and reflects the total distribution losses, technical and non-technical. Technical losses are calculated at 9% and non-technical losses are the difference between the total distribution and the technical losses.

For the 2014/15 financial year the total distribution losses was reduced to 18,63% with technical losses at 9% and non-technical losses at 9,63% amounting to R1,524 billion.

The City of Johannesburg annually makes budget provision for the purchase of electricity and the sale thereof and due to non-technical losses, the actual sales is less than the budget. The City of Johannesburg therefor pays for the non-technical losses.

03 November 2015 - NW3557

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any internal investigation has been conducted into the municipal manager of Kareeberg Local Municipality in the Northern Cape, Mr Willem de Bruin, because of (a) his appointment without meeting the minimum requirements for the position in terms of his department and National Treasury's regulations, (b) criminal charges laid against him (CAS96/3/2015) for his misuse of the municipal commonage for personal gain and (c) his unlawful interventions in the tender processes of the municipality; if not, why not; if so, what is the current status of the internal investigation?NW 4224E

Reply:

The Department has requested the MEC responsible for local government in the Northern Cape Province to investigate this matter and report back to the Minister. The Honourable Member will be furnished with a reply once the information referred herein is received

03 November 2015 - NW2980

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has made any progress in establishing any prisoner transfer agreements with other countries; if not, what (a) impediments are preventing the negotiation of such agreements and (b) action is her department taking to overcome the specified impediments; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, progress has been made in that all relevant Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) Departments were consulted and a process of approaching Cabinet for a decision on a South African position on prisoner transfer agreements with other countries has been initiated.

(a) and (b). Fall away.

03 November 2015 - NW3725

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether his department is aware that municipal disaster funds were utilised to repair the ring road in Kwanomzamo, Riebeek East in Makana Municipality in June and July 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details: 2. Who was the contractor appointed to repair the specified Ring Road?

Reply:

1.The municipal disaster funds were not utilised to repair the specific Ring Road at Kwanomzamo, Riebeek East in Makana Local Municipality.

This road is not specified within the approved Independent Assessment and Verified Report for the disaster declared in Makana Local Municipality in 2012. According to the report received from the Eastern Cape Provincial Disaster Management Centre, the Ring Road at Kwanomzamo, Riebeek East was not part of the assessed and verified project, as approved in the Independent Assessment and Verification report.

2. According to the report received from the Eastern Cape Provincial Disaster Management Centre, the Contractor appointed to repair the Ring Road is Izana Civils.

03 November 2015 - NW3655

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Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether three companies (names furnished) have been instructed to produce set-top boxes (STBs) arising from the four Digital Terrestrial Television programme tenders; if not, what are the relevant details; if so, (a) how many (i) STBs and (ii) antennae from each tender were ordered from each of the specified suppliers and (b) what are the costs of the specified items of each supplier, (2) whether any orders have been placed with other suppliers beside the specified suppliers; if so, (a) with which companies have these orders been placed, (b) when were the specified orders placed and (c) what is the delivery date of the specified orders; (3) whether a non-disclosure agreement by the Universal Service Access Agency of South Africa has been imposed on (a) her department and/or (b) the specified companies who have secured orders in terms of the specified tenders?

Reply:

(1) USAASA, as an entity, is responsible for the procurement of STBs and has confirmed placement of orders with the manufacturers of:

(a) (i) One million five hundred thousand (1.5 million)

(ii) One million antennae

(b) Department is still in the process of engagement with USAASA regarding the purchase prices of STBs and accessories

(2) USAASA has confirmed placement of purchase orders with the manufactures from the established panel of suppliers of STBs:

(a) USAASA has confirmed placing purchase orders with three companies

(b) Orders were placed in August 2015

(c) Delivery of STBs is dependent on the manufacturers satisfying Conformance Regime and the testing of STBs on the network. Actual delivery is to consider a lag period of eight (8) to twelve (12) weeks from ordering of components by manufacturers from suppliers.

(3)

(a) Any agreement for the production and supply of STBs is between USAASA and manufacturers

(b) Any agreement for the production and supply of STBs is between USAASA and manufacturers

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

03 November 2015 - NW3115

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 2600 on 5 August 2015, (a) what is the estimated cost of building the new hospital, (b) what is the expected completion date and (c) how many patients is the new hospital going to accommodate?

Reply:

a) The estimated cost of building the new hospital will be determined once the relocation of the existing hospital has been finalised and planning of the new hospital is complete. As part of the agreement with the successful bidder, the successful bidder will relocate the hospital and build new hospital at his own cost.

b) The expected completion date will be determined once the relocation of the existing hospital has been finalised and planning of the new hospital is complete.

c) The existing hospital has 266 usable beds. The bed utilisation rate is currently 60%. 150 patients are currently admitted with 116 beds empty. The hospital will be relocated with the same bed capacity of 266 beds.

END.

03 November 2015 - NW3418

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September, Ms CC to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether her department meets the Government’s 2% employment equity target for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No;

The Department does not meet the 2% Employment Equity target at present.

The Department acknowledges that achieving disability equity is imperative to the transformational agenda set by the Constitution (1996), the White Paper on Affirmative Action (1998) and other subsequent legislations.

Employees with Disabilities make up to 1.4 % (percent) of employees in the Department. The low representation of person with disabilities in the Department emanate from the rule that disability disclosure is done on a voluntary basis.

Concreted efforts are been made to allow persons with disabilities to apply for position in the Department and to apply for positions in the Department and encourage those that are within to disclose their disabilities status in order to meet or exceed the required 2% targets.

UNQUOTE

03 November 2015 - NW3721

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether a certain person (name furnished) is a consultant to his department; if not, in what capacity does the specified person work for his department; if so (a) what are the set key performance areas and outcomes of the specified person and (b) how is the specified person remunerated?

Reply:

The person referred to is not a consultant, but is employed as a Special Advisor to the Minister.

(a) The person referred to is appointed as a Special Advisor in accordance with Public Service Act Section 12A (i), to:

  1. Advise the Executive Authority on the exercise/performance of the Executive Authority’s powers and duties
  2. Advise the Executive Authority on the development of policy that will promote the department’s objectives and
  3. Perform such tasks as appropriate in respect of the exercise/performance of the Executive Authority’s powers and duties

(b) The person referred to is remunerated in accordance with Section 12A of the Public Service Act, 1994 and the relevant dispensation for Special Advisors, as contained in Section 17 of the Act.

03 November 2015 - NW3533

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether patients who have no medical aid cover are required to make any additional payments, including administration fees when making use of State hospital services; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether patients such as Transmed members, who do have medical aid cover and who are required to make use of State hospitals, are required to make any additional payments, including administration fees, when making use of State hospital services; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) how many patients in State hospitals have (i) died or (ii) been injured due to negligence or deliberate actions by the employees and/or management of State hospitals in each year from 1 January 1995 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what type of malpractices in State hospitals have brought about the most (i) deaths and (ii) injuries; (4) (a) how much compensation has been paid out in the specified period, (b) on what legal grounds were the payments made and (c) how many of the payments took place due to (i) court orders or (ii) settlement agreements; (5) what steps has he taken and will he take to reduce the number of deaths and injuries in State hospitals?

Reply:

  1. Cash-paying patients, i.e those with no medical aid are classified according to UPFS (Uniform Patient Fee Schedule).

Patients in H1 category paying nothing.

Patient in H2 paying part of the fee and patient in H3 category pay full hospital fees.

2. When a patient on medical aid utilises public health facilities, they are not required to pay only extra cash above what the medical aid pay for them.

3. Honourable Member, death of a patient due to a deliberate action by employees and/or management of state hospitals to me means murdering such a patient – that is what deliberate action will mean to me.

We have never had a report of such.

4. Since the various litigations are directed at provinces and not at the Minister, and payments are done by provinces, I am still collecting this data.

5. Honourable Member, it will to a long way for you to be a bit specific about the deaths you are referring to, in order to help me answer your question.

Number of deaths from what? HIV/AIDS? TB? Pneumonia? Diarrhoea? Diabetes, Stroke, Cancer? Hepatitis? Meningitis? Heart failure? Liver failure? Prematurity?

And what type of injuries – motor vehicle accidents? Gunshots wounds? Assault? Stab wounds? Burn wounds? What exactly?

END.

03 November 2015 - NW3531

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Health

(1)In view of the high incident levels of breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), what is the statistics on the number of (a) reported cases across all hospitals for (i) stage 2 to 4 breast cancer and (ii) DCIS and (b) procedures undertaken for (i) double mastectomies, (ii) single mastectomies and (iii) lumpectomies in (aa) 2012, (bb) 2013 and (cc) 2014; (2) does his department (a) train intern surgeons and (b) promote the performance of (i) reconstructive surgery and (ii) oncoplastic procedures; if not, why not, in each case, taking into consideration the dignity of and the emotional impact it has on a patient; if so, how many procedures were performed in the specified years?

Reply:

Honourable Member will remember that the Cancer Register has just been established in our country to try and record such statistics about Cancer.

It is only in April this year that National Treasury has started funding it directly from the fiscus rather than through the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) as it were. But the training of Registers and reconstructive surgery is definitely going on.

END.

03 November 2015 - NW3813

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Has the SA Human Rights Commission made a follow-up on their recommendations with regard to report reference number MP/2011/0134, in respect of the Emalahleni Local Municipality in Mpumalanga, to ensure compliance; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I wish to inform the Honourable Member that I have been informed by the South African Human Rights Commission, that yes, the Commission has made follow-ups in this regard.

I have furthermore been informed that following numerous correspondences (including a letter in February 2015) sent to the Municipality requesting an update on the implementation of the recommendations in the report, the Municipality appealed the Commission’s findings.

In September 2015, the Office of the Chairperson of the South African Human Rights Commission dismissed the Municipality’s appeal and the provincial office is now engaging the Municipality with a view to obtain the Municipality’s time-framed implementation plan aimed at effecting the recommendations in the report.

 

.

03 November 2015 - NW3773

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What reasons will the South African Government provide the Assembly of States for non-compliance with the International Criminal Court order to arrest President, Mr Omar Al-Bashir?

Reply:

The South African Government has requested the International Criminal Court for an extension of the time-limit to submit our view on the events surrounding Omar Al Bashir’s attendance of the African Union Summit in Johannesburg from 13 to 15 June 2015, until such time as the ongoing judicial proceedings before the South African Courts are finalized.

The Pre- Trial Chamber of the ICC has granted an extension and has ordered the competent authorities in the Republic of South Africa to report to the Chamber on any developments in the judicial proceedings as they occur; and should no such developments occur prior to 15 December 2015, to submit a report detailing the status of the relevant domestic judicial proceedings not later than 31 December 2015.

The Honourable Member’s request for reasons is therefore premature.

 

03 November 2015 - NW3694

Profile picture: Matshobeni, Ms A

Matshobeni, Ms A to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

In light of the claim by the workers at Magwa Tea Plantation in Ntabankulu, Eastern Cape, that they have not been paid since July 2014, which is contrary to his claim in his reply to question 2366 on 13 July 2015, what steps does he intend to take to ensure that the specified workers are paid their salaries on time? NW4362E

Reply:

The provincial department of agriculture in the Eastern Cape called the Department of Rural Development and Agrarian reform has reported that R1.9 million was paid to Magwa tea plantation for the workers’ salaries in 2015/16. The province has indicated that this amount is what they could afford in the current financial year but there is a huge backlog. This project is funded through the equitable share and was never funded through the conditional grants. The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) has been informed that a business rescue plan has been developed which indicates that at least R66 million is needed to turnaround the business, this figure includes outstanding payments due to workers. The DAFF welcomes the business rescue plan and will set up a team to verify this report by the province and determine the actual outstanding payments to workers as well as support the province in its bid to get additional funding to support the project. It is stated that the business is currently not profitable and no assurances can be made for workers to be paid their salaries on time under current situation.

03 November 2015 - NW3656

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Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to the Digital Terrestrial Television tenders relating to the set-top boxes and antennae administered by her department, (a) what amount has been paid to each specified supplier to date, (b) when was the specified amount paid and (c) what are the terms of payment of the balance due in terms of the contract arising from the specified tenders?

Reply:

(a) Contracts were entered into between USAASA and the Manufacturers of which terms of references

(b) Payments are part of the terms of the reference between USAASA and manufacturers

(c) Terms of payment are part of the contract terms of reference between USAASA and manufacturers

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

03 November 2015 - NW3065

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Health

(a) How does (i) his department and (ii) entities reporting to him define red tape and (b) what (i) specific interventions and/or (ii) systems have been implemented to (aa) identify and (bb) reduce red tape in (aaa) his department and (bbb) the entities reporting to him?

Reply:

a) As the Department we understand Red tape as set of processes/ systems that requires excessive formality or routine to perform or execute functions that impediments the department to achieve its set objectives within a reasonable time period.

b) (i) The department holds monthly management meetings to address all challenges faced by the department. Furthermore, there are Forums in place and functional i.e. Chief Financial Officers Forums, Technical Advisory Committee to National Health Council and National Health Council.

(ii) (aa) (bb) (aaa) The Department has approved policies in place and fully implemented, are in line with national policies and regulations. The department has management tracking system register in place and fully functional to track and reduce the red tapes.

The public entities reporting to the Minister of Health defines red tape as follows:

  • The Office of Health Standards Compliance: excessive regulation of external stakeholders (health establishments) and internal business operations which hinders flexibility in the business operations of the regulated stakeholders and internal business operations of the entity.
  • The National Health Laboratory Service: excessive regulation and bureaucratic practices which hinder timeous decision making.
  • The South African Medical Research Council: there is no legal / public policy instrument that gives an official meaning to the concept of “red tape”. However, the general understanding is that the concept would refer to an “unnecessary delay”.

- The Council for Medical Schemes: excessive regulation as well as rigid conformity to formal policies and procedures and as bureaucratic processes between the entity and the Executive Authority.

(b) (i) The specific interventions and/or (ii) systems implemented to identify (aa) and (bb) reduce red tape in the (bbb) entities reporting to the Minister of Health are as follows:

  • The Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC): Regulates health establishments in the country through regulations which get processed for promulgation by involving stakeholders through publication of the draft regulations for public comments to identify through comments received, any provisions in the draft regulations which may be considered Red Tape by stakeholders. Review of the comments received provide the OHSC an opportunity to identify and reduce “red tape” by ensuring that provisions in the regulations allow for flexibility in how the regulated stakeholders conduct their business, but without compromising on the compliance requirements (public protection) to ensure quality in the provision of health services by health establishments.

Internally OHSC also has policies in place which provide guidance in terms of how decisions should be made to avoid “red tape”. The policies go through a rigorous process of review by OHSC governance structures (Management and Board Committees) before approval by the Board as the ultimate Accounting Authority. This review process is meant to ensure that any provisions in the policies of the entity which may be considered “red tape” are identified and reduced by considering flexible ways for decision making. The OHSC has a delegation of authority policy which also assists in dealing with “red tape” by ensuring that operational decisions are left for management to take and that only strategic decisions are reserved for the Board.  

  • The National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS): The NHLS Board has clear mandate as outlined in the NHLS Act and Board Charter. These instruments allow the Board and Executives to make decisions within the confines of the delegated powers and authority. Issues requiring Ministerial approval are referred to the Department in writing and feedback is received timeously.
  • The South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC): Due to the lack of legal / authoritative premise to support the concept, the SAMRC does not have a standing policy on identifying “red tape”. However, the SAMRC has the internal policies that guide it on delivering its mandate and engagements with other health / science cluster entities or with the ministry or the departments.

In particular, among others, the SAMRC uses the following processes to ensure that no unnecessary delays result from any of the SAMRC processes:

  • A review of the key processes to identify bottlenecks and areas that can be improved from an efficiency perspective without compromising compliance with the relevant legislation; and
  • Feedback from customers and staff.

The following interventions have been introduced to reduce delays”:

  • Automated processes wherever possible to speed up transaction times and reduce manual intervention;
  • The coordination of key processes in a shared services environment to ensure processes are consistent and as efficient as possible;
  • Automated help desks in areas such as IT, facilities, finance and supply chain management to enable staff and customers to communicate problems quickly and enable their resolution to be tracked; and
  • Service level agreements for departments with target turnaround times for services provided which are tracked and published to staff and customers.

Laws such as the Inter-governmental Relations Framework Act, existence of the Research Ethics Committee as well as the Significance and Materiality Framework agreed between the SAMRC and the Ministry of Health in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, form part of the regulatory regime the SAMRC utilises to manage its engagements.

  • The Council for Medical Schemes (CMS): The CMS develops Memorandum of Understanding with entities it works with and departments within the CMS, this allows for more efficient processes to be followed. Policies and procedures are presented to the different governance structures within CMS where the policies are interrogated to ensure that they are not cumbersome and that CMS is able to carry out its mandate with minimal amount of “red tape”, it allows for flexibility without compromising CMS in terms of compliance with relevant legislation. Through its risk management process CMS is able to identify key areas where there are delays in processes that may hinder CMS in executing its mandate. Automated processes e.g. Real time monitoring of schemes financials have been introduced to stakeholders to allow for submission of regulatory information with as little “red tape” as possible. CMS deals with the Executive Authority through the office of the Health Regulation and Compliance division at the National Department of Health (NDoH) and further a task team has been established between CMS and NDoH in order to promote communication to avoid unnecessary “red tape”.

END.

03 November 2015 - NW3765

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In respect of the respect of the recent presidential pardons granted to political prisoners, what are the relevant details of the rehabilitative and reintegrative steps and procedures that are in place to assist those who have received such pardon to successfully reintegrate back into the society?

Reply:

A Special Dispensation was adopted on 21 November 2007 following an announcement by the President addressing a Joint Sitting of Parliament in order to facilitate the granting of Presidential pardon for individuals who have committed offences they believe were in pursuit of political objectives in terms of section 84 (2) (j) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996. On 19 January 2008 the President announced the appointment of a Reference Group that will consider applications for pardoning and to advise the President of the "special process" for the pardoning. The Reference Group and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development handled and managed the administration of the process. After consultation with the office of the President, the department has resuscitated this process and it is now at an advanced stage. However, it should be emphasized that only those individuals who applied for the presidential pardon are currently considered by a Ministerial Task Team.

At this stage it can be confirmed that no presidential pardons were granted to sentenced offenders. However, offenders in the above mentioned category who qualifies in terms of the normal parole placement policy are considered for parole placement and only those who comply with all requirements are released on parole. The Ministerial Task Team ensured that offenders who applied in terms of the Special Dispensation and still incarcerated have done the following programs to prepare them for eventual parole release:

  • Life skills with social workers (orientation, defining of self- image, completion of collage presentation, self-knowledge and self- acceptance , development , motivation, future planning).
  • Life skills with psychologists
  • Pre-release (health education, financial management, relationships, restorative justice, finding employment, parole conditions, substance abuse relapse prevention)
  • Cross roads
  • Substance abuse
  • Anger in anger out
  • Heart lines
  • Restorative justice / VOD / VOM
  • Recreational programs
  • Spiritual care
  • Hope Foundation: purple ribbon for peace: (conflict analysis, emotional planning, active listening, assertiveness, problem solving, negotiation, mediation)

03 November 2015 - NW3699

Profile picture: Dudley, Ms C

Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the trauma suffered by mothers of still-born babies who are not allowed to bury their babies if they are born at 26 weeks or younger and do not survive (details furnished), (a) his department is aware of this consequence of the existing legislation and (b) he intends to introduce amendments to current legislation that regulates the disposal of medical waste; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)-(b) We are aware of the provisions of the Births and Deaths Registrations Act (Act No 51 of 1992), which is the responsibility of the Department of Home Affairs. According to the Act a death below 26 weeks of intrauterine life, is not classified as a still-birth and thus does not qualify to receive a death certificate. Midwives and doctors provide counselling to the mother and her partner to come to terms with the still-birth and refer them for further counselling should this be necessary.

END.

03 November 2015 - NW3450

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

When does she intend to introduce the Media Development and Diversity Agency’s amending Bill in Parliament?

Reply:

The Department anticipates that the MDDA Amendment Bill will be introduced in Parliament during the fourth (4) quarter of 2015/16 Financial year

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

03 November 2015 - NW2953

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to her reply to question 1570 on 21 October 2014, what amount of the total expense allowance afforded to the (a) Chief Executive Officer, (b) Chief Financial Officer and (c) Chief Operating Officer, as executive board members, is attributed to (i) housing allowance, (ii) car allowance, (iii) cell phone allowance, (iv) other cash allowance, (v) entertainment allowance, (vi) subsistence allowance, (vii) benefit replacement allowance, (viii) insurance allowance, (ix) acting allowance and (x) special allowance, in each specified case?

Reply:

The information on the total expense allowance afforded to the CEO, COO, and CFO is contained in the 2015 Annual Report of the SABC.

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

03 November 2015 - NW3785

Profile picture: Mackay, Mr G

Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Why was the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) transaction not included in the nuclear co-operation framework agreement that was signed with the Russian Federation in 2014; (2) is the Government selling the PBMR hardware or intellectual property; (3) whether any tender process has been undertaken in this regard; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) PBMR has been placed under care and maintenance since 2010 and has not been involved in any commercial transactions other than the disposal of non-strategic assets that was approved as part of the care and maintenance. The Rosatom transaction reported in the National Treasury Annual Report was declined on this basis.

Issues relating to nuclear co-operation framework agreement and what is included therein, are within the domain of the Minister of Energy.

(2) Government is not selling any of PBMR hardware or intellectual property.

(3) There are no commercial activities taking place within PBMR as it is under care and maintenance, therefore no tender processes have been undertaken.

 

03 November 2015 - NW3446

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to her reply to question 2858 on 2 September 2015 and in respect of each case, (a) what (i) was the cost of the individual flights and (ii) class did she travel, (b) who accompanied her, (c) what was the cost of (i) the flights for those who accompanied her and (ii) accommodation for (aa) her and (bb) those who accompanied her and (d) what amount did her department spend on (i) other specified expenses and (ii) allowances for (aa) her and (bb) those who accompanied her?

Reply:

This question has been previously responded to in details. Refer to a response to Question number 2858 that was published on 7 August 2015.

 

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

03 November 2015 - NW2978

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) How many foreign nationals are currently incarcerated in correctional centres as (i) sentenced offenders, (ii) remand detainees and (iii) detainees awaiting deportation, (b) what is the breakdown of the specified foreign nationals in respect of their country of origin and (c) what services does his department provide to the specified foreign nationals?

Reply:

(a)(i), (ii), (iii) and (b):

NUMBER OF FOREIGN NATIONALS AS ON 10 AUGUST 2015

NATIONALITY

SENTENCE GROUPS

 

REMAND DETAINEES

DETAINEES AWAITING DEPORTATION

SENTENCED

ALL SENTENCE GROUPS

ALGERIA

0

 

1

1

AMERICAN SAMOA

0

 

2

2

ANGOLA

14

 

65

79

ARGENTINA

0

 

2

2

AUSTRALIA

0

 

1

1

AUSTRIA

0

 

2

2

BANGLADESH

14

 

5

19

BENIN

1

 

3

4

BOLIVIA

1

 

44

45

BOTSWANA

4

 

11

15

BRAZIL

2

 

20

22

BRIT. CARRIBEAN FED (JA,WL,WV)

0

 

1

1

BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY

0

 

2

2

BULGARIA

4

 

6

10

BURUNDI

17

 

18

35

CAMEROON

4

 

11

15

CANADA

0

 

1

1

CAPE VERDE

0

 

2

2

CHINA

8

 

15

23

COLOMBIA

0

 

4

4

CONGO

57

 

67

124

CZECH REPUBLIC

1

 

0

1

DENMARK

0

 

1

1

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

0

 

1

1

ECUADOR

0

 

5

5

EGYPT

2

 

1

3

EL SALVADOR

0

 

1

1

ERITREA

0

 

1

1

ETHIOPIA

18

 

13

31

FRANCE

0

 

2

2

FRENCH GUIANA

0

 

1

1

GAMBIA

1

 

0

1

GHANA

3

 

16

19

GUINEA

2

 

3

5

GUINEA-BISSAU

0

 

2

2

GUYANA

1

 

9

10

ICELAND

0

 

0

0

INDIA

3

 

8

11

IRELAND

1

 

0

1

ISRAEL

1

 

0

1

JAMAICA

0

 

2

2

KENYA

7

 

18

25

LATVIA

1

 

0

1

LESOTHO

467

11

1044

1522

LIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA

0

 

1

1

LIBERIA

2

 

1

3

LIECHTENSTEIN

1

 

0

1

MACAO

1

 

0

1

MALAWI

317

26

218

561

MALI

0

 

1

1

MAURITIUS

0

 

1

1

MOZAMBIQUE

710

8

1665

2383

NAMIBIA

17

 

23

40

NETHERLANDS

0

 

1

1

NIGER

3

 

1

4

NIGERIA

202

 

250

452

NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS

0

 

1

1

PAKISTAN

23

 

21

44

PARAGUAY

0

 

4

4

PERU

1

 

23

24

PORTUGAL

0

 

3

3

RWANDA

0

 

1

1

SENEGAL

0

 

3

3

SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO

1

 

3

4

SIERRA LEONE

1

 

1

2

SOMALIA

28

 

17

45

SPAIN

1

 

4

5

SUDAN

1

 

2

3

SWAZILAND

41

 

180

221

TAIWAN, PROVINCE OF CHINA

0

 

3

3

TAJIKISTAN

1

 

0

1

TANZANIA, UNITED REPUBLIC OF

141

2

188

331

THAILAND

0

 

1

1

TOGO

1

 

0

1

TURKEY

0

 

1

1

UGANDA

10

2

20

32

UNITED KINGDOM

0

 

5

5

UNITED STATES

0

 

1

1

VENEZUELA

1

 

3

4

VIET NAM

2

 

4

6

ZAIRE

0

 

5

5

ZAMBIA

4

 

17

21

ZIMBABWE

1324

9

2234

3567

TOTAL

3468

58

6318

9844

(c) Services are provided to all inmates within the South African Corrections System irrespective of their nationality. However, it is internationally accepted that foreign nationals in the correctional system of any country present a challenge due to their unfamiliarity with the language and culture as well as the lack of close contact with their families.

03 November 2015 - NW3546

Profile picture: Esterhuizen, Mr JA

Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

With reference to proper environmental measures that must be undertaken by large scale mining operations with regard to mining rehabilitation which will also prevent illegal mining, what is his department doing to transform illegal mining operations into legitimate mining businesses that will contribute to the economy of the country and create employment opportunities?

Reply:

The Department issues mining rights and permits to promote legitimate mining and removal of exposed minerals at sites which are viable to mine.

03 November 2015 - NW3758

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has evaluated the number of requests from citizens and organizations to the Public Protector to investigate complaints of the abuse of authority from 1 September 2010 to 31 August 2015, in order to (a) pick out the common threads and deal with it systemically through legislative reform, (b) draw the attention of the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, and the national executive to deal with such abuse of power, (c) work with the Minister of Police to ensure that hotspots of corruption in the Government are regularly and systematically investigated and transgressors prosecuted to maintain the confidence of citizens in the Government, (d) work with the Minister of Finance and the Auditor-General to ensure that better systems are put in place to prevent the serial and large-scale abuse of state funds and resources by rogue elements in the Government and (e) determine how best to provide the Public Protector’s Office with adequate resources in order to meet the avalanche of requests for the specified office to investigate; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a), (b), (c) and (d):

As the Honourable member is aware, in terms of section 181(3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, all organs of state, through legislative and others measures, must assist and protect all the institutions supporting constitutional democracy, including the Public Protector, to ensure the independence, impartiality, dignity and effectiveness of these institutions.

It is, therefore, the responsibility of all organs of state, including the President, the national executive and Government, as referred to by the Honourable member, to evaluate the number of requests from citizens and organisations to the Public Protector to investigate the complaints of the abuse of authority from 1 September 2010 to 31 August 2015, in order to act upon it as indicated in paragraphs (a) to (d) of the Honourable member’s question.

In view of the above, I would kindly advise the Honourable member to scrutinize the relevant findings in all the Public Protector’s reports during the period in question and if necessary address his questions to the organs of state concerned.

As far as could be ascertained from the reports of the Public Protector during the period in question, there were no requests from citizens and organisations to the Public Protector to investigate complaints of the abuse of authority against the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development and it was therefore not necessary for the Department to act upon it as indicated in paragraphs (a) to (d) of the Honourable member’s question.

(e) Government has been supportive of the Public Protector’s requests for increasing its investigative capacity as is evident by the significant increase in its budget allocation throughout the previous Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) periods. The Honourable member may also be aware that Parliament approved the revised organizational structure of the Public Protector comprising of 420 posts in the 2012/2013 financial year. At the time, the Public Protector was advised by my colleague the Minister of Finance to develop a multi-year implementation plan to ensure that critical posts are prioritized and filled within the medium term expenditure framework allocations. During his 2015 Medium Term Budget Policy Statement on 21 October 2015, the Minister of Finance also indicated that the Public Protector will receive an additional allocation to address capacity challenges.

It should also be noted that within the current economic climate it is expected of all institutions supporting constitutional democracy, including the Public Protector, to work together to determine how to deal with matters in a more economic, cost effective and efficient manner and to ensure that there is no duplication as it relates to their mandates.

The Honourable member may further be aware, that the National Assembly is still seized with the report of the Ad hoc Committee on the Review of Chapter 9 and associated Institutions often referred to as the Kader Asmal report. This report contains a number of recommendations that may have far-reaching implications for the institutions supporting constitutional democracy, including the Public Protector. The Speaker of the National Assembly recently convened a workshop of relevant stakeholders in order to exchange views and to finalize the National Assembly’s position in order to help Parliament to adopt the report.

With all the above in mind and given our limited resources, it is my view that the Public Protector should be able to execute its mandate and deliver on its core business responsibilities within the budget allocation and assistance that was provided for by Government.

 

03 November 2015 - NW3830

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Has he or his department contacted or been contacted by any organ of state of the United States of America (USA) in respect of the ongoing investigation and indictment into allegations of corruption with regard to the Fifa 2010 Soccer World Cup Tournament; if not, why has he not contacted any USA organ of state in this regard; if so, in each case, (a) when and (b) what are the relevant details of such communication?

Reply:

I wish to inform the Honourable Member that yes, I and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development have received a communication from the Legal Attaché of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in South Africa in this regard.

(a) During June 2015, the Legal Attaché (FBI) in South Africa, forwarded a letter to the Department, attaching a copy of an indictment related to the FIFA matter.

(b) The purpose of the letter was to bring the contents of the indictment under the attention of the Department. It was also stated in the letter that the FBI was looking forward to the continued partnership between the FBI, the American Department of Justice and the South African Department of Justice and Constitutional Development.

The Department submitted the letter to me in a memorandum, informing me of the contents of the letter as well as the indictment. I was also informed that a formal request for assistance has not yet been received from the American authorities. I noted the contents of the memorandum, including the indictment, and forwarded copies of the indictment to the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Corruption, the Minister of Sport and Recreation, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation and the Chairperson of the Anti-Corruption Task Team (ACTT).

.

03 November 2015 - NW3742

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

With reference to his reply to question 2388 on 7 October 2015, has his department now sourced the information; if not, when will the information be made available; if so, what were the (a) salaries, (b) bonuses, (c) travel, airtime and data allowances and (d) stipends payable to the (i) Chief Executive Officer and (ii) Chairperson of the (aa) 2010 Fifa World Cup Bid Committee and (bb) 2010 Local Organising Committee in the (aaa) 2004-05, (bbb) 2005-06, (ccc) 2006-07, (ddd) 2007-08, (eee) 2008-09, (fff) 2009-10 and (ggg) 2010-11 financial years?

Reply:

We are still trying to source this information as the Bid Company has long winded up its affairs and the information required is not readily available.

03 November 2015 - NW3751

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

(1)With reference to the allocation of the boxing bouts of Boxing South Africa, which province was assigned the boxing bout for 25 September 2015; (2) is the specified province responsible for financing the specified boxing bout; if not, which entity is responsible for financing the specified boxing bout; (3) (a) will the specified boxing bout be televised, (b) who was selected as the promoter of the specified boxing bout and (c) where is the specified promoter based; (4) has the specified promoter previously been selected to promote any boxing bout; if so, (a) which bouts has the specified promoter previously promoted and (b) how has the specified promoter arrange the (i) allocation and (ii) adjudication of the specified boxing bout; (5) has the Eastern Cape been assigned a boxing bout; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was the specified boxing bout scheduled to take place and (b) who is responsible for the allocation of the boxing bouts of Boxing South Africa?

Reply:

We are still trying to source information and consulting with the Boxing South Africa (BSA) on this matter.

02 November 2015 - NW3701

Profile picture: Mackay, Mr G

Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Energy

(1)With reference to the National Treasury’s 2014-15 Annual Report which states that the National Treasury compiled a memorandum on Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) training and research educational assets as well as the transaction with the Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation, why was the specified PBMR transaction not included in the nuclear co-operation framework agreement signed with the Russian Federation in 2014; (2) (a) what is the nature and extent of the Government’s transaction with Rosatom and (b) is the Government selling the PBMR (i) hardware and/or (ii) intellectual property; (3) What is the total value of the specified PBMR transaction; (4) What tender process has been undertaken in this regard; (5) Does the specified transaction comply with South Africa’s commitments under the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons of 1968?

Reply:

  1. Government of South Africa’s intention is to procure the Nuclear New Build Programme including the 9.6 GW of nuclear energy. The Department of Energy would respectfully advise you to further consult with National Treasury regarding their annual report statements.
  2. a) There is no transaction between Government and Rosatom apart from the signed Nuclear Framework Agreement.

b) No the Government is not selling the PBMR, i) nor is it selling the Hardware and/or ii) Intellectual Property.

3. See answer in 2) above.

4. There is no tender process involving PBMR taking place as stated above.

5. There is no specified transaction on this matter.

02 November 2015 - NW3831

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) provincial departments maintain a database of sick leave records of educators at schools for children with special educational needs; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what is the current method to track sick leave of educators at schools in each case; if so, in each province, (aa) how many sick leave days are taken on average annually, (bb) what are the top five reasons for taking sick leave and (cc) what is the average period of sick leave in each case; (2) whether the total number of sick leave days taken by educators at schools for children with special educational needs is hampering education at such schools in each specified province; if so, (a) why and (b) what steps are being taken to reduce this negative effect?

Reply:

1. Whether (a) her department and/or (b) provincial departments maintain a database of sick leave records of educators at schools for children with special educational needs; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what is the current method to track sick leave of educators at schools in each case; if so, in each province, (aa) how many sick leave days are taken on average annually, (bb) what are the top five reasons for taking sick leave and (cc) what is the average period of sick leave in each case;

1. (a), (b) and (i)

Yes, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) relies on the PERSAL system to monitor leave in general, including sick leave. The data on PERSAL is usually not up to date given the time lag between the receipt of forms at schools and such form being captured on PERSAL at district level.

(ii) Information on sick and all other forms of leave is recorded on PERSAL as part of human resource administration system. At operational level, other teacher time and attendance systems such as SASAMS and other provincial teacher systems used in the Western Cape and Northern Cape are also used to collect information on teacher attendance.

(aa) Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) have been requested to provide up to date information from their monitoring systems, it will be provided as soon as it is received.

(bb) Information requested from PEDs.

(cc) Information requested from PEDs.

2. Whether the total number of sick leave days taken by educators at schools for children with special educational needs is hampering education at such schools in each specified province; if so, (a) why and (b) what steps are being taken to reduce this negative effect?

(2) (a) PEDs have been requested to provide their assessment of the impact, based on the data, and respond accordingly.

02 November 2015 - NW3791

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether his department conducted a security vetting process in respect of any member of Parliament during the Fifth Parliament; if so, in respect of each specified Member of Parliament, (a) what were the reasons for the security vetting, (b) on how many occasions did his department do the security vetting process and (c) at whose request was the security vetting done?

Reply:

a) Members of the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) are expected to undergo the security vetting process in order to have Top Secret security clearance.

b) The State Security Agency has conducted vetting of the JSCI members twice. The security vetting process is conducted after every five years when the Top Secret security clearance has lapsed.

c) The State Security Agency received a request from the Chairperson of the JSCI.

02 November 2015 - NW3723

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his replies to oral question 322 on 7 November 2014 and question 265 on 17 March 2015 and the reply of the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services to question 761 on 27 March 2015, what is the current status of his department’s investigations into CAS 123/03/2014 opened at Nkandla Police Station?

Reply:

The case docket is at the National Prosecuting Authority for decision.

02 November 2015 - NW3297

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on each Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did each Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for each Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

(1) Minister G E Nkwinti:

(a) (i) R1 946 535.21

(ii) 28

(b) Accommodation Details

(aa) Cape Town

(bb) Pretoria

  1. Hotel

R0,00

R0,00

  1. Residential

None. Accommodation provided by Department of Public Works at no cost to Department.

 

The Minister pays from his monthly salary for accommodation in Cape Town ,Salary Advice reflects this

(2) Deputy Minister Mashego-Dlamini:

  1. (i) R948 658.96

(ii) 23

(b) Accommodation Details

(aa) Cape Town

(bb) Pretoria

  1. Hotel

R184, 258.75

R101, 127.80

  1. Residential

None. Accommodation provided by Department of Public Works at no cost to Department.

Deputy Minister Skwatsha:

  1. (i) R731 594.70

(ii) 30

(b) Accommodation Details

(aa) Cape Town

(bb) Pretoria

  1. Hotel

R216, 961.19

R221, 468.30

  1. Residential

None. Accommodation provided by Department of Public Works at no cost to Department.

02 November 2015 - NW3670

Profile picture: Figg, Mr MJ

Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Finance

What was the (a) total amount and (b) breakdown of such amount spent by each specified department on each specified service provider on (i) aircrafts and/or (ii) helicopters in respect of the transversal hiring of such aircrafts and/or helicopters to the government (aa) in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2015?

Reply:

The numbers given here are from the Vulindlela database which draws the data from the Basic Accounting System (BAS) of government.  The system does not contain information on service providers; this will have to be requested from the respective departments.

The total amount spent on hiring of aircrafts was R78.9 million in 2012-13, R82.4 million in 2013-14 and R34.7 million in 2014/15. Since 1 April 2015 spending on aircrafts hiring is at R9 million. The tables below show the breakdown by department. Related expenditure includes maintenance.

see the link for tables: Table 1 & 2 National and provincial departments

02 November 2015 - NW3331

Profile picture: Dudley, Ms C

Dudley, Ms C to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION:

(1) Whether the Government has ever discussed or intends to discuss at a diplomatic level with the Islamic Republic of Iran, the issue of religious freedom in Iran; (2) Whether she is aware that Christians in the country are frustrated to know that the Government has good diplomatic relations with Iran and yet does not seem to consider the issue of religious freedom and the persecution of Christians in Iran as a serious matter or even a concern; (3) has she taken any steps with regard to this issue; if not, why not; if so, (a) what steps has she taken and (b) are there further relevant details in this regard

Reply:

(1). Yes. South Africa and Iran are in the process of concluding a Modality Framework Agreement for the establishment of a Structured Dialogue Forum specifically focused on Human Rights. Once concluded, the Dialogue Forum will convene regularly and constitute a platform for both countries to hold frank discussions on issues and concerns regarding domestic human rights.

(2) The Dialogue Forum will allow the two countries to engage on all issues of human rights as contained in the United Nations Charter on Human Rights. South Africa and Iran already discuss human rights issues within the Joint Commission and the Dialogue Forum will provide a further platform for deeper engagement and cooperation.

(3) (a) During the 12th Joint Commission between South Africa and the Islamic Republic of Iran held in Tehran on 10 to 11 May 2015 the two sides agreed to strengthen their bilateral cooperation in the field of human rights in international fora among others. My Department, together with our Iranian counterparts are in the process of finalising a Modality Framework Agreement to establish a Structured Dialogue Forum.

(b). Not applicable.

UNQUOTE

02 November 2015 - NW3768

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, given the current challenge of the shortage of police officers, he will consider the shortening of the recruitment process of police officers to deal with the specified shortage; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African Police Service received criticism in the past on the poor quality of police recruits. The Recruitment Strategy for the recruitment of new police officers was therefore revised to strengthen the recruitment processes with a focus on quality than quantity and to professionalise the Police Service in terms of the National Development Plan, Vision 2030. The new process included in the Strategy includes the following:

  • Targeted recruitment (Community consultation / vigorous marketing and advertising of posts)
  • Segregation of functions related to the Strategy
  • Integrity Testing
  • Grooming Camps
  • Publishing of names of applicants in the media for public comment
  • Presentation of applicants to the communities for inputs / comments
  • Recruitment Board (to involve both internal and external stake-holders in the final decision of recommended candidates)

The recruitment strategy currently in place is continuously subjected to review informed by operational challenges and demands of the organization.

02 November 2015 - NW3735

Profile picture: Mackay, Mr G

Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What has been Eskom’s total electricity (a) generation and (b) demand figures for each day since 30 November 2014; (2) was there a decrease in electricity (a) generation and (b) demand in the specified period; if so, what were the reasons for this decrease?

Reply:

(1) Please take note of the following:

  • Eskom generation in the Eskom context is the electricity sent out from Eskom power stations plus imports across the border, being mainly the Cahora Bassa imports.
  • Customer demand in the Eskom context is the sum of Eskom generation, plus Independent Power Producer (IPP) generation (for IPPs selling their energy to Eskom, including renewables and some conventional generators), plus customer demand actions, being predominantly demand reduced either through contracted Demand Response or Interruptible Load Shedding; or load shedding.

(1)(a)

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2014/11/30

578 756

2014/12/01

630 963

2014/12/02

638 433

2014/12/03

647 476

2014/12/04

635 984

2014/12/05

612 986

2014/12/06

573 580

2014/12/07

572 699

2014/12/08

627 606

2014/12/09

644 498

2014/12/10

642 123

2014/12/11

641 043

2014/12/12

629 450

2014/12/13

605 528

2014/12/14

581 021

2014/12/15

621 518

2014/12/16

610 679

2014/12/17

623 169

2014/12/18

625 738

2014/12/19

620 630

2014/12/20

584 394

2014/12/21

571 936

2014/12/22

602 037

2014/12/23

592 089

2014/12/24

580 135

2014/12/25

537 821

2014/12/26

529 268

2014/12/27

546 364

2014/12/28

545 398

2014/12/29

564 978

2014/12/30

567 027

2014/12/31

570 693

2015/01/01

534 303

2015/01/02

558 219

2015/01/03

567 233

2015/01/04

563 298

2015/01/05

604 698

2015/01/06

621 243

2015/01/07

632 390

2015/01/08

632 665

2015/01/09

633 088

2015/01/10

606 775

2015/01/11

594 196

2015/01/12

641 883

2015/01/13

659 696

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2015/01/14

654 672

2015/01/15

653 681

2015/01/16

640 907

2015/01/17

609 410

2015/01/18

590 668

2015/01/19

646 069

2015/01/20

657 368

2015/01/21

661 808

2015/01/22

660 411

2015/01/23

657 848

2015/01/24

619 816

2015/01/25

606 225

2015/01/26

644 622

2015/01/27

648 116

2015/01/28

651 566

2015/01/29

659 784

2015/01/30

653 656

2015/01/31

611 674

2015/02/01

590 463

2015/02/02

639 638

2015/02/03

644 380

2015/02/04

641 530

2015/02/05

627 725

2015/02/06

635 242

2015/02/07

601 393

2015/02/08

590 178

2015/02/09

660 547

2015/02/10

674 361

2015/02/11

672 620

2015/02/12

684 395

2015/02/13

681 791

2015/02/14

609 675

2015/02/15

592 297

2015/02/16

659 581

2015/02/17

659 439

2015/02/18

660 731

2015/02/19

666 432

2015/02/20

669 626

2015/02/21

616 261

2015/02/22

603 605

2015/02/23

659 430

2015/02/24

671 780

2015/02/25

670 638

2015/02/26

646 383

2015/02/27

659 272

2015/02/28

614 049

2015/03/01

596 611

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2015/03/02

646 139

2015/03/03

655 131

2015/03/04

653 905

2015/03/05

654 915

2015/03/06

659 595

2015/03/07

624 880

2015/03/08

604 260

2015/03/09

658 244

2015/03/10

663 519

2015/03/11

669 379

2015/03/12

665 825

2015/03/13

669 401

2015/03/14

632 138

2015/03/15

604 051

2015/03/16

654 986

2015/03/17

662 898

2015/03/18

666 691

2015/03/19

666 581

2015/03/20

665 638

2015/03/21

620 301

2015/03/22

614 278

2015/03/23

666 732

2015/03/24

670 772

2015/03/25

658 540

2015/03/26

646 774

2015/03/27

651 994

2015/03/28

613 534

2015/03/29

592 406

2015/03/30

645 184

2015/03/31

653 596

2015/04/01

644 047

2015/04/02

630 578

2015/04/03

573 625

2015/04/04

564 804

2015/04/05

550 425

2015/04/06

561 540

2015/04/07

623 087

2015/04/08

642 058

2015/04/09

649 858

2015/04/10

651 494

2015/04/11

617 225

2015/04/12

572 859

2015/04/13

623 971

2015/04/14

614 182

2015/04/15

607 088

2015/04/16

624 413

2015/04/17

623 214

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2015/04/18

594 320

2015/04/19

590 557

2015/04/20

633 948

2015/04/21

644 856

2015/04/22

646 765

2015/04/23

644 561

2015/04/24

655 311

2015/04/25

607 875

2015/04/26

580 876

2015/04/27

598 433

2015/04/28

642 072

2015/04/29

640 837

2015/04/30

634 325

2015/05/01

592 895

2015/05/02

587 419

2015/05/03

591 139

2015/05/04

633 702

2015/05/05

644 061

2015/05/06

635 055

2015/05/07

645 770

2015/05/08

646 860

2015/05/09

602 641

2015/05/10

598 103

2015/05/11

653 257

2015/05/12

653 953

2015/05/13

649 259

2015/05/14

642 964

2015/05/15

647 772

2015/05/16

603 791

2015/05/17

581 184

2015/05/18

633 468

2015/05/19

645 843

2015/05/20

642 315

2015/05/21

626 664

2015/05/22

626 168

2015/05/23

594 155

2015/05/24

590 283

2015/05/25

646 513

2015/05/26

655 347

2015/05/27

658 980

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2015/05/28

656 093

2015/05/29

647 941

2015/05/30

607 979

2015/05/31

597 922

2015/06/01

635 557

2015/06/02

651 258

2015/06/03

656 137

2015/06/04

666 278

2015/06/05

680 469

2015/06/06

656 803

2015/06/07

631 345

2015/06/08

669 208

2015/06/09

678 704

2015/06/10

685 050

2015/06/11

684 724

2015/06/12

662 137

2015/06/13

636 584

2015/06/14

611 143

2015/06/15

644 926

2015/06/16

625 905

2015/06/17

673 569

2015/06/18

679 072

2015/06/19

674 545

2015/06/20

640 561

2015/06/21

624 080

2015/06/22

663 906

2015/06/23

669 845

2015/06/24

666 918

2015/06/25

668 623

2015/06/26

662 240

2015/06/27

642 001

2015/06/28

598 845

2015/06/29

662 150

2015/06/30

678 103

2015/07/01

669 141

2015/07/02

670 101

2015/07/03

665 420

2015/07/04

632 214

2015/07/05

615 172

2015/07/06

654 321

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2015/07/07

667 525

2015/07/08

663 161

2015/07/09

657 342

2015/07/10

653 336

2015/07/11

626 462

2015/07/12

606 680

2015/07/13

658 591

2015/07/14

674 178

2015/07/15

651 307

2015/07/16

657 591

2015/07/17

662 343

2015/07/18

634 578

2015/07/19

590 284

2015/07/20

649 609

2015/07/21

649 751

2015/07/22

668 486

2015/07/23

670 627

2015/07/24

658 947

2015/07/25

622 613

2015/07/26

609 759

2015/07/27

665 270

2015/07/28

671 639

2015/07/29

669 020

2015/07/30

657 291

2015/07/31

679 727

2015/08/01

637 311

2015/08/02

607 729

2015/08/03

636 299

2015/08/04

642 524

2015/08/05

651 050

2015/08/06

642 989

2015/08/07

646 820

2015/08/08

606 894

2015/08/09

583 584

2015/08/10

603 617

2015/08/11

657 160

2015/08/12

660 460

2015/08/13

646 812

2015/08/14

648 734

2015/08/15

602 957

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2015/08/17

626 974

2015/08/18

635 440

2015/08/19

634 955

2015/08/20

632 887

2015/08/21

623 709

2015/08/22

596 125

2015/08/23

582 524

2015/08/24

616 890

2015/08/25

620 678

2015/08/26

624 544

2015/08/27

622 084

2015/08/28

610 296

2015/08/29

578 111

2015/08/30

570 841

2015/08/31

615 499

2015/09/01

622 811

2015/09/02

628 798

2015/09/03

637 396

2015/09/04

659 525

2015/09/05

624 540

2015/09/06

592 077

2015/09/07

627 980

2015/09/08

644 515

2015/09/09

636 993

2015/09/10

635 199

2015/09/11

638 149

2015/09/12

615 652

2015/09/13

586 444

2015/09/14

620 244

2015/09/15

633 865

2015/09/16

631 170

2015/09/17

631 164

2015/09/18

636 441

2015/09/19

606 490

2015/09/20

594 972

2015/09/21

644 197

2015/09/22

640 287

2015/09/23

631 009

2015/09/24

591 012

2015/09/25

610 111

Date

Eskom Generation(MWh)

2015/09/26

592 081

2015/09/27

571 277

2015/09/28

617 732

2015/09/29

642 341

2015/09/30

639 808

2015/10/01

634 253

2015/10/02

638 957

2015/10/03

604 244

2015/10/04

584 857

2015/10/05

630 257

2015/10/06

645 349

2015/10/07

645 239

2015/10/08

642 990

2015/10/09

638 493

2015/10/10

599 265

2015/10/11

586 398

2015/10/12

632 374

2015/10/13

640 141

2015/10/14

644 053

2015/10/15

634 139

(1)(b)

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2014/11/30

614 773

2014/12/01

652 504

2014/12/02

658 698

2014/12/03

666 501

2014/12/04

667 600

2014/12/05

661 519

2014/12/06

631 278

2014/12/07

617 190

2014/12/08

659 295

2014/12/09

667 839

2014/12/10

662 811

2014/12/11

659 975

2014/12/12

651 849

2014/12/13

623 061

2014/12/14

602 952

2014/12/15

642 892

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2014/12/16

630 796

2014/12/17

641 361

2014/12/18

646 228

2014/12/19

640 496

2014/12/20

604 096

2014/12/21

593 812

2014/12/22

620 334

2014/12/23

614 089

2014/12/24

599 689

2014/12/25

559 594

2014/12/26

549 761

2014/12/27

562 026

2014/12/28

562 926

2014/12/29

582 607

2014/12/30

590 377

2014/12/31

591 629

2015/01/01

552 386

2015/01/02

578 062

2015/01/03

584 390

2015/01/04

580 635

2015/01/05

624 267

2015/01/06

641 990

2015/01/07

650 941

2015/01/08

654 458

2015/01/09

658 410

2015/01/10

624 717

2015/01/11

611 978

2015/01/12

664 274

2015/01/13

678 964

2015/01/14

676 747

2015/01/15

674 977

2015/01/16

667 243

2015/01/17

628 761

2015/01/18

611 902

2015/01/19

668 597

2015/01/20

678 586

2015/01/21

682 946

2015/01/22

681 396

2015/01/23

677 922

2015/01/24

638 834

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/01/25

623 534

2015/01/26

673 947

2015/01/27

681 891

2015/01/28

672 377

2015/01/29

676 011

2015/01/30

669 748

2015/01/31

630 383

2015/02/01

610 002

2015/02/02

660 164

2015/02/03

666 711

2015/02/04

681 407

2015/02/05

676 212

2015/02/06

674 520

2015/02/07

638 341

2015/02/08

625 706

2015/02/09

684 858

2015/02/10

696 146

2015/02/11

701 262

2015/02/12

704 915

2015/02/13

701 343

2015/02/14

662 979

2015/02/15

636 190

2015/02/16

678 073

2015/02/17

678 782

2015/02/18

683 821

2015/02/19

691 391

2015/02/20

690 313

2015/02/21

649 175

2015/02/22

629 863

2015/02/23

680 422

2015/02/24

690 519

2015/02/25

688 200

2015/02/26

693 423

2015/02/27

678 878

2015/02/28

632 385

2015/03/01

615 989

2015/03/02

669 051

2015/03/03

674 638

2015/03/04

675 675

2015/03/05

678 546

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/03/06

678 138

2015/03/07

644 353

2015/03/08

622 464

2015/03/09

677 087

2015/03/10

685 801

2015/03/11

687 776

2015/03/12

688 292

2015/03/13

689 000

2015/03/14

650 059

2015/03/15

625 750

2015/03/16

677 776

2015/03/17

684 592

2015/03/18

686 001

2015/03/19

687 755

2015/03/20

682 914

2015/03/21

644 010

2015/03/22

630 664

2015/03/23

683 404

2015/03/24

687 956

2015/03/25

685 945

2015/03/26

690 873

2015/03/27

669 502

2015/03/28

632 650

2015/03/29

608 103

2015/03/30

661 626

2015/03/31

669 967

2015/04/01

668 627

2015/04/02

651 398

2015/04/03

594 235

2015/04/04

590 128

2015/04/05

579 514

2015/04/06

589 727

2015/04/07

655 740

2015/04/08

666 176

2015/04/09

672 502

2015/04/10

672 108

2015/04/11

637 678

2015/04/12

619 241

2015/04/13

663 577

2015/04/14

677 597

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/04/15

677 271

2015/04/16

679 907

2015/04/17

671 634

2015/04/18

645 426

2015/04/19

630 322

2015/04/20

669 247

2015/04/21

679 860

2015/04/22

683 606

2015/04/23

679 504

2015/04/24

680 109

2015/04/25

635 071

2015/04/26

611 130

2015/04/27

624 250

2015/04/28

666 329

2015/04/29

668 547

2015/04/30

663 547

2015/05/01

617 955

2015/05/02

612 217

2015/05/03

617 004

2015/05/04

662 729

2015/05/05

679 554

2015/05/06

675 633

2015/05/07

686 368

2015/05/08

683 972

2015/05/09

653 427

2015/05/10

630 569

2015/05/11

680 763

2015/05/12

684 688

2015/05/13

683 584

2015/05/14

683 452

2015/05/15

680 843

2015/05/16

652 459

2015/05/17

627 987

2015/05/18

672 777

2015/05/19

682 316

2015/05/20

680 819

2015/05/21

684 597

2015/05/22

678 270

2015/05/23

649 686

2015/05/24

636 941

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/05/25

680 562

2015/05/26

691 093

2015/05/27

689 785

2015/05/28

687 883

2015/05/29

678 297

2015/05/30

636 299

2015/05/31

624 217

2015/06/01

663 832

2015/06/02

678 966

2015/06/03

687 834

2015/06/04

699 092

2015/06/05

702 533

2015/06/06

677 867

2015/06/07

653 802

2015/06/08

694 948

2015/06/09

703 928

2015/06/10

716 499

2015/06/11

716 836

2015/06/12

714 953

2015/06/13

661 765

2015/06/14

640 077

2015/06/15

673 059

2015/06/16

650 032

2015/06/17

706 515

2015/06/18

711 768

2015/06/19

705 245

2015/06/20

669 921

2015/06/21

650 940

2015/06/22

697 149

2015/06/23

706 460

2015/06/24

706 658

2015/06/25

706 221

2015/06/26

697 005

2015/06/27

672 992

2015/06/28

651 838

2015/06/29

688 460

2015/06/30

698 407

2015/07/01

692 949

2015/07/02

693 312

2015/07/03

690 260

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/07/04

653 354

2015/07/05

637 854

2015/07/06

679 880

2015/07/07

698 275

2015/07/08

692 722

2015/07/09

686 403

2015/07/10

682 469

2015/07/11

655 458

2015/07/12

635 239

2015/07/13

685 843

2015/07/14

698 754

2015/07/15

695 409

2015/07/16

691 166

2015/07/17

696 565

2015/07/18

660 855

2015/07/19

646 471

2015/07/20

683 527

2015/07/21

690 396

2015/07/22

699 851

2015/07/23

708 383

2015/07/24

701 131

2015/07/25

670 257

2015/07/26

651 721

2015/07/27

694 919

2015/07/28

700 715

2015/07/29

704 311

2015/07/30

698 663

2015/07/31

703 594

2015/08/01

661 007

2015/08/02

636 444

2015/08/03

682 407

2015/08/04

689 477

2015/08/05

692 994

2015/08/06

690 907

2015/08/07

678 144

2015/08/08

638 883

2015/08/09

614 219

2015/08/10

628 776

2015/08/11

681 094

2015/08/12

685 460

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/08/13

679 649

2015/08/14

677 149

2015/08/15

634 823

2015/08/16

607 120

2015/08/17

652 403

2015/08/18

660 354

2015/08/19

657 677

2015/08/20

657 116

2015/08/21

647 200

2015/08/22

617 489

2015/08/23

604 102

2015/08/24

644 647

2015/08/25

645 891

2015/08/26

646 045

2015/08/27

644 655

2015/08/28

634 684

2015/08/29

601 424

2015/08/30

591 426

2015/08/31

632 223

2015/09/01

669 042

2015/09/02

676 263

2015/09/03

682 373

2015/09/04

700 260

2015/09/05

661 441

2015/09/06

636 233

2015/09/07

675 372

2015/09/08

687 079

2015/09/09

677 477

2015/09/10

678 821

2015/09/11

678 059

2015/09/12

653 847

2015/09/13

629 895

2015/09/14

670 489

2015/09/15

679 680

2015/09/16

675 104

2015/09/17

676 985

2015/09/18

682 142

2015/09/19

653 659

2015/09/20

637 410

2015/09/21

688 762

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/09/22

683 341

2015/09/23

673 321

2015/09/24

633 573

2015/09/25

650 464

2015/09/26

629 960

2015/09/27

617 185

2015/09/28

661 945

2015/09/29

675 770

2015/09/30

675 378

2015/10/01

662 080

2015/10/02

665 036

2015/10/03

630 343

2015/10/04

611 024

2015/10/05

658 813

2015/10/06

669 966

2015/10/07

670 396

2015/10/08

668 657

2015/10/09

670 214

2015/10/10

633 378

2015/10/11

615 977

2015/10/12

662 540

2015/10/13

671 910

2015/10/14

673 013

2015/10/15

667 974

(2) It is very difficult to comment on the increase or decrease in the electricity generation or demand as the period from November 2014 to October 2015 includes all the seasons and tariff periods; and no comparative period is given. In general, the demand has been normal.

(2)(a) There is a trend of somewhat reducing Eskom generation during the specified period, as IPPs are able to replace some of the Eskom generation (most of them are currently self-dispatched) the reliance on Eskom generation is reducing.

(2)(b) There are no abnormal trends seen over the specified period. The customer demand varies significantly depending on the weather, winter demand being higher than summer demand. This is true for both residential and industrial customers.

02 November 2015 - NW3769

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has any plans of placing anti-drug centres in all high schools to address the issue of learners coming to school under the influence of alcohol and drugs; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, the establishment of anti-drug centres at all high schools has never been considered. Learners coming to schools under the influence of alcohol or drugs will be dealt with in terms of schools’ Codes of Conduct for Learners. The Code of Conduct for Learners spells out the rules regarding learner behaviour at school and describes the disciplinary system to be implemented by the School Management concerning transgressions by learners.

02 November 2015 - NW3092

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Who are the stakeholders and partners involved with the Academy for Leadership and Management in Healthcare and (b) what is the (i) nature and (ii) extent of their involvement; (2) whether the academy has presented any training courses and/or workshops; if not, why not; if so, (a) what was the nature of the specified training courses and/or workshops, (b) who underwent training or attended the workshops and (c) when did each training course and/or workshop take place; (3) whether the academy has accredited any health care management courses at education and training providers; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of the courses, (b) where are these courses presented, (c) since when have they been presented and (d) how many persons have graduated from each of these courses; (4) has the academy set norms and standards in health management; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether the academy has detailed the competency and qualification requirements for hospital managers; if not, why not; if so, what are they?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Academy for Leadership and Management in Health has not yet been established. The Public Health Enhancement Fund (which represents a grouping of companies operating in the private health care sector in South Africa), namely the Social Compact Forum, are assisting the Advisory Committee for the Academy for Leadership and Management in Health.

(b) (i) Funding and monitoring implementation of initiatives of the Advisory Committee of the Academy for Leadership and Management in Health to improve the management capacity and skills of health managers as well as the process to finalise the institutional framework for the establishment of the Academy for leadership and Management in Health.

(ii) The extent of their involvement is as follows:

  • Receive recommendations from the Advisory Committee of the Academy for leadership and Management in Health;
  • Ensure alignment and approval of these initiatives from the Department of Health;
  • Consider and grant approval for funding; and
  • Monitor progress and report back to the Social Compact Forum and the Department of Health.

(2) to (5) The Academy has not yet been established.

END.

02 November 2015 - NW3746

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she or her department is compelled by law to develop education management processes and interventions, such as the Annual National Assessments, in consultation with representatives of teachers unions; if not, why does she (a) consult with the teacher unions in this respect and (b) not also consult with (i) professional bodies within the education sector, such as the SA Principals' Association and/or (ii) other suitably qualified persons; if so, which law?

Reply:

In terms of section 5 read with section 6 of the National Education Policy Act, 27 of 1996 the Minister or her Department is compelled by law to develop education management processes and interventions, such as the Annual National Assessments, after consultation with representatives of teachers unions operating in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC), principals’ organisations, students organisations, School Governing Body Associations, etc.

02 November 2015 - NW3762

Profile picture: Esterhuizen, Mr JA

Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Energy

In light of the recent unveiling of the R150m clean energy power plant by Anglo American Platinum to reduce its reliance and draw on the national energy grid thus reducing demand for electricity from Eskom, has she considered promoting the specified kind of self-help and self-reliance strategy to other mining organisations and industries as this would greatly assist in reducing supply side shortages of electricity; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The electricity Regulation Act permits generation for own use (under schedule 2). This greatly assists in reducing demand for those entities like Anglo Platinum, that are able to provide their own power instead of relying on Eskom.

02 November 2015 - NW3636

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Have all significant risks related to her department’s infrastructure programme been internally audited; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant outcomes?

Reply:

A: The risks have been identified and included in the Strategic Risk Register and forwarded to the Internal Audit Branch to incorporate them into the Departmental Risk Register.

Risk Management activities are carried out continuously where new risks are identified, assessed and ranked according to impact-severity and, conversely, where certain risks are demoted following implementation of mitigatory measures. The Infrastructure Branch has regular meetings where aspects such as risk management are discussed.

Furthermore, the Internal Audit has included the audit of the infrastructure programme in their Audit Coverage Plan to be performed by the Auditor General South Africa.

02 November 2015 - NW3648

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to question 3111 on 8 September 2015, regarding the awarding of the tender for the development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR, City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality and in view of the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 (details furnisned), he has found that the health of the nearby residents will not be placed in danger with the proposed development and possible disturbance of anthrax graves; (2) whether he intends to stop the development due to the specified health risks; if not, why not; if so, when?

Reply:

1. This matter does not fall within the mandate of the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform.

2. Not applicable.

 

02 November 2015 - NW3703

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many (i) private firearms, (ii) police firearms and (iii) illegal substances, with respect to (aa) quantity, (bb) value and (cc) name of each illegal substance, went missing from each police station in the Tembisa cluster and (b) what are the relevant details of each individual police station (i) for the (aa) 2013-14 and (bb) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

Please see attached table for details.

 

 

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016 1 April 2015 to 30 September 2015

 

 

 

i

ii

iii

i

ii

iii

i

ii

iii

 

 

 

Private firearm

Police firearm

Illegal Substances

Private firearm

Police firearm

Illegal Substances

Private firearm

Police firearm

Illegal Substances

 

 

TEMBISA

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

SEBENZA

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

TEMBISA SOUTH

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

 

 

RABIE RIDGE

0

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

 

 

IVORY PARK

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

 

 

EDENVALE

0

2

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

 

 

KEMPTON PARK

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

OLIFANTSFONTEIN

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

NORKEM PARK

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

TOTAL

0

6

0

0

6

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

NOTE: No illegal substances went missing from SAPS13 Stores, thus no values are tabulated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02 November 2015 - NW3770

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has any plans in place for the eradication of pit toilets in all government schools, especially those in the (a) rural areas and (b) informal settlements; if not; why not, if so; what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the Department of Basic Education has plans for the eradication of pit toilets in all government schools. In terms of the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, all schools should be provided with acceptable basic services. Acceptable basic services include: waterborne sanitation, small-bore sewer reticulation; septic or conservancy tanks; Ventilated improved pit latrines and composting toilets; Municipal water supply; boreholes; rainwater harvesting (purified); and different forms of power supply. The scope and application of the regulations applies to all schools, including those in rural areas and informal settlements.

02 November 2015 - NW3702

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

Why was the employment contract of the suspended Western Cape Provincial Police Commissioner, Arno Lamoer, not renewed?

Reply:

Lieutenant General Lamoer entered into a five year contract as the Provincial Commissioner Western Cape with effect from 1 December 2010 with an expiry date of 30 November 2015. Section 7(1) of the South African Police Act, 1995 (Act No 68 of 1995) stipulates that an appointed Provincial Commissioner shall occupy that office for a period of five years from the date of his or her appointment or such shorter period as may be determined at the time of his or her appointment by the National Commissioner in consultation with the member of the Executive Council of the relevant province.

Section 7(2) of the Act provides for the National Commissioner to extend the term at the expiry thereof for a period not exceeding five years at a time, subject to consultation with the member of the Executive Council of the relevant province. The non-renewal of Lieutenant General Lamoer’s contract is a decision arrived in compliance with the above policy provisions.

02 November 2015 - NW3728

Profile picture: Terblanche, Ms JF

Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) When was the investigation, which was made upon the request of the National Assembly to the national Department of Health and the National Treasury (details furnished), commissioned and (b) who conducted the specified investigation; (2) was the investigation completed; if not, when will it be (a) completed and (b) tabled in the National Assembly; if so, (i) when was it tabled in the National Assembly and (ii) what was the total cost of the investigation?

Reply:

(1) (a) The investigation still underway.

(b) National Treasury is busy with the investigation.

(2) The investigation not yet completed;

(a) National Treasury is currently busy with the Investigation

(b) When National Treasury completes the investigation will be tabled in the National Assembly

 (i) Not yet tabled, investigation still in progress,

 (ii) Total costs of the investigation not yet determined as investigation still in progress.

END.

02 November 2015 - NW3787

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether his department has (a) state security agents and/or (b) any other departmental staff stationed in Parliament; is so, in each specified case, (i) (aa) for how long has the specified persons been stationed in Parliament and (bb) when is their deployment period expected to end, (ii) under whose instruction and/or request were such persons deployed and (iii) for what purpose were they deployed

Reply:

(a)&(b) The State Security Agency (SSA) has deployed its staff members from the Chief Directorate External Vetting and Advising to be stationed at Parliament to conduct vetting of Parliamentary support staff.

(i)(aa) The specified SSA staff has been stationed in Parliament since September 2015.

(bb) The SSA is expected to complete the vetting project in March 2016.

(ii) The SSA was requested by Mr.Gengezi Mgidlana, the Secretary to Parliament.

(iii) The Secretary to Parliament requested the SSA to conduct security vetting to all Parliamentary support staff.