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20 August 2015 - NW2275

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

(1)What action is taken by her department when labour inspectors find that an employee does not have a valid work permit; (2) are employees who are found to not have valid work permits removed from the work place?

Reply:

 

  1. When Labour inspectors find that an employee does not have a valid work permit, the matter will be reported to Home Affairs who has jurisdiction over such matters.
  2. The Department of Labour does not have a legal mandate or powers to remove such employees from the workplace but will refer the matter to Home Affairs to take further action.

20 August 2015 - NW2924

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Women in The Presidency:

Whether her department meets the Government 2% employment equity target for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3427E

Reply:

The department has met and exceeded the 2% target, in that as at end of 2014/15 financial year the department was al 3.8% with regards to people with disabilities.

Approved by the Minister
Date: 18 /08/2015

20 August 2015 - NW2958

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any companies currently doing business with the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa were found to be conducting (a) fraudulent and/or (b) illegal activities; if so, in each case, (i) what was the nature of such activities, (ii) when were such activities uncovered, (iii) what charges were brought as a result of such activities and (iv) what arrests were made in connection with such activities?

Reply:

No current service provider or supplier has conducted fraudulently and/or illegal activities that PRASA is aware of.

20 August 2015 - NW2956

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Has the enquiry set up by her department into the train crash that occurred in Denver, Johannesburg, on 28 April 2015, been concluded; if so, what were the (a) findings of the enquiry and (b) costs associated with the damage arising from this incident; (2) have any of the recommendations arising from the enquiry been implemented to date?

Reply:

1.  The inquiry has not been finalized.

      (a) See response in (1).

      (b) R19.3 million

2.  See response in (1)

 

20 August 2015 - NW2957

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How are the gantries along the e-toll routes being electrified when load shedding takes place, (b) how does load shedding effect the e-toll system, (c) what measures have been put in place to circumvent load shedding and (d) what has been the costs in this regard in each month since the e-tolls came into operation on the 04 February 2011?

Reply:

(a) The Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project is not treated differently from other plazas. However, in order to avoid disruption of toll collection, independent back-up power supply is installed at the locations where money is collected. The back-up power supply automatically switches on when the main supply is interrupted. Similarly, such precautions are in place at the Hugeunot tunnel.

(b) Load shedding does not affect the toll system due to the above measures.

(c) See (a) above.

(d) The system was implemented to accommodate power failures. The Contractor, in terms of the obligations under the contract must ensure that the above systems are maintained and operational in order to overcome any potential loss in transactions at a gantry. This is part of the contractual obligations and not a priced item for which compensation is paid for on a monthly basis. To date, no additional payments in this regard were made to the contractor.

20 August 2015 - NW2658

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Women in The Presidency

(1) With regard to the science, technology, engineering and mathematics intervention in the revised strategic focus document of her department, how many students have been targeted for the (a) 2015 (b) 2016 and (c) 2017 academic years; (2) which faculty or faculties will be targeted in the (a) 201 5, (b) 2016 and (c) 2017 academic years; (3) are there specific (a) provinces and/or (b) universities targeted for the specified interventions; if so, which (i) provinces and/or (ii) universities?

Reply:

(1) For the financial years 2015, 2016 and 2017, a total of 2000 learners are targeted to participate in the STEM programme in all nine provinces.

(2) Students apply to all universities and when accepted they are in the faculties of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

(3) (a) & (b) Yes.

(i) & (ii) Applied to various universities.


 

Approved by the Minister
Date: 18/08/2015

19 August 2015 - NW2773

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has undertaken any research to show to what extent and in what areas 21 years of education under a democratic government superseded what used to be provided under the highly discriminatory apartheid system; if not, why not; if so, (a) in which areas and to (b) what extent has the democratic government achieved greater results to the benefit of all children in South Africa?

Reply:

 

The Department of Basic Education has not undertaken research to measure and compare the education under the apartheid system and democratic government. However, the achievements of the democratic government surpass the apartheid education system by far. Below are some the detailed achievements of the education system under the new democratic government.

  • Since 1994, government has implemented major policy reforms to redress past inequalities in education, transforming the education system and increasing the skills and life chances of all South Africans. Nineteen different departments of education have been unified into a single education system, removing race as the basis for attending school.
  • While a range of changes and initiatives introduced since 1994 are starting to result in improvements in the education system, it will take more time for the terrible legacy of apartheid education to be fully addressed and for apartheid patterns of school performance to be removed.
  • Enrolment in Grade R (a pre-school year at primary school) has more than doubled, increasing from 300 000 to 813 044 between 2003 and 2014, nearly reaching the level of universal access.
  • Gross secondary school enrolment improved from 51 percent in 1994 to almost 90 percent in 2014, while gross primary enrolment in 2014 was high at approximately 99 percent.
  • The learner-to-teacher ratio improved from 33 to 1 in 2000 to 31 to 1 in 2014.
  • As a result of improved infrastructure, a higher proportion of younger children are accessing classroom facilities.
  • Overall, South Africa is achieving gender parity in school enrolment with a Gender Parity Index of 1 in 2014, and has met the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of achieving universal primary education.
  • Children with disabilities: Progress has also been made in increasing access to schools for children with disabilities, with more public special schools being built. Other public ordinary schools are being converted to full service schools.
  • The improvements in access have resulted from a number of interventions. The burden of school fees for poor households has been reduced by introducing no-fee schools. By 2014, 78 percent of learners (more than 8 million) in 80 percent of public schools (close to 20 000 schools) benefited from the no-fee policy.
  • By providing children with meals at school, the National School Nutrition Programme has contributed to regular and punctual attendance by learners and enabled them to attend school without being hungry. By 2014, over 9 million learners in over 20 000 primary and secondary schools – virtually all the learners from poor households – were receiving a government-funded school lunch.
  • Learners are using the same curriculum: the curriculum has been revised to improve the quality of learning and teaching. The National Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) has been implemented from Grade R to 12 by 2014.
  • To strengthen teaching and learning, CAPS was accompanied by the following measures:
    • Over 170 million workbooks and textbooks were distributed to schools between 2011 and 2014 to increase access to quality written material and help learners and teachers to understand the expected assessment standards and cover the curriculum.
    • The Annual National Assessments (ANA) system was introduced to enable the objective assessment of the education system below Grade 12. Almost 7 million learners across more than 24 000 schools participated in the third cycle of ANA in 2014.
  • To strengthen the quality of education, the Funza Lushaka bursary scheme was introduced to tackle teacher shortages by encouraging more learners to study to become teachers. From 2007 to 2013 a total of 62 804 bursaries were awarded to student teachers at a cost of over R1.9 billion.
  • The numbers of learners obtaining university entry qualifications each year (bachelor passes) has also increased. On average, between 2013 and 2014, 161 253 learners obtained bachelor passes, compared with 70 000 per year for the period 2000 to 2002.
  • To support the improvements that are emerging in basic education, better school management and administration, with a focus on school performance, are critical. Therefore, School Management Teams have been trained on management courses.
  • The percentage of the population aged 20 years and older that has had no education decreased from 19 percent in 1996 to 9 percent in 2011. The Kha Ri Gude Literacy Programme has been a success, with almost 3 million illiterate adult learners having been enrolled between 2008 and 2013. The majority of learners are female.
  • A new funding model was introduced to replace the race-based, inequitable funding model of the apartheid era. Overall, the education budget increased to more than 5 percent of GDP, and changed from a race-based education budget to a pro-poor education budget. Public spending per learner increased to overt R11 000 per year by 2012. While there has been an improvement in the equity of education funding, inequalities in terms of resources available at public schools remain due to the disparity in households’ ability to supplement the funding of public schools and due to inherited school infrastructure backlogs.
  • The Department of Basic Education has published detailed research, monitoring and sector reports on the achievements and challenges facing the sector on www.education.gov.za

19 August 2015 - NW2915

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the reindustrialisation of the country is taking place at a significant and sustained rate to allow for (a) large-scale job creation, (b) a positive impact on the gross domestic product, (c) increased fixed foreign direct investment, (d) annual increases in exports in real terms and (e) the substantial beneficiation of ores and minerals mined in the country; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) is the impact of reindustrialisation on economic growth?

Reply:

South Africa has an industrial sector characterised by pockets of sophisticated manufacturing capabilities which have developed over several decades to service the mining sector and a relatively small domestic consumer market.

However, in the early 1990s the Apartheid-state agreed to a far-reaching overhaul of South Africa’s trade policy regime with deep tariff cuts over a relatively short period, impacting a broad swathe of manufacturing subsectors. It is noteworthy that the Apartheid-state declared South Africa a Developed Country for the purposes of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) thereby subjecting South Africa to a far deeper tariff liberalisation episode compared to other developing countries.

These deep tariff cuts have led to a significant increase in imports of especially value-added goods while the commodity ‘super-cycle’ of the mid-2000s encouraged the rapid expansion of mineral commodity exports.

By the time the global financial crisis struck in late 2007, the limits of the above growth trajectory were becoming apparent. South Africa was fortunate that Government had already identified the risks associated with this growth trajectory and a National Industrial Policy Framework (NIPF) and the first Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) had already been developed.

The NIPF and IPAP’s are focused on fundamentally changing the structure of our economy towards a more value-adding and inclusive growth trajectory. In the process, several levers have been deployed to facilitate industrial development.

These include industrial financing in the form of incentives from the dti and industrial loans mainly from IDC; localisation through public procurement; and a wide range of sectoral interventions which have sought to deepen and widen our industrial capabilities.

It is important to note at the outset that industrialisation cannot be achieved through the implementation of isolated interventions in a single year. Rather, industrialisation requires the implementation of a range of interventions over the medium-term to change the structure of the economy. The global economic context can constrain or encourage these developments.

Progress made on the re-industrialisation programme:

Examples of progress will be drawn from Automotives; Clothing, Textiles, Leather and Footwear; Green industries; Agro-processing; industrial financing, and procurement.

Automotive industries:

All the major automotive OEM’s are operating in SA - Mercedes Benz, BMW, Volkswagen, Toyota, General Motors, and Ford and the new players include Iveco (Italy), Tata (India), BAW (China), FAW (China) and Hyundai (South Korea). With the policy certainty which Government has provided, the private-sector has invested over R25,7bn over the last 5 years, sustaining about 300,000 jobs. Auto exports exceeded R100bn for the first time in SA’s history in 2014.

Clothing, Textiles, Leather & Footwear:

In order to stabilise the sector, the Clothing and Textiles Competitiveness Programme (CTCP) was introduced in 2010. The Manufacturing Value-addition increase attributable to the CTCP between the base of 2009 and 2014 is R3.9 billion. About 68,000 jobs have been retained in the sector and 6,900 jobs created.

Metal Products, Engineering & Capital Equipment:

Preferential procurement and sector designations have been critical to the development of this value chain. For example, the designation of valves has led to foreign investment by Denmark AVK which has acquired South Africa’s Premier Valves Group (PVG) for R100 million. US technology multinational General Electric (GE) announced a R700 million commitment designed to support innovation, enterprise- and skills-development in South Africa. Grindrod unveiled its cost-effective shunting and short haul locomotive in October 2014.The locomotive boasts 80% local content, and is already being exported to a number of African countries.

Green Economy:

The dti has strengthened the local content requirements for renewable energy. It progressed from a threshold of 25% in bid window 1 to a threshold of 40% in bid window 4. These local content requirements have resulted in a number of new investments in local manufacturing:

SMA Solar Technology South Africa, officially launching its multi-million Rand manufacturing facility in Cape Town and Jinko Solar opening its R80 million plant.

Agro-processing:

Since 2009 we have supported Agro-processing industries to the value of R1.2 billion through various schemes such as the Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme (MCEP) and the Enterprise Investment Programme (EIP). Coega Development Corporation and the dti have partnered to create an R86 million Agro-processing facility within the Coega IDZ. the dti and JSE-listed Astral Foods partnered in a R200 million feed mill in Standerton to boost South Africa’s agriculture sector.

Industrial Finance:

The Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme in Financial Year (FY) 2014/15 approved 236 enterprises for funding with a total grant value of R1,1bn. This has leveraged private-sector investment of R3,7 billion in support of 28,093 jobs.

Under the 12i Tax Allowance, 17 enterprises were approved for funding with a total tax allowance of R2,7bn in FY 2014/15. This has leveraged private-sector investment of R6,7bn in support of the creation of approximately 4,500 jobs.

The Enterprise Investment Programme – for FY 2014/15, 39 enterprises were approved for funding with a total grant value of R147m. This has leveraged private-sector investment of R1,3bn in support of the creation of approximately 1,500 jobs.

The National Empowerment Fund (NEF) approved 549 transactions worth more than R5.4 billion for black-empowered businesses across the country, supporting over 47,000 jobs.

The Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) approved projects to the value of R7,7 billion with 6,899 jobs created and 4,668 jobs saved between April 2014 and December 2014

Procurement localisation (designations):

Given the R3,6 trillion infrastructure build programme, failure to designate would lead to substantial import leakages and a missed industrialisation opportunity. In total 16 products or sectors have now been ‘designated’ for localisation in government procurement.

PRASA has awarded a tender to Alstom for the manufacturing of 7,224 coaches at a projected cost of R123bn to be built between 2015 and 2025, the initial phase is estimated to create over 8,000 direct jobs.

As part of this deal, PRASA and Gibela Rail Transportation signed a contract to supply the state agency with 600 commuter trains (3,600 coaches) valued at R51 Billion.

Transnet has awarded a total of R50bn in contracts to CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive, CNR Rolling Stock SA, Bombardier Transportation SA and General Electric SA to build 1,064 electric and diesel locomotives in SA. All but 70 locomotives, will be built in Transnet Engineering’s plants in Pretoria & Durban.

Pharmaceuticals:

Four pharmaceutical companies were jointly awarded a R10 billion tender to supply the Department of Health with antiretroviral (ARV) medication from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2018. The tender had a conditional provision for designation of up to 70% of the tender volume for domestic manufacturers. DoH announced the tender valued at R14 billion of which 61.6% was won by companies that have manufacturing plants in SA.

19 August 2015 - NW2786

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Kilian, Ms JD to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) With reference to the expectations that the Technical and Vocational Education and Training college (TVET) sector has to expand significantly, (a) how long has the Mitchell’s Plain campus of the False Bay TVET college been sharing facilities with the high school in Mitchell’s Plain and (b) what are the relevant details of his department’s future infrastructure plan for the expansion of the specified college; (2) whether his department has considered the proposal presented by the False Bay TVET College Council for the acquisition of the Swartklip site situated between Khayelitsha and Mitchell’s Plain; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether any formal negotiations have been entered into with the current owner, the Airports Company of South Africa; if not, why not; (4) whether his department has made budgetary provision in the medium term for the necessary infrastructure roll-out of a campus to serve the community of Mitchell’s Plain; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. (a) False Bay Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College commenced renting and sharing the facilities of Portlands Primary School from 1 April 2004 until the end of 2006. The operations were then relocated to Spine Road High School from 1 January 2007 to date. The demand has outgrown the facilities and the college has secured 17 classrooms at Khanya School for usage from January 2016. The headcount enrolment at the Mitchell’s Plain site in 2014 was 1 149, with the additional facilities secured at Khanya School, the college will be able to accommodate approximately 1 500 students in 2016. The education activities at the Mitchell’s Plain campus will be delivered from two sites in 2016.

(b) The Department had identified the need for expansion of infrastructure for both the Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha campuses in 2011. The requirement has been included in the Department’s infrastructure planning and funding bids to National Treasury each year. The process that the Department follows is that all funding secured is mapped against the identified demands and basis of prioritisation. This process is informed by factors such as current available facilities and level of such, pool of potential students and finally the Provincial Indices of Multiple Poverty. In this regard, priority had to be given to sites in other provinces that are listed on a higher level of priority. The funding requirement of False Bay TVET College is still active on the Department’s infrastructure funding list.

(2) False Bay TVET College presented its proposal for the establishment of a campus at the Swartklip Denel site at a meeting, which was chaired by my Deputy Minister on 14 January 2014. I, together with the Department, have since been playing an active role in assisting the college to secure the site. The site is ideally placed to provide access to both the Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha areas.

(3) False Bay TVET College, supported by the Department, has been in active dialogue with Denel and the Department of Public Enterprises. Recently, the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) has shown an interest in purchasing the Swartklip site. To date the college has had two meetings on 29 July 2015 and 5 August 2015 with ACSA in order to ensure that our interests are taken into consideration in the process of acquiring the site from Denel. The Department will be approaching the Minister of Transport in order to secure support for the college, as ACSA resides under the Department of Transport.

(4) The Department works on the basis of prioritised infrastructure support and available funding. In light of the current fiscal climate and the Department’s steadfastness to complete its infrastructure commitments in areas that have high poverty rankings, it is not possible to make a budgetary provision in the current Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). The Department will however explore innovative means to assist with the refurbishment of the Swartklip site once funding has been secured.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2786 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 August 2015 - NW2985

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What progress has been made in the (a) establishment of the Black Economic Empowerment Commission and (b) appointment of the relevant commissioner? (2) whether he is considering the appointment of a certain person (name furnished) to the position of commissioner; if so, on what basis?NW3490E

Reply:

(1)(a) The process of establishing the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Commission is underway. The department has submitted to National Treasury the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budget request for both financial and human resource capital.

(1)(b) The Minister of Trade and Industry, in terms of section 13C of the B-BBEE Act, 2003 (Act No. 53 of 2003), as amended by the B-BBEE Amendment Act 46 of 2013, has consulted with the relevant Portfolio Committee of the National Assembly and the relevant Select Committee of the National Council of Provinces regarding the appointment of the BEE Commissioner.

The Minister is pleased to announce that Ms Zodwa Ntuli has been appointed as the acting BEE Commissioner.

19 August 2015 - NW2519

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to the inter-ministerial task team to be formed to consider the so-called unintended consequences of the new visa regulations on the tourism industry, (a) by what date will the specified team be formed, (b) what is the exact mandate of the team, (c) what (i) are the names and (ii) is the designation of each member of the team and (d) what is the team empowered to do; (2) will a composite finding be made; if so, by when?

Reply:

(1)(a) The date of the Inter-Ministerial Task Team is currently being processed by the Deputy Presidency which is facilitating the meeting.

(1)(b) The mandate of the team, as prescribed by Cabinet, is to propose measures to mitigate potential unintended consequences that occur as a result of administrative challenges.

(1)(c)(i)-(ii) The team is constituted by Ministers as announced by the President drawn from the Social, Economic and Security Clusters.

(1)(d) The team is empowered to deliver on its mandate as per (b) above.

(2) Refer to 1(d) above.

19 August 2015 - NW2929

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Why did the investment protection agreement between South Africa and Zimbabwe not retroactively provide for the protection of the property rights of South African citizens against expropriation and/or illegal occupation before the agreement came into force;

Reply:

The Bilateral Investment Treaty between South Africa and Zimbabwe is a negotiated Agreement. Furthermore, it is unusual for Agreements of this nature to have retrospective application as the guiding principle is that parties enter into such agreements with a view to addressing future events.

 

(2)Whether he intends to take steps to promote the rights, and claim compensation for the losses, of South African citizens who have been prejudiced by the Zimbabwean government and/or illegal occupiers before the commencement of the agreement; if not, why not, seen against the background of the Bill of Rights contained in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and relevant international law; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

The Republic of South Africa is responsible for enforcing rights and obligations within its own territory. Any events that take place outside the borders of the Republic are extra-territorial and remedies or redress would have to be sought in the jurisdiction where prejudice occurred. The Bill of Rights contained the Constitution of the Republic is applicable only in South Africa and has no application in Zimbabwe. The South African Government is addressing concerns of South African investors as and when they arise through the diplomatic and multilateral channels available bilaterally and regionally.

(3)Whether he is considering legislation to bring about compensation for such disadvantaged people by way of making the confiscation of assets of the Zimbabwean government and/or responsible ministers and/or officials in South Africa possible; if not, why not, seen against the background of the Bill of Rights, as contained in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and relevant international law; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

The dti respects the independence and competence of the judiciary to make determinations in that regard.

(4)What steps is he taking regarding the current unlawful dispossession of South African citizens’ property rights in Zimbabwe by the Zimbabwean government and/or illegal occupiers?

Under the Bilateral Investment Treaty concluded with Zimbabwe in 2009 and ratified in 2010, investors affected by measures taken by the Zimbabwean State can, after challenging such a matter in domestic courts, resort to international arbitration in order to settle any dispute. No further steps can be taken by the Government of the Republic of South Africa in that respect as the international arbitration process is independent and the rulings thereof are binding.

18 August 2015 - NW2719

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) Whether she has found that it is acceptable to combine Grade R with Grades 1, 2 and/or 3 in multi-grade teaching environments and (b) on what basis her determination has been reached; (2) whether the post provisioning norms and standards will be altered to accommodate her determination; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

  1. (a) It is not acceptable for schools to combine the Grade R class with Grades 1, 2, and 3. The recommendation that the Department of Basic Education is making to all schools that are delivering the curriculum through the multi-grade teaching model, is that the Grade R class should always be a stand-alone class.

(b) The Grade R prepares children to be ready for the primary school by developing their pre-reading, pre-writing and pre-numeracy skills. Children learn these skills through play. The real work of children in the Grade R class is predominantly characterised by play. Therefore, multi-grade primary schools should offer the Grade R class as a stand-alone class that will accord the children the opportunity to be introduced to formal schooling with ease and in a friendly and conducive environment.

2)  There is no need to make a determination on Grade R as the Department does not encourage multi-grade schools to combine Grade R with other grades. The post provisioning norms provide for the posts in Grade R in terms of relevant weighting in line with the ideal maximum class size for Grade R.

18 August 2015 - NW2598

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR in the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality, (a) how many (i) primary and (ii) high schools are to be built on the specified property, (b) how many learners will each school accommodate, (c) when will each school be completed and (d) what is the projected total cost of building each specified school?

Reply:

(a); (i), (ii), (b), (c), (d). According to information received from Gauteng Department of Education, no educational sites have been provided during the town planning of the area mentioned. Rietfontein falls within the border of the City of Johannesburg and Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipalities and is surrounded by areas such as Greenstone, Linksfield, Modderfontein and Edenvale. At this point there are no sites earmarked for public schooling within the area and no schools are presently planned to be built on the specified sites.

18 August 2015 - NW2850

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the early termination of employment of the Chief Executive Officer of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (name furnished), what (a) were the conditions of the early termination of employment, (b) total compensation has been paid to the specified person, (c) are the respective timeframes in this regard, (d) contracts was the specified person required to sign when employment was terminated and (e) are the reasons for the early termination of employment of the specified person?

Reply:

(a) The standard return of company assets.

(b) Sensitive information / unprocessed.

(c) 1st August 2015 to 30th November 2015.

(d) None.

(e) PRASA Board of Control decided that it was in the best interest of the entity that the then Group Chief Executive Officer be released early.

18 August 2015 - NW2649

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, arising from his remarks on the importance of mother tongue instruction in the light of the Government’s constitutional and international legal obligations to promote mother tongue instruction, he will consider the positioning of (a) some or (b) all universities as institutions of mother tongue instruction; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa declares that “the official languages of the Republic are Sepedi, Sesotho, Setswana, siSwati, Tshivenda, Xitsonga, Afrikaans, English, isiNdebele, isiXhosa and isiZulu”. The Constitution, Section 6 (1), (2) and (4) of the Founding Provisions also states that “the state must take practical and positive measures to elevate the status and advance the use of these [the indigenous] languages” and that all official languages must enjoy parity of esteem and be treated equitably. The Constitution enjoins the Pan South African Language Board to promote and create conditions for the development and use of these and other languages.

With regard to the provision of languages at institutions of higher learning, Section 29 (2) of the Constitution states that “everyone has the right to receive education in the official language or languages of their choice in public educational institutions where that education is reasonably practicable. In order to ensure the effective access to, and implementation of this right, the state must consider all reasonable educational alternatives, including single medium institutions, taking into account:

  1. equity;
  2. practicability; and
  3. the need to redress the results of past racially discriminatory laws and practices.

These facts are stated so that there is a clear understanding on the obligations of the Minister of Higher Education and Training. In terms of Section 27 (2) of the Higher Education Act (101 of 1997, as amended), the Minister determines Language Policy for Higher Education. In accordance with this legislation, each institution of higher education is required to establish its own language policy, guided by the Constitution and Language Policy for Higher Education. This requirement takes into account the autonomy of institutions to determine flexible language policies provided that such determination is within the context of public accountability and my responsibility to establish the parameters. Although the Language Policy for Higher Education is designed to promote African languages in institutional policies and practices in higher education, it clearly does not make a determination for institutions to instruct in various mother tongues. It would be against the Constitution of the Republic if institutions were to instruct in a language that will disadvantage non-speakers of that particular language. For example, English as a medium language of tuition allows access for all to our higher education institutions and therefore, no one is prevented from accessing our higher education institutions if English is utilised as a language of instruction.

In terms of individual university language policies, multilingualism is supported. Currently, it is however not practical to use languages other than English or Afrikaans as a medium language of tuition, since these have not been developed as languages of instruction at school level. The language of instruction at most universities is therefore English, while most formerly Afrikaans institutions have a dual language policy. The action required is aggressive improvement of universities in developing indigenous languages. I believe that the promotion of multilingualism in the higher education sector is imperative as the Constitution of the RSA accords equal status to all our languages.

In this regard, the Language Policy for Higher Education published in November 2002 is the framework that guides the practices at higher education institutions. The Department is in the process of revising this policy to ensure that other South African languages can be developed to a level where they can enjoy parity in our universities.

 

 

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2649 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 August 2015 - NW2840

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What is the detailed breakdown of all businesses who have received support from his department to attend (a) trade shows, (b) pavilions abroad in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (c) in each case, what is the (i) name and (ii) location of the business, (iii) amount of support received and (iv) industry or sector the business is involved in;

Reply:

In the 2013/2014 year 1084 companies received financial assistance to participate in 25 National Pavilions and 40 Trade Missions. Export sales of R3,54 billion were facilitated. The sectoral spread of the companies supported comprises 42% to Multiple sectors; 25% to agro-processing; 8% to the Aerospace, Rail, Marine and Defence Sector; 6% to Electro technical; 6% to the Built Environment Sectors; 4% to the creative Industries; 3% to the Auto sector; 6% to Mining and Capital Equipment.

During the 2013/2014 period, the provincial spread comprises as a percentage the following: 45% from Gauteng; 27% from Western Cape; 10% from KZN; 5 % from International participants 4% from Limpopo; 3% from Mpumalanga; 3% from Eastern Cape; 3% from Mpumalanga and the remaining portion being attributable to the rest of the provinces at 1% each.

In the 2014/2015 year 923 companies received financial assistance to participate in 27 National Pavilions and 24 Trade Missions. Exports sales of R2,77 billion were facilitated. The sectoral spread of the companies supported comprises 30% to agro-processing; 40% to Multiple sectors; 7% to the Aerospace, Rail, Marine and Defence Sector; 7% to Capital Equipment; 7% to the Electro technical sector; 5% to the Auto sector; 4% to the creative Industries.

The provincial spread comprises a percentage spread as follows: 40.4% from Gauteng, 30.77% from Western Cape, 10.51% from KZN, 8,13% from International participants and the remaining portion being attributable to the rest of the provinces at less than 2% each.

The detailed breakdown for each financial year is attached in Annexures A and B.

Question

(2) whether the trip resulted in new contracts for those companies;

Response

In various instances the trips do yield sales contracts, joint venture partnerships or sub-contracting projects for South African companies. The value thereof is included in the total export sales facilitated which are detailed in part 3 of this response. A few examples of sales that have been facilitated through the trade shows in the 2014/2015 financial year include but are not limited to the following:

At SIAL China, export orders of R1.3 billion were generated as a result of the participation of South African companies. For example the company Dynamic Commodities from the Eastern Cape, reported that it generated R53 million worth of export business.

At the WAPIC Trade Fair in Nigeria, 18 South African companies exhibited their products and services. The Gauteng based exhibitors which include Powertech, Landis + GYR Pty Ltd, General Cables, ADC Energy, Poynting Antennas and Doble Engineering Africa reported expected product and service sales of R112 million as a result of their participation.

At the Ghana International Trade Fair (GITF) Aveng Africa from the Gauteng province, reported that it has signed a joint venture investment that is worth in excess of R12 billion.

During an Outward Selling Mission to The Netherlands, Redsun Raisins from the Northern Cape, reported export sales totalling R16,6 million.

After a special mission to Russia, Sea Harvest based in the Western Cape received an order of $10 million for hake and hake related products from a Russian company.

Question

(3) does his department monitor the effectiveness of this support programme to ensure that (a) his department is getting value for money and (b) recipients do not waste the financial support they receive? NW3313E

Response

The division monitors the effectiveness of the support programme through questionnaires that are completed by business participants at the end of each mission and National Pavilion. This questionnaire focuses on the sales that have been made at the event as well as the projected sales that are anticipated in the next six months. After a period of six months the same participants provide information that confirms the projected sales and / or additional export sales that may have accrued to the company during the period. In addition, the dti also utilises the services of an independent auditor who verifies the reported export sales as well as the local content of the manufactured products.

In addition the Department of Public Monitoring and Evaluation has recently assessed the effectiveness of the EMIA scheme and has recommended that this instrument be continued to facilitate Trade and Investment Missions and National Pavilions.

In the 2013/2014 period the cost of EMIA assistance of R113 million yielded R3,54 billion of export sales facilitated. In this regard, for each R1.00 spent, there was a R30.54 return. For the period of 2014/2015, the cost of EMIA assistance of R147 million yielded R2,779 billion of export sales. In this regard, for each R1.00 spent, there was a R18.90 return.

The financial support is in the form of full or partial payments to service providers for hotels, accommodation, transport, freight logistics, venue hire and space allocation at exhibition. To avoid potential wastage, the only direct payments that occur between the dti and the participants are in the event where a business participant has been pre-approved to claim for expenses which they had paid directly to service providers. The claims thresholds are governed by the EMIA rules which are signed off by the Minister and implemented through an adjudication committee.

Furthermore the financial support to companies is qualified according to the following categories: Emerging Exporters receive 100% funding towards an air ticket, subsistence and ground transport; SMMEs air ticket limited to R17,000.00 and subsistence limited to R2 300.00 per day; Other sized companies qualify for freight and stand in the case of a National Pavilion. For the same other-sized companies, the air ticket finance cannot exceed R8 500.00 and the subsistence of R2 300.00 per day. In addition for the Trade and Investment missions, all companies qualify for an R2000.00 allowance for excess baggage on exhibition material.

18 August 2015 - NW2929

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Why did the investment protection agreement between South Africa and Zimbabwe not retroactively provide for the protection of the property rights of South African citizens against expropriation and/or illegal occupation before the agreement came into force;

Reply:

The Bilateral Investment Treaty between South Africa and Zimbabwe is a negotiated Agreement. Furthermore, it is unusual for Agreements of this nature to have retrospective application as the guiding principle is that parties enter into such agreements with a view to addressing future events.

 

(2)Whether he intends to take steps to promote the rights, and claim compensation for the losses, of South African citizens who have been prejudiced by the Zimbabwean government and/or illegal occupiers before the commencement of the agreement; if not, why not, seen against the background of the Bill of Rights contained in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and relevant international law; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

The Republic of South Africa is responsible for enforcing rights and obligations within its own territory. Any events that take place outside the borders of the Republic are extra-territorial and remedies or redress would have to be sought in the jurisdiction where prejudice occurred. The Bill of Rights contained the Constitution of the Republic is applicable only in South Africa and has no application in Zimbabwe. The South African Government is addressing concerns of South African investors as and when they arise through the diplomatic and multilateral channels available bilaterally and regionally.

(3)Whether he is considering legislation to bring about compensation for such disadvantaged people by way of making the confiscation of assets of the Zimbabwean government and/or responsible ministers and/or officials in South Africa possible; if not, why not, seen against the background of the Bill of Rights, as contained in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and relevant international law; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

The dti respects the independence and competence of the judiciary to make determinations in that regard.

(4)What steps is he taking regarding the current unlawful dispossession of South African citizens’ property rights in Zimbabwe by the Zimbabwean government and/or illegal occupiers?

Under the Bilateral Investment Treaty concluded with Zimbabwe in 2009 and ratified in 2010, investors affected by measures taken by the Zimbabwean State can, after challenging such a matter in domestic courts, resort to international arbitration in order to settle any dispute. No further steps can be taken by the Government of the Republic of South Africa in that respect as the international arbitration process is independent and the rulings thereof are binding.

18 August 2015 - NW2800

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department meets the Government’s employment equity target of 2% for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training has 0.72% of its employees who are classified as disabled. All advertisements for vacancies in the Department specify that candidates whose appointment will promote representivity in terms of race, gender and disability will receive preference. The Z83 application form that is used across the public service requires applicants to specify their disability. No qualifying applications received, have specified their disability status. The Department informally liaises with relevant organisations for persons with disabilities to recruit possible qualifying applicants for vacant positions within the Department. For the next five years, the Department aims at being an inclusive department through the implementation of strategies for the recruitment and retention of disabled individuals.

 

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2800 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 August 2015 - NW2751

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the most recent estimated number of (i)cloned or (ii) erroneous vehicle number plates in Gauteng and (b) how does this figure compare to the estimated numbers prior to launch of e-tolling in Gauteng?

Reply:

(a) (i) In terms of the current information that the Department has received the number of cloned motor vehicles that have been captured by our law enforcement systems in and around the Province of Gauteng is ten (10).

(ii) There are no erroneous number plates that have been issued as the system automatically allocates number plates and does not have margin for errors.

(b) I am informed that currently, there has not been an increase in relation to the use of cloned number plates after the roll-out of the Gauteng e-Toll.

Additional information for the Minister:

The Department will be engaging with the SAPS to ensure that there is an interface between the SANRAL and the SAPS systems with regards to the transferring and sharing of information on the cases reported and captured by the various systems.

18 August 2015 - NW2859

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) How many Grade R teachers and/or practitioners are employed in public ordinary schools and (b) what percentage of them are qualified at (i) National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Level 4, (ii) NQF Level 5 and (iii) NQF Level 6 in each (aa) province and (bb) district; (2) whether qualified Grade R teachers are employed and paid as educators and not practitioners; if not, (a) why not and (b) when this will be

Reply:

(1) (a) How many Grade R teachers and/or practitioners are employed in public ordinary schools and (b) what percentage of them are qualified at (i) National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Level 4, (ii) NQF Level 5 and (iii) NQF Level 6 in each (aa) province and (bb) district;

Province

aa(b) i

aa(b) ii

aa(b) iii

(a)

 

Level 4

Level 5

NQF 6 & above

Total (Employed)

EC

82%

4%

9%

4 765

FS

22%

19%

53%

1 270

GP

4%

52%

43%

2 710

KZN

74%

6%

17%

6 486

LP

0%

0%

100%

1 080

MP

38%

34%

18%

2 065

NC

42%

41%

15%

736

NW

Not Submitted

WC

30%

37%

30%

1 767

Total

52%

19%

26%

20 879

(bb) Provinces were only able to submit information aggregated at province

level.

(2) Whether qualified Grade R teachers are employed and paid as educators and not practitioners; if not, (a) why not and (b) when this will be the case?

(a) Grade R is currently not fully-funded as part of the mainstream education system. This refers to all funding including compensation of Grade R teachers.

(b) The Department is working towards the universalisation of Grade R by 2019. It is planned that by 2019, Grade R will be fully integrated into the mainstream education system and will accordingly be funded at the same level or fully-funded as part of the mainstream education system.

18 August 2015 - NW2687

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether (a) he, (b) his Deputy Minister and (c) any officials in his department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

(a-b) Neither the Minister nor Deputy Minister travelled to China during the 2014-15 financial year.

(c) The table below indicates the officials who travelled to China in the 2014-2015 financial year:

OFFICIAL

  1. PURPOSE

(ii)(aa-bb) COSTS

DDG: Immigration Services,

JW McKay

Study Tour on Integrated Border Management

Total: R 115 845.02

Flight: R 90 626.50

S&T: R 4 048.52

Accommodation: R 7 806

Ground transport: R 13 364

Director: Core Business and Change Audits, LT Kgopane

Assistant Director: Audits, NS Somdyala

Audit of DHA services in SA mission in Shanghai

Total: R 129 959.68

Flight: R 28 409.39

S&T: R 9 055.45

Accommodation: R 22 944

Ground transport: R 4 571

Flight: R 28 409.39

S&T: R 9055.45

Accommodation: R 22 944

Ground transport: R 4 571

OFFICIAL

  1. PURPOSE

(ii)(aa-bb) COSTS

DDG: Immigration Services, JW McKay

Director: Corporate Accounts, IP Mbhele

Bilateral discussions on immigration and official visit to SA missions in Beijing and Shanghai, respectively

Total: R 161 444.82

Flight R 61 547.39

S&T: R 4 541.52

Accommodation: R 19 441

Ground transport: R 9 285

Flight: R 38 597.39

S&T: R 4 541.52

Accommodation: R 14 206

Ground transport: R 9 285

Senior Accounting Clerk: Foreign Revenue, V Andrews

Accompanied Auditor – General officials to conduct regulatory audit of SA mission in Shanghai

Total: R 89 766.64

Flight: R 54 165.22

S&T: R 8 520.42

Accommodation: R 17 106

Ground transport: R 9 975

18 August 2015 - NW2810

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether her department will launch an investigation into the verification of the qualifications of top Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) officials; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) how many top PRASA officials were found to have false qualifications; (3) how many of the specified officials have (a) resigned, (b) been suspended with pay and (c) been suspended without pay? NW3282E

Reply:

  1. Yes. The Executive Authority has instructed the Board of PRASA and all other Department of Transport agencies / entities to verify the academic qualifications of all senior officials and to report to the Department by 31st October 2015.
  2. See above response in (1).
  3. (a) One

          (b) One

         (c) none

18 August 2015 - NW2809

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the cause of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) delays in construction and improvement of perways, platforms and other structures that are necessary for the testing of trains, (b) what are the names of the constructors employed and (c) why did they not commit to the tight construction deadline?

Reply:

 

(a) The De Wildt station to Wolmerton Depot line is identified for testing the new train and is ready. Procurement for the Wolmerton Depot testing facilities processes is underway.

(b) Permanent Way projects:

  • Steffanutti Stocks – Cleveland Station (Platform rectification);
  • Mpfumelelo Business Enterprises – Toronga Station & Denver Station (Platform Rectification)
  • Lenong Civil engineering – Hercules Station  - Drainage Project; and
  • Lettam Building and DKPB (JV) – Denneboom Station – Drainage Project

(c) Other than the pending appointment of contractors for the Wolmerton Depot and the non-performance of the perway contractor, current contractors are in compliance with their contracted timeline schedule.

Ministerial Note:

Due to deficiencies in the supply chain management process, the Wolmerton Depot tenders was withdrawn. Subsequent to re-advertising the tenders, it is being evaluated.

18 August 2015 - NW2836

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

How many (a) persons have applied for support under the Black Industrialist Programme and (b) applications have been approved;

Reply:

(a) and (b) the dti has conducted extensive consultations with key stakeholders as part of the Black Industrialist Policy development process. Such Stakeholders include Cabinet Committee, MinMec, Business, Development Finance Institutions, State Owned Enterprises and NEDLAC. The inputs from these Stakeholders have been considered in the development of the Black Industrialist Policy (BIP) which is en route to Cabinet for consideration and approval. No applications have been approved as the application process for the BIP has not as yet been finalized.

(2) What are the names of all those (a) who have applied for support under the specified programme and (b) whose applications have been approved to date?

Response:

(a) None, the Black Industrialist Programme has not yet approved by Cabinet.

18 August 2015 - NW2837

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) Is there any further progress on the negotiations with the National Treasury to extend the budget available for the S12i Tax Incentive and (b) what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

 

(a) The department continues to engage in discussions and deliberations with National Treasury on this matter.

(b) The engagements concern the anticipated increase in applications in the extended period up to December 2017.

18 August 2015 - NW2716

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Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) he, (b) his Deputy Minister and (c) any officials in his department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(a) total cost and (b) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

 

 
  1. Purpose of visit

(ii)(a) Total Cost

(Rand)

(ii)(b) Breakdown of cost

(Rand)

  1. Minister

Did not travel to China during the 2014-15 financial year.

  1. Deputy Minister

To attend the China International Business Tourism Mart (CIBTM); one of the biggest business tourism events in the Asia region.

341 820.08

Deputy Minister

Flight ticket:

Accommodation:

Insurance:

Service Fee:

Allowance:

Total:

83 430.00

22 026.00

585.00

625.00

11 317.92

117 983.90

  1. Officials

Ms L Mathopa

Ms N Sifanele

   

Ms L Mathopa

Flight ticket: Accommodation:

Insurance:

Service Fee:

Shuttle:

Allowance :

Total:

Ms N Sifanele

Flight ticket: Accommodation:

Insurance:

Service Fees:

Allowance:

Total:

78 859.00

28 630.00

630.00

665.00

870.00

3 797.14

113 451.14

83 430.00

15 456.00

585.00

625.00

10 289.02

110 385.02

  • Ambassador LM Makhubela, Director General (DG).
  • Mr V Tharage, Deputy Director General (DDG): Policy and Knowledge Services.
  • Ms L Mfecane, Deputy Director (DD): Office of the DG.

To attend the 2014 World Travel &Tourism Council (WTTC) Global Summit.

To attend the 2014 World Travel &Tourism Council (WTTC) Global Summit.

368 216.83

DG:

Flight ticket:

Accommodation:

Insurance:

Service Fee:

Allowance:

Total:

DDG:

Flight ticket: Accommodation:

Insurance:

Service Fee:

Allowance:

Total:

DD:

Flight ticket:

Accommodation:

Insurance:

Service Fee:

Allowance:

Total:

129 683.00

17 259.52

534.90

350.48

6 642.77

154 470.67

105 423.00

17 600.00

534.90

775.00

5 971.00

130 303.90

66 448.00

11 079.52

534.90

350.48

5 009.36

83 442.26

18 August 2015 - NW2883

Profile picture: Maimane, Mr MA

Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Is she aware of the situation at Metagong Primary School in Soweto in Gauteng, (a) where teachers have not been paid their monthly salaries for an extended period of time and (b) that in spite of more than R1 million that has been spent on security services for the school, the school has been vandalised numerous times since procuring the security services; if so, what steps has departmental officials taken to remedy the situation?

Reply:

(a) The Gauteng Department of Education is investigating the matter. A full response will be provided once the investigation has been completed and relevant information has been provided to the Department of Basic Education.

(b) The Provincial School Safety Coordinator (Mr Z Nkuna) has reported that the school was never vandalised whilst security was in place, the security was retracted at the end of the month of January 2015 with no reported incidents.

18 August 2015 - NW2721

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department has any reliable indicator of the number of undocumented foreign nationals in the country; if so, how many undocumented foreign nationals are currently residing in the country?

Reply:

The phenomenon of foreign nationals entering the country in contravention of the Immigration Act is difficult to quantify because, by their very nature, such movements do not take place through designated ports of entry and are therefore not recorded. As a result of this, the Department does not have a comprehensive view of the number of undocumented foreign nationals in the country.

Departmental systems do indicate, however, that since 2010, a total of 333 874 foreign nationals have overstayed the duration of their visas and have not departed through a designated port of entry. Further, in the first quarter of the 2015/16 financial year, 10 242 illegal immigrants were deported (and are therefore no longer residing in the country), whilst 4 860 were arrested during “Operation Fiela” as well as in normal operations. These figures only provide an indication of undocumented foreign nationals detected.

18 August 2015 - NW2852

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many engineers were dismissed by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) in each case, what (i) were the costs to PRASA and (ii) were the reasons for their dismissal?

Reply:

(a)  None.

(b)  Not applicable

18 August 2015 - NW2862

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether the vocational curriculum currently being developed will address the needs of learners at primary school level; if not, why not; (2) what are the relevant details of how schools for learners with special needs are expected to adapt the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement in order to allow effective teaching of learners in the specified schools?

Reply:

 

  1. The Skills and Vocational Curriculum currently being developed will address the needs of learners at primary school level, as it is the curriculum which would lead to an exit level qualification at NQF Level 1. The Skills and Vocational Curriculum is being developed at two levels:

(a) A Skills and Vocational Curriculum aligned to the National Curriculum Statement, Grades R to 12, to meet the needs of learners who experience barriers to learning (including learners with moderate intellectual disability) at Grade 6 to 9 level;

(b) A Skills and Vocational Curriculum (also CAPS aligned) to meet the needs of learners with severe intellectual disability at Grade R to 5 level.

2) Both curricula will provide clarity to schools for learners with special needs on how to adapt the National Curriculum Statement for learners with intellectual disability who struggle to meet the academic requirements of the National Curriculum Statement. Apart from the General Subjects (Language, Mathematics and Life Skills) which are adapted to be more functional and practical and less abstract, the Skills and Vocational Subjects are introduced to prepare learners more effectively for the world of work. For learners who do not have cognitive impairments, the Guidelines for Responding to Diversity in the Classroom and the Policy on Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support will be used to adapt the curriculum to meet their individual needs.

18 August 2015 - NW2772

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department supported the publish or perish principle for South African academics at tertiary institutions to ensure that the quality of research and teaching equated with the best in the world and that promotions in the academic sphere were directly related to peer endorsement of academic work; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) details and (b) outcomes of pursuing such a policy?

Reply:

The Department does not support the so-called principle of “publish or perish” for South African academics. The Department supports the development of academics that value teaching, research and community engagement as outlined in the recently approved Staffing South Africa’s Universities Framework (SSAUF). This includes supporting universities to be innovative and produce quality research. We expect that universities have some highly productive researchers, that may not focus much on teaching, and equally that there will be scholars who have a greater focus on teaching. The focus on publishing at all costs regardless of the quality or substance of the research is not supported by the Department.

It should be noted that the Department does not control nor develop policies on the promotions criteria at universities. The Department admits that highly productive academics, whether in the sphere of research or scholarship of teaching, should be recognised. It is also aware that some universities value research as a key criterion for promotion.

The Department has recently published a revised Research Output Policy (2015). The purpose of this policy is to encourage research productivity by rewarding quality research output at public higher education institutions. The policy is not intended to measure all output, but to enhance productivity by recognising the major types of research output produced by higher education institutions, and uses appropriate proxies to determine the quality of such output. While increased productivity is a key driver behind this policy, what has informed the revision was the need to ensure improved quality of subsidised research outputs.

Within the total subsidy funding allocated to universities in 2015/16, R3 billion which is just under 15% of the total block grant of R20.5 billion, is allocated for research output subsidies and implemented through the Research Output Policy. The remainder of the block grant (85%) is linked to teaching inputs and outputs as well as institutional factors. As can be seen, teaching is the area that is allocated the largest proportion of funding.

Since the implementation of the research outputs subsidy in 2005, South Africa’s research outputs have increased at a rate of 13% per annum, which is a substantial return on investment. The Department takes pride that our universities’ research productivity has improved significantly since 2005. South African universities’ research productivity is ranked top in Africa, and recent impact studies show that more South African research is published in high-impact journals than all other Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) member states.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2772 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 August 2015 - NW2851

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many vehicle drivers’ licenses have been issued, in each province, in each month in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) what (i) are the reasons for delays in the issuing of these licenses and (ii) is being done to reduce these delays?

Reply:

(a) (i) Driving Licences issued 2012/ 13 financial year:

                         

PROV

Apr 12

May 12

Jun 12

Jul 12

Aug 12

Sept 12

Oct 12

Nov 12

Dec 12

Jan 13

Feb 13

Mar 13

EC

9392

12474

12440

13692

12706

10349

12030

12540

6747

17276

14037

13278

FS

6874

9805

9568

10474

9515

7947

8753

8637

4671

13121

11230

9868

GP

50661

70317

68403

75559

73440

61958

68434

68946

39148

101448

78961

76874

KZN

21859

30604

29055

31493

30617

25800

28034

28409

16686

44105

33705

31572

LIM

11762

15552

15378

17079

16956

14165

15701

15220

8498

22219

18151

16628

MPL

11346

16038

15345

16682

16546

13955

15581

15298

8456

21828

17360

16456

NW

6644

8937

8611

8995

9314

7876

8461

9172

5213

11836

10512

10196

NC

2687

3572

3472

3876

3810

3473

3622

3614

1961

4764

4433

4012

WC

22606

32816

31582

32830

32103

26213

28646

29087

17300

48447

37291

34285

Grand Total

143831

200115

193854

210680

205007

171736

189262

190923

108680

285044

225680

213169

 

(a) (ii) Driving Licences issued 2013/ 14 financial year:

PROV

Apr 13

May 13

Jun 13

Jul 13

Aug 13

Sept 13

Oct 13

Nov 13

Dec 13

Jan 14

Feb 14

Mar 14

EC

12357

14850

12835

12524

13267

9484

15833

15052

11712

13327

12754

12291

FS

10062

10800

9084

10158

9515

8624

10447

9562

7625

9834

8903

8960

GP

73628

78857

67409

73625

70816

63412

76280

74557

56316

73135

62877

64868

KZN

31401

34296

28709

31914

31284

28695

34127

32717

28142

34155

29413

28998

LIM

16418

17811

15481

17347

16176

14509

17116

15956

13485

16974

15467

15589

MPL

16941

17613

15465

16685

17570

14527

18002

17340

12958

17025

16092

15399

NW

9790

10898

9119

9927

9863

8476

9927

9593

7137

9198

8528

8595

NC

4058

4349

3800

4056

3973

3706

4251

4228

2970

3665

3368

3601

WC

32783

36624

29491

30942

29025

27995

33771

32232

27039

31906

26600

28868

Grand Total

207438

226098

191393

207178

201489

179428

219754

211237

167384

209219

184002

187169

(a) (iii) Driving Licences issued 2014/ 15 financial year:

PROV

Apr 14

May 14

Jun 14

Jul 14

Aug 14

Sept 14

Oct 14

Nov 14

Dec 14

Jan 15

Feb 15

Mar 15

EC

12064

13656

12135

14236

13442

12329

14467

14313

10329

15367

13845

14848

FS

8723

9453

8102

10243

9716

8776

9391

8699

6797

11402

10037

10418

GP

61082

70525

59247

70734

70647

62664

73288

65968

55644

79129

67777

71353

KZN

27193

33159

26977

32857

31853

28914

31199

31798

24240

40237

30629

32553

LIM

14858

16926

14024

17547

16408

14895

16924

15343

12099

19733

15973

16473

MPL

15087

17361

14809

17970

17402

15740

18397

16422

12642

19230

16453

17884

NW

8055

9578

7870

9693

9678

8636

9645

9359

7490

10149

9381

10078

NC

3351

3786

3252

3911

3981

3719

3767

3730

2560

4053

3613

3819

WC

26134

29537

24932

29361

30841

27125

29785

30228

23552

36054

29036

31283

Grand Total

176547

203981

171348

206552

203968

182798

206863

195860

155353

235354

196744

208709

(b) (i) and (ii) the delay was as a result of contractual disputes between the Department and the Card Production Facility. This matter has been sorted out and the Department will henceforth in partnership with other relevant government entities take over the issuance of the driving licenses.

18 August 2015 - NW2681

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In light of the Western Cape High Court ruling against his department which set aside the closure of the Cape Town Refugee Reception Office on 19 March 2013, what interim measures are in place to address the high number for asylum-seeker applications while the Lebombo Refugee Centre is currently being built; (2) what is the current progress with the construction of the Lebombo Refugee Centre?

Reply:

  1. The Court set aside the decision as indicated above and instructed the department to take a fresh decision, which was taken in November 2013. The department is not aware of a high number of new asylum seekers. According to the annual statistics shared with the public, the number of newcomers continues to decrease from approximately 233 300 in 2009 to 72 000 new applications in 2014. Departmental officials are coping with these numbers. The only bottlenecks remain with the appeal and review cases dealt with by the Refugee Appeal Board and Standing Committee on Refugee Affairs.
  2. The construction of the centre has not yet commenced. The Department of Public Works (DPW) has identified a suitable site in Komatipoort. The site is however zoned for agricultural use. An application was then made by DPW to rezone and subdivide the site. The application was heard by the Tribunal on 31 March 2015. Approval was granted by the Tribunal for the rezoning and subdivision of the site subject to South African National Roads Agency (SANRAL) commenting on the access route to the site. SANRAL comments are awaited.

18 August 2015 - NW2722

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Tourism

Does his department have any information that there has been a noticeable impact on the arrival and departure of travellers from various African countries since the outbreak of xenophobic violence against foreign nationals in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal earlier this year?

Reply:

The Statistics South Africa monthly Tourism and Migration Statistical Release provides the available detailed information on arrivals and departures including in transit travelers. The number of tourists excludes in transit travelers and there was a year on year decrease for the period January to end April 2015 of 169 017 tourist arrivals, a decline of 7.19%, from the Africa continent. This was made up of a decline of 169 017 (7.1%) in tourism arrivals from SADC and a decline of 7 073 (11%) from the rest of the continent.

The reasons for the decline in arrivals from the African continent is not necessarily entirely attributable to the unfortunate attacks on foreign nationals.

18 August 2015 - NW2831

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the Kha Ri Gude Mass Literacy Campaign, how many unannounced visits to centres has her department conducted in each (a) province and (b) district in the (i) 2012-13 and (ii) 2013-14 cycle?

Reply:

(a)(i)

Due to capacity constraints the Kha Ri Gude officials at the DBE were unable to conduct unannounced site visits during the 2012/13 and 2013/14 campaigns.

However all Kha Ri Gude monitors, coordinators and supervisors in each province are required to visit 10 sites per month during the six (6) months of classes. The table below indicates the number of monitors, coordinators and supervisors contracted for the 2012/13 and 2013/14 campaigns.

Year

2012/13

2013/14

Province

Monitors

Coordinators

Supervisors

Monitors

Coordinators

Supervisors

Eastern Cape

10

45

852

10

46

875

Free State

4

16

296

4

16

299

Gauteng

7

27

495

8

28

529

KwaZulu Natal

10

41

792

9

41

800

Mpumalanga

2

17

308

2

17

315

Northern Cape

0

3

46

0

5

84

Limpopo

7

33

610

7

35

642

North West

2

11

186

2

12

196

Western Cape

2

7

100

2

6

101

Total

44

200

3685

44

206

3841

In addition, part of the monitoring of the Kha Ri Gude Campaign includes the verification of learning through site visits to the centres. This function is performed by SAQA. The SAQA reports show positive views of the reality and authenticity of classes. The sites visited during the period 2012/13 and 2013/14 are as follows:

(b)(ii)

PROVINCE

2012/13

2013/14

Eastern Cape

20

38

Free State

3

19

Gauteng

10

42

Kwazulu-Natal

32

64

Limpopo

26

55

Mpumalanga

12

42

Northern Cape

0

13

North West

0

18

Western Cape

0

10

Unfortunately information regarding districts was not available.

The 2013/14 Performance Report of the Auditor General recommended that the monitoring of the Kha Ri Gude Campaign should be strengthened in order to deal with the challenges experienced in the programme relating to fraud and deceased learners amongst others.

The 2014/15 campaign was then strengthened by increasing the capacity of the DBE officials, focusing on unannounced site visits which have assisted the programme to eradicate fraud.

17 August 2015 - NW2616

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

With regard to her reply to question 1336 on 23 June 2015, (a) why is the position of Chief Operations Officer (COO) being reviewed, (b) why has the board not appointed a Chief Financial Officer (CFO) and (c) in each case, what amount has the acting (i) CEO, (ii) CFO, (iii) COO and (iv) Programme Director earned in respect of each month since their appointment to the specified posts?

Reply:

(a) The rationale to review the position of the COO was based on the fact that the MDDA is a small organisation with a staff compliment of 34. After due consideration, the Board resolved that streamlining the organisational structure would result in a much more efficient and effective organisational performance.

 

 

 

 

MR N MUNZHELELE

[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

17 August 2015 - NW2617

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What was the purpose of the recent trip undertaken by the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Media Diversity and Development Agency to the United States of America, (b) how much was spent by her department on the (i) flights and (ii) accommodation for the trip, (c) which airlines were used for the trip and (d) in which hotels did the CEO stay?

Reply:

(a)  To attend the 76th World News Media Congress – 22nd World Editors Forum – 25th World Advertising Forum. The objective of the conference was bring together the industry and to discuss issues affecting the industry.

(b)(i) Flights – R56 334.72

(ii) Accommodation – R38 925.02

(c) Airline – SAA and JetBlue airways

(d) Washington Hilton Hotel

 

 

 

MR N MUNZHELELE

[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

17 August 2015 - NW2141

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Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) Did the (i) Tshwane TV, (ii) Soweto TV, (iii) Cape Town Community TV and (iv) Bay Community TV hold at least two meetings annually with their respective communities on (aa) programming and (bb) programme-related matters for the selection and provision of programmes in the (aaa) 2011-12, (bbb) 2012-13, (ccc) 2013-14 and (ddd) 2014-15 financial years and (b) did each specified television station furnish the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa with proof of such meetings as well as the attendance thereof by members of the community in each case?

Reply:

(a)  (i) Tshwane TV

No. Tshwane TV has been having compliance challenges with regards to community participation since the 2012/13 financial year. The problem started after the Licensee’s first Annual General Meeting (AGM) in 2011 which then resulted in two controlling structures that were elected in two different AGM’s. The Authority tried to assist the Licensee to convene a properly constituted AGM that would elect a recognized controlling structure in accordance with the Licensee’s founding documents.

The mediation process was abandoned after one of the parties took the matter to Court and a default judgement was then awarded. The Authority is currently assisting Tshwane TV to put structures in place in order to comply with all aspects of their service license pertaining to community participation.

(ii) Soweto TV

Yes. Soweto TV held two annual meetings during the four financial years in question.

(iii) Cape Town Community TV

Cape Town TV reported that they have held two annual meetings for the four financial years in questions. However, ICASA is still awaiting the necessary documentation to confirm this.

(iv) Bay Community TV

Yes Bay Community TV held two annual meetings during the four financial years in question.

(aa) Programming

(bb) Programme related matters

Tshwane TV

See response to the first question.

Soweto TV

Yes, Soweto TV addressed programming and programme related matters at the two annual meetings during the four financial years in question.

Cape Town Community TV

Cape Town TV reported that they have held two annual meeting for the financial years in questions. However, ICASA is still awaiting the necessary documentation to confirm this.

Bay Community TV

Yes, Bay Community TV addressed programming and programme related matters at the two annual meetings during the four financial years in question.

(b)

Tshwane TV

See response to the first question.

Soweto TV

Yes, Soweto TV has provided ICASA with proof of their two annual meetings as well as attendance registers signed by community members.

Cape Town Community TV

Cape Town TV has not yet furnished the Authority with copies of the minutes of the minutes held with the community members.

Bay Community TV

Yes, Bay Community TV has provided ICASA with proof of their two annual meetings as well as the attendance registers signed by members of the community for those meetings for the four financial years in question.

 

 

MR N MUNZHELELE

[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

14 August 2015 - NW2712

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

Whether (a) she, (b) her Deputy Minister and (c) any officials in her department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii) (aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

 

(a) Minister: No trip to China undertaken.

(i) n/a.

(ii) (aa) n/a.

(ii) (bb) n/a.

(b) Deputy Minister: No trip to China undertaken.

(i) n/a.

(ii) (aa) n/a.

(ii) (bb) n/a.

(c) Officials:

Mr Daan du Toit: 21 to 23 May 2014.

(i) To participate in a bilateral meeting with Mr Xu, DDG MOST and the SKA Strategy and Business Development Committee Meeting 4, in China.

(ii) (aa) Total: R18 113.

(ii) (bb) R8 900 air ticket from Brussels and R9 213 accommodation.

Mr Isaac Maredi, Ms Sunita Kalan and Ms Punkah Mdaka: 22 to 26 September 2014.

(i) To participate in the science park development initiatives in China.

(ii) (aa) Total: R69 933.

(ii) (bb) R33 600 three air tickets, R15 333 travel & subsistence for three officials, R18 000 accommodation for 3 officials and R3 000 for shuttle transport to the airport for three officials.

Officials from the DST: Prof Yonah Seleti: 8 to 10 October 2014.

(i) To attend meetings of the International Group of Funding Agencies for Global Change Research (IGFA) and the Belmont Forum in China.

(ii) (aa) Total: R26 432.

(ii) (bb) R12 213 air ticket, R2 576 travel & subsistence, R11 400 accommodation and R243 for parking at the airport.

Official from the DST: Dr P Mjwara: 15 to 17 October 2014.

(i) To participate in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Board of Directors meeting in China.

(ii) (aa) Total: R53 659.

(ii) (bb) R49 939 air ticket and R3 720 accommodation.

Official from the DST: Mr Bruce Tshilamulele: 27 to 28 October 2014.

(i) To participate in the first Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) workshop on pharmaceutical innovation and development in China.

(ii) (aa) Total: R27 189.

(ii) (bb) R12 213 air ticket, R2 576 travel & subsistence, R11 400 accommodation and R1000 for shuttle transport to the airport.

Official from the DST: Dr Cordelia Sita and Ms Anita Mnisi: 7 to 9 November 2014.

(i) To participate in the BRICS Solid State Lighting (SSL) Working Group Meeting, this takes place every year in China around November.

(ii) (aa) Total: R53 950.

(ii) (bb) R41 050 two air-tickets and R12 900 accommodation.

14 August 2015 - NW2675

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) With reference to his reply to question 1822 on 8 June 2015, why did he not refer to the docket with CAS number 63/03/2012 in his reply; (2) Why did he state in the specified reply that the investigations were concluded and that the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) declined to prosecute when the aforesaid docket is open and currently still being investigated; (3) Will he provide the findings of the Auditor-General stating that there was no wrongdoing; if not, why not; and (4) Has the NPA been contacted by the Department of Trade and Industry to assist in the investigation into the misappropriation of funds by a certain company (name furnished)?

Reply:

I wish to inform the Honourable Member that I have been informed by the National Prosecuting Authority that:


  1. The Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), South Gauteng indicates that Sandton CAS 63/3/2012 is a case involving theft (shoplifting) of lingerie valued at R99.00 at Woolworths Store in Sandton City on 2 March 2012 committed by a female student, aged 26 years, who appeared in court on 5 March 2012 and the matter was postponed to 20 March 2012. It is however inconceivable that this is a matter that the DA is referring to or interested in. It would assist if the Honourable member of the Democratic Alliance provides more details about the docket the Honourable member is referring to.The Serious and Commercial Crimes Unit (SCCU) Johannesburg Office only dealt with and declined to prosecute in Sandton CAS 1242/09/2010. The Special Director SCCU and Director of Public Prosecutions, Gauteng, are currently engaging in evaluating the request to review the said decision declining to prosecute in respect of Sandton CAS 1242/09/2010 where the complainant in the matter was Mr Sheldon Chellakooty and not the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). CAS number 63/03/2012 was never referred to the SCCU.
  2. See response in (1) above.
  3. The findings of the Auditor-General can be obtained from his office. These findings were specifically referred to by the suspect in Sandton CAS 1242/09/2010.
  4. The SCCU Johannesburg office in particular has not been contacted.

14 August 2015 - NW2684

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether (a) he, (b) his Deputy Ministers and (c) any officials in his department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

I wish to inform the Honourable Member that (a) neither I nor the former Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development travelled to China during 2014-15;

(b) the Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development and Deputy Minister of Correctional Services did not travel to China during 2014-2015; and

(c) I have been informed that no officials from all the departments, travelled to China during the 2014-15 financial year.

(i) and (ii) therefore fall away.

14 August 2015 - NW2659

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) How many small claims courts were established by his department during the 2014/15 financial year; (2) How may cases were finalised monthly by each of the specified courts? NW3090E

Reply:

  1. 39 new Small Claims Courts were established during the 2014-2015 financial year:

Mitchells Plain (WC), Bergville (KZN), Clanwilliam (WC), Boshof (FS), Herschel (EC), Fouriesburg (FS), Lions River (KZN), Polela (KZN), Phalaborwa (LP), Stilfontein (NW), Glen Grey (EC), Christiana (NW), Calitzdorp (WC), Goodwood (WC), Kuils River (WC), Pearston (EC), Namakgale (LP), Adelaide (EC), Bedford (EC), Wellington (WC), Impendle (KZN), Murraysburg (WC), Hopefield (WC), Mount Ayliff (EC), Heidelberg (WC), Uniondale (WC), Lady Grey (EC), Nkandla (KZN), Pofadder (NC), Piketberg (WC), Mapumulo (KZN), Mtunzini (KZN), Postmasburg (NC), Hanover (NC), Molteno (EC), Hay (NC), Tseki (FS), Laingsburg (WC) and Prince Albert (WC)

30 new Small Claims Courts were established from 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014:

Ngotshe (KZN), Elliot (EC), Msinga (KZN), Madikwe (NW), Peddie (EC), Middledrift (EC), Mooi River (KZN), Clocolan (FS), Camperdown (KZN), KwaMhlanga (MP), Mbibana (MP), Mdutjana (MP), St Marks (EC), Mutale (LP), Atteridgeville (GP), Secunda (MP), Dzanani (LP), Vanrhynsdorp (WC), Bultfontein (FS), Williston (NC), Sebokeng (GP), Melmoth (KZN), Reitz (FS), Nqutu (KZN), Hennenman (FS), Virginia (FS), Ventersburg (FS) Sasolburg (FS), Tsakane (GP) and Vuwani (LP)

14 new Small Claims Courts have been established since 1 April 2015:

Babanango (KZN), Libode (EC), Tabankulu (EC), Wodehouse (EC), Indwe (EC), Tsolo (EC), Qumbu (EC), Simon’s Town (WC), Middelburg (EC), Sterkstroom (EC), Tiyani (LP), Barkly East (EC), Kakamas (NC) and Flagstaff (EC)

2. The statistics for the new 39 Small Claims Courts is not yet readily available on the department’s ICMS system which is our main statistics information source as these courts are still being assisted to get registered and trained to use the system. However the 2014/15 national stats for the SCC were as follows:

Matters Finalized - Broken down into Regions:

                 

Regions

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Grand Total

Amount

Average of Days :

Registration to Finalisation Date

Average of Days:

First Hearing Date to Finalization date

Eastern Cape

596

626

603

655

2480

R 10 609 170.11

70.48

 52.97

Free State

267

205

252

279

1003

R 2 988 213.13

56.43

35.08

Gauteng

2711

2940

2217

2430

10298

R 53 338 021.86

39.48

19.87

Kwazulu Natal

870

901

809

816

3396

R 19 196 151.86

111.63

68.89

Limpopo

845

947

825

902

3519

R 12 391 156.03

87.96

60.12

Mpumalanga

419

571

573

374

1937

R 8 626 175.45

83.65

56.41

North West

671

585

497

361

2114

R 8 143 952.28

87.20

37.85

Northern Cape

177

99

85

90

451

R 1 814 831.20

45.93

20.79

Western Cape

740

901

801

890

3332

R 19 972 283.98

                   77.20

27.56

Grand Total

7296

7775

6662

6797

28530

R 137 079 955.90

                   68.38

                 

Matters Finalized - Broken down into Outcomes:

Outcomes

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Grand Total

%

Absolution

131

155

100

143

529

2%

Case Dismissed

559

664

529

500

2252

8%

Case Struck of Roll

2380

2579

2283

2387

9629

34%

Case Withdrawn

81

98

77

103

359

1%

Default Judgement

1316

1284

1150

1526

5276

18%

Judgement Granted

2435

2604

2150

1859

9048

32%

Out of Court Settlement

317

329

272

229

1147

4%

Postponed

77

61

101

46

285

1%

Rescission Granted

 

1

 

4

5

0.02%

Grand Total

7296

7775

6662

6797

28530

100%

 

13 August 2015 - NW2662

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

How many housing units were completed and delivered in terms of programmes of her department in the jurisdictional area of the Mangaung Metro during the periods (a) 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2011 and (b) 1 July 2011 to 31 May 2015?

Reply:

In terms of the housing programmes of the National Department of Human Settlements, delivery in the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality was as follows:

(a) Total number of housing units completed for the period 01 July 2006 to 30 June 2011: 11 237

(b) Total number of housing units completed for the period 01 July 2011 to 31 May 2015: 5 508

13 August 2015 - NW2871

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. (2) What process is followed when deciding on placements; (3) Are graduates able to appeal their placement; if not, why not; if so, how does a student go about appealing a placement?

Reply:

  1. It should be noted that in terms of the contemplated regulations, the Minister shall make a final decision with the regard to the place where a CCS veterinarian shall perform compulsory community service, criteria for the selection of places where Compulsory Community Service (CCS) is to be performed and the placement of veterinary graduates are based on key strategic objectives of the Compulsory Community Service (CCS), namely:

(i) To promote accessibility of veterinary services particularly in under-served and resource poor areas,

(ii) To distribute veterinary profession in an equitable manner thereby rectifying the current state of distribution of veterinary personnel and;

(iii)To provide an opportunity for CCS veterinarians to acquire knowledge, critical thinking and problem-solving skills that will help their professional development.

  1. The processes followed for the placement of CCS Veterinarians is complex; this is to ensure that applicants are placed in a fair and equitable manner and to ensure that the aforementioned CCS strategic objectives are realised. In this regard, a comprehensive list of selected available places where CCS is to be performed is sent to prospective graduates. In the list, each CCS place is described in detail including the nature of work.

An electronic application must be completed by prospective graduates, and shall be submitted to DAFF. Applicants are required to make a selection of five (5) provinces and three (3) CCS places of their choice per province resulting in fifteen (15) choices per applicant. The applicant must rank their 15 choices in order of preference, i.e. Choices 1 to 15 with choice 1 being the 1st preferred choice and choice 15 being the least preferred choice. The placement process is based on these fifteen (15) ranked choices.

Once all the applications are received the placement process is as follows:

Step 1:

Applicant’s specific choices were assessed in order of their preferred ranking.

Unique choices (meaning no other applicant has chosen that CCS place for that specific choice) will automatically be allocated to that CCS place.

Where there is more than one applicant applying for the same place within the specific choice then applicants should be randomly placed. These processes are to be repeated until all the fifteen (15) choices are exhausted per applicant.

  • For the 2015 cohort, DAFF received a total number of 131 applicants and 110 (84%) applicants were placed during step 1; the rest were subjected to step 2.

 

Step 2:

“Special circumstances”, for example medical conditions, may be considered at the discretion of the placement committee once all the applicant’s fifteen (15) choices are exhausted. Applicants who are not placed after this process are subjected to step 3.

.

  • For the 2015 cohort, 5 (4%) applicants were considered for “special circumstances” and the remaining applicants were subjected to step 3.

Step 3:

For applicants that were not placed from the steps above i.e. from their 15 ranked choices, a list of available CCS places are to be sent to the remaining unallocated applicants. Applicants should reapply and rank places according to order of preference. Applicants that are not placed after this process are to be subjected to step 4.

  • For the 2015 cohort, 14 (11%) applicants were considered for special circumstances and the rest were subjected to step 4.

Step 4:

Applicants who are not placed during step 1 to 3, if any, are to be placed randomly to the remaining CCS places. This means that the placement committee will allocate all the remaining applicants to all remaining CCS places without awarding them a chance to choose.

  • For the 2015 cohort 2 (1%) applicants were considered for special circumstances and rest were subjected to step 4.

Step 5:

All applicants are to be informed by DAFF about their placement and should be given a period of one (1) month to swap their placement with a fellow applicant. This provision should be done in writing using a DAFF standard form. Both applicants are expected to give consent and this marks the end of the placement process.

(3) Since the placement process was mostly done by a random selection process based on the number of available CCS posts, as a result, most of the students are placed by chance or if they selected a CCS place that they are not competing with anyone which was also by chance. Based on the above there was no provision for an appeals process because this will disadvantage other students who have already accepted placements that are least suitable to their needs. Step 5 was designed to alleviate any dissatisfaction among the applicants.

13 August 2015 - NW2723

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What was the cost of the building of the Metsi Matsho Resort in QwaQwa in Free State and (b) when will the project be completed; (2) Whether, in view of the poor financial management in the Maluti-a-Phofung Local Municipality which is subject to National Treasury intervention, this project will be handed over to them; if not, what are the relevant details; if so, what measures are in place to ensure that the specified resort is managed efficiently?

Reply:

  1. (a)The Metsi Matsho project is being built over two phases. The budget of the first Phase was R26, 125,000 and the expenditure incurred was R25, 734,505. The second Phase is under implementation. The budget for the second Phase is R28, 851,326.00 and the expenditure as at 31 July 2015 is R10, 964,585.

(b) The first phase started around August 2011 till October 2013. The second Phase commenced in February 2015 and is expected to be completed in January 2016.

(2) Due to the fact that the land belongs to the community, a Trust has been registered and ownership of the project will ultimately vest with the Trust with the support of the Local Municipality. The department will be assisting the Trust to appoint a private sector operator, to ensure that an operator is in place by the time the project is completed. This will be undertaken through a consultative process with the community and will adhere to the PFMA regulations and principals of Supply Chain Management.

13 August 2015 - NW2715

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether (a) she, (b) her Deputy Minister and (c) any officials in her department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

No.

13 August 2015 - NW2834

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to the procurement of locomotives and coaches by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), (a) what discussions did he hold with PRASA: (b) the Department of Transport to ensure that local (i) content and (ii) procurement was possible for the specified locomotives and coaches; (2) was the procurement of locomotives and coaches by PRASA designated by him for local content; if not, why not? NW3307E:

Reply:

1. (a) – (b) (i)-(ii) Numerous engagements were held with PRASA and the Department of Transport (DOT) on both locomotives and coaches procurement to ensure that localisation requirements are fulfilled. Significant inputs were provided on the capabilities of the domestic rolling stock manufacturing sector including comprehensive information on components that should be localised. Efforts to maximise local content are on-going.

The locomotives procurement has been subjected to the National Policy Industrial Participation (NIPP) Programme and discussions on the development of offset projects are advanced. Further, the dti participated in the Rail Inter-Departmental Committee chaired by the DOT so as to provide support and inputs on how the coaches’ procurement can be leveraged to resuscitate and enhance the rail manufacturing capacity and capability.

In addition, engagements with the winning bidder of the coaches tender (Gibela Consortium) are continuing. The contract has provided the department with the opportunity to offer the various incentive programmes to the rolling stock manufacturing firms in order to enable the necessary investments to improve the competitiveness and to meet the Original Equipment Manufacturers’ requirements.

2. The procurement of both coaches and locomotives were not subject to the designation process as the request for proposals were issued before the issuance of the National Treasury Instruction Note ,that provides guidelines for the invitation and evaluation of bids for the procurement of rolling stock sector. This instruction note only came into effect on the 07 December 2011. It is for this reason that the locomotive procurement is subjected to the offset obligation programme as indicated above. Although the designation had not been effected on the coaches’ procurement, the dti played a critical role to ensure the draft policy framework on local content was incorporated into the extensive procurement processes driven by DoT and PRASA, hence the coaches’ tender was issued with a minimum local content of 65%.

 

12 August 2015 - NW2680

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)How many public service employees have completed official training programmes on the procedures, regulations and legislation regarding the management of discipline and incapacity issues in the workplace either through the (a) National School of Government (NSG) or (b) any of the former government schools in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years;

Reply:

  1. The following training courses have been offered on “the management of discipline and incapacity issues in the workplace” during the 2012-2015 period.

Course

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

Totals

Grievance and Disciplinary Procedures

80

111

198

-

389

Investigating and Presiding Skills

159

136

145

-

440

PILIR - Policy & Procedure on Incapacity Leave & Ill health

   

324

166

490

         

1319

(2) The NSG has three programmes related to management of discipline and incapacity issues in the workplace. The first is the Grievance and Disciplinary Action Procedures programme. This programme is accredited by the Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA) against 2 (two) registered unit standards which are 12139 and 11286. The number of public service employees successfully accredited for this programme is 86 from 2012-2015. The second programme is the Investigating and Presiding Skills programme. This programme is not accredited, and thus has no registration number. The third programme is on Policy on incapacity and ill-health (PILIR). This programme is also not accredited, and thus has no registration number

(3) The NSG conducts training needs analyses on middle and senior management level for national, provincial and local government entities. Education interventions and capacity requirements are determined against the senior and middle management competency frameworks developed by the DPSA as well as specialised competency requirements in areas such as finance, supply chain management and human resources – which deal with issues of managing discipline and incapacity amongst others. Learning and education programmes provided by the NSG therefore meet the needs of public servants regarding the management of discipline and incapacity issues within the public service.

However, Management Performance Assessment Tool (MPAT) reports from the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation in the Presidency (DPME) as well as various reports by the Public Service Commission (PSC) suggest that departments need to increase the numbers of supervisors and managers undergoing training. Also senior managers attending specific NSG programmes are of the view that their performance has improved, but further training in areas of Human Resource Management such as discipline management is necessary. MPAT reports have indicated the following with regards to the handling of disciplinary cases by all National Departments: 41% non-compliance with legal/regulatory standards; 39% partial compliance; 5% full compliance; and 15% full compliance while “doing things smartly”.

The NSG is currently piloting mandatory training for public service Managers and Supervisors beginning with Performance Management Development System (PMDS) training in an endeavour to further meet the training needs regarding HRM including discipline and incapacity management.

12 August 2015 - NW2752

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) criteria and (b) qualifications are used by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her that qualifies a person to be called an engineer?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT

(a) and (b) (i). Reflect the toatal numberof engineers in the Department of Transport irrespective of them not having been e,mployed as engineers. e.g. DDG Hlabisa of Road sis an engineer and soi s many others. All Government Departments that appoint Engineers are guided by the Occupational Specific Dispensation (OSD) for Engineers that specifies the criteria as well as qualifications that are required for the various categories of Engineers.

1. Road Accident Fund (RAF)

The Road Accident Fund (RAF) does not currently employ engineers in that capacity, nor does the RAF accredit anyone in that capacity.

2. South African National Road Agency (SANRAL)

(a) SANRAL uses the criteria as per the requirements of the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) including those bodies who are signatories to the Washington Accord of 1989.

Registration as a professional engineer with ECSA is a statutory requirement for roles which take responsibility for the performance of engineering work. On meeting the criteria the following designations are used as per the ECSA regulations:

Professional Engineer (Pr Eng)

Professional Engineering Technologist (Pr Tech Eng)

Professional Engineering Technician (Pr Eng Techni)

(b) The basic qualifications required to attain the above are a Bachelor of Science in Engineering; Bachelor of Engineering; Bachelor of Technology; and Diploma in Engineering from a University or the then technikons.

3. Road Traffic Management Cooperation (RTMC)

(a) Currently RTMC does not have an engineer in its employ. The candidate should be registered with the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) , and

(b) Possess a B Degree in Civil Engineering or Equivalent qualification if the agency were to employ one.

4. Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a) For RTIA, the criteria for employing the Engineers would be based on the requirements of the position.

(b) The qualifications required would also be based on the needs of the position as well as those of the Agency

5. Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

(a) The incumbent will have to be registered with the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA).

(b) Qualifications to qualify a person to be called an engineer: Bachelor of Engineering degree or Bachelor of Technology with a focus on Civil/ Transport/ Structural Engineering.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a) Criteria

ATNS employs two types of engineers, namely, Systems Engineer and Senior Systems Engineer. A Systems Engineer is a person who holds a Bachelor’s degree or Bachelor of Technology in Engineering or Science from the university and is eligible for registration as a professional engineer.

The second level of engineer is the Senior Systems Engineer level where professional engineers are appointed. A professional engineer is a person who holds Bachelor’s degree in Engineering and is registered as a professional engineer with the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA).

The criteria used for the appointment of engineers, is the academic qualification, years of experience and professional registration with the Engineering Council of South Africa as a candidate or professional engineer or technologist.

(b) Qualifications

The qualifications used for engineer positions in the company are Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering from the university (including university of technology).

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a) Criteria

The Airports Company South Africa defines the need for specific positions based on the nature of the business. Formal structures exist which includes Engineers. The positions in the different Engineering disciplines are clearly defined in terms of a role description detailing:

  • key outputs,
  • qualifications; and
  • competence needed in the position.

(b) Qualifications

People appointed to positions of Engineers in the different disciplines, are required to have a formal B Tech or Engineering degree and/or with a Government Certificate of Competency, depending on the business need.

Further to this, qualifications are verified via a formal verification process with the institutions that issued the qualifications prior to making an appointment into an Engineering position.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a)(b)(i)N/A (ii) the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s criteria and qualification requirements for engineers are as follows:

Engineering Stream within the SACAA

Job Title

Qualifications and Criteria

Mechanical Engineering

Certification Engineer

Qualifications:

BSc degree in Mechanical Engineering

Criteria:

3 year experience as Certification Engineer in the aviation environment.

Electrical Engineering

Certification Engineer

Qualification:

BSc degree in Electrical Engineering

Criteria:

3 year experience as Certification Engineer in the aviation environment.

Aeronautical Engineering

Certification Engineer

Qualification:

BSc degree in Aeronautical Engineering

Criteria:

3 year experience as Certification Engineer in the aviation environment.

Railway Safety Regulator

(a) Criteria – Minimum National Diploma/ Degree

(b) A bachelor degree in engineering and a candidate for registration as a professional engineer or technologist with ECSA.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) As employee must have obtained a four year university engineering degree to be an engineer.

(b) The qualification for an engineer is a B.Sc (Engineering), B.Eng or any 4 year degree from a recognized university.

Ports Regulator South Africa (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator in terms of its organogram, does not employ engineers, thus this is not applicable.

While it is not applicable to the Ports Regulator, the CEO of the Ports Regulator is an engineer by virtue of being:

(a) accredited as a professional engineer (Pr Eng) by the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA)

(b) qualified with a university degree in engineering, in his case a masters degree (MSc Eng)

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a) The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA), as a special agency of the Department of Transport on matters relating to Maritime employs Marine Engineers. Marine engineering is a specialist field which is regulated internationally by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and here in South Africa, those standards are implemented and monitored by SAMSA.

(b) We hire Marine Engineers who holds Certificates of Competency as Chief Engineer[1] of a ship of any propulsion power in accordance with standards set by the IMO, through the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended (STCW Convention). These Marine Engineers qualifications are vetted and accepted by the IMO and its member states, e.g. UK, Netherlands, Singapore, Liberia, Philippines, etc. There is no requirement for Marine Engineers to be a member of the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) to be employed. However, some of them are members through their membership of the South African Institute of Marine Engineers and Naval Architects (SAIMENA)