Questions and Replies

15 September 2015 - NW3258

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

What (a) total amount did his department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that his department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

(1)(a),(b),(2)(a),(b) The required information is not immediately available in the categories requested. However the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform is collating the information from its database and travel agents and will submit the requested information by 30 September 2015.

15 September 2015 - NW3290

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The table below provides details of travel and accommodation costs between Gauteng and Pretoria during the 2014/15 financial year for the Deputy Minister and myself:

Executive Authority

Total amount spent

  1. (ii) Number of trips undertaken
 
  1. (i) Travel

(i) Hotel

(aa) Residential in Cape Town

(bb) Residential in Pretoria

 
  1. Minister

R128 065.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

16

  1. Deputy Minister

R203 463.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

29

Total

R331 528.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

45

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3290 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 September 2015 - NW3237

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(a) How many empowerment farms in the Northern Cape have been funded by the Government for the past 10 years, (b) in each case, at what cost to his department, (c) what amount was paid to the farm owner, (d) where are the specified empowerment farms located and (e) are the specified farms still profitable?

Reply:

(a) Further clarity is required on what is meant with the term ”empowerment farms”. The question will be answered in full on receipt of such clarity.

(b),(c),(d) and (e) falls away.

15 September 2015 - NW1788

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

What discussions were held between him and the President of the Russian Federation, Mr Vladimir Putin and/or any other Russian Federation government official during his visit to the specified country in May 2015?

Reply:

On 09 May 2015, I undertook a working visit to the Russian Federation at the invitation of Russian President Vladimir Putin, to attend the 70th Anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945 (WWII). The visit was guided by South Africa’s bilateral relations with the Russian Federation, which are informed by political, economic, social, defence and security cooperation and all the relevant legal instruments and mechanisms that affirm the strategic relationship between the two countries.

We held talks on the margins of the event which included an assessment of bilateral cooperation, the status and implementation of SA-Russia ITEC (Joint Intergovernmental Committee on Trade and Economic Cooperation) Agreements and preparations for the 13th SA-Russia ITEC Session to be hosted by the Russian Federation during the latter part of 2015.

We also discussed preparations for the 7th BRICS Summit which was hosted by Russia from 08 to 09 July 2015. We agreed on the need to intensify cooperation in various areas of cooperation.

15 September 2015 - NW3251

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What is the amount of the additional recurrent operational funding paid to full service schools based on screened learners with moderate to high support needs in each (a) province and (b) district; (2) (a) which schools have applied for additional staff in terms of the weighting of learners with disabilities and (b) how many staff have been appointed in each (i) province and (ii) district; (3) what amount has been budgeted for the (a) acquisition of assistive technology and learning and teaching support materials in accessible format such as Braille and (b) employment of itinerant learning support teachers in the implementation of inclusive education in each (i) province and (ii) district?

Reply:

1) The Department of Basic Education have requested responses from the nine Provincial Education Departments. However to date, only the following provinces have responded as stated below:

Gauteng Department of Education: In the 2015/16 financial year, no additional funding was transferred to full service schools. Additional support was provided through a provincially centralised provisioning process, including interventions such as the training of teachers and the provision of specialised Learner and Teacher Support Material and assistive devices.

North West Department of Education: The following budgets have been made available the 2015/16 financial year: Bojanala District: R1 151 462; Dr. Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District: R100 000; Dr. Kenneth Kaunda District: R100 000; Ngaka Modiri Molema: R100 000. An additional R8.4m budget has been made available for providing assistive devices to sixteen (16) newly identified full service schools.

Western Cape Department of Education: The additional funding paid to full service schools, over and above their norms and standards allocations, amounts to R48 000 per full service school for 2015, across all districts.

The responses from other Provincial Education Departments will be provided as soon as they are received.

2(a) Once learners are screened and categorised according to the nature of the disability, such information is entered in the post provisioning model and the appropriate weighting is used. There is, therefore, no need to apply for additional staff if all learners were included in the data supplied for the determination of the post establishment.

(b) The Department is not aware of any schools that that have requested additional staff in any (i) province and (ii) district. The Department has requested provinces to provide this information and once it is received, it will be submitted.

3(a) Provincial Education Departments have been requested to provide a response to this question. To date, the following responses were received:

Gauteng Department of Education: A sum of R6 894 300 was budgeted for in 2015/2016 to ensure schools in need of assistive devices are able to buy needed devices in order to increase support provisioning for learners.

Limpopo Department of Education: Provided Apex readers and tablets to schools for the visually impaired on to which textbooks and workbooks are downloaded. This was purchased to the value of R10 million.

Northern Cape Department of Education: The province has budgeted for the acquisition of assistive technology to the amount of R120 000.00 and learning and teaching support materials (LTSM) in accessible format such as Braille to the amount of R2 365 139.00.

North West Department of Education: The province have allocated a budget of R8 429 400 for assistive devices and R19 000 000 for LTSM.

Western Cape Department of Education (WCED): Braille equipment to the value of R4 200 000 has been given to the two schools for the Blind for the use of learners in the school and learners placed out from the school. The WCED has developed South African Sign Language (SASL) LTSM to the value of R500 000. Assistive technology was acquired to the amount of R960 000.00 and has been placed at 8 loan centres in the province, one in each district. These devices can be accessed by mainstream learners via the recommendation of the District Based Support Team (DBST) specialist staff or Inclusive Education outreach teams.

The Department of Basic Education is awaiting responses from other Provincial Education Departments.

Table 43: Number of remedial, learning support and special needs teachers in 2014

(b) The Department has the following information available for 2014. No new information for 2015 is available as yet.

Province

Number of Schools

Remedial Teachers

Special Needs Teachers

Learning Support Educators

Learning Support Teachers

Teacher Assistants/Aides

       

(School-based)

(Itinerant)

 

EC

35

0

0

0

82

54

FS

251

421

268

 

 

 

GT

325

0

258

372

0

0

KZN

66

106

1 255

344

 43

367

LP

 

 

 

 

 

 

MP

 

 

 

 

 

 

NC

2

0

1

1

13

 

NW

0

0

518

62

0

109

WC

1630

0

0

119

480

131

NATIONAL TOTAL:

2 309

527

2 300

898

254

661

Source: Information received from provinces in September 2014

15 September 2015 - NW3405

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)In respect of each province and each district, how many schools (a) have Disaster Management Procedures and Emergency Plans in place and (b) conduct regular evacuation trial runs; (2) in respect of each province and each district, how many schools (a) have access control measures in place for (i) learners, (ii) educators and (iii) visitors and (b) conduct random searches on students in conjunction with the SA Police Service?

Reply:

(1) Disaster Management Procedures and Emergency Plans are basic requirements to ensure the safety of learners and teachers and should be drafted and implemented by all schools. (a and b) The Department does not have specific data as requested on how regular evacuation trials are practiced by schools;

(2) As mentioned above, Access Control Measures is also a basic requirement for school safety and should be implemented:

(a) By all schools for (i) learners (ii) educators and (iii) visitors;

(b) Searches and seizures are conducted on reasonable suspicion by the South African Police Services (SAPS), in conjunction with principals and senior management teams. Specific data regarding the number of schools implementing this requirement is not available to the Department and resides with the provinces.

15 September 2015 - NW3283

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(I) What (a) total amount did her department spend on air travel betv.een Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that her department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year? NW3886E

Reply:

(1) (a) The Department spend R891 976.80 on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year.

(b) the total number of trips that were undertaken between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year was 170.

(2) (a) The total amount the Department spend on accommodation in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year was R180 823.50.

(b) The total amount the Department spend on car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year was R76 940.34.

15 September 2015 - NW3243

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has the Chief Executive Officer and/or the board of the Construction Education Training Authority received any petitions signed by staff members since 1 January 2013; if so, (a) what was the content of each petition and (b) how many staff members signed each petition; (2) did any of these petitions make allegations of corruption against a certain official (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) how many petitions made such allegations, (b) have the allegations been investigated and (c) has the specified official been suspended pending the outcome; (3) have any members of staff of CETA been (a) disciplined, (b) suspended or (c) dismissed for alleged disciplinary offences related to the petitions?

Reply:

  1. The Chief Executive Officer and/or the Board of the Construction Education Training Authority did not receive any petitions signed by staff members since 1 January 2013.
  2. and (3) Not applicable.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3243 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 September 2015 - NW3037

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) Of the 22 schools for visually impaired learners, what is the (a) enrolment at each school, (b) how many braille machines are available at each school, (c) what other support materials are available, (d) how many trained educators are appointed at each school, (e) how many support staff are appointed in (i) administrative posts, (ii) therapist posts and (iii) class assistant posts; (2) with reference to the specified schools in each province, (a) how many have the services of an Orientation and Mobility Practitioner, (b) what is the vacancy rate for support staff at each of the schools, (c) how many have implemented White Paper 6 as expected and (d) how many (i) district and (ii) provincial education department officials are appropriately trained to assist teachers and support staff at the specified schools? NW3577E

Reply:

Find here: Response

15 September 2015 - NW3247

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)How many learners were enrolled in Grade 10 in each province in 2013; (2) how many learners in each province are currently registered to write the 2015 National Senior Certificate examinations; (3) how many learners who were progressed from Grade 11 to Grade 12 are registered to write the 2015 National Senior Certificate examinations in each province?

Reply:

Question 1

PROVINCE

ENROLMENT GRADE 10

(2013)

Eastern Cape

154 920

Free State

60 643

Gauteng

201 341

Kwazulu-Natal

268 467

Limpopo

187 804

Mpumalanga

97 117

North West

70 032

Northern Cape

22 727

Western Cape

83 234

National

1 146 285

(Source: 2013 School Realities)

Question 2 and 3

 

QUESTION 3

QUESTION 2

PROVINCE

PROGRESSION NO

TOTAL ENTERED

Eastern Cape

13 927

93 115

Free State

9 945

35 389

Gauteng

18 411

112 128

Kwazulu-Natal

10 614

171 714

Limpopo

18 202

102 633

Mpumalanga

4 082

56 104

North West

3 808

33 841

Northern Cape

2 055

12 732

Western Cape

4 813

56 576

National

85 857

674 232

(Source: IECS – 2015 Preliminary Examination Enrolment Data)

15 September 2015 - NW3351

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether his department received a request to investigate Project Spider Web; if not, why not; if so, (a) who requested the investigation and (b) when was the investigation requested; • Whether the scope of the investigation will include (a) the origins of the document and/or (b) the particulars in the document; • Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The State Security Agency (SSA) received a request to investigate the Project Spider document in July 2015.
  2. The matter is therefore currently under investigation. However, as a matter of policy the SSA do not comment on the details of on-going intelligence operations as comment may compromise the security of the investigation.

15 September 2015 - NW1787

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

(1)     On which exact dates did he visit the Russian Federation in May 2015? (2) (a) how many government officials accompanied him on the specified visit, (b) what are the names of all non-government employees and persons who accompanied him on the specified visit and (c) what was the total cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation, (iii) travel within the Russian Federation and/or (iv) entertainment of the entire delegation during the specified visit?

Reply:

The visit to the Russian Federation was on 08-09 May 2015. Seventy-nine (79) officials from the Presidency and other departments accompanied me. Air travel costs incurred by the Department of International Relations and cooperation and the Presidency amounted to R179 124.93, while the accommodation of the entire delegation costed R627 630.54. Ground transport costs were R149 893.67.

15 September 2015 - NW3250

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How many officials from (i) districts and (ii) schools have been trained by the National Training Team on the Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support policy in each province and (b) what are the names of the specified districts and schools referred to above?

Reply:

a) There are (i) no districts and (ii) schools that have been trained by the National Training Team on Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support policy per province yet. Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) are currently finalising training plans for submission to DBE.

b) The names of districts and schools will be made available as soon as the training has taken place at those levels.

15 September 2015 - NW3392

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the court order issued by the Grahamstown High Court on 17 December 2014 (details furnished), the open post bulletins ordered by the court to be published have been gazetted: if not, (a) why not and (b) what alternative mechanisms (i) were and (ii) are now being used to ensure the filling of vacant posts, particularly Post Level 1 vacancies; if so, what are the relevant details of the (aa) bulletins and (bb) educators appointed as a result of each bulletin? NW4051E

Reply:

(aa) and (bb) The following table provides details of all open bullet ins issued by the Eastern Cape Department of Education in 2015 for each of the rank categories

Province: Eastern Cape

Vacancies

Nr

Date of Vacancy List

Date for filling

Nr Posts filled End of July 2015

Principal

Vol 2/2015(305 posts) Vol 4/2015( 190 posts)

24 March 2015
17 July 2015

1 July 2015
1 October 2015

66

DP

Vol 1/20 15(292 posts)
Addendum to Vol
1/2015( 137 posts)
Vol 3/2015(502 posts)

3 Feb 2015
16 Feb 2015)
3 June2015

1 May 2015
1 May 2015
1 September 2015

270

HoD

Vol 1/2015(980 posts)
Addendum to Vol 1/2015(426 posts)
Vol 3/2015(502 posts)

3 Feb2015
16 Feb 2015
3 June 2015

1 May 2015
1 May 2015
1 September 2015

967

PL1

Critical PL1 vacancies (338 posts advertised)

28 Aug 2015

1 November
2015

Closing date on
18 September 2015

Source: ECDOE Report, August 2015

15 September 2015 - NW3326

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(a) (i)What total amount did her department spend on her travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did she undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for her in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a) (i) What total amount did her department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) and Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?.

Reply:

  1. Total amount spent by the department on the Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in 2014-15 financial year;

a

b

 

aa

 

bb

i

ii

i

ii

R236 919,46

21

-

-

-

-

 

2. Total amount spent by the department on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs  between Gauteng and Cape Town in 2014-15 financial year?.

a

b

 

aa

 

bb

i

ii

i

ii

R236 919,46

21

-

-

-

-

 

15 September 2015 - NW3367

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

What is the current status of young scientists participating at different meetings of the Academy of Sciences of South Africa related to science policy? (2) How many young scientists have participated in the meetings related to science policy in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years?”

Reply:

  1. Since 2010, the Academy engages on average at least 100 young scientists in its various activities throughout the year (except in 2013 when ASSAf did not host a Young Scientists’ Conference).

Young scientists are engaged through the following:

    • The South African Young Academy of Science (SAYAS) and its various activities;
    • The ASSAf annual Young Scientists’ Conference;
    • Workshops, conferences and lectures that the Academy hosts;
    • Nominations to attend regional and international inter-academy network meetings;
    • Serve on ASSAf standing committees (health, poverty reduction, science education);
    • Serve on study panels - The Academy undertakes to ensure that young scientists are engaged within study panels and/or the convening activities that inform the products of the Academy; and
    • The organisation for Women in Science for the Developing World.

2.  The following is an indication of the number of young scientists who participated in meetings during the specified financial years:

  • 2012/13: 263 (includes young scientists’ conference, nomination to IAMP and IAP meetings, and SAYAS membership);
  • 2013/14: 35 (Lindau Laureate, IAP, IAMP, SAYAS and service on ASSAf activities – there was no YSC in 2013); and
  • 2014/15: 130 (Lindau Laureate, IAP, IAMP, SAYAS, service on ASSAf activities, YSC, OWSD fellowship holders).

The drop in numbers can be explained by the fact that there has been much more focus on quality of work for participation in the Young Scientists’ Conference rather than a focus on increasing the number of participants.

15 September 2015 - NW3313

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Transport:

Whether the Government has effective measures in place to ensure that fatalities and serious injuries on the road as a result of crashes (details furnished) are declining substantially and progressively on a year-on year basis, if, so by what number and percentage were serious injuries and accidents declining on our roads annually during the period 30 June 2010 to 30 June 2015? Year Fatal Crashes Percentage Increase/ Decrease Fatalities Percentage Increase/ Decrease 2010 10 837 13 967 2011 11 228 3,61% 13 954 -0,09% 2012 10 977 -2,24% 13 528 -3,05% 2013 10 170 -7,35% 11 844 -12,45% 2014 10 367 1,94% 12 702 7,24% Figures for 2015 are still being compiled and this will be followed by quality assurance. These figures will be available at the end of the calendar year.

Reply:

The Government is implementing a 365 days road safety plan to reduce fatalities and serious injuries on the roads. Through the implementation of this plan, which includes road safety education, law enforcement, road engineering and evaluation we have seen a progressive year-on-year decline in road fatalities.

Year

Fatal Crashes

Percentage Increase/

Decrease

Fatalities

Percentage Increase/

Decrease

2010

10 837

 

13 967

 

2011

11 228

3,61%

13 954

-0,09%

2012

10 977

-2,24%

13 528

-3,05%

2013

10 170

-7,35%

11 844

-12,45%

2014

10 367

1,94%

12 702

7,24%

Figures for 2015 are still being compiled and this will be followed by quality assurance. These figures will be available at the end of the calendar year.

15 September 2015 - NW3122

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

1. Is he aware of the report into the Madibeng Local Municipality water crisis that was put together by the Department of Water and Sanitation, which estimates that between 15 to 20 municipalities are faced with severe water shortages and collapsing water infrastructure; 2. What special projects is (a) he or (b) his Cabinet Ministers undertaking to mitigate the water crisis facing the (i) specified municipality and (ii) various municipalities faced with a water supply system collapse as identified by the Department of Water and Sanitation’s report; 3. Has he, in co-operation with the Department of Water and Sanitation, commissioned any academic studies into the economic impact of recent prolonged water shortages in urban municipal areas such as (a) Johannesburg, (b) Ekhuruleni, (c) Madibeng and others; if not, why not; if so, what are the findings of these studies?

Reply:

Departments prepare and commission many investigations in the course of executing their sector responsibilities and mandates and not all of these reports are brought to my attention. The Outcome of these reports and investigations is however used by Departments to develop specific intervention programmes where appropriate.

In the Case of Madibeng, this Municipality has been placed under Administration, with effect from 23 March 2015, by the Provincial Government in terms of Section 139(1)(b) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa with regard to the Water and Sanitation Functions of the Municipality. The key reasons for placing the Municipality under administration with regard to these services is due to:

  • Poor water and sanitation services which often result in water supply disruptions and poor water quality;
  • Poor maintenance and operations of water and sanitation infrastructure;
  • Uneven provision of services to communities; and
  • Project delays due to prolonged processes and possible fraud and corruption.

The Department of Water and Sanitation is working with the Provincial Government of North West to implement a programmatic intervention which is addressing the reasons for the intervention.

The Departments of Water and Sanitation and Co-operative Governance have developed and are implementing support programmes and interventions as part of the Back to Basics programme for prioritized municipalities across the country facing water and sanitation shortages and infrastructure disruptions. These support programmes also take into account the outcomes from the Municipal Strategic Self-assessment System (MuSSA), the Blue and Green Drop Assessments as well as the diagnostic reports conducted by the Provinces.

Reporting on progress and monitoring of the interventions is done through the CoGTA MINMEC, the Implementation Forum for Outcome 9 and the InterMinisterial Committee on Basic Services.

2. SUCCESSES IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND INTERVENTIONS

The following progress has been made

  • Makana;
    • Water supply has been stabilized and Grahamstown is now receiving water on a continuous basis. There is currently no disruption to educational institutions. The success has been largely due to the deployment of Amatola Water and support from the Department of Water Affairs in the Province;
    • Key interventions have been made to restore the supply of electrical, which has enhanced the capacity of pump stations; the refurbishment of raw water rising main; the restoration of plant capacity; and reduction and control of water losses.
    • A five year “turnaround plan/road map” was finalized following the Water and Sanitation Summit held in March 2015;
  • Madibeng,
    • We have reinstated the water supply systems in Majakaneng which had not been working for eight years, through a very successful community based leak detection and repair programme under the management of Magalies Water;
    • The programme is now be rolled out to the broader Madibeng Municipality;
    • Twelve Water Forums have been established;
    • Good progress has been made to increase of the capacity and optimization of the Brits Water Treatment works;
    • A business plan has been finalized for the implementation of the five year “turnaround plan/road map”;
  • Ngaka Modiri Molema
    • Sedibeng Water has taken over the operations of the former Botshelo Water Board and will support the retail services in Mahikeng for the next five years;
  • We have seen the reduction of the water tanker services through the repair and reinstatement of infrastructure;
  • A business plan has been finalized for the implementation of the five year “turnaround plan/road map”;

In addition to these specific actions a Programme Management Office (PMO) has been established by the Department of Cooperative Governance, coordinated by the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agency to specifically address the ongoing water and sanitation problems in the 27 identified Priority District Municipalities. A pipeline of projects is currently being compiled by the PMO for Amatola (EC) and Umzinyathi (KZN) District Municipalities. Bojanala and Sekhukhune District Municipalities will be addressed next.

3. The Department of Water and Sanitation is not specifically commissioning studies to determine the economic impact of prolonged water shortages) in Johannesburg, Ekurhuleni and Madibeng. It is however closely monitoring the state of non-revenue water (and water losses) in these Water Services Authorities (WSAs), and the economic impact this has, and to see whether the WSAs are meeting their water conservation and demand management targets, which have set by the Department.

The Department also (annually) monitors the vulnerability of all WSA nationally through Municipal Strategic Self Assessments, and is currently developing Municipal Priority Actions with these WSAs, based on the outcomes of the assessments, which feed into the WSA Water Service Development Plans, Integrated Development Plans, and Service Delivery Business Improvement Plans, to ensure that the identified areas of extreme and high vulnerability are addressed.

The above findings are available on the Water Services Knowledge System which is accessible on the website of the Department of Water and Sanitation.

15 September 2015 - NW2777

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the President of the Republic

Whether (a) he and (b) any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

(a) Yes, I travelled to China during the 2014/15 financial year

(b) Yes, officials from my office travelled with me to China

(i) The purpose was to embark on a State Visit on 04 and 05 December 2014, where the following issues were deliberated upon:

  • to review the status of South Africa’s bilateral relations with China;
  • to adopt the Five-to-Ten Year Strategic Programme for Cooperation;
  • to commit China to South Africa’s industrialisation agenda development finance and request an increase in training slots;
  • Discussing the high level Forum on Africa and China meeting that will take place in South Africa in December 2015;
  • to encourage China to commit to assist in establishing the African Regional Centre on the New Development Bank; and

(ii) Conclude the 2014 year of South Africa in China.Total costs related to the logistics of the visit including accommodation and transport were R834, 868.64.

15 September 2015 - NW3144

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the President of the Republic

Whether anyone from his office ever requested the Department of Public Works to provide a state house to Mr Mac Maharaj during his tenure as his spokesperson; if so, (a) who made the request, (b) when was the request made and (c) what was the basis for the request; 2. In terms of what (a) policy or (b) legislation was the request made; 3. Whether the allocation of the state house in the Bryntirion Estate in Pretoria formed part of his salary package; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how was this benefit calculated; 4. Whether The Presidency arranged for him to pay rent while he occupied the state house; if not, why not; if so, what rental amount was (a) requested and (b) paid?

Reply:

  1. There is no record of any official having made the said request to the Department of Public Works.
  2. See 1 above
  3. No
  4. The Presidency does not allocate housing and therefore is not involved in rental arrangements..

15 September 2015 - NW3169

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether his department is taking any steps to rid tourist sites of bogus tourist guides who are operating freely and preying on unsuspecting visitors at the specified sites (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what steps; 2. Whether he intends to set up a dedicated unit where tourists can report these bogus tour operators; if not why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Tourist guides operating illegally are in contravention of the Tourism Act, 2014, which states that it is a criminal offence to act as a tourist guide without a valid registration. Complaints of this nature must be reported to the relevant Provincial Registrar of Tourist Guides so that charges can be laid with the South African Police Services (SAPS) for further investigation. The Department of Tourism has implemented programmes to raise awareness about the use of registered tourist guides and the consequences of non-compliance. Initiatives have included inspections conducted at identified illegal guiding hotspots in collaboration with various law enforcement authorities and placing advertorials in both print and digital media.
  2. The Department also has a dedicated Unit which facilitates the handling of all tourism-related complaints received. In addition, the Department has a call centre and a website facility where such complaints can be reported. The contact details are: Tourism Complaints Officer, complaints@tourism.gov.za / callcentre@tourism.gov.za

Tel: +27 (0) 12 444 6314/6312

Toll free Line: +27 (0) 0860 121 929 or +27 (0)12 444 6000

 

15 September 2015 - NW3041

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether she intends to introduce mechanisms to link the measurement of the performance of foundation phase teachers directly to learner performance; if not, (a) why not, (b) who will be held accountable for foundation phase learner outcomes and (c) how will accountability mechanisms operate; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will utilise the annual national assessment results (a) as a measure of individual learner progress during a grade or a phase and (b) as a tool to measure the efficacy of teachers; if not, in each case, (i) why not and (ii) how will she hold individual teachers accountable for their learners’ outcomes; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. The performance of educators includes, inter alia, the performance of learners.

a) The performance measurement of educators has always included, amongst others, learners’ performance as one of the important proxies. This is in view of the fact that there are many factors at play determining learners’ performance. Factors which influence learning include the learner’s background, school conditions and context, and the teaching quality and processes. International research overwhelmingly points to the learner’s socio-economic status as being a major determinant of learning achievement. The measurement of the performance of all educators is a condition of service as agreed to in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC). Currently, all educators, including teachers in the Foundation Phase, are appraised in terms of the Integrated Quality Management System (IQMS). Performance Standard 4 of the IQMS instrument measures Learner Assessment/Achievement.

b) Accountability for learner outcomes rests primarily with the Head of the school. In instances where there is under-performance of learners in the Foundation Phase, the Head of Department as well as the responsible teachers are co-accountable. According to the section 16 E of the South African Schools Act, the Principal of the school has to put in place a plan that would address any under-performance of learners at the school. The implementation of this plan will be monitored by the District and Provincial Department of Education, who report on the progress to the Head of Department in the province.

c) Not applicable.

2) (a) The purpose of Annual National Assessment (ANA) is to diagnose learning challenges and monitor the “health” of the education system. ANA is currently administered in only two subjects, language and mathematics, and on all learners at a particular period in a year. For that reason, individual teachers can use ANA results to measure progress of individual learners in their classes but that is not the primary purpose of ANA.

Through the introduction of the Annual National Assessments, known as ANA, the Department have focussed all officials, schools, teachers, and parents on learning and teaching performance in our country. The Department have utilised the diagnostic function of ANA in classrooms so that the Department have a means to assess performance of learners within our classrooms in relation to learners in the district and province. The Department have only just introduced the ANAs in the system in 2011, and like other countries, the Department recognise that the Department need to strengthen formative (school-based) assessment in our schools and how it can be used to improve learning and teaching in our classrooms. However, the Department do know that more can be done through improved school performance, and oversight of the curriculum in schools – especially in those schools which cater for children from poor households.

The Department has started work on refining the systemic assessment function of the ANA so as to accurately compare results across years and better monitor progress in the system. This process of strengthening systemic performance monitoring has taken over a decade in many countries and has required a dedicated effort and capacity from specialists, researchers and academics in the country and abroad. The National Development Plan (NDP) identifies this as a key issue to be resolved – and our Basic Education sector plan, Action Plan 2019: Towards the realisation of Schooling 2025 prioritises the ability to track performance, through an objective tool, as a priority. The Department will, of course, learn from provincial and international assessments such as the Systemic Assessments in the Western Cape and the Department’s participation in regional and international assessments.

The Department are also strengthening the Integrated Quality Management System (IQMS) administration so as to improve the performance management of teachers in schools and more carefully reflect the reality of what is going on at school level.

(b) (i)The efficacy of teachers is not specifically linked to performance of learners in the Annual National Assessment (ANA) results. The efficacy of all educators is measured in terms of the instrument in the Integrated Quality Management System (IQMS) as agreed to in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC). Performance Standard 4 of the IQMS instrument measures Learner Assessment/Achievement.

(ii) Accountability for learner outcomes rests primarily with the Principal of the school. In instances where there is under-performance of learners in the ANA results, the Head of Department as well as the responsible teachers are co-accountable. According to the section 16 E of the South African Schools Act, the Principal of the school has to put in place a plan that would address any under-performance of learners based on the ANA diagnostic report of the school. The implementation of this plan will be monitored by the District and Provincial Department of Education, who report on the progress to the Head of Department in the province.

14 September 2015 - NW2975

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) In respect of each (i) province and (ii) district, (aa) how many and (bb) what percentage of Grade 10 learners in public ordinary schools are targeted to study mathematics in the (aaa) 2015, (bbb) 2016, (ccc) 2020 and (ddd) 2030 academic years and (b) what are the relevant details of her plans to achieve her targets of mathematics uptake for the Further Education and Training (FET) phase; (2) in respect of each province, (a) how many FET phase mathematics teachers will be required in public ordinary schools for the specified academic years, (b) how many FET phase teachers are currently employed in public ordinary schools teaching FET phase mathematics and (c) what are the relevant details of her plans to achieve her targets for FET phase mathematics teachers?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)(ccc)(ddd) 50% of learners in Grade 10 in 2015 are expected to offer Mathematics while 60% of learners in 2016 is expected to offer Mathematics in Grade 10 in 2016. For these two cohorts, their targets were calculated based on the actual number of learners in Grades 9 and Grade 8 for 2015 and 2016 respectively. The same formula was used on actual figures for Grade 4 learners released in 2014, to set the target for 2020. 4% of learners was added to the 2020 target to establish the target for 2030. The data released by the Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) for 2014 learners’ enrolments was used to formulate the targets.

Province

Actual No learners in Grade 9 in 2014

Actual No learners in Grade 8 in 2014

Actual No learners in Grade 4 in 2014

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2015

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2016

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2020

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2030

EC

137744

133581

157243

68872

80149

86484

89943

FS

65456

47326

57458

32728

28396

31602

32866

GP

153074

142693

164011

76537

85616

90206

93814

KZN

222267

218781

221758

111134

131269

121967

126846

LP

178040

113336

125977

89020

68002

69287

72059

MP

82106

84508

83712

41053

50705

46042

47884

NC

22623

23026

25360

11312

13816

13948

14506

NW

67746

59030

69413

33873

35418

38177

39704

WC

82993

75517

90587

41497

45310

49823

51816

 

1012049

897798

995519

506026

538681

547536

569438

(1)(b) The Department of Basic Education has a three year plan to train teachers who are offering Mathematics in Grade 10 in 2015, Grade 11 in 2016 and Grade 12 in 2017. The training is focusing on capacitating teachers on the Mathematics content as a whole. The aim is to cover all topics which are taught at a particular Grade.

This process is building teachers’ confidence in delivering quality content to the learners. Teachers are more encouraged to solve more problems on their own. New skills and techniques to solve mathematical problems are dealt with.

Follow up in-house support is also given by subject advisors and trainers themselves, to see if the skills sets acquired during the training are being utilised.

(2)(a)(b) As was indicated previously, the Department is currently engaged in a project to profile the qualifications of all teachers including what they are qualified to teach, and what they are actually teaching. The information is critical, not only for the determination and management of current teacher utilisation, but also for future planning for demand and supply. Once the information on the current provisioning levels has been finalised and verified, more accurate future projections that will take into account, among other factors, the current provisioning, will be made. Furthermore, this will enable the Department to determine targets for provisioning.

(2)(c)It should be noted that simplified projections on the needs can be calculated based on the number of learners and an ideal class size (currently and projected). However, such projections will be less accurate, given the other factors such as teaching across phases and grades and actual class size that affect the actual provisioning of teachers.

14 September 2015 - NW3403

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) With reference to her reply to question 2976 on 24 August 2015, in respect of each province, (a) what amount did volunteers for the Kha Ri Gude centres receive on average in stipends in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and {b) was the maximum amount received in stipends by an individual volunteer in the {i) 2012-13, {ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years; (2) In respect of each province, (a) how many individuals on average did each volunteer for the specified centers train for the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) what was the lowest number of individuals trained by an individual volunteer in the {i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years? NW4063E

Reply:

Find here: Response

14 September 2015 - NW3234

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(1)What is the current situation with reference to the retention of human resources within the Human Sciences Research Council; (2) What attempts has she and her department made to ensure that (a) staff is adequately remunerated, (b) working conditions are improved and (c) policies are established to support and facilitate human capital development?”

Reply:

(1) There is currently a problem with staff retention, specifically at Executive level.

 

(2) a) The HSRC periodically undertakes a remunerative review, which

benchmarks salary packages with similar entities within the Science system and universities. The next exercise will be undertaken in 2016.

b) A climate survey, commissioned by the HSRC Board will be undertaken in the third quarter of the current financial year to assess the satisfaction of staff relative to remuneration and working conditions. Recommendations from this survey will inform the revision of any related policies.

c) A human resources strategy, accompanied by a number of recruitment, retention and talent management strategies is being developed.

8/3/1

14 September 2015 - NW3248

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) When (a) did her department commence with the review of the South African Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and the admissions policy and (b) will the specified review be finalised : (2) will the specified review be (a) in line with the promulgated Policy on Screening. Identification, Assessment and Support and (b) tabled in the National Assembly for approval?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)The Minister appointed a task team to review all education legislation including the South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996. The task team commenced on 24 February 2013 and concluded its work on 30 October 2014. On the basis of the work of the task team, the Department then drafted a Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill, together with the Memorandum on the Objects of the Bill .The Bill must still go through the internal consultation processes before it can be published for public comment.

The review of the admission policy commenced in June last year and was concluded in May of this year. The amendments must be subjected to a Socio Economic Impact Assessment System (SEIAS). This is a new requirement that was introduced by the Presidency this year for all new legislation and policies as well as amendments to legislation and policies.

(2) (a) The review took into account all related policy developments.

(b) We foresee that the Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill will be submitted to Parliament towards the middle of next year.

14 September 2015 - NW3028

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to Raeleng Middle Secondary School in Bela-Bela, Limpopo, (a) why was norms and standards funding cut by almost 50%, (b) was the school notified (i) in time and (ii) in writing of the reasons why the specified funding was decreased and (c) what measures are put in place to ensure that this school will in future receive their full norms and standards funding?

Reply:

 

The Limpopo Department of Education provided the response as follows:

(a) The norms and standards funding was reduced due to funding constraints. The budget was insufficient to cover the national norm.

(b) Schools were notified around 25 May 2015.

(c) The Limpopo Department of Education is working on the funding of schools as a priority; the intention is to work towards funding schools according to the National Target amounts.

14 September 2015 - NW3249

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)When did her department implement the National Norms and Standards for the Distribution of Resources within an Inclusive Education System; (2) how will the specified system address the needs of learners with special education needs and disabilities; (3) which stakeholders were consulted in the development of the specified system; (4) when will the policy document pertaining to the specified system be tabled in the National Assembly for approval?

Reply:

 

  1. The Draft National Norms and Standards for the Distribution of Resources within an Inclusive Education System is still at the internal consultation stage within the Department of Basic Education, and has not yet been approved for publication for public comment.
  2. The draft proposals are aimed at increasing access to education and support on an equitable basis for all learners with special education needs and disabilities;
  3. At this stage, the draft proposal has been consulted with Provincial Co-ordinators of Inclusive Education representatives of teacher unions and School Governing Body Associations.
  4. Once the policy has been completed, it will be promulgated in terms of the National Education Policy Act (NEPA Act). The final policy that has been determined by the Minister must, in terms of section 7 of the NEPA, Act be tabled in Parliament within 21 days after notice of such determination has appeared in the gazette.

14 September 2015 - NW3238

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology:

(1) Is the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) experiencing difficulties in attracting donors and/ or funding; if so, (a) to what extent and (b) what influence does it have on the research agenda; (2) What portion of the total funds available to the HSRC is sourced from the (a) private sector and (b) government; (3) Do the private sector dictate the research agenda of the HSRC; if so, how?” FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NO (3238) DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: (04 SEPTEMBER 2015) (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 32-2015) “   Ms JF Terblanche (DA)to ask the Minister of Science and Technology: (1)Is the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) experiencing difficulties in attracting donors and/ or funding; if so, (a) to what extent and (b) what influence does it have on the research agenda; (2)What portion of the total funds available to the HSRC is sourced from the (a) private sector and (b) government; (3)Do the private sector dictate the research agenda of the HSRC; if so, how?” (3238) REPLY: (1)a) In the previous year (2014/15), as opposed to the previous two years, the HSRC has experienced difficulty in reaching its financial targets. These targets are particularly subject to changes in funder research imperatives and demands. b) The HSRC is guided by its mandate as articulated in the HSRC Act, as well as national government priorities when deciding the research agenda for a year. A process of consultation is undertaken with stakeholders as well as the HSRC Board annually where the strategic focus of research is agreed upon. (2)Aside from the Parliamentary grant and international funders (including international government agencies), the HSRC also receives funding from: a) Local Private sector funders – R4 197 000 b) Other Government Departments/Agencies – R48 114 000 No, the private sector does not dictate the research agenda of the HSRC.

Reply:

(1) a) In the previous year (2014/15), as opposed to the previous two years, the HSRC has experienced difficulty in reaching its financial targets. These targets are particularly subject to changes in funder research imperatives and demands.

b) The HSRC is guided by its mandate as articulated in the HSRC Act, as well

as national government priorities when deciding the research agenda for a year. A process of consultation is undertaken with stakeholders as well as the HSRC Board annually where the strategic focus of research is agreed upon.

(2) Aside from the Parliamentary grant and international funders (including international government agencies), the HSRC also receives funding from:

a) Local Private sector funders – R4 197 000

b) Other Government Departments/Agencies – R48 114 000

(3) No, the private sector does not dictate the research agenda of the HSRC.

 

 

14 September 2015 - NW3032

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James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the presentation by her department to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 28 July 2015, focusing on Kha Ri Gude which used the 2001 Census statistics, has her department compared its outcomes with the latest census statistics released in 2011; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department did use the census statistics released in 2011 in planning for the future years.

As indicated in the table below, the National Census of October 2011 indicates that South Africa is now at a 8.62% illiteracy rate compared to the 17.9% illiteracy rate of 2001. This will ensure the fulfillment of the Dakar Agreement which arose from the World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal, in April 2000 to reduce illiteracy by 50%.

 

2001

2011

 

Number

%

Number

%

No education

4 567 498

17.90

2 665 874

8.62

Some primary

4 083 742

16.00

3 790 134

12.26

Completed Primary

1 623 467

6.40

1 413 895

4.57

Some secondary

7 846 125

30.80

10 481 577

33.9

Matric

5 200 602

20.40

8 919 608

28.85

Higher

2 151 226

8.40

3 644 617

11.79

Source: Stats SA, Census 2011 results (Highest level of education for individuals aged 20 years and above)

When taking into account the outcomes of the National Census of October 2011 in respect of the provincial illiteracy rate, the Kha Ri Gude Mass Literacy Campaign adjusted the provincial targets for the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF).

This meant that the resources and activities of the Campaign will decrease in some provinces and increase in other provinces to address the provincial illiteracy rate.

The table below indicates the remaining target according to the Census 2011:

Province

2011 Census

(aged 15 years and above)

2012 Campaign

(Enrolled)

2013 Campaign

(Enrolled)

2014 Campaign

(Enrolled)

Remaining target according to Census 2011

1-Eastern Cape

384 104

129 999

114 647

61 419

78 039

2-Free State

117 105

49 834

45 601

24 519

-2 849

3-Gauteng

307 102

86 402

87 497

79 239

53 964

4-KwaZulu-Natal

633 050

129 357

119 886

92 627

291 180

5-Mpumalanga

504 396

50 894

47 761

48 162

357 579

6-Northern Cape

329 949

8 785

14 098

11 526

295 540

7-Limpopo

252 966

97 164

90 283

67 542

-2 023

8-North West

78 100

32 685

32 157

27 932

-14 674

9-Western Cape

104 648

15 044

14 434

16 539

58 631

Total

2 711 420

600 164

566 364

429 505

1 115 387

The following table shows the number of learners reached to date (2008 – 2014) and the targets for 2015 and 2016 in order to achieve the 50% target based on the 2001 census data.

Province

2008-2014 (Enrolled)

Target learners in 2015

Target learners in 2016

Number of illiterates learners reached

1-Eastern Cape

835 722

40 199

40 198

916 119

2-Free State

294 873

5 428

5 427

305 728

3-Gauteng

538 703

26 782

26 781

592 266

4-KwaZulu-Natal

826 179

139 868

139 868

1 105 915

5-Mpumalanga

341 596

92 010

92 010

525 616

6-Northern Cape

95 592

21 894

21 893

139 379

7-Limpopo

605 562

125 261

125 260

856 083

8-North West

225 033

80 621

80 620

386 274

9-Western Cape

99 368

29 659

29 658

158 685

Total

3 862 628

561 722

561 715

4 986 065

14 September 2015 - NW3190

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to his replies to questions 340 and 1292 on 8 April 2015 and 6 May 2015 respectively, whether the National Treasury has concluded the assessment of the (a) financial costs, (b) financial implications and/or (c) economic implications of (i) the nuclear build programme and (ii) the nuclear build programme compared to any other specified alternative energy generation option(s); if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

National Treasury is currently assessing the relative financial costs, financial implications, and economic implications of a nuclear build programme with the Department of Energy. The recommendations are expected to be submitted to Cabinet once this work has been concluded.

14 September 2015 - NW3246

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number and (b) percentage of Funza Lushaka bursars graduate (i) within the prescribed minimum period for their course of study and (ii) at all in respect of each university and each year of initial enrolment in (aa) 2007, (bb) 2008, (cc) 2009, (dd) 2010 and (ee) 2011?

Reply:

Preliminary data from the Implementation Evaluation of the Funza Lushaka bursary programme indicates the number and percentage of sampled Funza Lushaka bursars that graduated within the prescribed period for their course of study at university between 2007 and 2012:

Programme

Time Taken

Number

Percentage

BEd

More than Minimum Time

296

19%

 

Minimum Time

1265

81%

PGCE

More than Minimum Time

109

51%

 

Minimum Time

106

49%

Kindly note that the first intake of Funza Lushaka bursary holders was in 2007. It is expected that students will complete a Bachelor of Education degree within four years. Completing the course within the minimum prescribed period can therefore not be disaggregated by year from 2007-2011.

14 September 2015 - NW3029

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the purpose of norms and standards funds paid to schools and (b) criteria were used to determine the amount paid to every school; (2) (a) when are norms and standard funds transferred to schools, (b) who has the authority to decrease the norms and standards funds payable to schools and (c) what criteria are to be used when norms and standards are changed?

Reply:

(1) (a) According to paragraph 95 of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding, 2006 (NNSSF), the school allocations are intended to cover non-personnel recurrent items and small capital items required by the school as well as normal repairs and maintenance to all the physical infrastructure of the school. Schools can, therefore, use their allocations to pay for Learner and Teacher Support Material (e.g. textbooks and stationery), day-to-day maintenance of the school grounds and buildings, as well as for services provided to the school (e.g. municipal services and maintenance of equipment).

(b) The amount of funding allocated to a school is determined by its quintile classification, the provincial allocation amount per learner for the relevant quintile and the number of learners enrolled in the school.

(2) (a) Paragraph 121A of the NNSSF determines that Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) must make transfer payments to public ordinary schools on or before 15 May, and on or before 15 November each year.

(b) Each PED determines the amount it is able to make available for the school allocation, as part of their overall education budgetary process. Paragraph 114 of the NNSSF determines that each PED must, as part of its ongoing MTEF budgeting process, calculate the school allocation budget implied by the national targets, and compare this amount to the actual school allocation budget amount available in the MTEF budgets. Approval of the education budget, including the level of the provincial school allocation and whether it is increased or decreased, is done by the Member of the Executive Council for Education in the province.

(c) The national target amounts for the school allocation are annually adjusted in line with the Consumer Price Index. When Provincial Education Departments adjust their norms and standards allocation to schools they are guided by these nationally determined target amounts, as well as the budgets they can afford to make available. An individual school’s indicative allocation may also be adjusted if there is a significant change in the number of learners enrolled at the school when the final allocation amount is determined.

14 September 2015 - NW3031

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department’s data on the Learner Unit Record Information and Tracking System includes information of learners at (a) Setotolwane Secondary School for the Deaf and Blind in Mashashane, Limpopo, and (b) Lebaka Primary School in Mohlabaneng, Limpopo; if so, what are the relevant details of all learners in respect of each specified school?

Reply:

(a) Setotolwane Secondary School for the Deaf and Blind in Mashashane, Limpopo, and (b) Lebaka Primary School in Mohlabaneng, Limpopo; if so, what are the relevant details of all learners in respect of each specified school?

Table 1: Number of learners in Setotolwane Secondary School, by disability and gender, in 2015

Province

Emis Number

Institution Name

Street Address

Gender

Disability

         

BLIND

DEAF

Total

Limpopo

922223479

SETOTOLWANE SECONDARY

SETOTOLWANE; NEWLANDS; MASHAHANE DISTRICT

Female

35

66

101

       

Male

43

105

148

       

Total

78

171

249

Source: LURITS 2015: 1st quarter upload

Table 2: Number of learners in Lebaka primary Schools, by gender, in 2015

Province

Emis Number

Institution Name

Institution Type

Gender

Number Learner

Disability

Limpopo

918520511

LEBAKA PRIMARY

Ordinary School

Female

470

None

       

Male

458

None

       

Total

928

None

Source: LURITS 2015: 1st quarter upload

14 September 2015 - NW3404

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 2976 on 24 August 2015, in respect of each province and district, what is the total number of (a) blind and (b) deaf learners that attended classes at the Kha Ri Gude centres who (i) are now literate, (ii) have passed their relevant exams and (iii) are now being used as volunteers to teach at the specified centres?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The table below indicates the number of Blind and Deaf learners who registered and completed the Kha Ri Gude Mass Literacy Campaign from 2008 to 2014.

i) Blind learners received literacy and numeracy classes to enable them to read and write using Braille. Deaf Learners received literacy and numeracy classes to enable them to read and write using Sign Language.

ii) Blind and Deaf Learners complete a Learner Assessment Portfolio (LAP) which is moderated and verified by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and then entered on the National Learner Records Database (NLRD).

 

LEARNERS

                                     BLIND

 

                               DEAF

 

GRAND TOTAL

PROVINCES

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

TOTAL

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

2269

26

142

188

280

366

394

3665

1087

51

101

118

173

127

96

1751

5418

FREE STATE

887

 

34

59

134

214

230

1558

264

215

331

469

652

455

205

2591

4149

GAUTENG

1465

22

56

53

86

103

115

1900

324

74

29

11

44

123

70

675

2575

KWAZULU NATAL

2471

60

118

176

235

448

482

3990

540

56

26

19

162

192

146

1141

5134

MPUMALANGA

919

36

46

51

72

135

183

1442

239

136

117

124

78

147

98

939

2381

NORTHERN CAPE

76

3

5

13

 

19

3

119

35

48

5

 

104

 

 

192

311

LIMPOPO

691

35

144

177

209

372

400

2028

258

42

23

 

106

263

290

982

3010

NORTH WEST

705

44

43

88

143

281

231

1535

264

42

58

67

98

53

32

614

2149

WESTERN CAPE

52

 

 

 

 

 

0

25

22

139

65

73

144

130

147

720

772

GRAND TOTAL

9535

226

588

805

1159

1938

2038

16289

3033

803

755

881

1561

1490

1084

9607

25896

 

(iii) The table below indicates the number of learners (2008 -2013) who registered and completed the 8 months of Kha Ri Gude lessons in Braille or Sign Language and were then registered as volunteers to teach new learners.

This is only possible for the disability sector as many of the learners were once sighted and able to hear but lost their hearing and sight due to various reasons. These individuals are often educated with matric and sometimes post graduate degrees. They then become illiterate and require lessons in Braille and Sign Language which they are then able to teach to other learners.

Blind and Deaf Learners who became VE's in the subsequent years

 

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

 

Blind

59

Deaf

24

KZN

 

Blind

60

Deaf

12

Western Cape

 

Blind

0

Deaf

12

Northern Cape

 

Blind

0

Deaf

0

Gauteng

 

Blind

14

Deaf

5

North West

 

Blind

31

Deaf

9

Mpumalanga

 

Blind

7

Deaf

19

Limpopo

 

Blind

27

Deaf

12

Free State

 

Blind

8

Deaf

68

14 September 2015 - NW3182

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr PJ

Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What precautions has her department taken with the writing of the record examinations and final examinations of this year’s matriculants in case load shedding takes place at the schools and/or examination halls during this time; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Load shedding, will in the main, affect the writing of Computer Application Technology (CAT) and Information Technology (IT) practical examinations, where computers are used. In the management of examinations in previous years, power outages have been factored into the planning so as to ensure that no candidate is affected. The Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) have established contact with the regional managers of Eskom, and a request has been made for load shedding to be suspended on the days on which these practical examinations are administered during the Trial Examinations and the Final November examinations. In addition, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) will communicate with the Acting Chief Executive Officer of Eskom, to impress on him the need to suspend load shedding on the two days on which the Final Practical Examinations are written in CAT and IT. However, should load shedding occur, the Department has a protocol in place to cater for power outages which entails the following:

a) Candidates must be quarantined for the duration of the load shedding and the examination may resume when the electricity is restored;

b) Should the electricity not be restored in a period of two hours, the examination session is terminated and the examination must be re-scheduled; and

c) The DBE has set a back-up paper for these two practical examinations, and the examination will be re-scheduled for schools that may experience load shedding.

2. All schools are aware of the protocol relating to load shedding or power outages. This has been communicated via an official circular to all schools. In addition, the Department will convene a media briefing prior to the commencement of the final examination and this will be reiterated at this briefing.

14 September 2015 - NW3236

Profile picture: Terblanche, Ms JF

Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(1)Are there measures that are put in place to protect the reputation of the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) in order to ensure that evidence-based output remains independent and authoritative in all spheres; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What additional steps is the HSRC taking to preserve its autonomy

Reply:

(1) Yes. The HSRC’s approved Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plan (2015/16, page 26) makes reference to the key risk of “undue donor/funder influence on the research agenda and pressure to secure income” as a key risk affecting its research programme.

The HSRC depends on a combination of government funding (through its Parliamentary Grant) and external income (in the research context, secured through competitive tender processes, contracts and grants). An over-dependence on a source of funding does carry the risk of potential influence by funders in terms of the issues addressed or not addressed through research, and the way in which research findings are presented.

The following measures are listed as mitigating the above-mentioned risk (ibid.):

  • “Engagement between the Board and/or executive team and DST, with a view to securing an additional increase in the parliamentary grant – specifically for innovative research;
  • Commitment to science prescripts, whereby the HSRC’s work is defined by the rules of science, rather than political allegiance;
  • Broadening the funding portfolio through a concerted effort by the executive team, with Business Development’s support towards expanding HSRC sources of funding to EU countries and possibly East Asia.”

 

(2) The HSRC has very clear mandated objectives as outlined in its founding legislation, the Human Sciences Research Council Act, Act 17 of 2008. These mandated objectives serve as an enabling framework but also as a source of reference when research opportunities and requests are considered.

When opportunities to undertake externally-funded research are considered, the conditions set by potential funders are considered before a decision is made to respond to that opportunity, or not. The HSRC’s legal department also provides a vetting service for research contracts and will help to safeguard the autonomy as well as intellectual property of the HSRC.

Governance structures of the HSRC benefit from the involvement of independent experts. This does not only refer to statutory structures such as the HSRC Board and its subcommittees, but also to committees such as the HSRC Research Ethics Committee and HSRC Press Board whose Chairpersons and several of the expert members are employed outside the HSRC. At the same time, internal members are also experts in their own right, adding value to discussions and review of submitted documents.

The HSRC places great value on the independent review of research outputs. Researchers are strongly encouraged to publish research in internationally recognised, peer reviewed journals. Other outputs, such as policy briefs and book publications, are also externally reviewed before they are published.

 

14 September 2015 - NW3038

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) Which districts in each province have converted schools for children with special educational needs to resource centres, (b) what are the names of the specified schools, (c) what is the enrolment number in each school, (d) how many educators have been appointed in each specified school and (e) how many support staff such as (i) therapists, (ii) school sisters and/or nurses, (iii) administrative staff, (iv) janitors, (v) general assistants and (vi) class aids have been appointed in each specified school?

Reply:

The information about:

(a) The districts that have converted schools for children with special educational needs to resource centres;

(b) Names of the resource centres;

(c) Enrolment in each school; and

(d) The number of:

    i) (Therapists;

    ii) School sisters/or nurses;

    iii) Administrative staff;

     iv) Janitors;

     v) General assistants; as well as

     vi) Class assistants appointed at each school are all provided in the annexure.

ANNEXURE A

Statistics required in questions (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e)

Sources:

  • The statistics on enrolment have been made available by Provincial EMIS Directorates from the 2014 Annual Special School Survey
  • Statistics on Staffing has been made available by Provincial Human Resource Planning and Inclusive Education Directorates.

Province

  1. District

Names of Resource Centres

Learner Enrolment

Number of Educators Appointed

(e)(i)

Number of Therapists appointed (Specify)

(e)(ii)

Number of Professional Nurses/Number of Staff Nurses

(e)(iii)

Number of Administrative Staff

(e)(iv)

Number of Security Staff (Janitor)

(e)(v)

Number of General Assistants (School)

(e)(vi)

Number of General Assistants (Hostel)

(e)(vii)

Number of Class Aids

EC

Port Elizabeth

Cape Recife

Information to be provided by EMIS

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

 

Port Elizabeth

Merryvale

                 
 

Port Elizabeth

Quest

                 
 

Port Elizabeth

Reubin Birin

                 
 

Port Elizabeth

Khanyisa PE

                 
 

Qumbu

Tsolo

                 
 

Mbizana

Zamokuhle

                 
 

Mthatha

Ikhwezi Lokusa

                 
 

Mbizana

Vukuzenzele

                 
 

Mbizana

Nompulanga

                 
 

East London

Vukuhambe

                 

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Maluti Hoogland

379

34

03

01

04

0

18

10

03

 

Motheo

Martie du Plessis

527

42

20

01

03

06

11

09

06

 

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Thiboloha

364

49

01

01

02

06

30

43

26

 

Motheo

Tswellang

297

30

13

03

03

04

10

08

10

GT

Ekurhuleni North

Con Amore

Belvedere

339

736

24

47

07

08

01

0

03

03

To be provided by HR Planning

03

04

0

05

0

 

Ekurhuleni South

Ezibeleni

Isipho Sethu

262

626

21

44

03

05

02

0

03

03

 

03

04

03

05

0

 

Gauteng East

Phelang

Muriel Brand

387

495

28

37

03

09

01

01

02

03

 

02

03

03

04

06

 

Gauteng North

Sizanani

264

22

0

01

02

 

02

03

02

 

Gauteng West

Itumeleng

Wesrand

257

320

21

24

06

08

0

01

02

03

 

02

03

03

0

05

 

Jhb Central

Phillip Kushlick

Don Mattera

451

185

37

18

13

03

01

01

03

02

 

04

03

 

04

0

 

Jhb East

Nokuthula

Gresswold

341

841

24

51

06

07

01

0

03

04

 

03

04

03

06

0

 

Jhb North

Delta Park

Randburg

567

176

46

18

13

02

01

01

03

02

 

03

02

02

0

03

 

Jhb South

Jiswa

MC Karbhai

522

422

40

37

06

04

01

01

03

03

 

03

03

03

07

07

 

Jhb West

Roodepark

Sizwile

765

355

48

33

04

04

0

01

03

03

 

03

02

03

0

07

 

Sedibeng East

Krugerlaan

629

45

02

0

03

 

03

02

0

 

Sedibeng West

Thabo Vuyo

420

39

06

01

02

 

03

 

04

 

Tshwane North

Dominican

Prospectus Novus

681

404

49

40

07

07

02

01

04

03

 

03

03

04

12

0

 

Tshwane South

Unica

Via Nova

149

551

21

44

06

12

01

02

03

03

 

02

03

03

08

06

 

Tshwane West

Reinotswe

Pretoria School for CP

237

481

21

43

02

11

01

02

02

04

 

03

04

 

01

12

KZN

Umkhanyakude

Khulani

288

14

00

00

03

02

02

04

02

 

Uthungulu

Thuthukani

356

21

04

02

04

01

07

00

08

 

Zululand

Zamimpilo

Inkanyiso

105

399

06

37

02

03

00

01

01

01

02

02

02

05

00

04

02

02

 

Amajuba

Vumanisabelo

YWCA

491

461

38

28

00

00

00

00

01

01

02

02

05

04

05

00

04

08

 

Uthukela

Inkanyezi

428

31

02

00

01

02

04

00

09

 

Umzinyathi

Pro Nobis

260

23

03

00

01

02

02

00

17

 

Ilembe

Stanger

223

25

02

00

01

02

04

04

05

 

Umgungundlovu

Open Gate

271

20

02

01

02

02

24

00

09

 

Sisonke

Daniel Mzamo

Vulekani

301

251

13

00

00

00

02

06

04

09

 

Ugu

Schola Amoris

259

24

00

00

01

02

03

00

08

 

Pinetown

Khalipha

Tongaat

The Browns

269

157

366

13

07

34

01

00

14

00

00

01

01

01

03

02

01

02

05

04

05

05

02

07

00

10

02

 

Umlazi

St Raphaels

Open Air

235

307

23

16

08

02

01

01

01

02

02

02

02

14

00

04

05

08

LP

No information available

                   

MPU

Bohlabela

Estralita Special School

222

22

1 (Occupational therapist)

1 Professional nurse

1

1

PRIVATELY PAID (2/SHIFT)

1

16 House-hold Super-visors and General Assistants

18

 

Gert Sibande

Jim van Tonder school

547

39

1 Occupational Therapist

0

5

0

5

24

0

 

Ehlanzeni

Kamagugu Inclusive

336

28

3 (2 x Occupational Therapist & 1 x Social Worker)

0

3

0

4

0

6

 

Nkangala

Pelonolo

85

9

1 Professional nurse

1

2

4

1

2

6

NC

Frances Baard

Boitumelo

   

0

01

1

0

     
   

Elizabeth Conradie

381

43

0

2-Prof Nurses

2-Auxilliary Nurses

3

0

20

6

0

   

Kimberley Training Centre

105

10

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

   

Re Tlameleng

169

22

0

1-Auxilliary Nurse

1

0

20

0

1

NW

Bojanala

Kutlwanong

323

42

0

0

3

0

0

0

13

   

Meerhof

262

35

3- OT

1-Physio

1-Speech

1

3

0

1

17

15

 

Kenneth Kaunda

Ikalafeng

294

25

2-OT

1

2

1

4

5

11

   

Janie Schneider

134

13

1-OT

1-Seech

1

1

0

1

4

12

 

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

MM Sebitloane

237

17

0

0

1

0

0

0

5

   

Temoso

127

12

0

0

1

0

0

0

5

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tlamelang

182

23

1-Physio

1

3

7

3

45

10

   

Retlametswe

155

12

1-Physio

0

1

0

5

0

7

WC

South

Agapeskool

208

18

4

1

2

1

1

0

7

 

Overberg

Agulhas School Of Skills

175

17

1

1

1

1

2

13

0

 

Central

Astra Skool

249

23

5

2

2

1

2

18

0

 

North

Athlone Skool Vir Blindes

313

43

4

1

3

1

2

19

11

 

South

Blouvlei Skool

163

14

1

1

1

1

1

0

5

 

North

Carel Du Toit Sentrum.

156

16

1

0

1

1

2

0

2

 

Eden & Central Karoo

Carpe Diem Skool

266

25

4

1

1

1

2

12

3

 

North

Chere Botha Skool

228

19

1

1

1

1

0

0

12

 

Cape Winelands

De La Bat-Skool

172

25

1

1

2

1

2

20

2

 

Eden & Central Karoo

Eljada-Kairos Skool

231

26

5

1

2

1

2

31

9

 

North

Filia Skool

171

15

3

1

1

1

1

0

9

 

East

Jan Kriel-Skool

496

46

13

1

3

4

6

38

17

 

West Coast

Karitas Skool

150

12

1

0

1

1

1

0

6

 

Cape Winelands

Langerugskool

123

11

2

0

1

1

1

6

6

 

Central

Mary Harding Skool

261

23

2

1

2

1

3

13

11

 

East

Mitchell's Plain School Of Skills

431

35

0

0

2

1

2

0

0

 

East

Noluthando Sch. For The Deaf

306

34

2

1

2

1

3

 

3

 

West Coast

Paarl-Skool C

334

31

7

1

2

1

5

13

4

 

East

Riebeeck Valley Special School

237

21

0

0

1

1

1

20

3

 

North

Rusthof Skool

152

13

1

0

1

1

1

8

6

 

Central

Tafelbergskool

349

31

9

0

2

2

3

0

0

 

Central

Tembaletu

179

21

6

1

2

1

2

0

5

 

Central

Vera-School

137

19

3

0

2

1

2

16

10

 

West Coast

Vista Nova-School

418

40

11

1

3

1

5

0

8

   

Weskus Spesiale Skool

324

26

0

0

2

1

2

19

0

14 September 2015 - NW3191

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury has modelled the impact on the economy of the (a) nuclear build programme and (b) the nuclear build programme compared to any other specified alternative energy generation option(s); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

National Treasury is assessing the economic impact of a nuclear build on the economy, as well as alternative scenarios provided for in the Integrated Energy Plan. This work is currently not finalised yet, as there is an interactive process underway with the Department of Energy on the scale of the programme and possible financing / procuring scenarios that have a bearing on the modeling work and its results. The recommendations from this work are expected to be submitted to Cabinet as soon as the work is completed.

14 September 2015 - NW3030

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to the Getting the Nation to Read Campaign (a) who are the members on the steering committee of the 1 000 libraries project and (b) what expertise does each specified member possess which is relevant to libraries and reading; (2) what (a) are the contents of each trolley to be delivered and (b) is the cost of each trolley; (3) who was awarded the contract for the delivery of trolleys to schools?

Reply:

 

(1) With reference to the Getting the Nation to Read Campaign (a) who are the members on the steering committee of the 1 000 libraries project and (b) what expertise does each specified member possess which is relevant to libraries and reading;

  1. (a) The team is led by the Deputy Director General (DDG) for Teacher and Professional Development.

(b) In addition to the Senior Managers who support the DDG: Teacher and Professional Development, an official with extensive knowledge and experience of school libraries was appointed on contract for the project.

(2) What (a) are the contents of each trolley to be delivered and (b) is the cost of each trolley;

(a) Each trolley library contains 250 library books in English, 250 library books in IsiZulu, teacher resources on CD and DVD, a television and a DVD player.

(b) Each trolley, with its resources, costs R17 000.

(3) Who was awarded the contract for the delivery of trolleys to schools?

EBMS Trading cc. was awarded the contract to deliver the trolley libraries.

14 September 2015 - NW2784

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he is considering any plans whereby private and public pension funds will be compelled to invest more money in development projects; if not, whether any consideration will be given to this in the future; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, I am not considering any plans whereby we compel private or public pension funds how to invest. The key point to note is that it is the trustees of a pension fund who have to determine the investment strategy for a pension fund, taking into account its assets and liabilities, and the need for long-term growth. All that government does is to provide a broad framework to protect members of retirement funds, by reducing risks to their funds, like concentration risks when investing (refer to maximum investment limits in Regulation 28 of the Pension Funds Act (1956)), poor governance practices or high and opaque charges.

Since 2011 when Regulation 28 was revised, trustees of retirement funds now have to consider Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) principles before determining their investment policies and strategies. The principle is meant to encourage retirement funds to actively consider investments that might be of a developmental or infrastructural nature, without compromising returns in the long-term. Indeed, in the aggregate, retirement funds already have significant exposure to Government and State Owned Companies’ bonds, which, by their nature are developmental. In 2014, for example, 32 percent of Government issued bonds, excluding state owned company bonds, were held by local retirement funds (Budget Review 2015). Furthermore, according to the South African Reserve Bank’s Quarterly Bulletin March 2015, about 37.1 percent of total retirement fund assets are invested in public sector bonds (Government, state companies, and local government).

The nature of retirement funds means that they should invest for the long term. This implies that they do not necessarily have to be compelled to realise this long term objective to provide decent retirement savings for their members. Further, retirement funds, through their trustees, are in the best position to assess the retirement needs of their members and to decide how best to achieve this through various investment and asset-liability matching approaches. The National Treasury is also engaging with various stakeholders to unlock any funding bottlenecks for infrastructure projects and enable an environment which will facilitate more investment in public infrastructure.

14 September 2015 - NW3239

Profile picture: Lotriet, Dr  A

Lotriet, Dr A to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(1)What is the current status of the maintenance and upgrade of the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) building in Pretoria; (2) Does the Pretoria HSRC building comply with the requirements set out in the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993; if not why not; (3) Did her department request infrastructure funding from the National Treasury; if not; if so, what was the outcome?

Reply:

(1) The HSRC has a plan for the maintenance and upgrade of the building. Financial constraints, however, limit the capacity to effect the full-scale implementation of the plan. Attention is given to the most urgent needs on a priority basis.

(2) Yes, the HSRC is compliant with the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

(3) Yes, funding submissions for infrastructure have been submitted via the Department of Science and Technology annually since 2009. None of these submissions have been successful.

 

 

14 September 2015 - NW3138

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the rationale for only giving Funza Lushaka bursaries for teacher training to students who have a third language or for giving preference to students who are doing an African language at the Foundation Phase training level, (b) is his department aware that this de facto, although not de jure, excludes most so-called coloured, Indian and white students from the specified bursaries regardless of their financial circumstances, particularly those who attend colleges which do not offer African languages and (c) how many students from so-called coloured, Indian, white and black backgrounds respectively have received Funza Lushaka bursaries at each level of training in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014?

Reply:

a) The Funza Lushaka Bursary programme does not have a specific focus on students who have a third language. However, the bursary programme does give preference to students who will be able to teach in an African Language in the Foundation Phase. The rationale for this is teacher supply and demand statistics of the Department of Basic Education (DBE) and the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) that corroborate the shortage of Foundation Phase teachers and emphasise the importance of recruiting Foundation Phase teachers who are trained to teach in an African Indigenous Language. More teachers who teach in African Indigenous Languages are needed to promote mother tongue instruction at the Foundation Phase level (DBE & DHET, 2011), particularly in light of the Initial Introduction of African Languages Policy. A report released by the Centre for Development and Enterprise (March 2015) also highlights the shortage of new teacher graduates in the Foundation Phase, whose mother tongue is an indigenous African Language.

b) No. The Funza Lushaka Bursary programme aims to attract academically deserving, suitable South African students, including Afrikaans and English speaking students, to become competent teachers in identified priority, scarce skills subjects and phases.

c)(i) (ii) (iii) and (iv) The table below reflects the number of bursaries awarded by race:

Year

African

Coloured

Indian

White

Not Indicated

Total

2010

5 806

1 267

326

2 573

101

10 073

2011

4 955

1 124

298

2 242

6

8 625

2012

6 988

1 553

345

2 722

10

11 618

2013

9 170

1 723

407

2 971

29

14 300

2014

9 639

1 632

368

2 692

18

14 349

Source: Funza Lushaka Awards Data

14 September 2015 - NW3026

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Can the norms and standards funds be used to pay the salaries of (a) educators and (b) other staff members; if so, what amount from the funds was used to pay the specified salaries in each province?

Reply:

(a) (b)

Paragraph 99 of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding, 2006 (NNSSF) determines that the school allocation may not be used to cover the cost of personnel and new buildings. The norms and standards funds should, therefore, not be used by schools to pay for salaries of educators or other staff members. According to paragraph 95 of the NNSSF, the school allocations are intended to cover non-personnel recurrent items and small capital items required by the school, as well as normal repairs and maintenance to the physical infrastructure of the school. Schools should therefore use their allocations to pay for items such as Learner and Teacher Support Material (e.g. textbooks and stationery), day-to-day maintenance of the school grounds and buildings, and services provided to the school (e.g. municipal services and maintenance of equipment).

12 September 2015 - NW3653

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) Has the enquiry set up by her department into the train crash that occurred in Denver, in Johannesburg, on 28 April 2015, been concluded; if so, what were the (a) findings of the specified enquiry and (b) costs associated with the damage arising from the specified incident;(2) have any of the recommendations arising from the specified enquiry been implemented to date? (2) have any of the recommendations arising from the specified enquiry been implemented to date? NW4319E

Reply:

RSR RESPONSE

1 a) The Board of Enquiry set up into the train accident at Denver Station has concluded its work. The main finding of the Board of Enquiry is that the driver of the Express Train passed the 'signal at danger', and rear ended train number 0600 that was stationery at Denver train station.

b) The cost of the damage is R22 million.

2. PRASA has started implementing the recommendations of the Board of Enquiry, in order to prevent a recurrence of an incident of a similar nature.

11 September 2015 - NW3309

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did The Presidency spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did The Presidency spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did The Presidency spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did The Presidency spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

I wish to refer the Honourable Member to the unqualified Annual Report (2014/2015) and audited clean Financial Statements of my department that were tabled in Parliament on 2 September 2015 and published in the ATC of 7 September 2015, wherein travel costs are reflected under the item ‘Travel and Subsistence’.

In regard to accommodation, I wish to remind the Honourable Member that accommodation of Ministers and Deputy Ministers in Cape Town and Gauteng is provided through the Department of Public Works.

11 September 2015 - NW3197

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Were the Immigration Regulations that were introduced in 2014 assessed through the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System in his Office to (a) ensure alignment with the National Development Plan and (b) reduce the risk of unintended consequences; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant findings?

Reply:

The above Bill and Regulations have not been subjected to the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment (SEIAS). SEIAS was only introduced this year after approval by Cabinet in February 2015. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) conducted series of awareness and inductions between April and June 2015 for departments to institutionalise the SEIAS.

The implementation of SEIAS for developing or amending policies, legislations and regulations came into effect from 01 July 2015.

11 September 2015 - NW3178

Profile picture: Esterhuizen, Mr JA

Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

With regard to his department’s new regulations that call upon surface mines to enhance safety for all trackless mobile machinery apart from reducing mining accidents how (a) effective will the specified regulations be and (b) will it reduce (i) capital expenditure and (ii) the cost of maintenance?

Reply:

The trackless mobile machinery accidents are also the major contributor of fatalities, disabilities and injuries in the mining sector. In this regard, the Department has been implementing measures including reviewing the relevant legal provisions to protect the health and safety of the mineworkers.

The new regulations require the employer to ensure that pedestrians are prevented from being injured as a result of a collision between the trackless mobile machines or vehicles and persons, where there is a significant risk of such a collision.

 (a) These regulations are expected to be effective and should result in decreased fatalities and injuries. The department will monitor the situation continuously.

(b)  (i) and (ii)

Yes, it is envisaged that the prevention of accidents as a result of compliance to the regulations will ultimately reduce capital expenditure and cost of maintenance because there will be far less production interruptions and less money spent to repair vehicles that have collided. However the loss of life is of utmost importance and cannot be equated to costs or profit at the mine.

11 September 2015 - NW3173

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1)      How many no-go zones, where no mining activities may take place, has his department (a) approved and (b) rejected since the coming into force of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002; (2) (a) which areas have been declared as no-go zones, (b) on what date was (i) each application submitted and (ii) approval given and (c) what were the reasons for approval in each separate case; (3) (a) for which areas were such applications rejected, (b) on what date was (i) each application submitted and (ii) approved and (c) what were the reasons for the rejection in each separate case; (4) whether her department has received an application to declare the Lake Chrissie area in Mpumalanga as a no-go zone; if so, what is the status of the specified application?

Reply:

  1. (a) One (1)

(b) None

2.  (a) Chrissiesmeer Biodiversity Site

(b) (i) 31 August 2009

(ii) 04 March 2011

(c) The national interest to protect the sensitive environment of areas around Lake Chrissie, commonly known as the Chrissiesmeer Biodiversity Site.

3.  (a) (b) (i) (ii) (c) None

4. Yes, the area was declared on 04 March 2011 for a period of 3 years. The declaration has since lapsed and an application for extension was lodged with the Department and it is still under consideration.

11 September 2015 - NW3196

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Has the Private Security Industry Regulation Amendment Bill, which is currently awaiting the President’s assent, been assessed through the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System in his Office to (a) ensure alignment with the National Development Plan and (b) reduce the risk of unintended consequences; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant findings?

Reply:

The Private Security Industry Regulation Amendment Bill has not been subjected to the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment (SEIAS). SEIAS was only introduced this year after approval by Cabinet in February 2015. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) conducted a series of awareness and inductions between April and June 2015 for departments to institutionalise the SEIAS. About 136 officials in 33 departments were trained on SEIAS application.

The implementation of SEIAS for developing or amending policies, legislations and regulations came into effect from 01 July 2015.