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10 October 2022 - NW3243

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that the Vaal Gamagara Regional Water Supply Scheme began in 2016 with a project completion date of May 2022, (a)what (i) was the initial estimated cost for the project and (ii) total amount has been spent to date and (b) how much work has been completed to date with the replacement of the existing steel pipeline with a new pipeline?

Reply:

a)  (i) The initial estimated cost for the project was R 1,2 billion.

(ii) The total amount spent on the project was R 1,7 million.

b) The project comprises on the replacement of 80km of pipeline, the installation of pressure release valves and construction of chlorination building. These works were completed and the pipeline is functional

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10 October 2022 - NW3051

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has been informed of the rising trend in cybercrime; if not, why not; if so, what steps have been taken to counter it?

Reply:

Cybercrime refers to illegal internet-enabled activities that are perpetuated using computers. This is a global problem that transcends national boundaries. The cost to the global economy is estimated at $7 trillion US dollars. South Africa, being a global citizen and with our developed infrastructure – be it in sectors such as financial, communication, transportation, government, health, education or energy – is an attractive target for cybercriminals who use the Internet for extortion, fraud, child sexual exploitation, human trafficking, identity theft, disruption of critical services, selling illicit goods, and so forth.

The Honourable Member will be aware that in 2020, this Parliament passed the Cybercrimes Act to delineate offences that constitute cybercrime. The Act places the South African Police Service at the driving seat to investigate, combat and prosecute cybercrime. The Act bestows specific powers and responsibilities upon the Cabinet member responsible for policing, such as issuing Standard Operating procedures to be observed by the South African Police Service or any Law Enforcement Agency authorised to investigate any offence in terms of the law.

More specific to your question Honourable Member, Chapter 8 of The Act on reporting obligations and capacity building, sections 54(1) and 54(2), is very clear in terms of the reporting of cybercrime, to whom cybercrime must be reported and the role of the Cabinet member responsible for policing in terms of classifying offences to be reported and how reporting must be done.

Of course as the Cabinet member responsible for State Security, I am informed of matters that raise the national risk and threat posture. When malicious activities in cyberspace and anywhere else surpass the threshold of criminality and threaten national security, it is the duty and obligation of the relevant authorities to report such to me. It is my responsibility and obligation to act in a manner that will maintain and ensure peace and stability in our country.

To answer your question about the countering steps that are in place, the State Security Agency, as the leading department looking into cybersecurity in government, has a Government Computer Incident Response Centre, where cybersecurity incidents are reported and responded to. Work is also underway to improve our detection and response capabilities, through capacity building (across multiple government sectors). So, in conclusion Honourable Member, work is underway aimed at improving and enhancing coordination and collaboration within government in order to respond to cybersecurity threats and combat cybercrimes effectively.

 

10 October 2022 - NW3182

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

(1) and (2) The Honourable member to note that the appointment in the public sector positions in the Department of Basic Education and the entities reporting to the Department are governed by the rules and regulations as outlined by the Public Service Act and the Public Service Regulations of 2016. 

10 October 2022 - NW2528

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department has on record a list of incomplete schools’ renovation projects in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details; (2) what are the (a) projected timelines for the completion of such renovation projects, (b) reasons for the incomplete projects and (c) cost

Reply:

1. Yes the Department of Basic Education (DBE) does have the list of incomplete school renovation projects as they are captured on the Infrastructure Reporting Model. The details  are as per the attached project list from Infrastructure Reference Mode (IRM). 

(2) (a) The project timelines are as per the project list attached, (b) Some of the reasons are  poor performance by contractors and  disruptions by business forums; (c) The cost implications are as per attached project list.

10 October 2022 - NW2857

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is the total number of children aged between 0-18years who (a) have one parent registered on their birth certificates and (b) have both parents registered on the birth certificates?

Reply:

a) Currently the Department, does not disaggregate children’s birth certificate according to whether they have a single parent or not. The Department intends to develop a system that generates data related to the above. However, data for both parents is contained in the unabridged birth certificate.

b) Section 9 dealing with Notice of birth in subsection (1) of the Births and Deaths Registration Act (Act 51 of 1992) states that, in the case of any child born alive, any one of his or her parents, or if the parents are deceased, any of the prescribed persons, shall, within 30 days after the birth of such child, give notice thereof in the prescribed manner, and in compliance with the prescribed requirements, to any person contemplated in section 4. There is no provision made in terms of the Births and Deaths Registration Act (Act 51 of 1992) for both parents to register children on their birth certificates.

10 October 2022 - NW3130

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to his reply to question 2284 on 26 August 2022, what steps will he and/or his department take to assist the community of Doornkop in Gauteng that needs help with water supply, as the local municipality does not have sufficient water supply and service delivery is lacking. (2) what intervention measures will he put in place to provide water to the entire area, as the current boreholes cannot meet the demand and the occupants of the informal part of Doornkop are connecting pipes to the main water supply line, and they use all the water before it reaches the community. (3) whether she has been informed that on 19 September 2020 a notice was intended to be delivered to the occupiers of Doornkop who illegally connected to the borehole; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified notice served, (b) will she furnish Ms A M M Weber with a copy of the notice and (c) how will she ensure that the notice will be enforced?

Reply:

(1) The source of drinking water for Doornkop area is potable water that is supplied through a reticulation network system from Doornkop Reservoir. The water supply capacity and infrastructure servicing Doornkop is deemed adequate as there have been no documented prolonged water outages that could point to supply limitations.

(2) Information received from Johannesburg Water is that there are no boreholes in Doornkop. The City of Johannesburg Water supplies water to the informal settlements in the area through standpipes or stationary water tanks which are filled by mobile water tankers on a regular basis.

(3) Not applicable.

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10 October 2022 - NW3044

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) How does his department intervene in cases where a person does not have the funds to pay for their own DNA tests in the quest of proving their nationality as South African and (b) what other alternatives does his department make available for poor, undocumented South Africans?

Reply:

1.  Honourable member DNA tests are conducted for many reasons in the department and not just for people to prove their nationality. The test can be conducted for proving parenthood of South Africans themselves.

Unfortunately, there is no waiver of fees process in place by the department for the parents who cannot afford DNA tests, as the fees and tariffs hereto are administered by the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS). The institution is not dictated to by the Department of Home Affairs as it is a Department of Health facility.

The Department however has a Memorandum of Agreement with the Department of Health. Presently the two departments are exploring a possibility of provision of paternity tests free of charge or at a minimal fee to indigent clients if the Department of Health agrees.

2. Obviously, these are indigent people who are referred to the Department of Social Development to assist.

END

10 October 2022 - NW2820

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What number of members of the State Security Agency (a) should have Top Secret Security Clearance and (b) have (i) Top Secret Security Clearance and/or (ii) a lower security clearance?

Reply:

(a) The State Security Agency (SSA) issues Top Security Clearance to its members as the nature of the work requires. Details regarding (a) (b) (i) (ii) will be provided to the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

 

10 October 2022 - NW2624

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is her department’s estimate of the total annual additional cost of moving from the 1% notch increase to the 1,5% notch increase in the notches of salaries of educators?

Reply:

During negotiations following PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2018, extensive costing of various modes of implementation was undertaken. The final cost estimated that the compensation of employees (CoE) baseline for provincial education departments was set to increase by R347 million after the first leg of 0.3% increment in 2018/19 with the increase in 2019/20 being R1094 million following the second leg increment completing the 0.5%. 

10 October 2022 - NW3265

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) plans and strategies are in place to protect the rights of tourists and travelers from the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex community, (b)(i) mechanisms, (ii) processes and (iii) procedures have been put in place in this regard, (c) are the timelines, time frames, deadlines and milestones in this regard and (d) is used as a yardstick to measure it in each instance?

Reply:

(a – d)

Travelling of all persons through our international borders, irrespective of their sex, gender and sexual orientation, is regulated through the Immigration Act No 13 of 2002 and South African Passports and Travel Documents Act No 4 of 1994. Section 9(3)(a) of the Immigration Act states that, “No person shall enter or depart from the Republic unless he or she is in possession of a valid passport, and in the case of a minor, has his or her own valid passport. Subject to the provisions of this Act, every South African citizen shall be entitled to a South African passport”. Section 3 of the South African Passports and Travel Documents Act states that, “Subject to the provisions of this Act, every South African citizen shall be entitled to a South African passport”.

In administering these legislation, the Department observes the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic, Act 108 of 1996. Section 9(3) of the Constitution provides that the State may not unfairly discriminate directly or indirectly against anyone on one or more grounds, including race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth. Therefore, the rights of tourists and travelers from the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) community are protected through the Bill of Rights.

As far as transgender travellers are concerned, the Department does not refuse entry to visitors who carry non-binary passports; that is, passports that do not indicate a person’s gender. As for SA citizens, the current legislation only allows for the issuing of binary passports; that is, passports that indicates a person’s gender (male or female). The Official Identity Management Policy, which was approved by Cabinet in March 2022, recommends the introduction of non-binary identification documents. Subsequent to Cabinet approval of the Official Identity Management Policy, the Department began with the process of drafting the new Identification Act which will also impact on the current SA Passports and Travel Documents Act. The plan is to submit the new Identification Act to Cabinet by March 2023 to request approval for public consultations. It is anticipated that the new legislation will be tabled in Parliament during the 2023/24 financial year.

END

 

10 October 2022 - NW2482

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) In view of the violence against women and children, and crimes of sexual nature in particular, what (a) is the minimum number of rape kits that must be available at a police station and (b) is the period before the kits functioning expire; (2) what (a) number of officers of the SA Police Service (SAPS) do not comply with the specified requirement and (b) are the names of SAPS officers that so not meet the requirements; (3) whether all members of the SAPS received training in the appropriate handling of the kits; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what measures have been put in place to ensure that a member of the SAPS who is properly trained in the use of the rape kits is available when a rape victim comes to the office to lay a charge; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

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10 October 2022 - NW2522

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department is working on a gender-sensitivity policy document; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what timelines are involved and (b) will she furnish Mr W J Boshoff with the proposed policy document; (2) which organisations are involved with the drawing up of the proposed policy document; (3) (a) what are the (i) goals and (ii) mandate for the Social Cohesion and Equity in Education unit and (b) where will the funding for the specified unit be sourced from?

Reply:

(1) The Department is not working on a gender-sensitivity policy per se. The DBE is preparing to consult on a set of guidelines for Sexual Orientation Gender Identity, Expression and Sex Characteristics.

(2) The DBE has collaborated with the Social Inclusion in Education Working Group to address the human rights and needs of gender and sexual minorities in education.

(3)(a)(i)The goals of the Social Cohesion and Equity in Education unit are linked to the National Development Plan as follows: In 2030, South Africa will be a society where opportunity is not determined by race or birth right, and where citizens accept they have both rights and responsibilities. We will be a united, prosperous, non-racial, non-sexist and democratic South Africa. The Social Cohesion and Equity in Education unit translates this goal for the school setting. 

(ii) The mandate of the Social Cohesion and Equity in Education unit is to lead the transformational agenda of the basic education sector, with a focus of how transformation manifests in schools. 

(b) The work of the Social Cohesion and Equity in Education unit is mainly funded through the Basic Education Budget Vote. Supplementary funding sources are sometimes obtained through social partners, development agencies and international organisations to support the mandate. 

10 October 2022 - NW2587

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What is the number of (a) criminal cases opened, (b) convictions achieved, (c) child abuse cases opened and (d) persons convicted of child abuse as a result of charges laid at each police station within the Uthekela District Municipality in the period 1 January 2021 to 31 December 2021; (2) what are the relevant details of the (a) specialised equipment and (b) rooms for use in the instances of child abuse reported at each police station within the Uthekela District Municipality in the period 1 January 2021 to 31 December 2021; (3) what are the details of the (a) holding cells available and (b) the number of usable holding cells at each police stations within the Uthukela District Municipality in the period 1 January 2021 to 31 December 2021?

Reply:

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10 October 2022 - NW3246

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of cases of corruption involving (i) School Governing Bodies and (ii) principals have been recorded over the past five years and (b) how is her department dealing with the issue raised?

Reply:

The information requested resides with the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) not the National Department of Basic Education. The Hon Member is therefore requested to direct the question to the Members of the Executive Councils (MECs) at the PEDs. 

10 October 2022 - NW3081

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, given the long-standing water supply issues in (a) Butterworth, (b) QwaQwa and (c) Hammanskraal and how municipal officials prefer the water supply contracts in order to benefit from the supply of water to communities, he has found it necessary to take over the water affairs of municipalities that have failed to provide water to their communities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) by what date does he intend to intervene to provide long-term sustainable solutions to the water problems in the specified municipalities?

Reply:

1.  The constitutional responsibility for providing water and sanitation services rests with local government. The Department of Water and Sanitation regulates how these services are provided, monitors and supports municipalities providing water services and has a duty to intervene where national norms and standards are not met.

As indicated in the recent Green Drop and Blue Drop assessments, Municipal water services are in decline in many municipalities and government’s constitutional obligation to progressively provide safe water and a healthy environment for everyone is being compromised. In many cases, water and sanitation infrastructure is in a critical state due to inadequate investment and maintenance.

As mandated by the Constitution and other relevant legislation, the DWS has developed a Water Services Improvement Programme (WSIP) to strengthen its support and intervention at municipal level.

The aim of the programme is to support municipalities and intervene more consistently and systematically to address water and sanitation service delivery challenges. The overall aim of this initiative is to guide, initiate and lead national government support and regulatory interventions to reverse the decline in the provision of water and sanitation services in all municipalities.

Interventions being implemented by the DWS in Qwaqwa, Butterworth and Hammanskraal of the DWS

Area of intervention

Nature of interventions

Qwaqwa

  • Since 2012 DWS has completed 16 projects to a total value of R524,759,353.05 in Maluti-a-Phofung LM, which includes the construction of the Sterkfontein WTW, raw water supply, bulk pipelines, reservoirs, upgrading of the Makwane WTW, drilling, and equipping of operational boreholes.
  • Furthermore, a directive has been issued to Bloemwater to intervene to:
    • Refurbish and Upgrade Wastewater Treatment (WWTWs) and Water Treatment Works (WTWs),
    • manage and supervise Operations and Maintenance (O&M) of water and sanitation infrastructure,
    • Develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP),
    • Undertake Feasibility Studies (FS), and Implementation Readiness Studies (IRS) for future projects to ensure sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation in all areas of Maluti-a-Phofung LM.
  • The DWS is actively involved in the developing and implementation of short, medium, and long-term solutions to alleviate the lack of water supply in the Maluti-A-Phofung Local Municipality.
  • Three (3) projects are currently funded through grants:
    • Upgrading of the Sterkfontein WTW (at 53% progress)
    • Refurbishment of the Fika Patso WTW (at 24% progress)
    • Construction of the reversal gravity pipeline in Qwaqwa (at 77% progress)
    • Replacement of pipeline and leak repairs in Tlholong (at 88% progress)
    • Drilling and equipping boreholes in Intabazwe (at 60% progress)
    • Construction of the pipeline from Comet to Ha-rankopane (at 77% progress)

Butterworth

  • In the case of Butterworth, the two dams supplying the town (Xilinxa and Gcuwa Wier) were dry due to drought and led to a water crisis, which was broken in January 2022. Both these dams were now full (100% as at 26 September 2022)
  • A long-term solution of augmenting raw water supply to Butterworth is being prioritised and funded under the Ngqamakwe Bulk Water Supply.

Hammanskraal

  • The Minister issued a notice of intention to intervene through Section 63 of Water Services Act in the City of Tshwane (CoT).
  • The City did not agree to the intervention but instead requested financial support to address the water and sanitation challenges.
  • The Department has informed the CoT that grant funding cannot fund water infrastructure in metropolitan municipalities. The CoT was advised to engage Human Settlement for additional Urban Settlement Development Grant (USDG) funding.

The Department had instituted legal action against the CoT for the pollution of water resources by the Rooiwaal Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTW). However, in a meeting held between the parties (DWS and CoT) on 27 September 2022, the parties agreed to have an amicable settlement on the matter where a detailed action plan will be agreed on and be a court settlement to ensure the prevention of the pollution and sustainable water supply to Hammanskraal in the medium to long term.

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10 October 2022 - NW2945

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 209 on 24 February 2022, what criteria, apart from academic qualifications, are used to determine whether a person has critical skills?

Reply:

I have published on 2 August 2022 an updated critical skills list for South Africa, showing what skills are in short supply across the country. The new list has added 39 new skills, building on top of the previous publication in February of this year.

The critical skills list falls under the Immigration Act, No. 13 of 2002 which is administered by the Department of Home Affairs and sets out the qualifications and skills deemed to be critical for the country in relation to an application for a critical skills work visa or permanent residence permit. An application for critical skills work visa or permanent residence permit needs to be part of the 140 skills identified in the critical skills list. The complete list can be found in the government gazette no. 47182 dated 2 August 2022.

Furthermore, Regulation 18(5) of the Immigration Act, prescribes that the following criteria be applied when determining whether a person has critical skills:

a) a confirmation, in writing, from the professional body, council or board recognised by SAQA in terms of section 13(1)(i) of the National Qualifications Framework Act, or any relevant government Department confirming the skills or qualifications of the applicant and appropriate post qualification experience;

b) if required by law, proof of application for a certificate of registration with the professional body, council or board recognised by SAQA in terms of section 13(1)(i) of the National Qualifications Framework Act; and

c) proof of evaluation of the foreign qualification by SAQA and translated by a sworn translator into one of the official languages of the Republic.

END

10 October 2022 - NW2906

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)In light of the fact that there are about 10 000 water stands with water meters in the backyards of villagers in Bushbuckridge installed in 2018, (a) what are the reasons that the water (i) does not reach the taps and (ii) billing does not take place after four years since installation, (b) on what date is the 62 km asbestos bulk water pipe going to be replaced with steel pipe to reduce asbestos poisoning, (c) what steps are being taken to prevent 75% of water treated by water treatment plant being stolen by farmers, entrepreneurs such as car washing businesses who are bridging air water valves and by 60% of residents vandalising asbestos bulk water supply pipe and (d) on what date is it envisaged that the residents can expect an end to water rationing and 4-day zeros per week;

Reply:

The Bushbuckridge villages have access to water through the Hoxane Water Treatment Works, Inyaka bulk water supply system and through boreholes. There are two boreholes, one of which has been decommissioned due to frequent vandalism.

(a) (i) The community does not have reliable access to water due to leakages caused by illegal connections, which results in the supply system not being able to cater for all villages. The municipality has implemented a rationing programme to ensure that all residents have access to water.

The water rationing programme has been communicated to all communities through ward councillors and any shutdowns that impact on the water supply are communicated timeously through the municipality’s communications systems.

(ii) The Bushbuckridge Local Municipality is currently in a process of data cleansing to verify all households where meters were installed for billing purposes. This process should be completed by the end of the current financial year so that billing can commence in the beginning of the next financial year (2022/2023). 

(b) The municipality is implementing a project to replace the asbestos pipeline with steel pipeline, it is anticipated that the project will be completed during the 2024/25.

(c) The Municipality is implementing its Water Conservation and Demand Management strategy (WCDM) and Water Services by-laws which are undergoing the process of gazetting. The municipality has initiated the procurement processes to appoint service providers.

The WCDM Strategy includes projects such as:

  • Installation of bulk flow meters to conduct water balance and to identify water loss hotspots
  • Purchase of leak detectors to detect leakages
  • Installation of reservoirs level controls valves to prevent reservoirs overflows
  • Installation of lockable valves chambers to prevent valves interferences, telemetry system to monitor pressures in the bulk network
  • Removal of illegal connections to reduce non-revenue water and improve water supply status

(d) The municipality is currently implementing a project to install an additional clear water pump at the Hoxane Water Treatment Plant which will increase the volumes pumped by the plant from 22 Ml/day to 31 Ml/day to the Ndonga Reservoir that supplies the villages. The Hoxani Bulk Water Supply Scheme project, which is due to commence at the beginning of 2023/24, will also improve water supply to the villages in Bushbuckridge when is completed.

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10 October 2022 - NW2463

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the State Security Agency was involved in any way in the burglary investigation into the Phala Phala farm; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how was it involved?

Reply:

No. The SSA derives its mandate from section 2 of the National Strategic Intelligence Act, 1994 (Act No 39 of 1994). This mandate does not cover the private residences of the President and thus the SSA had no involvement in the Phala Phala investigation; not before, nor after the alleged criminal acts that took place in February 2020.

10 October 2022 - NW3267

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of (a) arrests have been made with reference to combating fraudulent South African passports and (b) prosecutions have taken place in this regard in the (i) past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2022?

Reply:

(a) Since 2019 to date 45 people have been arrested; 10 officials and 35 members of the public.

(b)(i) In the past three financial years, 1 official has been prosecuted and a sanction of 8 years’ imprisonment imposed.

(b)(ii) 44 of the 45 cases are still pending in court.

END

10 October 2022 - NW2805

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to his indication in November 2019 that his department is working around the clock to ensure that the registration of a public-private partnership (PPP) for visa facilitation services occurs timeously, and in view of the fact that the contract with VFS Global was extended to December 2022 without going to tender for several years past the expiry of the original contract, what is the progress on registering the PPP; (2) with the current contract giving the specified company a monopoly on visa processing services and has seen several local companies and professionals that previously provided visa services out of business, what has he found to be the reason for the lack of political will to provide a visa facilitation service that benefits not only the international corporate, but also South African immigrations professionals as provided by a PPP model?

Reply:

1. The Department registered a PPP project with the National Treasury on the 14th of January 2020. The Project is allocated reference N138. The National Treasury through the Government Technical Advisory Component (GTAC) has been providing support and guidance to the Department.

2. Please provide us with evidence that there is lack of political will. The Department had already appointed a service provider (24 May 2022) through an open bidding process (Kelotlhoko Consulting Services) as a transaction advisor to conduct a feasibility study and PPP procurement for VISA and permit application centre services through a Public Private Partnership (PPP) for a period of three years. This appointment was part of the requirements of the PPP model. However, it came to the attention of the Department that the appointed service provider was convicted of money laundering under Case No 111/40/2022 at the Pretoria Specialised Commercial Crimes Court in that Mr Kgatitsoe (the owner) submitted fake invoices to the Fetakgomo Tubatse Local Municipality and the Department followed a process to cancel the contract. The Department has successfully cancelled the contract and will be commencing with a new competitive process to replace this contract. All service providers will be provided with an equal opportunity through the PPP process.

END

10 October 2022 - NW2646

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

With regard to the recent attach and robbery at the Kwaggafontein Police Station in Mpumalanga on 15 June 2022, what(a) total number of functional police members were (i) on duty at the time the incident took place, (ii) armed and (iii) on duty in the Customer Service Centre and (b) physical access control measures are available at the specified police station?

Reply:

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07 October 2022 - NW2774

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With regard to an article on Fin24 on 7 June 2022, regarding the potentially failed sale of Hulamin (details furnished), what were the non-cash requirements that his department and/or the Industrial Development Zone attached to the deal; (2) whether he bears responsibility for potentially collapsing the deal because of the demands which the buyer was unable and/or unwilling to accede to; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The sale by the IDC of shares that it holds in a company is based on a number of considerations, including whether such sale is warranted given the IDC strategic mandate. The discussions between the IDC and the investor covered matters that are covered by the IDC mandate, including working capital commitments, market access commitments including on exports, transformation, incorporation of minority protection rights and development of industrial opportunities in South Africa, including in green technologies. The shareholder representative supported the approach of the IDC in respect of securing appropriate terms on these matters that would further the IDC mandate.
  2. We are advised by the IDC that the prospective buyer cited their reason for withdrawing from the deal as the weakening global economic conditions, which have led them as a company to reconsider their investment decisions.

-End-

07 October 2022 - NW3379

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1)What are reasons for the mine slimes dam burst in Jagersfontein; (2) whether it has been found that the burst was an accident and/or a result of negligence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether negligence was found to have contributed to the burst; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on whose part was negligence found and (b) what has been done to hold responsible persons accountable?

Reply:

(1) The Department does not have the authority to regulate the processing of residue deposits at the Jagersfontein dam and thus cannot investigate the cause of the accident. This is as a result of the De Beers court judgment over Jagersfontein mine residue deposits (De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd v Ataqua Mining (Pty) Ltd & others, case no. 3215/06, Free State Provincial Division, 13 December 2007).

(2) Department of Mineral Resources and Energy will not be in a position to provide response on the matter which should be responded to by the Departments of Labour, Forestry, Fisheries, Environmental Affairs, and Water and Sanitation since they have a regulatory jurisdiction over certain of the operations of Jagersfontein Developments (PTY) Ltd.

(3) Please refer to (1)

 

03 October 2022 - NW3187

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

I do not discuss my diary and political activities with those deemed not to be relevant on the matter. The member is requested to explain the relevance of the question to my work as a Minister.

03 October 2022 - NW3136

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to her reply to question 2638 on 6 September2022, and with further reference to the South African Consulate situated 845 3rd Avenue, New York, what (a) total number of (i) staff personnel and/ or delegates are working in the office and (ii) floors and/or offices are included within the rental and (b) is the (i) total square footage of the office and (ii) reason and/or justification for the high rental figure of almost R2,7 million per month?

Reply:

A) What total number of (i) staff personnel and/ or delegates are working in the office and (ii) floors and/or offices are included within the rental?

(i) The total staff establishment of transferred staff and locally recruited personnel for the two (2) missions occupying the premises is 67.

(ii) The missions occupy two (2) floors on these premises. They are occupying the 9th and 10th floor respectively.

B) What is the (i) total square footage of the office and (ii) reason and/or justification for the high rental figure of almost R2,7 million per month?

(i) The total square footage for the two and (ii) reason and/or justification for the high rental figure of almost R2,7 million per month?

(i) The total square footage for the two Missions is 51 843 square feet, and

(ii) The building wherein the Missions are now situated is within close proximity to the United Nations and the transit system. These are critical considerations with regard to the accessibility and mobility requirements of the Missions’ operations.

03 October 2022 - NW2785

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of (a) all contracts awarded to training and development service providers, (b) the breakdown of costs for training and development services in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years, (c) the number of persons trained, (d) the NQF level of the training attained, (e) the certificates awarded and (f) the amounts spent on travel, venues and catering from the cost centre; if not, what is the position in this regard: if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Contracts awarded to training and development service providers:

The Department has not awarded any contracts to training and development service providers. When a training and development request is received, a RFQ is issued to Supply Chain Management to obtain quotations which are sourced as per National Treasury requirements for service providers through the Central Supplier Database through National Treasury.

b) The breakdown of costs for training and development services in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years is tabulated below:

Description

Amount Spent

2021-22 Financial Year

Bursaries

R1 237 000.00

NQF aligned Training and Development

R346 820.49

Non NQF aligned Training and Development

R567 238.51

Internship

R849 781.68

Total spent

R3 000 840.68

2022-23 Financial Year

Bursaries

R117 791.00

NQF aligned Training and Development

R0.00

Non NQF aligned Training and Development

R390 193.00

Total spent

R507 984.00

c) The number of persons trained:

The number of staff members trained in the Department for:

  • 2021-22 financial year amounts to 185 staff members for NQF and Non-NQF aligned training; and
  • 2022-23 financial year amounts to 34 staff members trained for Non-NQF training from 01 April to 05 September 2022.

d) The NQF level of the training attained is tabulated below

NQF Training and Development Interventions for staff :2021-22

NQF Training and Development

NQF Level

Intervention

Number of staff members

NQF levels 1-3

SHE Representative training

25

NQF levels 1-3

Fire Fighting training

25

NQF levels 1-3

Evacuation Marshal training

25

NQF levels 4-6

Assessor training

1

NQF levels 4-6

Moderator training

1

Qualifications

NQF level 6

BA in Public Administration and Communication Facilitation

1

NQF level 8

BCom Honours: Industrial & Organisational Psychology

1

 

BCom Business Management

1

 

BCom Media Studies

1

 

BCom Integrated Organizational Communication

1

 

B-Tech Project Management

1

 

B-Tech Forensic Investigation

1

 

Postgraduate Diploma Management

2

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration

1

 

Bachelor of Law

1

NQF level 9

Master’s in Business Leadership

1

 

Master’s in Business Administration

2

 

Masters in Urban Infrastructure Design and Management

1

e) The certificates awarded to staff:

Certificates awarded to staff members for 2021-22 and 2022-23 financial years are:

NQF, Non-NQF Training and Development Interventions and Qualifications obtained by staff for 2021-22 and 2022-23 financial years

NQF Training and Development

NQF/ Non Level

Intervention

Number of staff members

Certificate as per Programme

None NQF training

Executive Education Programme

2

Certificate as per Qualifications

NQF level 6

BA in Public Administration and Communication Facilitation

1

NQF level 8

BCom Honours: Industrial & Organisational Psychology

1

 

BCom Business Management

1

 

BCom Media Studies

1

 

BCom Integrated Organizational Communication

1

 

B-Tech Project Management

1

 

B-Tech Forensic Investigation

1

 

Postgraduate Diploma Management

2

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration

1

 

Bachelor of Law

1

NQF level 9

Master’s in Business Leadership

1

 

Master’s in Business Administration

2

 

Masters in Urban Infrastructure Design and Management

1

f) The amounts spent on travel, venues and catering from the cost centre:

The amount spent on travel, venues and catering for:

  • 2021-22 financial cycle amounted to R38 400.00; and
  • 2022-23 financial cycle (01 April to 05 September) amounts to R0.00.

03 October 2022 - NW2920

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) How does her department plan to ensure that it fulfils an inclusive and balanced multilateral trading system and reform of the international debt architecture, as alluded to in her department ‘s Framework Document on South Africa’s National Interest and its advancement in a Global Environment and (b) what does the reform of the international architecture entail; (2) Whether the Republic has implemented the reform of debt in the past when negotiating for loans on an international scale; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) does it seek to change through the reform? NW3546E

Reply:

1. Since the pandemic, South Africa has played a more prominent role as an official bilateral creditor and G20 member to provide constructive solutions to the debt challenges on the African continent, first through its participation in the G20 Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI) that was in force from May 2020 until December 2021, and now as vice-chair of Zambia’s official creditor committee (OCC) under the G20 Common Framework for Debt Treatment beyond the DSSI. South Africa has supported the Common Framework which was established in November 2020 as a great improvement in the international debt architecture as it involves the first ever formal coordination between the G20 and the Paris Club creditors on debt treatments for the 73 Low Income Countries (LICs) eligible for the DSSI. The framework is to ensure broad participation of creditors, including the private sector, with fair burden sharing to ensure timely debt resolutions.

South Africa has agreed to become a prospective member of the Paris Club this year, after being an ad hoc participant since 2015. The Paris Club consists of a group of officials from major creditor countries whose role is to find co-ordinated and sustainable solutions to the payment difficulties experienced by debtor countries. South Africa’s enhanced status in the Paris Club provides it with the opportunity to become a full member of the Paris Club within a set period or revert to its former status as ad hoc participant.

The reform of the international debt architecture entails an end objective of broader multilateral cooperation in addressing sovereign debt issues and shifting away from plurilateral arrangements.

2. South Africa previously participated in some of the Paris Club debt treatments and restructuring processes in the 1990s. Also, South Africa participated in the Seychelles restructuring in 2015, during which it became an ad hoc member to the Paris Club. South Africa has credit exposure to Zambia who requested a debt treatment in 2021 from its creditors. This year, South Africa became vice-chair of Zambia’s official creditor committee (OCC) under the G20 Common Framework for Debt Treatment beyond the DSSI, with China and France co-chairing the OCC. The OCC brings together Zambia’s official bilateral creditors to negotiate the parameters of a debt treatment for the country. South Africa’s participation in international debt treatments and restructurings are guided by its status as an African creditor that seeks to implement fair solutions to the debt challenges experienced on the African continent. South Africa has exposure as a creditor through loans provided by its Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) on the continent.

30 September 2022 - NW3084

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to combating fraudulent South African passports, what total number of (a) arrests have been made in this regard in the (i) past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2022 and (b) prosecutions have taken place?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

30 September 2022 - NW2950

Profile picture: Joseph, Mr D

Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What is the total amount paid annually to the security company at the Sarah Baartman Centre of Remembrance in the Hankey district in the Cacadu District Municipality in the Eastern Cape in the (a) 2018-19, (b) 2020-21 and (c) 2021-22 financial years; (2) what is the (a) name of the security company that has been appointed in the 2022-23 financial year and (b) total cost of the contract; (3) whether her department and/or any of the previous contractors own the unprotected building plans in one of the rooms at the Sarah Baartman Centre; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has informed me as follows:

(a) None

(b) None

(c) R 415 805,75

(2)

(a) Capital Ship Trading 605 (PTY) LTD

(b) The contract is a rate-based two (02) year term contract which commenced on 26/04/2021 for the protection of vacant state property within the jurisdiction of the PE Regional Office. The monthly rate for a single 12-hour shift per guard is R 13 860, 19. See the table below for security payments from April 2018 to September 2022.

INVOICE DATE

AUTHORISED DATE

AMOUNT

2021/11/15

2021/11/16

R83 161,15

2021/11/15

2021/11/16

R83 161,15

2021/11/15

2021/11/16

R83 161,15

2022/02/18

2022/02/21

R 83 161,15

2022/02/18

2022/02/21

R 83 161,15

 Payments Made During 2021/2022 Financial Year 

R415 805,75

INVOICE DATE

AUTHORISED DATE

AMOUNT

2022/04/05

2022/04/05

R83 161,15

2022/04/11

2022/04/11

R83 161,15

2022/05/10

2022/05/11

R83 161,15

2022/06/20

2022/06/27

R83 161,15

2022/07/11

2022/07/12

R83 161,15

2022/08/02

2022/08/03

R83 161,15

2022/08/31

2022/09/01

R83 161,15

 Payments Made During 2022/2023 Financial Year 

 

R582 128,05

(3) These are site plans issued to the previous contractor that was left behind when the site was vacated. These plans will be replaced with an updated set of plans when a new contractor is appointed to complete the project.

30 September 2022 - NW3103

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What total number of (a) permanent and (b) contract workers are employed in the horticulture section of the Western Cape regional office; (2) which properties in the Western Cape are serviced by the specified section; (3) whether any vehicles are available for use by the section to perform their functions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

  1. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has informed me there are 111 permanent workers and zero contract workers employed in the horticulture section of the Western Cape regional office.
  2. The horticultural section services 58 properties.
  3. Yes. One car, one 8-seater bus, one long wheel base bakkie and one 4x4 bakkie – it is important to note that this section also has access to other vehicles as and when required.

30 September 2022 - NW3070

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What total number of farm worker cases of the (a) Unemployment Insurance Fund, (b) Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and (c) Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act were recorded and/or attended to successfully in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

a) There are 90724 cases registered by UIF during the financial year 2020/2021, and 68 669 cases were paid.

During the Financial Year 2021/22, 116250 cases were registered and 91034 paid.

In the period of 2020-2021

The Total Number of Farm worker cases for:

UIF

17

CCMA

33

COIDA

6

30 September 2022 - NW2911

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1) Whether, with reference to the Women’s Month Roundtable where he pointed out that 10% of all rape cases take place in universities, his department has regulations in place in terms of processes and procedures that serve as guidelines on how universities deal with Gender-Based Violence and rape cases; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details thereof; (2) whether his department follows up on cases reported to the university to ensure that the processes it follows are equitable and sensitive to victims; if not, why not; if so, what practices of accountability are there from his department to ensure that cases are handled correctly; (3) whether his department offers any legal and/or psychological support to victims going through university-led legal processes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Addressing the occurrence of GBV forms part of integrated Gender Equality functions in the Department of Higher Education and Training (the Department), under the umbrella of Social Inclusion across all branches.  Every branch, in this case the University Education and Planning, Policy and Strategy branches each have unique responsibilities.  These include for the University Education branch:

  • Create the enabling environment, coordinate, support institutions in the implementation of social inclusion in the PSET system;
  • Manage the institutional policy environment; and
  • Manage and support implementation programmes within institutions.

The Planning, Policy and Strategy branch is responsible for:

  • Develop and manage the enabling policy environment (including sector policies, guidelines, standards, protocols and tools) for social inclusion in the PSET system;
  • Support (where needed) implementation branches in the implementation of Social Inclusion and Equity;
  • Collate information from Branches and monitor the implementation of social inclusion policies and programmes in the PSET system;
  • Report on the implementation of social inclusion in the PSET system;
  • Liaise with Chapter 9 institutions, other Departments; and
  • Report on national and international obligations.

(1) In order to create the enabling environment to address GBV and rape cases in Universities the Department has published the Policy Framework to address Gender-based Violence in the Post-School Education and Training System (Government Gazette No 43575, 31 July 2020). The purpose of the Policy Framework is to create an enabling environment for the eradication of GBV and instil respect, protection, promotion and fulfilment of human rights as enshrined in the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act No 108 of 1996). The Policy Framework intends to assist PSET institutions to address the occurrence of GBV and to provide a monitoring instrument to the Department to assess the implementation of the Policy Framework.

The Policy Framework aims to:

  • Conceptualise GBV and define its manifestation in terms of existing laws and policies;
  • Detail the international and national regulatory framework compelling institutional and departmental responses to GBV;
  • Provide guidance around the structures, mechanisms and processes that PSET institutions must put in place to address GBV;
  • Compel PSET institutions to both create awareness of GBV policies and prevent incidents of GBV; and
  • Set out a framework for oversight of the DHET and PSET institutions’ development and implementation of policy.

The Policy Framework has 3 strategic objectives, including:

  • Create an enabling environment in the Department and PSET institutions to ensure the effective implementation of the Policy Framework, actions and programmes;
  • Promote the safety of all students and staff by putting in place comprehensive prevention and awareness programmes intended to raise the importance of policies and services addressing GBV, as well as other measures aimed at preventing incidents of GBV; and
  • Provide comprehensive support, assistance to victims and refer them appropriately to specialised support and assistance in line with the National Instructions, National Directives, List of Designated Health Establishments and Additional Services directives under the Sexual Offences and Related Matters Act (SORMA) (Act 32 of 2007). 

It is the responsibility of PSET institutions to implement the Policy Framework with the support of the Department and HIGHER HEALTH. 

Following the release of the Policy Framework and as part of its work, the Ministerial Task Team on GBV in Universities held a series of engagements with university communities across various institutions.  Amongst others the aim was to establish how universities respond to sexual harassment and GBV and harm, and what support is needed from the Department to enable effective implementation of the Policy Framework.

It has been established that not all universities have sufficient means to deal with GBV, and the Department and HIGHER HEALTH aim to support these universities and campuses in addressing the problem. The Ministerial Task Team, as soon as the report is released. will advise on areas requiring improvement in institutional responses to GBV violence and sexual harassment and appropriate levels of support needed for the implementation of the National Policy Framework to address gender-based violence by universities.

The Department furthermore plays an oversight role, monitoring institutions to ensure that they take full responsibility for addressing GBV on their campuses.

The Department supports institutions in implementation, monitors the implementation of the Policy Framework and is now finalising the Social inclusion Review and Implementation Model (SI-RIM) that is a mechanism to provide information on what to include in addressing GBV and also for reporting purposes.

The Department, HIGHER HEALTH, in collaboration with several Departments (such as Health, Justice and Constitutional Development, South African Police Service (SAPD) and others), experts and institutions developed institutional implementation Guidelines and supporting protocols and standards for Institutions to address GBV. 

HIGHER HEALTH, through the Department has furthermore released a set of instruments that will strengthen the realisation of the Policy Framework. These instruments include directives to all institutions and Management to put the necessary infrastructure towards a comprehensive response on cases of sexual and gender misconduct, rape, sexual assaults across all our campuses. The procedural guidelines and protocols on rape, code of ethics ensure that reporting of cases, disciplinary systems, safeguarding evidence, provision of rape kits, psychosocial support services and survivor friendly infrastructure is developed across campuses.

The Department is supporting institutions to develop and implement policies and protocols on GBV.  All universities have measures in place to raise awareness, and offer guidance and advice on GBV related matters. These include, but are not limited to:  workshops or presentations during orientation weeks and during various parts of the year for students; roadshows; training; production and dissemination of brochures and other literature for the university community; and information on institutional websites. In addition to these initiatives, a large number of students have completed a curriculum on GBV prevention and mitigation via HIGHER HEALTH, empowering them with knowledge and understanding of GBV and related matters. Higher Health is the Department’s implementing agency for student health, wellness and development in the post-school sector.

(2)  The Department through HIGHER HEALTH follows up on cases reported to the university to ensure that the processes it follows are equitable and sensitive to victims.  

HIGHER HEALTH provides psycho-social support services through two main modalities: (1) through the HIGHER HEALTH toll-free helpline, and (2) through interventions provided by counselling and clinical psychologists. HIGHER HEALTH is also providing support to victims through trained mentors and they are also running a comprehensive awareness programme through several focussed campus activities, campus radio programmes and peer support mechanisms.

HIGER HEALTH works closely with psychosocial support structures on and off-campus.  Victims are supported on campus through trained mentors and staff, as well as specialist support personnel such as counselling and clinical psychologists.  They also assist victims through the reporting processes and refer them to specialist psychosocial support off-campus.  Thorough follow-up is being made to support victims throughout the process of reporting and rehabilitation.

HIGHER HEALTH is implementing a comprehensive and integrated programme promoting health and wellbeing of students across South Africa’s public universities and TVET colleges and provide on-campus support to PSET institutions in 7 priority areas:

This year, over 14 000 students accessed the various HIGHER HEALTH models of psychosocial support. Academic stress and anxiety (30%), general stress and substance abuse (22%) depression and suicide (18%) and sexual, physical and emotional abuse (19%) present the main reasons for accessing support care.

HIGHER HEALTH has set up campus and community radio stations to engage young students routinely on matters related to Sexual and Gender Based Violence and mental health as a matter of priority. There is also HIGHER HEALTH's 24-hour toll-free helpline available in all 11 official languages.  The line offers health, wellness and psychosocial risk assessment toolkits for early screening, empowerment and referral related to gender-based violence, mental health, HIV, TB and other matters.

(3)  Through HIGHER HEALTH he Department offers legal and/or psychological support to victims going through reporting and legal processes. Universities also have their own systems and processes to support students and staff in these areas.

30 September 2022 - NW3224

Profile picture: Pambo, Mr V

Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) Who is responsible for the enforcement of the mandatory Code of Practice for Mine Residue Deposits at a mine, with particular reference to the monitoring, maintenance, risk assessment and disaster prevention and recovery for tailings dams and (b) with reference to the Jagersfontein dam, what work had been done to monitor the maintenance of the dam to minimise disasters such as the one that happened at the Jagersfontein mine in Free State on 11 September 2022?

Reply:

a) The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy, is responsible for the enforcement of the respective legal provisions in the mining sector.

b) The court in the De Beers judgment over Jagersfontein mine residue deposits (De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd v Ataqua Mining (Pty) Ltd & others, case no. 3215/06, Free State Provincial Division, 13 December 2007) held that historical mine residue deposits (those created before the coming into operation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MPRDA) on the 01st of May 2004) are not minerals as contemplated in the MPRDA and such they are not regulated under provisions of the MPRDA. The processing of historical mine residue deposits does not constitute mining and the area where they are situated is not classified as a mine. This was again confirmed by the court judgment in the case of Ekapa Minerals (Pty) Ltd & Others vs Lucky Seekoei & Others (2057/2016) [2017] ZANCHC 5 (13 January 2017). Consequently, the Department did not have the authority to regulate the activities (including health and safety) in the processing of mine residue deposits at the Jagersfontein dam. However, the Department is fully committed to providing its technical and other expertise in the investigation of the accident by the relevant government authorities.

30 September 2022 - NW2852

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) How is the Government taking care of the vulnerable people in financial difficulties in accessing electricity; (2) whether the Government intends to take steps to prioritise the roll out subsidised prepaid meters for Eskom-direct customers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the Department of Public Enterprises.

30 September 2022 - NW3292

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

In view of the burst in the Jagersfontein tailings dam on 11 September 2022, the Merriespruit tailings dam disaster in 1994 and the Bafokeng tailings dam failure in 1974, what regulatory oversight and enforcement measures are in place for (a) major and smaller mining companies and (b) retreat operations with regard to the maintenance and monitoring of tailings dams?

Reply:

The Department enforces compliance in the mining sector through the following legislation:

a) Mine Health and Safety Act, 1996 (Act 29 of 1996, as amended),

b) Guideline for the Compilation of a Mandatory Code of Practice on Mine Residue Deposits (issued by the Chief Inspector of Mines),

However, the Department does not have the authority to regulate the processing of residue deposits at the Jagersfontein dam. This is as a result of the De Beers court judgment over Jagersfontein residue deposits (De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd v Ataqua Mining (Pty) Ltd & others, case no. 3215/06, Free State Provincial Division, 13 December 2007). The judgement held that historical mine residue deposits (those created before the coming into operation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MPRDA) on the 01st of May 2004) are not minerals as contemplated in the MPRDA and such they are not regulated under provisions of the MPRDA. The processing of historical mine residue deposits does not constitute mining and the area where they are situated is not classified as a mine. This was again confirmed by the court judgment in the case of Ekapa Minerals (Pty) Ltd & Others vs Lucky Seekoei & Others (2057/2016) [2017] ZANCHC 5 (13 January 2017). The Department is fully committed to providing its technical and other expertise regarding mining related matters to the relevant government authorities.

30 September 2022 - NW3003

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he and/or his department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr M S Mabika with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

All Policy review documents and /or any other government policy document developed by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) follows policy development processes as prescribed by the legislature.Reviewed policy documents and /or any other government policy document developed follows a consultative process and are also gazetted if required for public comments and are accessible by the public, interested and affected parties, including by private or external structures or structures of any political party.

30 September 2022 - NW3223

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) number of fraudulent marriages has his department reversed since 1 January 2022 and (b) are the details of the steps that his department has taken to end fraudulent marriage certification?

Reply:

a) Five hundred and fifty-three (553) fraudulent marriages have been finalised since 1 January 2022.

b) Due to the number of fraudulent marriages reported every year, the department has implemented measures that have largely contributed in reducing the number of fraudulent marriages, as follows:

  • Introduction a new marriage register form (DHA-30) with requires a photo and thumbprint of the couples for verification purposes.
  • The Department requires prospective couples to make an appointment with nearest front office to verify the marital status and to subject themselves for brief interviews prior to registration of the marriage.
  • Couples are also advised and forewarned that marriage is a legally binding contract and that they should be fully aware of the consequences. Couples are thereby encouraged to seek legal advice regarding the benefits and disadvantages of accepting marriage, regardless of it being to a foreigner, as fraudulent marriages are prevalent mainly with foreign nationals marrying South Africans for convenience purposes.
  • On the day of the marriage a couple must present the following documents to the person officiating the marriage ceremony:
  • Identity documents (for each person getting married)
  • If a foreign national is marrying a South African citizen, the non-citizen should present a valid passport as well as well as a completed BI-31 Form (Declaration for the Purpose of Marriage, Letter of no impediment to confirm that he/she is not married in country of origin)
  • If the marriage is for a minor (a person under the age of 18 years), written consent is needed in the form of DHA32 by both parents/ legal guardian or form DHA34 from the Commissioner of Child Welfare or a judge. In the case where the marriage is between minors under the ages of 18 for boys or 15 for girls, written consent from the Minister of Home Affairs will also be required
  • If any of the persons who are getting married are divorced, then the final decree of divorce should be furnished.
  • If any of the persons who are getting married are widowed, the deceased spouse’s death certificate must be submitted.

END

 

30 September 2022 - NW2998

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he and/or his department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr E J Marais with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) and its precursor, the Department of Science and Technology (DST) have shared policy documents and policy review documents with structures outside of government during the past five years. Examples of such policy and policy review documents are given below:

  • The 2019 White Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation (STI)
  • The 2020 Ministerial Review of the Higher Education, Science, Technology and Institutional Landscape (HESTIIL Review)
  • The Draft 2022 Science, Technology and Innovation Decadal Plan

In addition, policies and reviews are regularly made available on the DSI Website where these can be accessed widely. Finally, when the DSI organises science engagements, conferences (for instance the upcoming World Science Forum to be hosted in South Africa) and exhibitions of South African science and innovation advances and technological progress, copies of policies and other documents relevant to the topic under discussion, are also provided to the attendees.

a) The copies of the documents referred to above are attached to this reply.

b) It is the mandate of the DSI to steer the national system of innovation (NSI) in South Africa. For the NSI to function optimally the flow of information across South African society is critical. Innovation is driven by the private sector, with the role of government being to create and enabling environment for innovation and to set the regulatory parameters for innovation-related activity in the NSI. For instance, the government provides financial support to undertake research linked to the national priorities and global opportunities for economic growth for instance in the Digital and the Circular Economies. The government further supports the necessary education and skills development, and the acquisition and maintenance of knowledge and innovation infrastructure to help South African research organisations and universities compete on the global stage. However, because of fiscal strain, the government cannot fund all of the research and education needs of South Africa. Funding is also derived from investments in the South African NSI by private sector firms, and foreign governments. The private sector is the main driver of innovation performance in the country, and the government needs to ensure that it responds to the needs of industry and society in developing policies and regulations, for instance proposed procurement of locally developed technologies and business incentives to stimulate innovation in South Africa.

Therefore, it is necessary to involve all of the NSI actors (academia, industry, government and civil society, including labour) in the development of science and innovation policies. It is for these purposes that policy reviews and policy documents are regularly shared with stakeholders such as the following:

  • Business associations (for instance the Manufacturing Circle and the Minerals Council South Africa);
  • Universities (for instance through USAf, Universities South Africa and the Deputy Vice-Chancellors: Research of South African universities);
  • Public research organisations (for instance the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research and the Medical Research Council, as well as the Committee of Heads of Research and Technology Organisations, COHORT);
  • Foreign governments (for instance through the British Council, aid organisations and multilateral organisations such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD);
  • Civil society organisations (for instance through the South African Local Government Association, SALGA, the Engineering Council of South Africa, ECSA; and activist non-governmental organisations such as Section 27 in the health field), and finally
  • Labour organisations (for instance through NEDLAC).

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

The Department submits policy documents to stakeholders within and outside of government as part of the consultation process.  The relevant policies are:

  1. The Recognition of Prior Learning Coordination Policy (2016);
  2. Articulation Policy for the Post-School Education and Training System of South Africa (2017);
  3. The National Skills Development Plan (NSDP) (2019);
  4. The SETA Landscape’ (2019); and
  5. Skills Strategy to support Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP)’ (2022).

The Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Coordination Policy provides a strong enabling policy environment for the further development and implementation of RPL across the Post -School Education and Training System (PSET), and across all levels of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). It guides the implementation of RPL, especially concerning the roles and functions of the Department, the South African Qualifications Framework (SAQA), the Quality Councils, the national coordinating mechanism, and the funding mechanisms for RPL implementation.

The Articulation Policy establishes the overarching conceptual structure, principles, and policy statements to support the implementation of credible approaches to articulation within the South African PSET system.

Prior to the publication of these policies in a gazette, SAQA, the Quality Councils, and other relevant stakeholders were consulted as they have a role to play in the implementation of RPL and Articulation.  

The RPL Policy is currently under review and consultations with SAQA, and the Quality Councils were held through meetings including the Chief Executive Committees (CEO) meetings. An online consultative workshop on the Review of the RPL Coordination Policy took place with stakeholders including government; universities; Private Higher Education Institutions; Universities South Africa; SAQA; Quality Councils; Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs); Professional Bodies; DHET Regional Offices; Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET); and Community Education and Training (CET) Colleges.

The overarching purpose of the National Skills Development Plan (NSDP) is to build the capability of South African citizens through the provision of quality education and skills development thereby contributing to economic growth, employment creation and social development in South Africa.

The New SETA landscape was ushered in on 1 April 2020 by the NSDP and the re-establishment of the SETAs by the Department. In this new dispensation, the role of the SETA’s has been streamlined and re-focussed in order to strengthen their ability to successfully contribute towards the achievement of the NSDP outcomes.

The Skills Strategy has been designed to ensure that skills are available to support the implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP). The strategy identifies the skills implications of the ERRP and outlines ways in which the PSET system, together with other key role-players, will ensure that the skills required to implement this plan are available.

The Department consulted with National Skills Authority (NSA) and social partners at the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC) since these stakeholders have an interest in Skills Development Act and related policy documents. Such consultations were conducted to solicit further inputs since the National Skills Development Plan (NSDP), SETA Landscape and ERRP have implications for Organised Labour, Organised Business and Community Constituency.

30 September 2022 - NW3107

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) What (a) total number of (i) Directors-General (DGs) and (ii) Heads of Department (HODs) are currently serving in an acting capacity as at 1 June 2022 and (b) is the breakdown of the specified total number in each (i) national and (ii) provincial department in each case;

Reply:

Find here: Reply

30 September 2022 - NW2936

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What is the status of the boards of the (a) Acacia Park, (b) Laboria Park and (c) Pelican Park Parliamentary Villages, (2) whether each board comprises the requisite number of members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the boards have met the threshold of (a) board and (b) resident meetings since 1 January 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Parliamentary Villages Management Board was appointed by the Minister on 26 November 2022

(a) The following Members represent Acacia Park;

  • Hon H April, MP
  • Hon B Tshwete, MP
  • Hon T Letsie, MP
  • Mr G Kobo, Sessional Official

(b) The following Members represent Laboria Park;

  • Hon J Manganye, MP. The Member replaced the late Hon Nkosi, MP, who was the Laboria Park residents committee, chairperson.
  • Hon R Semenya, MP
  • Hon N Gantsho, MP
  • Mr M Ndara, Sessional Official

(c) The following Members represent Pelican Park;

  • Hon N Mvana, MP
  • Hon P Mahlo, MP
  • Hon Lesoma, MP

(2) Acacia and Laboria Park parliamentary villages are fully constituted. However, Pelican Park is not fully constituted as there is a vacancy for a sessional official.

(3)

(a) No, plans are afoot to convene a Board meeting at the beginning of October 2022, depending on the availability of Board Members.

The previous board appointed on 31 July 2020 met its threshold in that meetings were held as follows, 16 September 2020, 23 March 2021, 01 April 2021 and 07 June 2021.

(b) According to Rules, Conditions and General information, there is no threshold for residents' meetings.

30 September 2022 - NW3264

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What actions are taken against mining companies that have failed to rehabilitate the disused mines according to the original agreement entered into between the State and such mining companies?

Reply:

The Department oversee the rehabilitation of disused mines that are owner less. It should be indicated the pace and the rate at which rehabilitation of the owner-less mines are carried out is largely informed by the allocation of funds from Treasury. It is common knowledge that the allocated funds remain in adequate to address the existing backlog of operations.

In respect of the mines with owners, administrative processes are followed in that mines are issued with legal notices to carry out rehabilitation as per the approved Environmental Authorization or approved Environmental Management Programme. It should be indicated that where there are challenges relate to areas that are already rehabilitated (in accordance with the commitments outlined as per Environmental Authentications or approved Environmental Management Programme) and are reopened by illegal miners (who are undocumented migrants). Rehabilitation of such area follows after the conclusion of the criminal enforcement process.

 

 

30 September 2022 - NW3171

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What amount was paid to the facilities management service that provided services to the Lindela Repatriation Centre from 1 April 2021 to 31 January 2022, (b) what procurement process was undertaken to contract a facilities management service provider on 31 January 2022 when the contract of Enviromongz expired, (c) who was the successful service provider that was appointed and (d) what is the (i) duration and (ii) value of the contract?

Reply:

(a) The total amount for the indicated period from 1 April 2021 to 31 January 2022 was R77,708,123.

(b) The process followed was an open one at the beginning with the advertisement of the Request for Qualification (RFQ) on 14 May 2021 which closed on 18 June 2021.The Bid Evaluation Committee (BEC) made a recommendation to the Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC) on 21 October 2021, in relation to the bidder which complied with the requirements and the proposal was approved.

The process then assumed a closed format with the Request for Proposals (RFP) circulated to the shortlisted bidders. The closing dates for the submission of costing was 14 December 2021. At the conclusion of the evaluation process, the contract offer was made to the successful bidder on 18 January 2022 and which was accepted on 19 January 2022.

(c) Enviromongz Projects (Pty) Ltd

(d)(i) The contract is for 60 months from 1 February 2022

(d)(ii) The value is R51,886,730.83 per annum

END

 

 

30 September 2022 - NW2913

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What were the outcomes and relevant details of the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) lifestyle audits of senior officials in her department; (2) whether there has been any official red flagged by the SIU; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how does her department intend to recoup funds from officials identified as having engaged in corrupt activities?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure informed me the final report is being compiled for the Phase 1 SIU lifestyle audit project. Phase 1 of the lifestyle audits is focused on salary levels 14 and above. During this first phase of lifestyle audits, 66 of the DPWI’s senior management personnel were subjected to lifestyle audits per circular no 03/221 TAU from DPSA. The draft reports are currently being reviewed, and follow-up areas are being identified. The report will be submitted to the Minister as soon as the Phase 1 report has been finalised.

(2) Several individuals have been red-flagged, and these red flags are being followed up to ensure a fair evaluation of the possible risk. Of great concern is that 11 officials did not submit any of the requested documentation, whilst another one submitted their documents after the final SIU deadline, meaning that 12 officials did not comply and could not be assessed. All of these individuals have been red-flagged by the SIU. They will be dealt with in line with the DPWI disciplinary policy, referred for further investigation and reported to DPSA per the lifestyle audit procedure.

30 September 2022 - NW2918

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to the comments by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that the Government, in support of or collaboration with his department, is tackling illegal migration and alluded to meetings between the Republic, Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Botswana, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Lesotho, what are the full and relevant details of the (a) plan to effectively deal with illegal migration and (b) meetings held with the Southern African Development Community and other African leaders in relation to illegal migration; (2) whether such meetings will be held with leaders of other countries such as Pakistan, Bangladesh, Somalia, Ethiopia and others; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)&(2) The Republic of South Africa does have diplomatic relations with the above mentioned countries and many more. There are regular bi-lateral engagements with those countries at senior official and ministerial level. The details of when these meetings will be held will be communicated prior to their commencement with a communique released afterwards explaining the issues discussed and agreements reached.

END

30 September 2022 - NW2850

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

In light of the fact that Eskom customer services offices are closed nationally since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, on what date is it envisaged that the (a) offices will reopen to the public and (b) operational issues and services are improved, namely reporting structures such as Alfred Chat bot and email that do not generate valid reference numbers and timeous responses?

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the Department of Public Enterprises.

30 September 2022 - NW2851

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) How is Eskom working with provincial governments to solve the energy supplied to pensioners, indigent and unemployed residents to be converted from conventional to prepaid electricity; (2) whether his department, working with the provincial governments, has plans for residents with arrears and disconnections to be rehabilitated and provided with access to prepaid supply as a matter of urgency; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3448E

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the Department of Public Enterprises.

30 September 2022 - NW3008

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether she and/or her Department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Ms E R J Spies with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) informed me that no policy review document or any other government policy document has been submitted by the Department to structures outside of Government unless such was part of a policy development process in line with the approved Policy framework where a stakeholder matrix was developed with key stakeholders identified in advance in terms of their participation and contribution in the development of policy.

The Department follows government-based policy development processes. When a policy is developed and ready for consultation with stakeholders, the process follows approval from the Accounting Officer and/or the Executive Authority before engaging stakeholders. The Policy, Research and Regulation Branch is charged with the responsibility of assisting the Minister in the development of policy (e.g. legislation or regulations) in terms of the construction and property industries also align to policy development processes prescribed in the National Policy Development Framework (NPDF).

In the last five years, policies developed or reviewed were engaged in the prescribed format through gazetting for public comment. For instance, in terms of the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB), regulations such as the amendment to the Best Practice Project Assessment Scheme were gazetted in September 2020 and in 2018, the CIDB adjusted range of tender values that were also gazetted. In such instances, members of society have access to these documents as they are public documents. With regards to the Expropriation Bill [B23-2020], on the other hand, the Department consulted with various government departments as part of developing SEIAS; and we have also engaged with the Ambassadors (Minister’s engagement) of different countries.

Therefore, apart from a standard and approved policy development process where relevant stakeholders are identified and consulted in different stages of the process, no policy document has been shared with structures outside of Government.

30 September 2022 - NW2938

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) (a)In what year did her department inspect the lifts in the various buildings in parliamentary precinct and (b) what is the due date for the next inspection; (2) whether she has found that the inspections are overdue; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the reasons that they have not been carried out and (b) on what date will the next inspections take place; (3) whether the lift contracts are in place for the ongoing inspection and maintenance of the lifts; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. (a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) informed that a routine inspection of lifts in the various buildings at the Parliamentary Precinct was done on October 2020 by an independent lift inspector, which is a two-year inspection. However, every month, the DPWI conduct a 10-point service checklist. Due to the fire in Parliament, the client (Parliament) requested that we conduct another routine inspection which DPWI conducted in March 2022. The last 10-point service checklist was done at the end of August 2022.

(b) The due date for the next routine inspection by an independent lift inspector is in October 2022, and the due date for the 10-point service checklist is at the end of September 2022.

2. There is no overdue inspection of lifts

(a) Not applicable.

(b) The routine inspection by an independent lift inspector is due in October 2022, and the 10-point service checklist is due at the end of September 2022.

3. Two lift contracts are in place for the serving and maintenance of the lifts. One contract will expire in November 2022, while the other will expire in January 2023. The process of appointing the replacement contract for the next five years is underway.

30 September 2022 - NW2912

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What steps is her Department taking against companies flagged for corruption and looting of funds for the rebuilding of infrastructure in KwaZulu-Natal following the April flood disaster; (2) whether any contract been cancelled following the Auditor General’s red flagging of dubious contracts linked to the rebuilding efforts; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Auditor General of South Africa (AGSA) findings were noted. In response, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI), through its KZN regional office, prepared a comprehensive report on actions taken and recommendations thereto, in consultation with the Directors General: Project Management Office and Facilities Management, which was submitted to the Director General and Head: Property Management Trading Entity (PMTE) dated 28 August 2022. The matter was also referred to the Labour Relations unit in the Department for further investigation.

In addition to the above, information was forwarded to the Special Investigative unit (SIU) as requested in a letter dated 30 August 2022. Both processes are still unfolding, and the outcome of both processes will guide any further action.

(2) To date, the Department has not paid any service provider for the refurbishment of infrastructure owing to the April storm damages, even though all work on infrastructure was finished months ago. The payments will be processed once the investigation report has been finalised.

30 September 2022 - NW3043

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of (a)(i) applications, (ii) reports and/or (iii) grievances of undocumented South Africans have been received by his department in the 2021-22 financial year and (b) the specified cases were resolved?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of (Late Registration of births) applications received of undocumented South Africans in the 2021/22 financial year were 104 823.

(a)(ii)&(iii) The total number of reports and grievances of undocumented South Africans that were received in the 2021/22 financial year were 598.

(b) The total number of the specified cases that were resolved in the 2021/22 financial year were 260.

END