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20 September 2019 - NW436

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

1)       What are the details of the (a) name of each consultant and/or contractor, (b) amount allocated to each consultant and/or contractor, (c) project each consultant and/or contractor will work on and (d) expected duration of each project her department budgeted for in the 2019-20 financial year; (2) Whether each project was or will be put out to tender; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) Whether the relocation of her department’s offices will result in cost savings; if not, (a) why not and (b) why is her department relocating its offices; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) What amount did her department spend on offices in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Departments as follows:

In respect of the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services:No

No. 

NAME OF CONSULTANT

  1.  

AMOUNT ALLOCATED

2019/20 FY(b)

PROJECT

  1.  

EXPECTED DURATION

  1.  

1. 

Broadband Infraco

R134 million

SA Connect ( Broadband provisioning to government facilities)

  1.  

2. 

SITA

R40 million

SA Connect ( Broadband provisioning to government facilities)

  1.  

3. 

N/A – Project not contracted

R2 million

Organisational Structure Development

12 months

4. 

N/A – Project not contracted

R1 million

Leadership Development

12 months

5. 

N/A – Project not contracted

R1 million

Implementation and maintenance of CCTV cameras

36 months

 

2. All projects not yet contracted mentioned above will be put out on tender.

The contracts awarded to Broadband Infraco and SITA were not put out on tender because the department mandated its State Owned Companies to implement the projects on its behalf. The BBI and SITA contracts will run for 10 years, from 2018/19 to 2028/29.

3.  No cost savings will be realised.

(a) The Department is not relocating offices.

(b) The Department is not relocating offices.

4.  An amount of R90 million was paid with respect of the lease / rental of office accommodation as from April 2014 until March 2019.

In respect of the Department of Communications:

1.

No

NAME OF CONSULTANT

(a)

AMOUNT ALLOCATED

(b)

PROJECT WILL WORK ON

(c)

EXPECTED DURATION

(d)

1

N/A – Consultant not yet appointed

R 400 000.00

Conducting cost benefit analysis of the draft South African Audio Visual Content Growth Strategy.

2 months

2

N/A – Consultant not yet appointed

R 300 000.00

4IR training for emerging content producers

Once Off

3

N/A – Consultant not yet appointed

R2 000 000.00

Research and report on ID television set and decoders sold by retailers

12 months

4

N/A – Consultant not yet appointed

R2 000 000.00

Implementation evaluation of the Community Media Policy and Support Programme.

12 months

2. Projects 1-2 will not be put on tender because the amount is less than tender threshold of R500 000.00. RFQ process will be followed.

Projects 3-4 will be put on tender. Tender specifications have not been finalised.

(3) It is not known at this stage if the relocation will result in the cost savings or not as the discussions on the relocation and costs thereof have not commenced as yet.

(a) N/A

(b) The department is relocating because of the pronounced reconfiguration together with Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services to establish a new department.

(4) The accommodation cost over the past financial years are as follow:

2015/16 - R0.00

2016/17 - R0.00

2017/18 - R0.00

2018/19 - R250 271.49 per month (R3, 003 million for the year)

2019/20 - R256 666.00 per month (R1, 027 million for the 2019/20 financial year to date, i.e. April to July 2019). The amount will be paid per month until the integration of the merging departments is completed.

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

20 September 2019 - NW770

Profile picture: Tseke, Ms GK

Tseke, Ms GK to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the fact that some of her department’s catalytic and/or mega projects are not following the complete project matrix plan, (a) what details can she provide on how plans of a catalytic project are initiated and (b) has she found that there is integrated planning where all role players become involved?

Reply:

CATALYTIC PROJECTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:

(a) All the projects within the housing programmes including catalytic projects follow an approved human settlements project readiness matrix (PRM) as outlined in the PRM required as part of annual business planning processes of Provinces for the approval of the allocation of the human settlement development grant.

The target for the previous Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) period was to identify and implement fifty (50) national priority catalytic projects using different tenure options to deliver mega, high impact integrated and sustainable human settlements that clearly demonstrate spatial, social and economic integration. The assessment process that was conducted in initiating catalytic projects and getting them approved by MINMEC was as follows:

Stage 1: This stage adhered to the three core principles and criteria of Impact, Integration and Project Readiness aligned to the Human Settlements Master Spatial Plan (MSP).

Stage 2: This stage looked at the detailed project description; project readiness; institutional, financial and legal arrangements; socio-economic impact and how it links to the plans of the province and the municipality within which the catalytic project is being developed.

Stage 3: This stage was assessing the technical project readiness interrogating and conducting an in-depth analysis of the due diligence reports from stage 2. Further this analysis looked at the risks involved in the project development life cycle and analysed the factors that could hamper or delay the implementation of projects including availability of bulk infrastructure required for these projects.

Stage 4: The last stage was an assessment that was conducted by the Public Investment Unit of the National Treasury to look at the catalytic projects from a public finance and public economics point of view.

(b) The plans for a catalytic project identified are aligned to the Human Settlements Master Spatial Plan (MSP) developed by the Department of Human Settlements. The MSP articulates the principles and approaches for the formulation of spatial targeting with the intention to direct spatial transformation of cities and towns whilst considering the efficient utilization of land and therefore defined the spatial, social and economic integration components required from catalytic projects. The MSP also seeks to promote the integration of basic services and social amenities in human settlement developments in line with general principles applicable to housing development. Planning for the implementation of these catalytic projects is done in a coordinated and streamlined process between and amongst spheres of government and across government departments.

CATALYTIC PROJECTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION:

a) Honourable Member, catalytic and/or mega projects are planned in a fully integrated manner involving all interested and affected stakeholders in such projects. These projects can be initiated either on the supply side, that is for example, the development of a dam or a well field (borehole) or from the demand side within a particular municipality.

Water schemes are complex, costly and require long lead times (10 years +) from identifying the need, to the final operation. This is underpinned by coordinated planning following steps that include needs identification, conceptualising, reconnaissance studies, pre-feasibility, feasibility investigations, financing, detailed design, implementation and commissioning for operation. These rigorous but necessary steps are followed diligently as required by the National Water Act (NWA, Act 36, 1998), and applicable environmental legislation of the country. The NWA requires the Minister to develop and give effect to the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), which is updated at least every 5 years. The NWRS identifies key strategic focus areas, which are further developed into master plans and other guidelines that are implemented. The Department ensures that Project Planning and execution of mega projects follows the clear and identified steps that have evolved over the past in implementing various water schemes in the country.

From a water services perspective and in terms of the Water Services Act (108 of 1997), it is a legislative mandate of every Water Services Authority in the country to develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) for its area of jurisdiction over a 5 year period and as part of the Integrated Development Plan (IDP) process (Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000).

The Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is a five-year plan which local government is required to compile to determine all the development needs of the municipality from the perspective of all services that fall under their responsibility: water, sanitation, roads, electricity etc. This process requires the full participation of all stakeholders for all projects including catalytic / mega projects. The development of a WSDP and an IDP is the responsibility of a Water Service Authority through the Department of Corporate Governance and Traditional Affairs (CoGTA). The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) provides support to the WSA to ensure the WSDP completion.

b) Integrated Water Resources Development planning is the cornerstone of successful project execution and delivery to the intended beneficiaries of water schemes. The Department follows fully laid out processes through the requisite project governance structures like coordinating committees or Project Steering committees, which steer, guide and ensure project are planned and implemented with full participation of all stakeholders so that outcomes are delivered successfully. Thus, Interested and affected parties (I&APs) are given a platform to play an integral role from the identification process to the successful implementation of the project.

From a local government perspective Integrated Planning which includes Water Services Development Planning ensures maximum involvement of all stakeholders. The Spatial Land Management Act (SPLUMA) also provides the legal requirements for spatial planning and land management through a fully integrated process at National, Provincial and Local Level which includes the provision of water and sanitation services.

20 September 2019 - NW793

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. (a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state-owned entities reporting to her went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) (i)

(aa) 2016/17: R7 318 000,00

(bb) 2017/18: R8 549 000,00

(cc) 2018/19: R3 613 000,00

2. (a) (i) Of the total expenditure incurred by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, the following went to Black-owned companies:

(aa) 2016/17: R3 891 444,75

NO

DESCRIPTION

MONTH

COMPANY NAME

B-BBEE Level

AMOUNT

1

Newspaper Advertisement:

Apr-16

Human Communications

2

R 24,587.34

2

Advertisement

Apr-16

Human Communications

2

R 42,557.66

3

Newspaper Advertisement:

Jun-16

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 24,455.00

4

Advertisement

Jul-16

Shisuka Communications

1

R 247,635.56

5

Advertisement

Jul-16

Burning Spear Advertising

1

R 244,701.05

6

Advertisement

Jul-16

Comet Box Studios

1

R 80,510.85

7

Advertisement

Jul-16

Decimal Cube Advertising (Pty) Ltd

2

R 147,368.80

8

Advertisement

Aug-16

Fabrizimedia

1

R 232,407.47

9

Advertorial On National Newspapers

Sep-16

Thinknthink

1

R 338,000.00

10

Advertisement

Sep-16

Los Pepes Investments (Pty) Ltd

1

R 73,399.70

11

Advertisement

Sep-16

Vonben Trading Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

 

R 140,839.24

12

Advertisement

Sep-16

MTKR Marketing And Communincation Cc

1

R 127,420.70

13

Advertorial Sawubona Magazine

Oct-16

Ndalo Media

1

R 140,839.24

14

Advertisement

Oct-16

Khehla Rendani Trading And Projects

1

R 338,000.00

15

Advertisement

Oct-16

MTKR Marketing And Communincation Cc

1

R 107,344.22

16

Advertisement

Dec-16

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 148,702.69

17

Advertorial On Various National Newspapers

Jan-17

Singi Consulting & Communication

1

R 332,694.12

18

Advertisement

Feb-17

Mashemong Marketing Communications

1

R 332,694.12

19

Bid Advertisement

Feb-17

Luonde Holdings

1

R 121,500.00

20

Advertisement

Feb-17

Buti Le Sello Multimedia

1

R 112,544.31

21

Advertisement

Feb-17

Machi-Ra Trading Enterprise

1

R 219,411.15

22

Advertisement

Feb-17

Byte Code Consulting

1

R 87,262.77

23

Advertisement

Mar-17

Bodina Trading Enterprise

1

R 251,156.10

 

Total

R 3,891,444.75

(bb) 2017/18: R2 160 377,05

NO

PUBLICATION

MONTH

COMPANY NAME

B-BBEE Level

AMOUNT

1

Advertisement

May-17

Broadword Trading 33 (Pty) Ltd

1

R 211,100.90

2

Advertisement

Jun-17

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 150,281.91

3

Advertisement

Jul-17

Matibis Creatives

1

R 53,760.48

4

Advertorial

Aug-17

Singi Consulting And Communications

1

R 481,600.00

5

Advertorial

Aug-17

Basadzi Personnel And Media

1

R 46,654.27

6

Advertisement

Aug-17

Netstreet

1

R 133,775.00

7

Advertising

Sep-17

Sunday Tribune

1

R 16,084.00

8

Advertising

Sep-17

Ilanga, Paarl Media

1

R 3,903.00

9

Advertisement

Sep-17

Basadzi Personnel And Media

1

R 104,486.13

10

Advertisement

Sep-17

MTKR Marketing And Communications

1

R 49,392.52

11

Advertisement

Sep-17

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 75,140.96

12

Advertisement

Sep-17

Kone Staffing Solutions

1

R 34,382.40

13

Advertisement

Sep-17

Basadzi Personnel And Media

1

R 75,813.19

14

Advertisement

Sep-17

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 32,753.75

15

Advertisement

Sep-17

Basadzi Personnel And Media

1

R 113,719.79

16

Advert On Daily Dispatch And The Herald

Oct-17

Sagittarius Communication

1

R 16,183.44

17

Advertisement

Oct-17

Human Communications

1

R 23,062.07

18

Advertisement

Oct-17

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 106,931.36

19

Advertisement

Nov-17

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 34,680.44

20

Advertisement

Nov-17

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 19,266.91

21

Advertisement

Nov-17

Basadzi Personnel And Media

1

R 23,009.76

22

Advertisement

Dec-17

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 57,800.74

23

Advertisement

Jan-18

Kone Staffing Solutions

1

R 124,104.96

24

Advertisement

Jan-18

Kone Staffing Solutions

1

R 54,037.37

25

Advertisement

Feb-18

Basadzi Personnel And Media

1

R 95,817.00

26

Advert For Leases On Herald And Daily Dispatch

Feb-18

Sagittarius Communication

1

R 22,634.70

 

Total

R 2,160,377.05

(cc) 2018/19: R1 200 032,95

NO

PUBLICATION

MONTH

COMPANY NAME

B-BBEE Level

AMOUNT

1

Advertisement

Jul-18

Human Communications

1

R 16,212.57

2

Advertisement

Aug-18

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 110,680.72

3

Advertorial

Sep-18

Concorse Suppliers and Projects

1

R 286,000.00

4

Advertisement

Oct-18

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 40,000.00

5

Advertisement

Nov-18

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 18,257.40

6

Advertisement

Jan-19

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 81,144.00

7

Advertisement

Jan-19

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 31,025.85

8

Advertisement

Jan-19

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 81,144.00

9

Advertisement

Feb-19

Ultimate Recruitment Solutions

1

R 18,615.51

10

Advertisement

Feb-19

Kone Staffing Solutions

1

R 31,037.58

11

Advertisement

Feb-19

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 92,199.87

12

Advertisement

Feb-19

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 18,622.55

13

Advertisement

Mar-19

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 28,973.10

14

Advertisement

Mar-19

Light way (Pty) Ltd

1

R 315,690.80

15

Advertisement

Mar-19

Basadzi Personnel

1

R 30,429.00

 

Total

R 1,200,032.95

a) (ii) The following expenditure was incurred on outdoor advertising:

(aa) 2016/17: Nil

(bb) 2017/18: R537 396,00

NO

PUBLICATION

MONTH

COMPANY NAME

B-BBEE Level

AMOUNT

1

GCIS Advertising Billboards Campaign -

Sep-17

GCIS

N/A

R 498,180.00

2

Government Buildings Outdoor advertising, Tswalanang Logistics & Township Media

Dec 2017/ Jan 2018

GCIS

N/A

R 39,216.00

 

Total

R 537,396.00

(cc) 2018/19: Nil

c) On outdoor advertising, the following went to Black-owned companies:

(aa) 2016/17: Nil

(bb) 2017/18: R39 216,00 (Paid to Tswalanang Logistics & Township media: B-BBEE Level 1, outdoor advertising done through GCIS)

(cc) 2018/19: Nil

In respect of State-owned Entities Reporting to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1)

(ii)

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Agrément South Afgrica (ASA)

None, ASA was Business Unit under the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

R226,938

R165,629

Council for the Built Environment (CBE)

R216,000

R168,000

R95,000

Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB)

R1 155 955.03

R1 945 290.48

R2 038 520.68

Independent Development Trust (IDT)

R352 979.29

R581 731.68

R338 779.27

(2)

(b) Public Entity

(2) Amount of Total Expenditure

(i)

(ii)

(c)

ASA

2017/18

2017/18

   
 

R24,430.58

Basadzi Media

   
 

R25,986.87

Human Communications

R0.00

R0.00

 

R79,022.52

Stay Frosty Media

R0.00

R0.00

 

R 72,960.00

Ayvel Strategic Media Agency

R0.00

R0.00

 

R2,542.20

Kaimara

R0.00

R0.00

 

R21,996.00

Via CSIR Procurement

R0.00

R0.00

 

2018/19

R86,252.88

2018/19

Basadzi Media House

R0.00

R0.00

 

R42,050.33

Stay Frosty Media

R0.00

R0.00

 

R37,325.60

GPW

R0.00

R0.00

CBE

(Explanatory note: Expenditure incurred on advertising mostly relates to promotional material, i.e pens, booklets, etc)

 

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

CIDB

2016/2017

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

 

R 1 155 955.03

R1 038 602.11

R0.00

R0.00

 

2017/2018

2017/2018

2017/2018

2017/2018

 

R 1 945 290.48

R1 071 575.74

R0.00

R0.00

 

2018/2019

2018/2019

2018/2019

2018/2019

 

R 2 038 520.68

R1 365 152,86

R0.00

R0.00

IDT

(2) what amount of the total expenditure

(i) each specified black-owned media company

(ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year

(c) outdoor advertising by her department and state-owned entities reporting to her went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year

 

R1, 273 490.24

R613 626.20

None

Not applicable

20 September 2019 - NW800

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that her department failed to reinstate Mr Obilana Aderemi (details furnished) despite the ruling of the Education Labour Relations Council and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration, which ordered the reinstatement of the specified person after finding that he was dismissed unfairly?

Reply:

This is an employer-employee relations issue of which the processes are regulated by the Labour Relations Act, 66 of 1995. In terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998, the Head of the Provincial Education Department is the Employer of educators employed at the provincial level. Therefore, the responsibility to implement rulings wherein cases were ruled against the Employer lies with the Head of the Provincial Education Department.

The response received from the Mpumalanga Education Department states that the Department/Employer has demonstrated its willingness to comply with the award, but Mr Obilana refused to comply and cooperate. An alternative post was identified for him to occupy effectively from 1 October 2018 and was within the same circuit a few kilometres from the school where he used to teach prior to his dismissal, but he failed to report for duty to date.

The details are as follows:

The Department did not immediately comply with the award because at the time the award was received, the position which Mr Obilana occupied prior to his dismissal was already filled. Mr Obilana was, however, informed through his union on 28 September 2018 that the Department had established a vacant substantive post where he would be placed effectively from 1 October 2018. He was directed to report at the Emalahleni Circuit where the Circuit Manager would take him to the institution he would be serving at. A response was received from his union indicating that he was sick, and insisted that the Department place him in accordance with the award. Mr Obilana never reported for duty, but instead proceeded to take steps to enforce the award by filing an application for the certification of the award with the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA).

The award was certified in terms of section 143 of the Labour Relations Act. The CCMA issued a document entitled “Enforcement of the Award” [the CCMA writ] instructing the sheriff to attach and execute the movable goods of the Employer to the value of R 171 952.40 with interest. The sheriff served the document and attached a vehicle belonging to the Employer on several occasions and this culminated in the Employer filing an urgent application with the Labour Court, which was heard on 27 August 2019, wherein the enforcement award was declared invalid and set aside.

20 September 2019 - NW726

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What are the reasons that the Lindelani Informal Settlement in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has not been electrified, (b) what plans have been put in place to electrify the informal settlement in the future and (c) by what date will the electrification work be completed in the 2019-20 financial year; (2) what are the reasons that (a) there are no operational water trucks in portion 71 of Lindelani Informal Settlement and (b) chemical toilets are only cleaned once a week; (3) what are the reasons that the high-mast light in Alliance Ext 9 is not operational; (4) what are the reasons that the toilets built in Alliance Ext 1 in the past six years are not operational?

Reply:

(1) (a) The City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is currently implementing two housing projects in the area, namely Alliance Extensions 1 and 9, which are earmarked to benefit the qualifying beneficiaries of Lindelani Informal Settlement. Through these projects the beneficiaries will be provided with electricity.

(b) Once the community has been relocated to Alliance Extensions 1 and 9, the remaining households will be reconfigured by grouping shacks into clusters and reorganizing the ground plan in such a manner as to optimally utilise space to promote the health, safety and well-being of households, with a particular focus on promoting accelerated service delivery to informal settlements, including the provision of electricity.

(c) There are no plans to electrify the informal settlement in 2019-20 financial year.

(2) (a) The City’s Water and Sanitation Department is providing water to the entire Lindelani Informal Settlement. There are sections which are provided with water through water tankers and there is a portion next to the Paul Kruger Highway which has tap water. The City is not aware of a portion known as Portion 71, and has consulted the community who could not clarify which portion is referred to as Portion 71.

(b) As from 1 July 2019 the chemical toilets are serviced once a week as per the City’s contract with the new service provider. The City has not yet received any complaints from the community and or the leadership.

(3) The City’s Energy Department is attending to the high-mast light that is not working at Extension 9. When the problem has been identified, the matter will be resolved.

(4) During 2011 the designs for the water and sewer network systems and toilet structures were approved by the City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. In April 2011 the construction work commenced, but the contractor had only access to 296 stands. The remainder of the 338 stands were inaccessible, as they were occupied by 808 households. The City attempted to relocate the residents to an identified Temporary Relocation Area (TRA) without success. Only 42% of the work within 296 stands was completed.

In 2012 the contract awarded to the contractor responsible for the construction work was terminated due to poor performance and community issues.

A new contractor (2nd contractor) was appointed in 2014 to repair and complete the construction work. This contractor experienced challenges to access the area. The City’s MMC for Human Settlements had several public meetings with the community to agree on the relocation to the TRA, and therefore to make way for the construction work. Unfortunately, the community was not in agreement to relocate and the work on site progressed very slowly. The City started to incur standing time claims from the contractor.

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements with the assistance of the City’s Corporate and Legal Department obtained a Court Order in August 2016 to relocate the 808 households to the TRA. The Court Order was never implemented due to political considerations.

During 2017 the contract of the second contractor was also terminated due to contractual issues and resistance by the residents to make way for construction. The City appointed two contractors for the construction and installation of roads and storm-water designs. The contractors could only access 42% of the development. The first phase of the construction of roads and storm-water was completed in February 2018.

On 27 September 2017 it was resolved that the City’s Human Settlements Department will take over the installation of water and sewer network systems from the Water and Sanitation Department, as it was agreed that the relocation of residents to make way for construction is a Human Settlements function. Since then, no work has been done on the water and sewer infrastructure, as there are shacks that need to be relocated to make way for construction.

During 2018 the City resolved to suspend the Alliance Extension 9 development until the relocation issues have been resolved with the community.

19 September 2019 - NW773

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department can provide the results and findings of the ministerial review of SA Tourism that the former Minister of Tourism commissioned in 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

The Honorable member is referred to website of the Department of Tourism to download the document or alternatively a copy can be supplied by my office by arrangement.

https://www.tourism.gov.za/website/publications/Report%20of%20the%20SA%20Tourism%20Review%20J une%202015.pdf#search=Ministerial%20Review

19 September 2019 - NW762

Profile picture: Mkhatshwa, Ms NT

Mkhatshwa, Ms NT to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether there has been any substantive progress with regard to the restoration of stability in the management of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) (details furnished); if so, (2) whether the persons who are found to have caused the degeneration of NSFAS will face legal consequences; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Significant changes and improvements have been undertaken by the Administrator in keeping to the gazetted terms of reference of the administration period up to August 2019. This has resulted in a more stable 2019 student funding cycle in the sector.

This can be seen most clearly in the improvements in the disbursement of student allowances in 2019, resulting in significantly less disruption to the academic programme than what occurred in 2018, where students were confirmed late in the academic year and received allowances late. In 2019, the majority of students where funding was confirmed, registration took place, and students signed their bursary agreements, received their allowances early in the academic year.

Data exchange between institutions and NSFAS has significantly improved and resulted in a smoother funding cycle, and many errors from the 2017 and 2018 academic years have been corrected. This has a direct effect on students receiving funding at the appropriate time. Appeals are being processed efficiently and data exceptions have been reduced significantly.

There have also been improvements regarding the support provided to institutions by NSFAS to resolve problems timeously, including more direct support to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Compliance with bursary rules has improved and this has resulted in low error numbers and outstanding or incorrect payments.

As reported in Parliament on 28 August 2019, NSFAS, while under Administration has paid significant attention to issues of organisational governance and management, including identifying high-risk areas in the business processes of NSFAS. This has included significant attention to areas of information technology (IT), governance and risk, and the management of data at the entity. Controls that are more effective have been put in place to ensure effective management and administration of IT systems.

Issues of data integrity and cyber security were identified as critical areas of work, and many challenges remain within the entity that are being addressed. Challenges with the IT systems, which regularly crashed in 2018 were urgently addressed, and IT operational systems are currently operating at 98% uptime, in contrast to daily system crashes in 2018. Disbursements are processed more effectively in 2019 on a monthly rather than a daily basis.

NSFAS has undertaken a number of forensic investigations to uncover and act in areas of fraud and maladministration. An overview of this work has been presented to Parliament and the work continues.

NSFAS has opened the 2020 applications cycle at the beginning of September 2019.

The new Administration term, together with new Terms of Reference, have been published in the Government Gazette. This is to allow for continued work to improve the operations of the entity. The Administrator and his team will also work closely with the Ministerial team that will be appointed soon to conduct a review of NSFAS business processes with a view to making decisions about NSFAS going forward.

NSFAS has a critical mandate to support funding for students from poor and working-class backgrounds in the university and TVET college sectors, and a more efficient and effective NSFAS is an absolute priority of the Administrator, supported by the Department of Higher Education and Training, and the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology.

2. Those who are found responsible for wrongdoing at NSFAS will face consequences. The Administrator reported in Parliament on 28 August 2019 on a number of forensic investigations underway at the entity. In some cases, disciplinary processes have already been initiated where evidence is available. In other cases, investigations are continuing. NSFAS will work with the necessary authorities, where necessary, to lay charges in cases where evidence of illegal activity is uncovered.

19 September 2019 - NW675

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether any studies have been conducted to determine the impact of the Government’s proposed National Health Insurance system on health and medical tourism in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what has the study found will be the likely (a) decline in international arrivals of so-called health and medical tourists once the National Health Insurance is implemented, (b) decline in tourism revenue generated from health and medical tourists and (c) total impact on the Republic’s fiscus?

Reply:

No studies have been conducted by the department of Tourism or its entity (South Africa Tourism) to determine the impact of the Government’s proposed National Health Insurance system on health and medical tourism in the Republic as the system has not been finalised yet.

a) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

19 September 2019 - NW763

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Mkhatshwa, Ms NT to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What legal interventions have been made in the cases of maladministration, unethical and self-enriching practices which found expression in the governance of institutions of higher learning from the University of Venda to the University of Fort Hare, where there are unfinished infrastructure development projects and institutions are under administration?

Reply:

In terms of the Higher Education Act, if the Minister has reasonable grounds to believe that the council or the management of a public higher education institution is involved in financial impropriety or the institution is being otherwise mismanaged, the Minister may issue a directive which must state the nature and extent of the deficiency; the negative impact of the deficiency on the institution; the steps which should be taken to remedy the situation; and a reasonable period within which the steps must be taken. In the event that the Minister has reasonable grounds to believe that the council has failed to comply with the directive, the Minister may, depending on the circumstances, appoint an independent assessor, appoint an administrator, or take any other appropriate action allowed by this Act or any other law.

The Minister may appoint an independent assessor if circumstances arise at an institution that involve financial or other maladministration of a serious nature; or seriously undermine the effective functioning of the institution. In the case where an audit of the financial records of an institution or the report by an independent assessor or any other report or information reveals financial or other maladministration of a serious nature or serious undermining of the effective functioning of a public higher education institution, the Minister may appoint an administrator.

There are two universities under administration currently, namely the University of Fort Hare (UFH) and Vaal University of Technology (VUT). Under normal circumstances, an independent assessor would be appointed first to investigate the affairs of a university and advise the Minister on the source and nature of problems facing the institution and the measures required to restore good governance and management at the university. At the recommendation of the independent assessor, the Minister would then appoint an Administrator. However, the circumstances surrounding these institutions were such that the appointment of an Administrator preceded an independent assessment in the case of UFH, and for VUT before the independent assessment could be concluded.

Institutions with unfinished infrastructure development projects

There are two institutions with abandoned infrastructure development projects, namely the University of Venda (UNIVEN) and the University of Fort Hare (UFH).

In the case of UNIVEN, the existing abandoned infrastructure projects are as a result of insufficient funds to finalise construction or appointed service providers failing to deliver in terms of the contractual agreement. When the matter was brought to the Minister’s attention, the Minister issued a directive to the Council to discontinue any new infrastructure development plans. The Department also conducted an institutional oversight visit to understand the infrastructure challenges facing the University. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the implementation and management of the Recovery Projects at UNIVEN was done to assist the University going forward. During the last quarter of 2017, contractors were invited, through an open tender process, to complete some of the abandoned projects. An additional amount of R55 million has been allocated to the University to complete some of the critical projects, and the University was instructed to seek additional funds from other sources to complete other projects. The University has since put stringent measures in place to ensure the completion of these projects, and the Department is monitoring the University closely.

With regards to UFH, the abandoned project is the Early Childhood Development Centre (ECDC) building on the East London Campus. This has been due to maladministration to some extent, but also lack of capacity to manage and implement infrastructure projects. The Department has supported the University to develop an infrastructure procurement strategy to ensure the commencement of the implementation of the abandoned ECDC project and is also monitoring the university closely.

17 September 2019 - NW182

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) With reference to the reply to question 687 on 3 April 2019, (a) what were the exact dates on which his department met with the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) who attended each meeting; (2) whether the notice of the meetings were given in writing; if so, (3) whether he will furnish Mr M Waters with (a) a copy of the written notice and (b)(i) any additional correspondence issued to the City and (ii) the responses of the City thereto; (4) what exactly does he mean when he says the City will face the consequences? NW1140E

Reply:

1. With reference to the reply to question 687 on 3 April 2019, (a) what were the exact dates on which his department met with the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) who attended each meeting;

The first meeting was on 26 June 2018 and was part of a 2 day follow up engagement on the project financials with 6 of the 13 Public Transport Network Grant cities. The City of Ekurhuleni presented and took questions during a two hour slot. The session was attended by DoT and Treasury officials led by the Acting Chief Director for Public Transport Network Development, Mr Ibrahim Seedat. The City IPTN project team attended led by acting HoD for Transport, Ms Dorothy Mabuza.

The second meeting was a standing bilateral on 27 September 2018 and was again led by Ms Dorothy Mabuza for the City and Mr I Seedat, Director Public Transport Networks for the DoT.

The third meeting was a standing bilateral on 13 March 2019 and was led by Mr Kabelo Mothobi, IPTN Division Head Legal for the City and Ms Khibi Manana, Chief Director for Public Transport Network Development for the DoT.

(2) Whether the notice of the meetings were given in writing; if so,

These are project review or bilateral meetings and notices are confirmed either through a request for a meeting by email or via direct emails.

(3) Whether he will furnish Mr M Waters with (a) a copy of the written notice and (b)(i) any additional correspondence issued to the City and (ii) the responses of the City thereto;

Written notices and responses for the three meetings are attached.

(4) What exactly does he mean when he says the City will face the consequences?

This refers to invoking the relevant sections of the Division of Revenue Act in consultation with National Treasury to either withhold or reallocate in year budgets and secondly to deprioritise the City’s IPTN project in the next annual MTEF budget allocation process, due to ongoing lack of performance.

These measures will only be invoked if the City is unwilling or unable to correct deficiencies after several engagements and will be elevated to the level of Director General and Municipal Manager prior to any final decision being taken.

NW1140E

17 September 2019 - NW758

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

(1) Yes.

(1)(a) In Parliament.

(1)(b) Catering for 60 Journalists                  R 4,440.00

        Catering for 200 stakeholders              R48,400.00

         Sound system                                  R25,000.00

         Exhibition                                        R27,160.00

         Total                                               R105,000.00

(1)(c) See attached list

(2) No.

(2)(a) Not applicable.

2(b) Not applicable.

17 September 2019 - NW651

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What (a) is the total number of technical advisors who are currently deployed by the National Treasury under Programme 8 and (b) is the name of each (i) municipality and (ii) provincial department to which each technical advisor is currently deployed; (2) whether he has found that there is any improvement as a result of Programme 8 with respect to the financial management of the specified municipalities and provincial departments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the progress related to the specific tasks of each advisor is monitored; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what is the (a) specific task of each technical advisor and (b) cost to the National Treasury with respect to each technical advisor; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) What (a) is the total number of technical advisors who are currently deployed by the National Treasury under Programme 8 and (b) is the name of each (i) municipality and (ii) provincial department to which each technical advisor is currently deployed?

(a) There were 82 MFIP technical advisors deployed under the Municipal Finance Improvement Programme (MFIP) as at 30 August 2019.

(b) Attached kindly find annexure ‘A’ which details the deployment of the 83 technical advisors per municipality, National Treasury (NT) and provincial treasuries (PTs).

(2) whether he has found that there is any improvement as a result of Programme 8 with respect to the financial management of the specified municipalities and provincial departments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details;

The MFIP III context

The current phase three of the MFIP, which commenced on 1 April 2017 and ends 31 March 2020, is a strategically-driven programme of technical assistance aligned to the six Local Government Financial Management (LGFM) game changers, viz. funded budgets, revenue management, mSCOA implementation, asset management, supply chain management and audit outcomes. The overall strategic goals of the MFIP are to facilitate improved local government financial management capacity, enhanced budget and financial management practices and improved audit outcomes through the provision of direct technical capacity support.

Accordingly, the MFIP III is designed to build the institutional and technical financial management capacity of the National Treasury (NT), provincial treasuries (PTs) and Municipalities. This is mainly achieved through the placement of technical advisors (TAs) within the MFMA support units of national and provincial treasuries, and the Budget and Treasury Offices (BTOs) of municipalities.

Almost 50% of the TAs were sourced by November 2017 with the remaining TAs sourced between January 2018 and August 2019. It should thus be noted that the actual date of deployment is directly associated with the extent of improvements shown.

Has there been any improvement as a result of MFIP with respect to the financial management of the specified municipalities and provincial departments? If yes, provide some details:

Yes, there has been improvement, in some of the following financial management areas:

2.1 Supply Chain Management

a) Capacitation of Councillors specifically in dealing with Unauthorised Irregular Fruitless and Wasteful Expenditure (UIF&W) which has resulted in some municipalities that did not have functional MPACs establishing such committees.

b) Establishment of Disciplinary Boards in most of the municipalities now monitoring implementation of the implementation of this reform.

c) Evaluation for alignment of SCM Policy to the legislation and reforms resulting in municipalities increasingly complying with applicable regulations. There has been a marked decline in the utilisation of SCM regulation 32 which was a major source of irregular expenditure for municipalities.

2.2 Audit outcomes

a) Most municipalities with Municipal Advisors improved or retained their previous audit opinions in the 2017/18 financial year, as outlined below:

  • 3 out 15 or 20% of municipalities improved on their audit outcomes;
  • 4 out 15 or 26% of municipalities retained their unqualified audit opinion;  
  • 3 out of 15 or 20% of municipalities retained their qualified audit opinion;  
  • 4 out 15 or 26% of municipalities retained their disclaimed audit opinion; and  
  • 1 out of 15 or 8% of municipalities regressed from qualified to disclaimer audit opinion

2.3 Asset management

  1. Reviewed and updated the asset management policies and standard operating procedures for 59 municipalities.
  2. Drafted and circulated various methodologies and guidelines to assist municipalities on how they can correctly apply the GRAP standards on Property, Plant and Equipment, Investment Property, Intangible assets, Heritage assets and Inventory
  3. Training and capacity building for municipal officials for 65 municipalities on asset management practices such as
    • GRAP compliance when valuing and accounting for the municipality’s assets
    • Implementation of municipal asset management policy and procedures
    • Internal control systems of assets and liabilities, including an asset and liability register, as prescribed 

2.4 The following are some of the key institutional and technical factors that contribute to areas that do not show the requisite improvements?

  1. Some provincial treasuries and municipalities are severely incapacitated by the absence of staff (warm bodies) in the MFMA units and BTOs respectively impacting adversely on the programme’s impact.
  2. Some MPACs and Councils not taking decisive action (consequence management) to deal with officials responsible for causing UIF&W expenditure resulting in recurrence of such incidents.
  3. Municipalities adopting unfunded budgets, which generally leads to cash flow challenges during the financial year.
  4. Poor revenue management, cash flow management and expenditure management practices resulting in liquidity and business continuity risks.
  5. Severe cashflow challenges is experienced by a number of municipalities resulting in high level of fruitless and wasteful expenditure (interest payable on overdue accounts) emanating from the late or non-payment of ESKOM, water board and other creditor accounts.
  6. Over reliance on external service providers to perform functions like the preparation of annual financial statements and the compilation of fixed asset registers.
  7. Poor asset management, ageing infrastructure and low levels of maintenance resulting in high distribution losses and service delivery breakdowns or interruptions.
  8. Municipalities not budgeting, transacting or reporting in/from their core financial system (FS) impacting the quality and reliability of financial information.
  9. Poor or non-implementation by municipalities of audit action plans to effectively address the root causes of audit findings.

(3) Whether the progress related to the specific tasks of each advisor is monitored; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details;

Yes, the progress related to the specific tasks of each advisor is monitored by the MFIP Programme Management Unit (PMU) as part of the overall performance management protocols of the programme. The following are the key steps involved:

    1. Each advisor prepares a support plan or workplan, in line with the original scope of work, within one to three months after appointment and placement for approval by the relevant entity and the PMU;
    2. Each advisor captures his/her effort/time daily on the Capture Effort Application against the approved support- or workplan. This is then reviewed and approved by the relevant NT Director/ Chief Director/ Senior Advisor/ Director at the PMU.
    3. Monthly reports for each advisor are submitted to the PMU signed off by the Municipal Manager / NT Chief Director and/ or PT MFMA Coordinator.
    4. Formal performance reviews of all technical advisors are conducted bi-annually by the PMU in consultation with the relevant NT, PT or municipal counterparts.

(4) What is the (a) specific task of each technical advisor and (b) cost to the National Treasury with respect to each technical advisor;

a) Each technical advisor signs a support plan or workplan that details the specific key focus areas, functional areas, tasks/activities and timelines that they will be performing, in accordance with the original scope of work published in the procurement terms of reference. The support- or workplan is also signed by the counterpart at the relevant entity and approved by the MFIP PMU.

(b) The cost of each technical advisor is capped as follows:

  • Senior Advisors are currently paid on average R861.12 per hour and are contracted for a maximum of 1 840 hours per annum, amounting to an average annual cost of R1 584 460.80 exclusive of VAT per senior advisor.
  • Advisors and Specialists are currently paid on average R807.30 per hour and are contracted for a maximum of 1 840 hour per annum, amounting to an average annual cost of R1 485 432.00 exclusive of VAT per advisor or specialist.

(5) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

The Minister is prepared to make a statement relating to the above responses.

17 September 2019 - NW683

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the National Public Transport Regulator applications for tourism transport operating licenses, what (a) total number of tourism-related (i) applications have been received and (ii) licenses have been issued in each month in the (aa) past three years and (bb) since 1 January 2019, (b) are the reasons for the delays in the issuing of licenses, (c) is being done to speed up the issuing of licenses and (d) how is the issuing of licenses being measured and/or monitored?

Reply:

a) (i) A total of 5774 applications have been received from the 29 July 2016 to 31 August 2019.

(ii) (aa) 2780 operating licences were issued from 29 July 2016 to 31 August 2019. The variance between the applications received and operating licences issued is attributed to applications that were withdrawn or cancelled by operators and refused by the National Public Transport Regulator.

 

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

APRIL

--

14

64

78

MAY

--

11

90

61

JUNE

--

53

64

66

JULY

--

40

152

107

AUGUST

02

97

110

78

SEPTEMBER

06

114

148

 

OCTOBER

07

75

125

 

NOVEMBER

33

113

101

 

DECEMBER

22

68

132

 

JANUARY

110

97

29

 

FEBRUARY

83

131

84

 

MARCH

42

119

54

 

Total

305

932

1153

390

(bb) A total of 557 operating licenses have been issued from 1 January 2019 to 31 August 2019.

b) The cause for the delays in the issuing of operating licenses is related to capacity constraints, IT challenges and the submission of incomplete applications by operators.

c) The Department has appointed additional staff, currently redesigning the National Land Transport Information System (NLTIS) and has organized workshops with operators in partnership with the Department of Tourism to raise awareness on the requirements and the processes of the NPTR.

d) The issuing of operating licences is monitored monthly through the National Land Transport Information System, by submitting quarterly and annual reports together with portfolio of evidence.

17 September 2019 - NW671

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the (a) average time taken to process payouts from the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) and (b) cause of the delay in pension payout from the GEPF to Ms Robin-Lee Fortune?

Reply:

a) The average time it takes to process claims are 33-days.

b) Ms Robin-Lee Fortune should enquire herself directly from the GEPF why there was a delay in the payment of the benefit.

17 September 2019 - NW646

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) On what date will the tender specifications on the improvements of Cape Town International Airport Upgrades be finalised and (b)(i) what would be included in the total project scope, (ii) over what period, (iii) what are the project estimates and (iv) what are the details of the improvements; (2) what (a)(i) improvements are intended at the Tambo Springs Intermodal Terminal and (ii) bulk services for development will be needed from Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and (b)(i) what benefit will result from these improvements and (ii) at what cost?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(1)

(b)Project

(iii)Estimated Value

(i)Scope of works

(ii) Period)Status

New Realigned Runway

R 3.8 bn

The construction of a new code F compliant runway with associated taxiways and ancillary systems

The tender document preparation phase was concluded and was just issued to the market.

T2 enablement works

T2 Main works

R 2.8

International Terminal expansion including check-in, baggage handling systems and arrivals carousels

The Enablement Works is currently in the procurement phase with tenders in the market

The Main Works is in the detail design phase and will be go through the procurement process during the course of next year

New Domestic Arrivals

R 688 mn

Expansion of the Domestic Arrivals Terminal

The project will be procured 2-3 months

Several other smaller projects

Multiple values

Aprons, taxiway upgrades and minor terminal expansion

The projects are in the design development phases and will go through the procurement process during the course of next year

(2) Falls away.

17 September 2019 - NW833

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McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether he has been informed of the various reports stating that the National Treasury is seeking an initial budget allocation cut to his department of 5% for the 2020-21 financial year, followed by a 6% and 7% cut for the following two financial years; if so, (2) whether the financial cuts will affect the provision of essential services to South Africans by his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the financial cuts will result in (a) any jobs losses and/or (ii) the closure of any Home Affairs offices in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the requirement to present compulsory budget baseline reduction scenarios is set out in the MTEF Technical Guidelines 2020 issued by National Treasury in June 2019. In addition, the CFO presented the compulsory budget baseline reduction scenarios at the Departmental priority setting workshop held on 13 and 14 August 2019.

2. It is logical that when there are budget cuts, it will impact on the capacity to certain services.

(3)(a-b) Budget cuts will have a negative impact on the filling of some posts, but we are not envisioning closure of any Home Affairs office.

 

END

17 September 2019 - NW473

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What number of (a) National Treasury officials have been investigated for the abuse of market-sensitive information (i) in each of the past three calendar years and (ii) since 1 January 2019 and (b) the specified investigations have led to (i) dismissals and (ii) the institution of criminal charges?

Reply:

a) (i) 2016 - Nil

2017 - Nil

2018 - Nil

(ii) Since 1 January 2019 - Nil

(b) (i) Dismissals - Nil

(ii) Criminal charges - Nil

17 September 2019 - NW548

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What was the total amount transferred annually from his department to each of the Bus Rapid Transport projects of the 13 cities in the categories (a) Allocated Transfer Amount and (b) Actual Expenditure by the City?

Reply:

The period is 2018/19 (July - June):

Municipality

Allocations/Transfers R'000

Expenditure

R’000

Additional in Year Adjustment

Buffalo City

95

101

 

Cape Town

1 046

956

 

Jo’burg

1 066

912

 

Tshwane

808

743

 

George

168

137

 

Ethekwini

825

516

 

Mangaung

235

142

 

Rustenburg

396

211

98

Ekurhuleni

604

425

 

Mbombela

203

133

 

Polokwane

330

214

125

Nelson Mandela Bay

275

186

 

Msunduzi

199

199

 

Totals

6 254

4 902

 

 

17 September 2019 - NW832

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether, with reference to providing protection for refugees, taking into consideration the first safe country principle for refugees to first sought asylum between transit routes, his department has any formal bilateral agreements between transit route countries and destination countries in order for refugees to first seek asylum in the transit country; if not, (a) will he consider such decision and (b) by what date; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, the Department has no formal bilateral agreement/s with transit route countries and countries of destination on application of the first country of asylum principle. As an international practice, any person may request asylum in any country outside his/her own country. The first country principle as practiced in international law requires that:

(i) an asylum seeker should have been recognised in that first country of asylum as a refugee and he or she can still avail himself or herself of that protection; or

(ii) he or she otherwise enjoys sufficient protection in that country, including benefiting from the principle of non-refoulement.

(a-b) No, the Department will not consider such decision, because management of asylum and refugees in South Africa is centred on the cardinal principle of non-refoulement; and inclusion before exclusion, at the core of which is the 1951 UN Convention and its 1967 Protocol. This means that South Africa has an international obligation to receive asylum applicants who may have transited a number of countries before arrival in South Africa.

Furthermore, South Africa will in terms of Section 2 (a) – (b) of the Refugee Act, Act No. 130 of 1998, not return such applicants to a country where:

(i) they may be subjected to persecution on account of his or her race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group; and or

(ii) their life, physical safety or freedom would be threatened on account of external aggression, occupation, foreign domination or other events seriously disturbing or disrupting public order in either part or the whole of that country.

 

END

 

17 September 2019 - NW523

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he intends to conduct an oversight visit to the collapsed commuter station of the Rustenburg Rapid Transport (RRT) system; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether he intends to assess the progress made by the Rustenburg Local Municipality on the completion of the RRT project; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department is working closely with the Rustenburg Local Municipality (RLM) to ensure that the municipality is ready to implement operations on the Tlhabane corridor (where the unfinished defective station is located) as soon as possible. It is expected that the initial operations will start no later than the end of January 2020. I will conduct a full inspection once the system is operating.

In the meantime, the RLM Municipal Manager is taking legal action against the former station contractor for substandard work.

2. The Department has met the RLM and the local Taxi Negotiating Forum twice in August 2019, with a view to accelerating operations over the next 12 months to cover both the Tlhabane and Boitekong corridors.

By January 2020, we expect at least Starter Service IPTN operations to Tlhabane using branded and formalized minibuses. We expect new trunk buses to start running at the same time or shortly thereafter. Simultaneously with the start of operations, the RLM will fast track completion of stations and a depot. I would like to emphasize that if all RLM stakeholders pull together, I foresee the Rustenburg Yarona IPTN system carrying over 20 000 weekday passenger trips by the end of 2020.

17 September 2019 - NW650

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the replies of the former Minister of Transport to questions 1500 on 4 June 2018 and 2728 on 9 October 2018, he has found that the procedure, as set out in section 4(2) of the Air Services Licensing Act, Act 115 of 1990 for the appointment of boards (details furnished), has been followed in respect of the newly appointed members of the Air Services Licensing Board;

Reply:

Civil Aviation Branch

The prescribed procedure for the appointment of the International Air Services Council and the Air Services Licensing Council was followed and members of both the Councils were nominated and appointed as espoused the prescripts of the Acts.

(1)(a) As mentioned above the procedure was duly followed. Section 4(2) of the Air Services Licensing Act, (Act No. 60 of 1990) stipulates that the Minister of Transport has discretionary power to consult with the Aviation industry on the nomination of the Council Members.

(b) There are no steps to rectify since the Air Services Licensing Act, (Act No.115 of 1990) and the International Air Services Act, (Act No. 60. of 1990) have been met in the appointment of the Councils.

(2) No further legal compliance is required. The Members of the Councils were dully nominated and appointed as Council members. The Council members’ appointment was preceded by nominations of people who, in the opinion of the Minister, have appropriate knowledge and experience regarding aviation, or who are well versed in law, finance, transportation or engineering to serve in the Councils as per Section 4 (1).

The nominations were published in the Government Gazette and advertised in the public newspapers for the appointment of members.

The question of dissolving the Councils does not apply since the Councils were dully appointed as prescribed by Section 4 (1) and (2).

17 September 2019 - NW551

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Which international carbon dioxide emissions agreements has the Government agreed to, (b) how does the Government comply to the specified agreements, (c) which measures have been implemented to co-operate with international standards and (d) what measures are put in place to include the civil aviation sector?

Reply:

(a) The international political response to climate change began with the adoption of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992, which sets out a framework for action aimed at stabilising atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases to avoid anthropogenic or human interference with the climate system. The UNFCCC entered into force on 21 March 1994 and now has 195 parties. In December 1997, the third session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) in Kyoto, Japan, agreed to a Protocol to the UNFCCC that commits industrialised countries and countries in transition to a market economy to achieve emission reduction targets. These countries, known as Annex I Parties under the UNFCCC, agreed to reduce their overall emissions of six greenhouse gases by an average of 5.2% below 1990 levels between 2008-2012 (the first commitment period), with specific targets varying from country to country. The Kyoto Protocol entered into force on 16 February 2005, and has been used as the basis for ongoing international climate negotiations. South Africa is Party to both the UNFCCC (“the Convention”) and its Kyoto Protocol.

Following the decision of the Parties to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol that the regulation of emissions from international Shipping will be regulated by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the IMO adopted amendments to the 1973 Convention on the prevention Marine Pollution from international shipping by adopting a Protocol that will regulate as from 1 January 2019 atmospheric pollution from shipping. South Africa is a party to the principal MARPOL Convention including Annex VI regulating energy efficiency of ships. MARPOL Regulations under Annex VI introduces and Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for new ships and the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) for existing ships. As of 1 January 2020, all ships will be required to use fuels of not more than 0.50% sulphur fuel content.

South Africa is a signatory to the Kyoto Protocol agreement which commits state parties to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, based on scientific consensus that (part one) global warming is occurring and (part two) it is extremely likely that human made Carbon Dioxide emissions have predominantly caused it.

Also, in the civil aviation sector: The Government complies by implementing the agreement through its state-owned entities and in cooperation with other aviation sector stakeholders.

(b) One of Government’s key interventions aimed at addressing the challenge of climate change came in the form of the 2011 White Paper on National Climate Change Response, which presents the Government’s vision for an “effective climate change response and the long term, just transition to a climate-resilient and lower carbon economy and society.”

1. The White Paper has two objectives:

Effectively manage inevitable climate change impacts through interventions that build and sustain the country’s social, economic and environmental resilience, and,

Make a fair contribution to the global effort to stabilise GHG concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that avoids dangerous anthropogenic (human) interference with the climate system. One of the White Paper’s key elements in the overall approach to mitigation actions is the adoption of sectoral carbon budgets approach,

2. There are also a number of transport environment flagship programmes that the Department has undertaken in the context of climate change, sustainable development and transitioning to a green economy. These projects will necessitate a high capital investment and are essential in ensuring that the department continues to play a part in lowering carbon emissions.

The Transport Flagship Programmes entails, inter alia:

  • Enhanced Public Transport Programmes,
  • Efficient Vehicles Programme,
  • Government Vehicle Efficiency Programme,
  • Integrated Transport Network Development.

3. The flagship programmes are intended to be developed and implemented over a certain period, while programmes that were already in existence at the time the White Paper, are also adopted and are expected to be rolled-out further. The Department is also meant to develop a sectoral Climate Change Response Strategy that will address measures to be taken by the Department of Transport in relation to climate change. The Department has also developed the Green Transport Strategy which was approved in August 2018, which sets out the environmental policy directive for the transport sector, and also sets out the different modal targets in order to reduce the emissions from the transport sector.

With regard to the maritime sector the Regulations are not in force yet. The Department has finalised drafting the MARINE POLLUTION (PREVENTION OF POLLUTION FROM SHIPS) AMENDMENT BILL, 2019. The Bill will be taken through NEDLAC and the Director Generals Cluster before being presented to Cabinet. Parliament will be requested to prioritise the BILL considering the entry into force of the IMO regulations.

Further, as a member state of the International Civil Organization (ICAO), South Africa complies with the Standards and Recommended Practices of Annex 16, which amongst others, sets limits for the emissions of smoke and certain gaseous pollutants. ICAO’s basket measures to reduce Carbon Dioxide emissions include the following:

Aircraft-related technology development;

Alternative fuels;

Improved Air Traffic Management (ATM) and infrastructure use;

Market-based measures;

Airport improvements; and

Regulatory measures.

South Africa has successfully implemented one measure under Improved Air Traffic management (ATM) and Infrastructure use which is Performance Based Navigation (PBN).

(c) Government also participated and negotiated in the “Paris Agreement” which had to focus equally on mitigation - that is, efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to limit global warming to below 2°C - and societies’ adaptation to existing climate changes. These efforts must consider the needs and capacities of each country. The agreement will enter into force in 2020 and will need to be sustainable to enable long-term change the Paris Agreement and the accompanying COP decision:

  • Reaffirm the goal of limiting global temperature increase well below 20C, while urging efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 0C;
  • Establish binding commitments by all parties to make “nationally determined contributions” (NDCs), and to pursue domestic measures aimed at achieving them;
  • Commit all countries to report regularly on their emissions and “progress made in implementing and achieving” their NDCs, and to undergo international review.
  • Commit all countries to submit new NDCs every five years, with the clear expectation that they will “represent a progression” beyond previous ones;
  • Reaffirm the binding obligations of developed countries under the UNFCCC to support the efforts of developing countries, while for the first time encouraging voluntary contributions by developing countries too;
  • Extend the current goal of mobilizing $100 billion a year in support by 2020 through 2025, with a new, higher goal to be set for the period after 2025;
  • Extend a mechanism to address “loss and damage” resulting from climate change, which explicitly will not “involve or provide a basis for any liability or compensation.
  • Require parties engaging in international emissions trading to avoid “double counting.

South Africa has submitted the following as being the Nationally Determined Contributions for the transport sector:

  • Investment in public transport infrastructure: This type of investment was forecasted at R 5 billion in 2012, and is expected to continue growing at 5% per year. South Africa allocated R1.1 bn in the 2011 and 2012 and budgets to fund “green economy” initiatives and establish a SA Green Fund, which would have to be scaled up in future, including contributions from domestic and international sources;
  • Electric vehicles: $513 billion over 2010 to 2050; and
  • Hybrid electric vehicles: 20% of vehicles by 2030 - $488 billion.

Maritime has ratified Annex VI in 2014 was a measure contribution by South Africa and the process now is to adopt domestic legislation to give effect to the Protocol.

(d) South Africa is adhering to the standards and recommended practices for the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction scheme for international aviation (CORSIA), as prescribed by ICAO. The aim of the scheme is to monitor emissions and control international civil aviation. These measures have been incorporated into the Civil Aviation Regulations, for aircraft operators to comply with. The applicable ICAO standard is contained in the South African Civil Aviation Regulations

17 September 2019 - NW271

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

The Guide for Members of the Executive, dated 8 June 2019, distinguishes between private and administrative offices of the Executive.

a) R58 895 425

b)

Remuneration per annum at specified salary level

Salary level

Job title

Qualification

Job description

1251183

L 14

Chief of Staff

Bachelor of Social Science

Managing staffing and administration in the Ministry, as well as external and internal operations for the Minister/Ministry

1073202

L 13

Private Secretary

Masters in Business Administration

Manage the diary of the Minister, travel bookings and submissions

1073202

L 13

Medial Liaison Officer

Bachelors Degree

Spokesperson for the Minister

1269960

L 14

Community outreach officer

Matric / 15 years experience working in Ministries of Home Affairs, Correctional Services and Defence

Manages special Ministerial projects and stakeholder management

895272

L 12

Assistant appointment secretary

Matric / 15 years experience working in Ministries of Home Affairs, Correctional Services and Defence

Assist with the diary and bookings of the Minister

537432

L10

Secretary/receptionist

Matric / 17 years experience working in Ministries of Home Affairs, Correctional Services and Defence

Fulfil secretarial and receptionist duties

1105641

L13

Portfolio Coordinator

National Diploma: Public Relations

A post created for Ministers responsible for more than one portfolio – in this instance Defence and Military Veterans; including the following entities/Boards Armscor; Castle Control Board; Reserve Force Council; Defence Force Service Commission

17 September 2019 - NW653

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What is the annual contribution by foreign-owned businesses operating within the borders of the Republic to the gross domestic product, in particular businesses owned by (a) Chinese, (b) Pakistani, (c) Somali, (d) Bangladeshi, (e) Nigerian nationals and (f) all others; (2) (a) what number of the specified businesses are registered for value-added tax and pay tax and (b) has he found that this constitutes 100 per cent of all businesses owned by foreign nationals trading within the Republic; (3) whether he has been informed of reports that the Republic allegedly loses R7 billion annually in revenue due to foreign-owned tuck shops that have replaced local spaza shops; if so, (a) can he verify such reports and (b) what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

South Africa has enjoyed substantial Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and seeks to grow FDI in order to improve economic growth. FDI ranges from small investments to billion Rand investments by multinational enterprises.

“Business ownership” structures and compositions are varying in nature. Businesses can be incorporated and established in the Republic for example as either a sole proprietorship, partnership; proprietary limited company and, public company.

The shareholder ownership composition as well can vary between 100% locally owned, 100% foreign-owned, a combination of both local and foreign ownership (i.e. Foreign-owned can include 100%, 50.1%, 25% or something in between). Furthermore, stock exchange listed companies can be owned by persons from over 240 countries worldwide.

Foreign-owned businesses can include companies, sole proprietorships, partnerships and so forth that have indicated to be non-South African in their records with SARS.

The top three countries that contribute to foreign-owned businesses in the Republic are the United Kingdom, United States and Germany.

1. Per the SARS records, the annual contribution by foreign-owned businesses that include but are not limited to companies, sole proprietorships and, partnerships that are trading in the Republic is approximately R2.4 trillion gross income declared per tax returns submitted for the tax year 2017.

(a)(b)(c)(d)(e)(f)

The SARS does not maintain a distinction of foreign-owned businesses based on country of nationality in our records. Our records only reflect the classification of foreign-owned businesses where the taxpayer completed the required indicator or specified the country of nationality.

2. (a) Of the 14 269 foreign-owned businesses on our records, 1 266 are registered and contribute to value-added tax (VAT).

(b) The VAT return filing rate is 52.09% with a correlating VAT payment compliance rate of 88.15% as per the SARS annual report for 2018/19. SARS is on an ongoing journey to improve compliance and close the tax gap through compliance interventions in both the formal and informal sectors.

3. The report in question Shifting Market Frontiers: Africa Rising indicates that South Africa has an estimated annual revenues of R7 billion from “spaza shops” that are operated in the Republic that can be owned by both South Africans and Foreign nationals.

There has been no record or evidence found that “the Republic allegedly loses R7 billion…”, it has been noted per aforementioned report that the “estimated annual revenues of R7bn, spaza shops are a significant retail channel in South Africa, especially in townships and informal settlements. This stems from the fact that their business structure is established to cater to the buying patterns, rising purchasing power and product preferences of consumers living there”. As such, spaza shops play a vital role in serving local communities as part of the informal economy.

This segment does contribute to indirect taxes (Value-add Tax) through their purchasing from suppliers and direct taxes (Income Tax) on their income earned. SARS endeavors to expand efforts through our outreach programme by way of clarification, awareness and education to improve compliance efforts with traders alike.

17 September 2019 - NW575

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What number of (a) security, (b) cleaning and (c) general worker personnel who work in buildings, facilities and all other infrastructure are employed through tenders obtained by their companies or third party service providers at the (i) Development Bank of Southern Africa and (ii) SA Revenue Service; (2) what total amount does the Development Bank of Southern Africa and the SA Revenue Service spend from their current budget on security, cleaning and general worker personnel who work in their buildings, facilities and all other infrastructure?

Reply:

DBSA

Number of workers: (None of these workers sourced through tenders since insourcing dates)

Personnel

Number

Comments

Cleaning

19

DBSA insourced the cleaning workers June 2015

Security

15

DBSA insourced the security workers July 2016

General workers

22

Consist of all Facilities’ workers excluding Manager, Supervisors, Cleaning and Security staff – general workers always permanent employees of DBSA

Total amount spend FY 2018/19: (Total Cost to Bank)

Personnel

Rand

Cleaning

3,425,033

Security

6,402,059

General workers

5,158,569

SARS

1. SARS has contracted, through service providers,

a) eight hundred and thirty one (831) security officers on a contractual basis and one hundred and seventy (170) on an ad-hoc basis for annual SARS peak periods that include the tax filing season and the festive season increase experienced at Ports of Entries;

b) seven hundred and sixty nine (769) cleaning personnel deployed by the appointed service providers for the SARS offices nationally;

c) no general workers are contracted by SARS.

2. Estimated spend on security service providers who are contracted to safeguard all SARS buildings, facilities and infrastructure is approximately R150 million per annum. SARS spends on average R69.6 million per annum on cleaning services nationally. SARS has not contracted any general workers through service providers; therefore no spending has been done in this regard.

17 September 2019 - NW684

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the National Public Transport Regulator applications for tourism transport operating licenses, (a) why is there incomplete and insufficient information online in this regard, (b) what is being done to improve online information and (c) why are applicants required to provide a route when making such applications?

Reply:

a) The National Land Transport Act of 2009, which is the blue print for the processing and issuing of operating licences together with supplementary information such application forms and templates, checklists indicating requirements, accreditation guidelines, question and answer booklet are available on the website.

b) The online information is updated as and when there are changes to the requirements and to post notices and announcements.

c) Regulation 36 (5) (b) of the National Land Transport Regulations of 2009 provides that an operating license for tourist services must stipulate the area within which the vehicle may be operated, which may be within a province, across provinces or the Republic as a whole.

16 September 2019 - NW869

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether professional scouts are involved in the Rural Sport Development Programme; (2) what number of talented young persons participating in the specified programme, who have been scouted and nurtured, are currently playing at a professional level nationally or internationally since the inception of the Rural Sport Development Programme in 2016; (3) how is the mandate of the Rural Sport Development Programme different than that of the provincial sport federation?

Reply:

(i) Yes. There are professional scouts involved in the Rural Sport Development Programme. They are provided by the Provincial Federations.

(i) A total number of 58 talented young persons have been scouted and nurtured since 2016.

(ii) Below is the information on the level of participation of the talented athletes;

EASTERN CAPE

a) Two Boys and 1 Girl were scouted for Athletics in the 2017 National Rural Sport Championships

b) Four Netball Girls were scouted by Netball South Africa at National Rural Sport Games in 2017

FREE STATE

a) Victor Mlangeni was signed by Mamelodi Sundowns School of excellence trough football trials

b) Twelve football players scouted and attended trials hosted by SAFA School of Excellence

c) Eight Athletes were scouted and attended Free State Athletics Championships

d) Lerato Tshabala Athletics participant was scouted in the Free State Athletics Championships and qualified for National Championships in 1500m

GAUTENG

a) The Football Team from Magaliesburg has been promoted to Sasol League. It should be noted that the Programme in Gauteng has two Traditional Council and three farming communities.

KWA ZULU NATAL

a) The following athletes from Maphumulo Traditional Council, Mongezi Langa (100m and 200m in athletics), Olwethu Manana (400m in athletics) have progressed to participate in the South African Championships. Candice Khumalo (400m in athletics) has progressed to participate at the Provincial Athletics competitions.

b) Mfundo Mchunu from the Maphumulo Traditional Council has signed with Wits Academy.

c) Sambulo Nxumalo and Sandiso Mchunu were selected for provincial U15 Rugby. They are both from Mnqobokazi Traditional Council.

d) Nelisiwe Madonsela and Lindokuhle Chonco have progressed to participate at the Provincial Schools Athletics Championships. They are from Ama Swati Traditional Council.

e) Onelihle Mkhize has progressed to participate at National Schools Championships. She is from Kwa Xolo Traditional Council.

NORTHERN CAPE

a) Three Boys football players were scouted for Schools of excellence in Gauteng

MPUMALANGA

a) One player is now part of the Rugby Pumas Club

NORTH WEST

a) Two Boys football players have been scouted and joined Florida Academy in Gauteng

(i) The Rural Sport Development Programme is a development programme conceptualized and implemented in conjunction with the National Federations and the Provincial Federations as well as other key stakeholders such as the Provincial Departments, National House of Traditional Leaders, Provincial Houses of Traditional Leaders.

16 September 2019 - NW613

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

CASTLE CONTROL BOARD:

Question 613 (a)(ii): for (aaa) 2017/2018

(aa) Cleaning – nothing spent

(bb) Security – nothing spent

(cc) Gardening services – nothing spent

(a)(ii): for (bbb) 2018/2019

(aa) Cleaning – nothing spent

(bb) Security – nothing spent

(cc) Gardening services – nothing spent (kindly note that a service provider was appointed on 1 March 2019 through a Department of Defence process and funding at the cost of

 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

REPLY

a) (i) During 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years, the Department of Military Veterans (DMV) spent R2 887 000.00 on Security Services utilizing a service provider named Red Alert. The Department did not utilize a service provider for both cleaning and gardening services.

(aaa) During 2017/18 financial year, DMV spent R1 448 000.00 on security services – service provider called Red Alert

(bbb) During 2018/19 financial year, DMV spent R1 439 000.00 on security services – service provider called Red Alert

(b) and (c) as per the below table, total amount paid per service provider per year is indicated

Services Provided

FY2017/18

 

FY2018/19

Service Provider

Cleaning

Nil

Nil

No service provider

Security

R1 448 000.00

R1 439 000.00

Red Alert

Gardening Services

Nil

Nil

No service provider

 

MILITARY OMBUD

The Office of the Military Ombud incurred the following expenditure:

 

Ser No

Description

FY2017/18

FY2018/19

a.

b.

c.

1.

Cleaning Services

R214,310.58

R253,275.66

2.

Security Services (Property)

-

R93,150.00

3.

Gardening Services

-

-

 

 

DEFENCE FORCE SERVICE COMMISSION

REPLY

(a) (ii): (aa) 2016/17 – Nothing spent

(bb) 2017/18 – Nothing Spent

(cc) 2018/19 – Nothing Spent

b)         Nothing

c)         Nothing

                       

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

REPLY:

  1. The Logistics Division (Directorate Procurement Management) obtained the data from State Information Technology Agency (SITA), through the office of Director Budget Control (DBC) at the Finance Management Division (FMD). Transactions paid by cash account system (CAS) are excluded, as neither the Finance Management System (FMS) nor any other system in the Department of Defence (DOD) makes provision for the retrieving/obtaining of such information. The amount spent by the DOD on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017/18 and (bbb) 2018/19 financial years is as indicated in Appendix A. The amount that was paid to each service provider for to provide each specified service is indicated in Appendix B and the total amount that was paid to each of the service providers is as indicated in Appendix C.

ARMSCOR

REPLY

16 September 2019 - NW397

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the post of chief executive officer (CEO) of certain hospitals in Limpopo (names furnished) is filled; if not, (a) why not, (b) since what date has each specified hospital been without a permanent CEO and (c) on what date will each vacant post be (i) advertised and (ii) filled; if so, what (aa) is the name of each CEO, (bb) are the qualifications and experience of each CEO and (cc) is the term of each CEO’s contract; (2) what are the (a) details of the term of each acting CEO in each specified hospital and (b) qualifications and experience of each acting CEO?

Reply:

1. The table below reflects the details in this regard:

a) The CEO for Letaba Hospital has been transferred to another hospital in the Province.

b) Only Letaba Hospital has been without the CEO since 01 February 2019.

c) (i) The post of the CEO of Letaba Hospital will be advertised as soon as the former CEO has vacated the post on PERSAL.

(ii) The post will be filled after the recruitment process has been concluded.

(aa), (bb) and (cc) refer to the attached spreadsheet

Hospital

CEO Post status

(aa)

Incumbent

 

(bb)

Qualifications and Experience

(cc)

Contract Term

Letaba Hospital

Acting

Sibuyi MV

 

Bachelor of Dental Therapy

21 yrs

On secondment

Van Velden Hospital

Filled

Selatlha JM

 

MBCHB

10 yrs

N/A

Maphutha Malatji Hospital

Filled

Peta MR

 

BA: Nursing Science

38 yrs

N/A

2. (a) The Acting CEO of Letaba Hospital has been seconded to the Hospital.

(b) The Acting CEO has 21 Experience as the manager.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW733

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De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total costs of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to the guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts and who sponsored the gifts? NW1778E

Reply:

In response to the above-mentioned questions:

1. (a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) hosted a Stakeholder Engagement Session after the Minister’s Budget Vote on 16 July 2019 at Radisson Blue Le Vendome in Sea Point, Cape Town.

(b) The Stakeholder Engagement Session was sponsored by AFGRI, Fruit-SA, Distell, Poultry SA and Ocean Group Limited. The cost of the sponsorship is as follows:

Venue and entertainment–R225 768, 00

Beverages–R25 000,00

Branded corporate gifts–R136 102, 50

(c) Captains of the industry and stakeholders from the sector were invited to attend the Minister’s Budget Vote and the Stakeholder Engagement Session after the Budget Vote.

2. (a) Corporate gifts given to attendees were branded power banks, pens and diaries sponsored by Poultry South Africa.

16 September 2019 - NW730

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether his department still regards the SA Doping Control Laboratory (SADoCoL) as a strategic national asset in anti-doping, as previously expressed by his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the new Director-general of his department will continue with the negotiations with SADoCoL in order to render support to the laboratory; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will this happen; (3) whether his department has given the World Anti-Doping Agency any assurance of its intended financial support to SADoCoL; (4) whether, once the non-profit organisation is established, his department still intends to proceed with the registration of SADoCoL as a sporting body; (5) Whether, in view of the fact that since the start of negotiations between his department and SADoCoL in 2015, there were three changes in Ministers of the department, he and his department will now fully support SADoCoL?

Reply:

The Department still regards the South African Doping Control Laboratory (SADoCol) as a strategic national asset in anti-doping. SADoCol is the only Doping Control Laboratory accredited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in the African Continent. The proper and effective operations of the SADoCol is therefore critically important for the country, the region and the entire continent.

The Acting Director General is planning to meet SADoCol at least by 15 October 2019 to continue with the co-operative work undertaken to date.

The Department has previously provided WADA with the letter of intended support to SADoCol.

It is the intention of the Department to register SADoCol as a sporting body to enable the Department and Government in general to work with and support the Laboratory on Anti-doping matters.

It should be noted that the final status of incorporation for SADoCol will have to be in line with the WADA prescripts which seeks to safe guard the independence of the Doping Control Laboratory from external influence.

Recognizing the strategic significance of the SADoCol as outlined in (1) above, the Department remains committed to support the Laboratory.

16 September 2019 - NW727

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) total cost and (b) detailed breakdown of the cost incurred since the establishment of the Commission of Inquiry into tax administration and governance by the SA Revenue Services?

Reply:

a) The total cost of the Commission of Inquiry into Tax Administration and Governance by the South African Revenue Services (SARS) from inception to date is R8,106,113.00.

b) The detailed breakdown of the cost incurred is tabulated:

Economic Classification

Expenditure 2018/19

Expenditure 2019/20

Compensation of Employees

R205 838

-

Goods and Services (Legal Advisory Services)

R6 908 582

R991 692

Machinery and Equipment

-

-

Total SARS Commission

R7 114 421

R991 692

16 September 2019 - NW632

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The Department of Trade and Industry does not pay for these services individually to service providers, since it is participating in a Public Private Partnership Agreement as approved by the National Treasury.  A unitary payment for an all-inclusive campus office accommodation, including services such as security, cleaning, gardening, is paid to the concessionaire party. 

The Economic Development Department, Competition Tribunal, Companies Tribunal, and the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) occupy space at the dti campus and pays the dti a monthly facility fee which covers all expenses related to occupation, including cleaning, security and gardening.

In addition, we have requested information from public entities. Five of the replies are set out below. Additional information will be provided shortly.

 

  1.                 The entities:

Entity

(a)(ii)(aa) (aaa)

Cleaning

(a)(ii)(bb)(aaa)

Security

(a)(ii)(cc)(aaa)

Gardening

(a)(ii)(aa)(bbb)

Cleaning

(a)(ii)(bb)(bbb)

Security

(a)(ii)(cc)(bbb)

Gardening

(b) Amount paid to each service provider for each specified service

 

(aaa) 2017-2018

(bbb) 2018-2019

 

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

R417 089

R584 674

Not Applicable

R458 933

R658 775

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Masana cleaning service – R849 446
  • Zwito cleaning – R26 576

 

 

Security

  • Tactical gardening – R773 668
  • Selkirk security services- R469 781

 

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

R176 825

R53 981

Not Applicable

R237 333

R281 346

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Monabo – R398 321
  • Serra – R15 837

 

Security

  • Mode – R249 783
  • Chubb – R14 696
  • Hestritix- R70 847

National Metrology Institute of South Africa  (NMISA)

R124 459

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

R135 658

R467 517

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Sanitech Hygiene – R260 118

 

Security

  • Rhinoforce protection services R467 517

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

R906 522

R1 562 124

N/A

R915 531

R1 932 148

N/A

Cleaning

  • Botho Ubuntu Cleaning – R630 577
  • Masana Hygiene Services (Pty) Ltd – R953 820
  • Neledzi Cleaning Services R52 457
  • F And O Specialised Cleaning – R56 190
  • PSU Services – R129 007

 

Security

  • ADT Nothern Cape – R24 505
  • ADT Security Guarding Division – R21 225
  • ADT Security FS, NW and Nelspruit – R33 245
  • Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd – R6 664
  • Corporate Business Security – R11 538
  • Marshal Nights Security Service (NEF HQ) – R3 388 415
  • Enforce Security Services – R430
  • Fohla Security – R368
  • National Security & Fire T/A Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd – R7 879

National Gambling Board (NGB)

R83 323

R4 104

N/A

R72 053

R115 120

N/A

Cleaning

  • Plus Infinity Office Cleaning – R98 042
  • Bidvest Prestige Cleaning – R57 334

 

Security

  • Fidelity Security – R5 427
  • ADT – R2 550
  • Bidvest Protea Coin Security – R111 247

16 September 2019 - NW564

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, since 1994, the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan to (a) certain persons (names furnished) and/or (b) any company of which any of the specified persons is a direct or indirect shareholder or director; if so, in each case, (i) on what date was each such loan granted, (ii) to which company was the loan granted, (iii) for what amount was the loan and (iv) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. None of the persons in question have been identified as having received funding from the IDC over the period in question.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW862

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether the Government budgeted for the 2019 All Africa Games; if not, why not; if so, what amount was budgeted; (2) whether there were any arrangements that the SA Football Association (SAFA) would not participate in the games; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of any agreements made; (3) did the Government assist the (a) SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) and (b) SAFA to secure funding to go to Morocco; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) who (a) granted SAFA the permission to participate in the games and (b) is responsible for covering SAFA’s costs for participating in major events and/or tournaments?

Reply:

(1) No. The Government did not specifically budget for the All Africa Games.

(ii) Government provide an annual funding to the South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC).

(iii) SASCOC determines the split of the funds allocated towards various projects including the African Games.

SAFA, which qualified for the games via the CAF process of qualification as early as February already, and as such were not bound by the criteria for qualification stated by SASCOC, which had in any event not been approved by the Members

(i) SAFA (as with the other member federations) had notice in respect of SASCOC’s selection policy for the African Games 2019.

(ii) In respect of delivering Team SA to the African Games 2019 and as per the applicable selection policy, football was not a qualifying code.

(iii) The selection policy had as its basis that only those codes of sport that needed to participate in the African Games for purposes of gaining the necessary qualification to participate in the 2020 Olympics, would be part of Team SA for these games.

(IV) The policy was motivated due to SASCOC not being able to fund a larger team to attend these games.

(i) Government assisted SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) to secure funding to go to Morocco. This as part of the support provided to SASCOC over the quadrennial towards preparation and delivery of teams at various multi-coded events including the African Games.

(ii) Given the constrained budget allocated to the Department, the Department could only provide additional funding to SASCOC in previous financial year by cutting the allocation to the Federations. This could not be repeated for consecutive years.

(iii) The time at which SASCOC wrote to the Department indicating the inadequacy of the budget did not allow for any engagement of corporate for possible sponsorship.

(i) Government does not support individual codes for participation at the multi-coded events. This is because participation at multi-coded events such as the African Games is through SASCOC.

(i) SAFA, following an appeal to SASCOC and subsequently the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture, were granted permission by SASCOC after the Minister’s intervention to SASCOC, understanding the SAFA appeal and statement of facts around this matter.

(i) The approval for SAFA to participate in the African Games 2019 came from the intervention of the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture. In a letter dated 15 August 2019, the Minister issued a directive in terms of section 13 of the National Sport and Recreation Act.1998 (Act No. 110 of 1998 as amended), for SASCOC to grant SAFA to participate in the African Games 2019.

(i) In respect of costs, SAFA has at all times taken full responsibility for its own costs in all major events, with no support from other stakeholders, other than the related sponsors who fund the relevant teams

(i) With reference to the African Games 2019, SAFA paid for all the registration participation, travel and accommodation costs to attend these games. No costs of SAFA attending these Games were covered by SASCOC.

(ii) Should SAFA have qualified in terms of SASCOC’s approved selection criteria to be a part of Team SA in attending major events and/or tournaments then SASCOC would have met the cost of attendance as with any other qualifying sport code.

(iii) One of the main reasons for adopting the selection policy that resulted in a reduced team to the African Games 2019 was due to SASCOC not being in receipt of the requisite funds to be able to cover the cost of a larger Team SA size.

16 September 2019 - NW351

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed that the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) is yet to publish a list of accredited tertiary medical institutions as recognised by his department and as indicated in item 6 on the Policy Guideline on the Requirements for Practice of Medical Professionals in South Africa, 2018; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the full relevant details of the steps that he intends to take in order to expedite regulatory compliance by HPCSA as this matter is seemingly at the very core of the problem that South African foreign qualified medical doctors are facing today in terms of having a recognised foreign qualification?

Reply:

1. The list of accredited tertiary medical institutions as recognised by the Health Professions Council of South Africa is as follows:-

  • Stellenbosch University
  • Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
  • University of Cape Town
  • University of the Free State
  • University of Pretoria
  • University of Witwatersrand
  • Walter Sisulu University
  • University of Kwa Zulu Natal
  • University of Limpopo

2. As a creature of statute, the HPCSA and Boards powers are confined to those conferred by the statute creating them and limited to the Republic of South Africa. The HPCSA thus endeavours to run its operations in accordance with the relevant Act and Regulations.

In this regard, the HPCSA will soon be embarking on a process to review the regulations and rules in their entirety so as to address any gaps identified in the course of application of the said rules and regulations.

It is envisaged that this process will be completed in a few months and that the above concern will be addressed in the process.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW754

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

1. Whether his department hosted any event and or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as guest; 2. whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

1. The department did not host a budget vote event or function. However, the department had an exhibition at the old Assembly Chamber courtyard for a total amount of R198 455. 04

2. The Department did not give out gifts.

16 September 2019 - NW425

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) number of new-born babies have died in public (i) hospitals and (ii) clinics (aa) in each of the past four years and (bb) since 1 January 2019 and (b) has he found to be the main causes of the deaths; (2) whether any investigations have been conducted into the mortality rate of new-born babies in the public health-care system; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) details of the recommendations?

Reply:

(1) (a) The following table reflects the details in this regard

(Neonatal deaths in hospitals, Community Health Centres and Clinics, 2015-2019

(aa)

(bb)

 

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

(i) Neonatal deaths/1000 live births: Hospitals (public and Private)

16.3

15.3

14.8

14.5

14.6

(ii) Neonatal deaths/1000 live births: clinics and CHCs (public only)

0.9

1.1

1.5

1.2

1.2

(b) The main causes of newborn deaths (source: Saving Babies Report, 2014-2016) are:

i. Immaturity related causes;

ii. Hypoxia;

iii. Infections, mostly associated with HIV; and

iv. Congenital abnormalities.

(2) (a) Relevant details of investigations in causes of mortality:

The National Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality Committee - a Ministerial Committee appointed since 2012 is mandated to report on the number and causes of neonatal mortality. The Committee reviews data from all available sources such as the District Health Information System, the Perinatal Problem Identification Programme and StatSA data to determine mortality rates. The Committee prepares reports and presents the report to the Minister and the National Health Council.

(b) Details of recommendations:

Recommendations to reduce neonatal mortality (Saving Babies Report, 2014-2016) are:

i. Scale up Helping Babies Breathe skills;

ii. Continue with the implementation of the management of small and sick neonates programme;

iii. Continue with scale-up of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) intervention;

iv. Focus on intrapartum care; and

v. Scale up Basic Antenatal Care plus.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW709

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) total cost and (b) detailed breakdown of the cost incurred since the establishment of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry to Inquire into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, chaired by the Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo?

Reply:

a) A total amount of R356, 127 million has been spent since the establishment of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry to Inquire into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State up to 31 August 2019 as tabulated below:

Financial Year

Expenditure

             R’000

2018/19

244 573

2019/20 As at 31 August 2019

111 553

Total Spent

356 127

 

b) The table below provides a detailed breakdown of the cost incurred since the establishment of the Commission:

 

16 September 2019 - NW732

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports Arts and Culture

In light of the general feeling from the arts fraternity that the Districts Consultations and Provincial Summits were not well organized (details furnished), what total number of artists attended District Consultations in each province; 2. (a) what has he found to be the reason that his department organized the District Consultations and Provincial Summits even though the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) has not yet been dissolved and (b) why does he intend to go to the CCIFSA National Conference without allowing the CCIFSA to have an annual general meeting first; 3. does his department have all necessary reports and audited financial statements prior to his attending the National Conference, as delegates never received any reports and the CCIFSA Interim Committee never accounted by submitting audited financial statements of about R5 million and yet his department continues to fund CCIFSA; 4. what (a) exactly is the status of the National Conference and (b) total amount has his department given to CCIFSA so far, including money given for the Usiba Conference and Awards?

Reply:

1. In my view, the Districts Consultations and Provincial Summits were well organized and went according to the CCIFSA NEC’s plan. The total number of voting participants across all nine provinces were a total of 2223.

2. (a). My department engaged on the District Consultations, which were held under the umbrella of (District General Meetings) and Provincial Summits as an emergency intervention after seeing that CCIFSA was failing to achieve the planned Conference.

(b) I had indicated in the past that CCIFSA was encouraged to continue with its programmes and related activities, however I cautioned CCIFSA that this should not delay the conference further as it was long overdue already in March 2019 and that their term of office had lapsed and other stakeholders such as CITT were adamant that the conference should be held in order to appoint a new leadership.

3. My department received all necessary reports and audited financial statements from CCIFSA prior to the National Conference. As this was a CCIFSA Conference, the CCIFSA National Executive Committee (NEC) was responsible for the content of the conference including distribution of the reports to their delegates at their own accord. The role of the department was only to provide strategic support and logistics coordination in order for CCIFSA NEC to achieve the implementation of the conference. The Interim Committee was able to account to the Department for the funds provided by submitting reports and audited financial reports.

4.(a).The National Conference took place in August 2019 and a new CCIFSA leadership was elected comprising of 6 National Executive Committee members and 9 Sector Representatives.

(b). The total amount given to the CCIFSA so far amounts to R15 million inclusive of the funds provided to the Interim Committee, the amount given for the Usiba amounts to R12 million.

16 September 2019 - NW522

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Water and Sanitation to question 3369 on 7 October 2015, and question 3370 on 7 October 2015, what is the (a) current status of the construction of the new (i) water purification plant in Bloemhof in the North West and (ii) pipeline from Bloemhof to Schweizer-Reneke and (b) expected date of completion of each project; (2) what (a) is the current total cost of the construction of the (i) plant and (ii) pipeline and (b) costs were incurred in respect of each contractor employed to date?

Reply:

(1)(a) (i) The new water purification plant in Bloemhof is at 89% completion.

(ii) The entire pipeline from Bloemhof to Schweizer-Reneke is 60km long. However, my Department is currently working on the construction of the first 11km. The progress is at 50% towards completion.

(b) Both the water purification plant and the 11km pipeline will be completed in December 2019 and the plan is to complete the entire project by December 2020.

(2)(a) (i) The current total cost of the construction of the plant is R120 million.

(ii) The current total cost of the construction of the pipeline is R278, 490,800.

(b) The costs incurred in respect of the contractor for the Water Treatment Plant is R75 580 million, and for the pipeline it is R21 980 million. This includes the fees of the engineers.

16 September 2019 - NW636

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What is the status of the B-BBEE Commission investigation into the case number: 3/7/2017 between certain entities (details furnished), (b) on what date was the case first brought forward to the commission and (c) when will the (i) investigation be completed and (ii) findings released?

Reply:

The B-BBEE Commission has advised me that the complaint was lodged on 31 July 2017; that the Respondent in the matter requested that alternative dispute resolution processes be used, which was agreed to by the complainant and that this process has not resulted in an agreed outcome. The Commission issued its preliminary findings on 2 September 2019. The respondent has 30 days to respond and thereafter the B-BBEE Commission will issue its findings.

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW867

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) What number of sport academies were (a) directly supported or is budgeted for by his department in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years and (b) planned for the 2018-19 financial year; (2) what (a) is the name of each specified sport academy, (b) type of support did each sport academy receive and (c) total amount was allocated to each sport

Reply:

We support the initiative of Sport Academies because our vision is to upskill and professionalise the craft whether be the athlete or the artists.

Financial year

2016-17

2017-18

2018-2019

Number of Sport academy supported

38

39

55

Budget

R41,454,000

R56,064,000

R56,212,840

 

 

Name of the academy

Type

Province

1

Eastern Cape Provincial Academy

Provincial

EC

2

Sarah Baartman District Academy

District

EC

3

Amathole District Academy

District

EC

4

Buffalo City District Academy 

District

EC

5

Chris Hani District Academy

District

EC

6

Joe Gqabi District Academy

District

EC

7

OR Tambo District Academy

District

EC

8

Alfred Nzo District Academy

District

EC

9

Nelson Mandela Metro District Academy

District

EC

10

Free State Provincial Academy of Sport

Provincial

FS

11

Lejweleputswa

District

FS

12

Thabo Mofutsanyana

District

FS

13

Fezile Dabi

District

FS

14

Mangaung metro

District

FS

15

Provincial Academy

Provincial

GP

16

Sedibeng

District

GP

17

West Rand

District

GP

18

Ekurhuleni

District

GP

19

University of Johannesburg (HPC)

District

GP

20

Tshwane

District

GP

21

Prime Sports

Provincial

KZN

22

KZN Canoe Club

District

KZN

23

Football for Life

District

KZN

24

Rugby

District

KZN

25

Midlands

District

KZN

26

Athletics

District

KZN

27

Cricket

District

KZN

28

KZN Provincial Academy

District

KZN

29

Masidlalesonke

District

KZN

30

Club 10

District

KZN

31

Limpopo Academy of Sport

Provincial

LP

32

Capricorn

District

LP

33

Waterbe rg

District

LP

34

Sekhukhune

District

LP

35

Mopani

District

LP

36

Vhembe

District

LP

37

Mpumalanga Sports Academy

Provincial

MP

38

Ehlanzeni

District

MP

39

Nkangala

District

MP

40

Gert Sibande

District

MP

41

NC Academy of Sport

Provincial

NC

42

Namaqua District A

District

NC

43

ZF Mgcawu District

District

NC

44

North West Academy

Provincial

NW

45

DR Ruth SM

District

NW

46

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

District

NW

47

Ngaka Molema M

District

NW

48

Bojanala academy

District

NW

49

Western Cape Sport Academy

Provincial

WC

50

Eden District Academy

District

WC

51

West Coast District Academy

District

WC

52

Cape Winelands District Academy

District

WC

53

Central Karoo District Academy

District

WC

54

Overberg District Academy

District

WC

55

Metro academy

District

WC

 

The Provincial and District Academies are mainly provided with financial support through the Conditional Grant funding. This support is for training, resourcing of Academies, provision of athlete support and provision of support to Sport Focus Schools.

(i) Funding for the Academies Programme is not allocated per sport. It is allocated per Province which in turn further allocate to the Academies within Province.

16 September 2019 - NW455

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Health

Whether all community health care workers in the Western Cape have been integrated into the public health system; if not, why not, if so, what is their remuneration package?

Reply:

Community Health Workers (CHWs) in the Western Cape Department of Health (WCDoH) are contracted through the local Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs). When the Public Health and Social Development Sectoral Bargaining Council (PHSDSBC) Resolution 1 of 2018 agreement between the Department of Health and the Labour Unions on the standardisation of the Community Health Worker Remuneration was communicated to all provinces, the WCDoH indicated that the agreement does not apply to them as their model of contracting CHWs is different from that of the National Department of Health. This matter was also discussed in the National Health Council (NHC) meeting of 28 February 2019 wherein the same argument was presented. The NHC decided that all provinces should pay CHWs through PERSAL except for the Western Cape.

This meant that the WCDoH could continue with their contractual arrangement that is, contracting CHWs through NPOs.

The WCDoH also defended their argument in the PHSDSBC in response to a dispute that was referred by a Labour Union, NUPSAW, on the interpretation of Resolution 1 wherein an award was made as follows:

  • Resolution 1 of 2018 applies and binds the WCDoH;
  • As a result of the WCDoH not having Health Care Workers in its employ, it has no obligation to implement Resolution 1 of 2018.

It is for the reasons stated above that the WCDoH is contracting CHWs through local NPOs.

With regards to the remuneration package, the WCDoH complies with Resolution 1 agreement. CHWs are remunerated at R3,500 per month.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW783

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016 – 17, (bb) 2017 – 18 and (cc) 2018 – 19 financial years: (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black – owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state – owned entities reporting to him went to each black – owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

a) (i) Dirco

Total Amount = R 0

b) (ii) ARF

Total Amount = R 0

(aa) Financial year 2016-17

Total amount paid: R 0

(bb) Financial year 2017-18

Total amount paid: R 0

(cc) Financial year 2018-19

Total amount paid: R 0

16 September 2019 - NW791

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state-owned entities reporting to her went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

CASTLE CONTROL BOARD

1)(a)(ii): (aa) 2016/2017 – R 19 768.57

(bb) 2017/2018 – R 0.00

(cc) 2018/2019 – R 0.00

(2)(b): for (i) 2016/2017 – R 12 768.57 (Independent Newspapers) and

R 7 000.00 (Ruben Richards Foundation)

(ii) 2017/2018 – nothing spent

(iii) 2018/2019 – nothing spent

(2)(c): for (i) 2016/2017 – nothing spent

(ii) 2017/2018 – nothing spent

(iii) 2018/2019 – nothing spent

MILITARY OMBUD

The Office of the Military Ombud incurred the following expenditure:

Ser No

Description

FY2016

FY2017

FY2018

 

a.

b.

c.

d.

1.

Advertisements: Recruitment

R360000.00

-

R480000.00

2.

Marketing Adverts

-

-

-

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

1 (a) Advertising Spent for Department of Military Veterans:

(aa) In 2016–17 was R 3 715 781, 51

(bb) In 2017-18 was R 2 626 847, 19

(cc) In 2018–19 was R 2 463 573, 20

REPLY:

DEFENCE FORCE SERVICE COMMISSION

1.  (a)(ii): (aa) 2016/17 – Nothing spent

(bb) 2017/18 – nothing spent

(cc) 2018/19 – nothing spent

2. (b): (i) 2016/17 – Nothing Spent

(ii) 2017/18 – Nothing spent

(iii) 2018/19 – Nothing Spent

3. (c): (i) 2016/17 – Nothing spent

(ii) 2017/18 – Nothing spent

(iii) 2018/19 – Nothing spent

 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

Costing of Advertorials, Publications, Awareness Campaigns

2016

350 Years of the Castle of Goodhope: A year-long commemoration of the History of the Castle.

Armed Forces Day - Port Elizabeth: February 21, 2016

Recruitment

R4,878,248.93

2017

Centenary of the sinking of the SS Mendi (100 Years)

Armed Forces Day – Durban/Pietermaritzburg: February 21, 2017

MSDS Recruitment

R8, 539,139.24

2018

Minister of Defence Budget speech 2018

United Nations Peacekeepers Day

Return of the SS Mendi Bell

Centenary of Battle of Squarehill (100 Years)

Armed Forces Day – Kimberley: February 21, 2018

Notices – July 2018

Calling on Nominees for Defence Force Service Commission

R4, 547,874.00

2019

Minister of Defence Budget Speech 2019

Armed Forces Day – Cape Town: February 21 2013

Notices – Repeat May 2019

Calling on Nominees for the Defence Force Service Commission

R7,941.180.43

16 September 2019 - NW563

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, since 1994, the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan to (a) certain persons (names furnished) and/or (b) any company of which any of the specified persons is a direct or indirect shareholder or director; if so, in each case, (i) on what date was each such loan granted, (ii) to which company was the loan granted, (iii) for what amount was the loan and (iv) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. Only two individuals were identified as having received funding from the IDC. These are set out below:

Siyabonga Cwele

On 23 November 2007, the IDC approved a funding amount of R3.1 million and a R5 million performance guarantee to Prop 5 Corporation. The person in question was listed as a director, at the time. The R5 million performance guarantee was never called on and it expired in 2009. R 5 027 769,75, which includes interest, has been repaid on the loan provided.

Gwen Ramakgopa

Between 2012 and 2018, the IDC provided funding totalling R110.45 million to Kiaat Private Hospital. Dr Ramakgopa was appointed by Nozala as a director to Kiaat Private Hospital but she subsequently resigned. No repayment has been made yet as the hospital faced several operational and financial challenges. The facility has been restructured.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW567

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to the 10 disciplinary cases and three suspensions in the Annual Performance Plan for 2019-2022 of his department, (a) what are the reasons for each (i) disciplinary action and (ii) suspension being instituted against each person, (b) what is the job title of each person in each case, (c) what are the reasons each disciplinary case has not been finalised and (d) how long has each person been suspended; (2) has each person in each case been receiving a monthly salary; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1564E

Reply:

The Director General’s Office has compiled a detailed list in response to the question, as well as the reasons for delays, which I attach below, and I have taken note of the challenges the Department notes with regard to completion of some cases of disciplinary action.

Clearly, it is necessary to review the systems relating to disciplinary matters to enable a fair and expeditious process of completing such cases, as lengthy periods of suspension of staff on full pay is not in the interest of the public nor of the employees concerned. I have asked the Director General to consider appropriate ways, within the legislative framework and prescripts to avoid lengthy suspensions in future.

The response of the Corporate Management Services Division of the Department to the question is as follows:

“It should be noted that there is a general challenge in the Public Service with regard to acquiring experienced chairpersons for disciplinary proceedings. The reasons provided by trained chairpersons are due to the shortage of staff in their own areas, reluctance to deal with complex cases as well as the fact that the chairperson needs to be on a more senior level than the employee who is being charged.

Cases cannot proceed before forensic reports are concluded as thorough work needs to be done prior to an employee being charged for misconduct. In a number of cases, the forensic reports were awaited for the Department to have a sound case.”

 

Reason for Disciplinary Action

Job Title

Reasons why matter has not been finalised

Length of suspension

1

Gross Negligence

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement for the recordings to be availed and software had to be procured for the reproduction of the recordings. Challenges were experienced with the recordings and the disciplinary enquiry was scheduled for 13 June 2018 and 5 July 2018 but had to be postponed. The matter was escalated to the Director-General for a decision.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

2

Disgraceful Conduct

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement. The matter was postponed to 14 and 27 March 2018, 7 June 2018, 22 June 2018, 27 June 2018. The sanction was issued.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

3

Dereliction of duties

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement as he challenged the level of the initiator. The matter was responded to in writing and the hearing took place on 13 April 2018. Another request was received for postponement by the employee and postponement was granted until 9 May 2018. Further hearings were conducted on 29 May 2018 and 16 July 2018. The matter was withdrawn.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

4

Alleged fraud

Assistant Director

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a chairperson and initiator in the matter.

N/A

5

Disgraceful Conduct

Deputy Director

The employee has resigned shortly after he was charged. The matter has been finalized.

N/A

6

Dereliction of duties

Deputy Director

Reasons: The employee was suspended pending the disciplinary process. Challenges were experienced to acquire the services of a chairperson as well as initiator. The precautionary suspension was lifted and he resumed duties. Counsel was appointed to advise on the matter and a legal opinion was received.

Status: The Department is in the process of appointing the initiator and chairperson.

N/A

7

Gross Negligence and Dishonesty

Chief Director

Reasons: The Department appointed on two occasions, chairpersons to chair the internal disciplinary enquiry and the employee requested the matter to be referred to the GPSSBC for appointment of an arbitrator. The disciplinary enquiry chaired by an arbitrator from GPSSBC took place on 8 and 15 May 2017. The Commissioner recused himself because he had foreknowledge about the case. Another Commissioner was secured. The enquiry took place on 4 and 5 July 2017 and a referral to CCMA was received. The arbitration at the CCMA was concluded on 20 November 2017.

The matter was set down at the GPSSBC on 26-28 March 2018. The employee party requested the Commissioner to recuse herself from the proceedings, because they were of the opinion that the Commissioner was biased. The Commissioner recused herself from the proceedings and the GPSSBC appointed a new Commissioner. The matter has been set down for 3 August 2018, 20 May 2019, 24 June 2019 and 2-4 July 2019.

Status: The parties are awaiting the outcome.

N/A

8

Disgraceful/

unprofessional conduct

Chief Director

Reasons: The employee referred the matter to the GPSSBC after suspension and various postponements were experienced. The Director-General notified the GPSSBC of the delays and the need to expedite the process. They are, however, of the view that there is a need to strictly follow due process.

Status: The disciplinary enquiry took place on 3-5 April 2019, 24-25 April 2019, 15 May 2019 and 11-12 June 2019. The Department concluded the testimonies of all its witnesses and the employee also concluded the testimony of one (1) of his witnesses. The employee is currently on the stand and the matter has been postponed until
14 and 18 October 2019.

729 days

9

Alleged Fraud

Trade and Invest Advisor

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a Chairperson and Initiator in the matter.

325 days

10

Alleged Fraud

Director

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a Chairperson and Initiator in the matter.

235 days

2. Each of the officials mentioned above received their monthly salaries, in line with the provisions of Clause 7.2(a) of PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2003: “Disciplinary Code and Procedures for the Public Service” and Clause 2.7(2)(a) of Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook of 2003, as amended: “Disciplinary Code and Procedures for Members of the SMS”.

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW731

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) has a selection policy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether it is his department or SASCOC that is responsible for funding the participation of Team SA at the African Games that are scheduled to take place in Morocco from 16 to 31 August 2019; (3) What amount was (a) allocated to SASCOC for Team SA to participate in the African Games and (b) requested by SASCOC in this regard? NW1776E

Reply:

1.1 The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) does have a selection policy. It has a General Eligibility and Selection Criteria which was ratified by the SASCOC General Assembly on 9 June 2018.

a) The Department makes direct payment to African Games Organizing Committee (COJAR) for participation fees and allocates an annual allocation to SASCOC part of which is to cover costs towards the African Games.

a) The total amount of R10,963,000 is allocated to SASCOC for the 2019/2020 financial year. This amount is not earmarked for African Games nor split per project. It is SASCOC that determines the split of the amount based on their priorities as per their business plan.

b) There was no specific amount requested by SASCOC for the African Games except that SASCOC indicated that the estimated cost for the African Games was R20,000,000.

16 September 2019 - NW562

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan since 1994 to certain persons (names furnished) and/or any company of which each of the specified persons is a shareholder, direct or indirect, or director; if so, (a) on what date was each loan granted, (b) to which company, (c) for what amount and (d) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date in each case?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. Only two individuals were identified as having received funding from the IDC. These are set out below:

Tokyo Sexwale

In February 2005, the IDC provided funding to a BEE consortium to which Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments was party to. Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments is a subsidiary of Mvelaphanda Holdings, in which the individual in question is the Chairman. The funding amount provided was R126 388 617.50 to Mvelaphanda. R287 276 627.50 was repaid, which includes dividends and interest on the facility.

In 2006, IDC provided a funding amount of R4 million to Business Century Publishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual in questions is the chairman of Mvelaphanda Holdings which is a 35% shareholder in Business Century. R 832 500 was repaid. The company ceased operation and was liquidated in or about October 2008.

During the period 2013/14, the IDC provided a funding amount of R30 590 000 to Delimazi (Pty) Ltd in which the person in question was a Private Equity Investor. R 23 440 000 has been repaid to date. The film performed poorly as a result of strong competition.

Iqbal Surve

The IDC has found records of funding captured in October 2002 for an amount of R50.6 million. It relates to a facility that was signed in July 1998, provided for the acquisition of Premier Fishing Group Ltd’s 80% shareholding in Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual has 51% shareholding in Sekunjalo Investments (Pty) Ltd and is a Director of Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. An amount of R65 million was repaid on the facility as full and final settlement to the IDC’s exposure.”

-END-