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13 October 2022 - NW2543

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Noting that most correctional centres are without functional electrical fences and flood lights, what measures have been taken by his department to fully insource the protection services of its correctional centres, without delegating responsibility to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI)?

Reply:

All Protection services at correctional centres under the management of the Department of Correctional Services (DCS) are insourced not outsourced. The Department has further diversified the Infrastructure Procurement Strategy by appointing additional Implementing Agents to fast-track infrastructure projects, inclusive of maintaining fences and Integrated Security Systems (ISS) in order to be less reliant on DPWI.

During the 2021/2022 financial year the Department implemented contracts to maintain Integrated Security Systems (ISS) at prioritised correctional centres. These contracts included the maintenance of existing security fences which are equipped with detection systems.

In addition, under 2022/23 financial year, the Department has finalised the planning and design for the implementation of 36 month maintenance contracts on ISS. The tender was advertised during June 2022, and will be implemented by the Independent Development Trust (IDT). The proposed contracts will include the maintenance of security fences, access control systems, detection systems, monitoring systems and lighting systems. A 09 Kilometre perimeter fencing project at Mthatha Management Area, inclusive of a patrol road, is currently under construction, which is implemented by the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA).

Furthermore, on a frequent basis the Department conducts maintenance of fences under the auspices of the day-to-day maintenance allocation and in terms of the Capital allocation.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW2916

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

In view of the success of the social housing programme relies on, amongst other things, the creation of more sustainable social housing institutions and the development of mechanism for better social housing management, what (a) has her department done to (i) develop and capacitate social housing institutions and (ii) develop a mechanism for social housing management and (b) mechanism in place for the monitoring and evaluation of the social housing programme

Reply:

(a) (i) & (ii) Capitation and mechanisms are largely driven through Institutional Investment Grant (IIG) support which include training, incubation, and project packaging support summarised as follows:

Social Housing Training rolled out, nineteen (19) training sessions were conducted reaching over a thousand participants countrywide. Topics included Introduction to Social Housing, Planning and Project Packaging a Social Housing Project, Governance Training, Property Management and Social Housing Institution Accreditation Process training. To increase accessibility, reach and raise awareness the training has been converted to a series of short 5-10 minute videos available on the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) website.

Incubation Programme – in the 2021/22 financial, year, nine (9) Social Housing Institutions (SHI) received support under this multi-year programme. Two of these we successful in registering potential Social Housing Projects in the pipeline and received further grand funding to carry out project feasibility studies on these projects. One of these SHIs has since began with construction of the project and has been provided with legal support around contracting.

Pre-Accreditation Grant support – five (5) emerging companies are supported for Accreditation.

(b) Through compliance monitoring on the performance of institutions areas of poor performance and areas of improvement are identified. Tenancy audits and building condition audits undertaken by SHRA have led to the development and implementation of remedial action plans.

Failure to adhere to the remedial actions identified would then result in enforcing powers of intervention (section 12 of the Social Housing Act 16 of 2008) permits the SHRA to undertake forensic investigations and in instances where maladministration is identified seek for a high-court application to place the institution under administration.

The Social Housing Act 16 of 2008 specifies that the delivery of sustainable Social Housing requires participation of National Government, Provincial Government, Local Authorities, and the Regulator.

As a schedule 3A public entity, the SHRA under the Human Settlements portfolio is required to comply with the legislative prescripts such as the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 and the Department of Public Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) revised framework for Strategic and Annual Performance Plans. The National Department of Human Settlements is in the process of a mid-term review of its programmes.

13 October 2022 - NW2914

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) With reference to the State of the Cities Report released earlier this year by the South African Cities Network, which indicates that 1 in 5 people in Johannesburg and Cape Town live in Informal settlements, and in my view of the fact that Cabinet has approved just over 14 000 hectares made up of 167 portions of land held by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure for release for human settlements development and the portions of land will be held by the Housing Development Agency, while the programme is aimed at providing the poor and marginalised access to land in urban areas. (a) What criteria will be used to allocate land, (b) on what date is it envisaged within this current financial year that the reported 7000 hectors of land will be released and (c) what plans does the Government have in place to ensure delivery of services to those who settle on the land?

Reply:

(1)(a) The identified and targeted land parcels are required for the implementation of various key human settlements programmes which include upgrading of informal settlements, rural housing programme, social housing, integrated residential development programme, title restoration programme (tenure upgrading) and the finance-linked individual subsidy programme. The respective programmes, therefore provide for criteria for allocation of completed units with preference being given to local qualifying beneficiaries residing within the specific localities where the projects are located.

The generic qualification criteria for housing subsidy and therefore land allocation are the following:

  1. A lawful resident of South Africa or in possession of permanent residence status.
  2. Legally competent to contract.
  3. Not yet benefited from government housing assistance.
  4. Married or cohabiting.
  5. Single with financial dependents, must reside permanently with the applicant.
  6. Single persons without financial dependents – apply for purchase of a vacant serviced site or rental accommodation.
  7. Monthly household income (proof of income required), R0 – R3500 for a full housing subsidy, R3501 – R 22 000 for a partial subsidy known as Finance Linked Individual Subsidy Programme (FLISP).

(1)(b) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has already released 2491 hectares of land located in all nine provinces and seventeen municipalities for human settlements development purposes.

DPWI targets to conclude the release of over 7000 hectares of land for human settlements by the end of the current financial year. Additional land parcels have also in the meantime been identified by various municipalities for human settlements development including emergency housing

(1)(c) The Housing Development Agency works with the respective municipalities and the provinces to ensure joint development planning of the released land parcels. This includes coordination and monitoring of infrastructure planning and budgeting for the required services to support human settlements projects.

13 October 2022 - NW2865

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the (a) full details of the progress with regard to the R255 million Free State asbestos corruption case and (b) reasons that it has taken so long to arrest the former Head of the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements, Ms. Ann Diedricks?

Reply:

a) The Free State Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that 13 accused have been charged by the State and are going to appear in the Bloemfontein High Court on the 23rd of September 2022. Amongst the individuals charged are the following: former HOD of the Department and three current employees namely the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Director responsible for Project Management and the Director responsible for Supply Chain Management.

b) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements did not open a criminal case against the former Acting Head of the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements. The appropriate organ of state to respond to this Question is the Free State Directorate of Priority Crimes Investigation (DPCI) which is investigating the matter.

 

13 October 2022 - NW2545

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What specific measures does he have in place to address the issue of rising fuel prices in the Republic?

Reply:

Government was able to cushion the consumers at the height of these increases by selling strategic crude reserves as well as foregoing some revenue. In addition a 10 cent demand side management levy was removed for inland provinces.

13 October 2022 - NW2901

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Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of shelters (i) are registered with her department and (ii) does her department support and (b) amount in terms of financial support does each shelter receive?

Reply:

a) The department of social development has a total number of 147 shelters

(i) There are 147 shelters, which are registered with the department of Social Development.

(ii) While 125 are run by non-governmental partners and are financially supported by the government.

b) These shelters received financial resources amounting to about R 700 million from government. Below is a table containing a breakdown of the shelters and the amounts distributed by provincial departments of social development between 2019-2023 financial year.

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF SHELTERS

BUDGET ALLOCATION

Financial Year

 

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Eastern Cape

13

37 686 000.00

38 188 000.00

30 867 000.00

31 732 000.00

Free State

07

5 194 000.00

5 439 000.00

4 277 014. 09

4 214 044 .00

Gauteng

25

30 734 000.00

32 511 000.00

35 309 000.00

34 894 000.00

KZN

23

23 819 627.32

24 837 489.70

26 791 682.20

29 750 230.94

Limpopo

1 Funded

317 500.00

317 500.00

317 500.00

317 500.00

 

01 Government Run

   

4 108 000.00

12 541 000.00

Mpumalanga

22

21 598 000.00

18 098 000.00

24 251 000.00

25 218 956.00

North West

22

14 360 200.00

14 000 000.00

15 984 800.00

15 954 800.00

Northern Cape

07

5 894 078.82

6 191 880.00

7 631 292.77

8 107 000.00

Western Cape

26

26 462 976.00

37 706 606.00

33 572 256.00

32 569 409.00

Total

147

166 066 382.14

177 289 475.70

183 109 545.06

195 298 939.94

13 October 2022 - NW2844

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total (a) number of employees of her department have been fingered as perpetrators of scams and other illegal activity, (b) the number of cases and or complaints have been brought against her department and its employees in this regard and (c) amount did it cost her department in the past five financial years?

Reply:

a) Two officials were fingered in allegations of illegal activities.

b) Two cases were referred to the Department and one criminal case was opened with the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the matter is currently in court and the other matter is still under investigation within the department; and

c) The Department lost an amount of R320,0000.00, during 2018/2019 financial period through two fraudulent payments and the other matter was reported in 2022/2023 financial period. The matter is still under investigation and the determination of financial implications will be concluded once the investigation has been completed.

13 October 2022 - NW2485

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has been advised that (a) residents in Mkhuhlu, Ndubane, Mashonamini, Johnella, Madras and Buyelani in Bushbuckridge are reportedly dying of thirst due to the lack of a water supply and of the danger the situation is posing to the residents of the villages, (b) in 2018, as many as 5 000 standpipes and water meters were installed in the 40 villages in Bushbuckridge, but that the treated water does not reach the reservoir as farmers, residents and residents who recently got land from chiefs unlawfully tap into the bulk water pipe of 62 km, (c) half of the potable water is captured and (d) the municipality says they cannot stop the damage to state infrastructure and theft of water treated at a high cost; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the details of the steps he has taken in this regard; (2) whether the residents’ request for a borehole is receiving his attention; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) time frames that his department has set to act and positively address the request and (b) further relevant details in this regard. (3) whether he has found that the Bushbuckridge Local Municipality is failing to provide water to the villages; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a-c)The department has been advised that there are villages that do not have twenty-four hour access to water due to leakages caused by unauthorised and illegal connections, which also impacts the water pressure and adequate supply to villages. The municipality has a rationing programme in place to ensure that all residents have access to water. Bushbuckridge Local Municipality has been advised to implement the water conservation and water demand management and COGTA is part of the Task Team to ensure that it is implemented in order to ensure water availability to communities.

(d) The municipality has a duty to enforce its by-laws by ensuring that farmers and residents that have illegally connected into the water infrastructure are held liable through penalties to curb and regulate water consumption.

2. The Bushbuckridge Local Municipality has reported that there are two boreholes supplying villages in the Bushbuckridge area, furthermore, one is functional and the other one in the Buyelani Village, had to be decommissioned due to frequent vandalism. This village receives water through bulk water supply, although it is also impacted by the illegal connections. Once the Hoxani Bulk water scheme is finalised, water supply will improve in the long term.

3. As indicated above, the municipality is not able to meet the demand for water supply due to unauthorised connections and water losses. However, there is an ongoing project to replace the asbestos pipeline which is planned for completion in the 2024/25 financial year. The replacement of the asbestos pipeline with a steel pipeline will significantly reduce water losses and improve water supply to the area.

The municipality is also implementing a project to install an additional clear water pump at the Hoxane WTW which will increase the volumes pumped by the plant from 22 Ml/day to 31 Ml/day to the Ndonga reservoir that supplies the villages in Bushbuckridge. The Hoxani Bulk Water Supply Scheme project, which is due to commence at the beginning of 2023/24, will also improve water supply to the villages in Bushbuckridge when is completed. The completion of the Hoxani Bulk water scheme will increase the water supply to full capacity of 36 Ml/day.

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13 October 2022 - NW2763

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What total amount has his department spent on external consultants in the period 1 May 2019 to 31 May 2022?

Reply:

a) The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development spent R537 million on external consultants between 01 May 2019 and 31 May 2022, as depicted on the table below:

DEPARTMENTAL SPENDING ON CONSULTANTS FOR THE PERIOD 01 MAY 2019 31 MAY 2022

Description

Periods

Total

 

01 May 2019 - 31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial Year

2021/2022 Financial Year

01 April 2022 - 30 May 2022

 

Department

R29 241 527.43

R30 552 650.95

R46 646 953.27

R4 968 853.16

R111 409 984.81

State Capture Commission

R222 144 229.73

R100 013 032.00

R103 414 189.44

R142 294.00

R425 713 745.17

Total

R251 385 757.16

R130 565 682.95

R150 061 142.71

R5 111 147.16

R537 123 729.98

12 October 2022 - NW3318

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). (a). Which sporting code are the biggest challenge for the International Institute for Drug-Free Sport and (b) what is the similar sporting code record in the Republic? (2). whether the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport intends to propose a world ranking list to the International Institute for Drug-Free Sport of countries with sporting codes that are guilty of contravention of anti-doping regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details. (3). whether he has been informed of the ranking of the Republic on any international body for drug-free sport; if so, (a) what is the Republic’s ranking, and (b) on which institute’s list?

Reply:

There is no organization that we know as International Institute for Drug-Free Sport.

12 October 2022 - NW3354

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his replies to questions 1988 0n 15 June 2022 and 1989 0n 15 June 2022 in the context of his constitutional obligations to account and to provide reports concerning matters under his control, what are the reasons that he, as the executive authority, does not directly furnish Mr TW Mhlongo with the information, instead of referring to third party submissions only?

Reply:

In terms of Section 13 (5) (b) (ii) of the National Sport and Recreation Act, the Minister is debarred from involvement in matters of administration in sport. The Section states that “The Minister may not interfere in matters relate to administration of sport and appointment of or termination of the service of the Executive Members of the sport or recreation body.

In addition, the Federations are Non-Governmental Organizations and as such are independent of Government. The matters referred to are administrative and are Human Resources related and as such are dealt with in terms of policies governing employer and employee relationships.

Minister urges the Hon. Member to familiarise himself with the policies and legislation referred to above.

12 October 2022 - NW3342

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). With reference to his department requesting information about the Theatre & Dance Policy Consultative Conference that was scheduled to take place on 2 and 3 September 2022, what amount was a certain person (name furnished) and/or his organisation and/or associates paid for their engagement to drive the policy conference. (2) whether his department issued an open and transparent call for bids regarding the tender; if not, how did his department elect the specified person’s organisation to drive the policy conference; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The total project amount awarded is R993 000, 00, and is inclusive of the policy conference amongst other deliverables as outlined in the response to Parliamentary question 3343.

2. The Departmental applied its internal SCM Procurement Process through Request for Quotations (RFQ) which is within an R1 000 000, 00 quotation threshold recommended by SA Treasury.

12 October 2022 - NW3319

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1(a). What percentage of the budget of the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport was spent on education related to anti-doping in the 2021-22 financial year, (b) which sporting codes received the most attention, and (c) what type of educational programmes are used to prevent the use of prohibited substances. 2(a). from what age and/or stages in sporting codes do anti-doping start and (b) what is the motivation for such early intervention?

Reply:

1(a). The South African Institute for Drug–Free Sport (SAIDS) in their response indicated that (a) Due to COVID restrictions and the increased use of webinars, only 2% of the budget was spent on education in 2021/22 years. Generally, expenditure on education is in the region of 10% and expenditure has been further supplemented by a Lottery Grant over the past five years.

(b). Rugby received the most attention pertaining to anti-doping education.

(c). The intervention is in the form of webinars, workshops, and outreach at tournaments.

2(a). With the co-operations of schools and national sports federations, SAIDS has delivered anti-doping talks and outreach to as young as Grade 8 level.

(b). Some sports codes have young athletes that participate at an elevated level (provincial/national) at an early age. Sports such as swimming, gymnastics, and track & field receive anti-doping education services at an earlier age.

12 October 2022 - NW3343

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). With reference to the Theatre & Dance Policy Consultative Conference that was scheduled to take place on 2 and 3 September 2022, for which a certain person (name furnished) was awarded R993 000, (a) how was the amount awarded, (b) was there a public call for expressions of interest, (c) what are the terms of reference between the specified person and his department and (d) what are the budget line items. (2). what are the reasons that people and/or institutions who made submissions have been excluded from the conference when they have clearly demonstrated knowledge, expertise and an interest for engagement in the policy development process. (3). whether the conference has invited 20 delegates from each province; if not, what number was invited; if so, how (a) were the delegates selected and (b) do their skills and talent base reflect the nine focus areas of the conference?

Reply:

1. The amount awarded is based on the three quotations which were received. They were assessed and an appointment was made.

2. A Request for Quotations (RFQ) for a project within R 1 000 000, 00 Treasury Threshold was used.

3. Terms of References were detailed as indicated herein below:

This is a national policy which requires participation and input from DSAC, Task Team, Provincial Departments and theatre and dance sub sector organizations. The service provider will therefore be required to work closely with all indicated stake holders.

The service provider to use Treasury Remuneration rates (Category C Subcategory C2) to pay 18 Task Team Members attending National conference.

The service provider to submit a project close out report by September 30, 2022.

(d) This budget came from Goods and Services Budget item of the CCID Budget

2.According to the best knowledge of the Department no people and / organizations were deliberately excluded at the expense of the other hence a virtual link was created as an additional platform for everyone to participate in the conference.

1. The conference invited 10 Provincial Delegates per province.

a) These delegates were selected through a process that involved Theatre and Dance Task Team Members and Provincial Departments.

b) The guideline was to select active theatre and dance stakeholders who have insight and vision of how theatre and dance sector should be transformed to address the nine focus areas of the conference.

12 October 2022 - NW2927

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to the European Union’s claims that the Republic’s temporary ban on the export of scrap metal is not aligned to the trade deals of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), what further steps has his department and/or the Government taken to (a) illustrate that ban of scrap metal is in line with the position of other states that have banned the sales of scrap metal and (b) ensure that it is not in contravention of WTO agreements in this regard?

Reply:

South Africa’s infrastructure is being stripped at an unprecedented rate with a substantially negative impact on government, citizens and the economy. The objective of the proposed measures (which include prohibition on scrap metal) is likely to lead to a material reduction in the theft of metal from the country's infrastructure. The details setting out the rationale for and proposed modalities of such restriction, were published in the Government Gazette for public comment.

Over the past decade research has pointed to 26 developing and developed countries (the latter including the European Union) who have imposed different forms of restrictions on the export of scrap metal for a variety of reasons, including environmental reasons or to ensure domestic supply. Some countries have imposed export restrictions on scrap metal to curb criminality and the destruction of infrastructure.

Government has consulted with external lawyers regarding the legality of the proposed measures and believe them to be compliant with international trade obligations.

-END-

12 October 2022 - NW3431

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. Having heard how the creativity of Solomon Linda was abused by white persons both locally and abroad, what measures have been taken to assist poor, vulnerable and uneducated artists, so that they are not exposed to the same exploitation and slavery by unscrupulous producers and record company executives?

Reply:

We have vigorously supported the initiative by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition in the development of the Copyright Amendment Bill and Performers Protection Bill, which have since been by the National Assembly and has sent them to the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) for concurrence. The main aim of the two bills is to protect the interest of the creative workers.

 

12 October 2022 - NW3494

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). what is the status of (b) structures in each province; (2) what are the details of support programme offered by SA Rugby to the deaf sevens rugby team in view of their participation in the 2023 world cup in Cordoba, Argentina in 2023?

Reply:

South African Rugby provided the following information in response to the question;

There are no deaf rugby clubs in South Africa, all deaf rugby players play for amateur clubs in their area of residence, which is understandably problematic. SADRA’s aim is to implement more programmes in future to enable player numbers to grow and to establish their own clubs.

The South African Deaf Rugby Association (SADRA) has a footprint in the following provinces:

  1. Eastern Cape
  2. Free State
  3. Gauteng
  4. KwaZulu-Natal
  5. Limpopo
  6. Mpumalanga
  7. Northwest
  8. Western Cape.

The relationship with SADRA is governed by a memorandum of agreement entered in 2018. SADRA has their own governance structures and is responsible to source its own money, sponsors, and partners. SADRA is responsible for their own development and building its footprint. SA Rugby assist SADRA on their request. The following is the support provided by SA Rugby to SADRA.

  1. Ensures access to BokSmart training programs and courses for all SADRA members. It was made accessible to deaf and hard-of-hearing people.
  2. Ensures SADRA participants have access to SA Rugby/World Rugby Coaching, Referee and Club administration courses.
  3. Supports SADRA events.
  4. SA Rugby provided SADRA with funds in 2022. This support will be repeated in 2023.
  5. SA Rugby has applied for funding to the Department for Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) for a grant in aid (Funding) on behalf of Deaf Rugby.
  6. SA Rugby is assisting SADRA with an application to the Lotto. Due to governance reasons at SADRA prior to the appointment of their new President, this is currently work in process.
  7. SA Rugby is committed to contributing certain items (kit) for the men and female teams for the 2023 World Cup Sevens in Cordoba, Argentina 2023.
  8. The participation of the female team is under consideration and subject to the availability of player resources that is currently being investigated by SADRA.

12 October 2022 - NW3535

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport Arts and Culture

(1) whether his department intends to facilitate a soccer and/or football indaba of the SA Football Association (SAFA); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how far are the preparations. (2)(a) on what date is it envisaged that the football indaba will be held, (b) what is the total budget for the indaba, (c) what are the challenges his department is experiencing with regard to the indaba and (d) what steps has he taken to put pressure on safa to ensure that the soccer indaba takes place; (3) how far are the negotiations with SAFA regarding school sports? NW4350E

Reply:

1. Yes. The Department is working with SAFA to host a Football Indaba. The goal of the National Football Indaba is to objectively assess all facets of the South African football system, identify the challenges, problems, critical failures, and success factors and formulate a turnaround plan and/or approach to reposition and restore South African football as a premier sport in the country. The concept documents and draft programme for the indaba are in place, however, a suitable date is yet to be confirmed.

2(a). No date has been confirmed as yet, however, on 03 October 2022, the Department met with SAFA and resolved that the Indaba would take place in the 4th quarter of 2022/23, ideally in February 2023. SAFA committed to confirm a date by 14 October 2022.

(c). The budget for Indaba has not been determined. The budget is dependent on the final plans, operations, and logistical arrangements.

(d).The challenge has been in terms of coordinating the diaries of all the key stakeholders considering a range of factors such as the National, Continental and International Football Calendar. It is worth noting that 2022 concludes the full cycle of SAFA Vision 2022 which would form the basis of the review and Indaba Agenda. This was resolved at the last meeting held with SAFA.

(e). There has not been any reason or need identified to pressure SAFA.

3. SAFA is working closely with the Department in terms of the implementation of Schools Football, whereby football is part of the Winter National School Sport Championship. Subsequently, both parties with the Department of Basic Education manage the participation of the two winning schools in the continental championship. Additionally, SAFA and the Department jointly launched the FIFA ‘Football for Schools’ programme, which is to be officially rolled out in the fourth quarter of the current fiscal year. SAFA further provides technical support by offering the training of educators and school-linked volunteers in coaching and refereeing.

12 October 2022 - NW3446

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) By what date will provisions be made for local platforms such as radio, television and museums through which artists will be able to express their craft within their communities and improve tourism and (b) how will his department discourage artists from migrating to Johannesburg in order to build their profile?

Reply:

(a). In as far as the craft sector is concerned the Department is looking to set up a permanent national exhibition, the Beautiful Things Exhibition (BTE), alongside an outlet for transactions, in City of Tshwane to provide craft practitioners from all parts of the country with an opportunity to showcase and derive economic benefit from their products by February of 2023. The last edition of BTE was at the Graskop Gorge in March of 2022, and now the Department intends to set this up as a permanent exhibition to provide a national platform for crafters.

In as far as performing arts are concerned the Department is engaged in consultative discussion with previously marginalized Provinces: (i) Northern Cape – Northern Cape Theatre was refurbished by DSAC and launched on 15 December 2021, (ii) Limpopo - Limpopo Theatre site has been identified, design approved and the Mpumalanga Theatre Feasibility Study Report has been submitted, (iv) Eastern Cape - Mandela Bay Theatre Complex was launched in May 2021 to establish creative spaces (provincial theatres). The intention is to retain talents within local spaces in these Provinces through the provision of theatres for development and promotion of local talents.

(b). The intention is to provide an opportunity for participation to craft producers without them seeing the need to migrate to the cities to build their profile. Furthermore, the Department, working with the Department of Small Business Development and other strategic partners collaborate better to support targeted market access platforms.

12 October 2022 - NW3332

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether the Government has provided any financial support and /or loans to Zimbabwe in the past five financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) In the past five (5) financial years, the Government of the Republic of South Africa has not provided any financial support and/ or loans to Zimbabwe.

b) However, following an appeal for assistance from the Zimbabwean Government, the South African Government, through the African Renaissance Fund (ARF), provided R50 million worth of humanitarian aid to Zimbabwe following the 2019 Cyclone Idai which destroyed infrastructure and left scores of people homeless and without food. The aid was in the form of 450 000 x 12,5 kg of maize meal procured from South Africa and delivered to Zimbabwe. This project was completed in February 2022.

12 October 2022 - NW3317

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

(1). what (a) number of anti-doping tests were carried out by the SA institute for drug-free sports (SAIDS) during 2022 rugby craven week held at Rondebosch in cape town and (b) were the results. (2). what number of players in each region participated in the 2022 Rugby Craven week (3). whether any players were tested by SAIDS in the qualifying and / or preparation games prior to the rugby craven week; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African Institute for Drug – Free Sport (SAIDS) in their response indicated that (a) 995 of the players participating in the 2022 Craven Week were tested in both out-of-competition and in-competition tests (b) No players tested positive for banned substance during the 2022 Rugby Craven week.

(2). The South Africa Rugby Union (SARU) in their response indicated that a total of 2843 players participated in the 2022 Craven Week. Of the total number 2153 players participated in the Boys Youth weeks and 690 participated in the Girls Youth Weeks.

(3). Yes, players were tested, and no one tested positive for a banned substance.

 

12 October 2022 - NW2933

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With reference to the reply to question 1102 on 17 May 2022, on what dates were each of the Chief Directors, currently earning a salary at level 15, appointed at the specified salary level at the (a) national and (b) provincial level; (2) what are the reasons that the Chief Directors in the (a) Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Health and (b) Gauteng Department of Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation are earning a salary at level 16; (3) what are the reasons that heads of department in some provincial departments are earning a salary at level 15 and in other provinces they are earning a salary at level 16; (4) What are the reasons that the project manager in the Department of Education is earning a salary at level 16?

Reply:

1. The dates on which each of the Chief Directors, currently earning a salary at salary level 15, were appointed on this salary level at the (a) national and (b) provincial level are indicated in the table below:

Dates on which each of the Chief Directors earning a salary at salary level 15 were appointed on that level

as on 28 February 2022

Province

Department

Component

Job title

Event date

         

Eastern Cape

Education

 

Chief Director: Financial Management Services

2021-10-01

Free State

Office of the Premier

 

Chief Director

2006-01-01

Gauteng

Human Settlements

 

Chief Director

2013-12-01

 

Office of the Premier

 

Chief Director

2010-08-01

       

2014-04-01

 

Provincial Treasury

Infrastructure Financing Agency

Chief Director

2013-09-01

     

Chief Director: Project Finance

2016-11-01

   

Provincial Treasury

Chief Director

2000-11-01

KwaZulu-Natal

Finance

 

Chief Director: Municipal Finance

2010-12-01

 

Public Works

 

Chief Director: Corporate Services

2003-05-01

Limpopo

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

 

Chief Director: Commercial Operation

2017-06-01

National

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

Chief Director: Monitoring & Evaluation

2009-12-01

     

Chief Director: National Rural Youth Service Corps

2010-12-01

     

Chief Director: Policy Research

2012-04-01

 

Basic Education

 

CD: Strategic Planning Research & Co-Ordination

2011-10-01

 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

 

Chief Director L14

2008-04-01

       

2012-01-01

       

2012-04-01

 

Government Communication and Information System

 

Chief Director: Content And Writing

2009-04-01

     

Chief Director: Entity Oversight

2015-07-01

     

Chief Director: Provincial And Local Liaison

2013-03-01

 

Health

 

CD: CCOD & Occupational Health

2014-12-19

     

Chief Director

2010-04-01

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

 

Chief Director: Economic Growth & Global Relations

2014-06-11

 

National Treasury

Government Technical Advisory Centre

Chief Director: Financial Management

2008-12-01

     

Chief Director: Transaction Advisory Services

2007-09-01

   

National Treasury

Chief Director: Legal Tax Design

2014-05-01

     

Chief Director: Legislation

2008-07-01

     

Chief Director: Regulatory Impact Assessment

2005-11-01

     

Chief Director: Tax Specialist

2009-01-26

     

Chief Director: Technical Support Services

2013-09-01

     

Chief Director: Information Technology

2012-02-01

     

Chief Director: Legal Services

2012-04-01

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

 

Chief Director: Education & Skills

2010-08-01

     

Chief Director: Frontline Monitoring & Support

2016-12-01

     

Chief Director: Health

2013-04-01

     

Chief Director: Social Cohesion Protection & Gender

2011-04-01

 

Public Service and Administration

 

Chief Director: Human Resource Development.

2012-12-01

 

Statistics South Africa

 

Chief Director: Price Statistics

2012-05-01

     

Chief Director: Programme Office

2002-05-01

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

 

Cd: Investment Promotion & Facilitation

2015-04-01

     

Chief Director: Consumer And Corporate Regulation

2014-05-01

Western Cape

Transport and Public Works

 

Chief Director

2001-02-01

Data source: PERSAL

2. The reason why the KwaZulu Natal Department of Health is paying the Chief Director: IDMTS on salary level 16 is because an offer of employment was made to him, by the Development Bank of South Africa, on a salary package which fell within salary level 16 in the Public Service. In order to retain his services, a counter-offer was made by the department on the nearest higher salary package compared to the offer received.

The Chief Director in the Gauteng Department of Economic Development, paid on salary level 16, was appointed as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site and Dinokeng Projects on 1 January 2022. This was done in accordance with the approved organisational and salary structure below:

3. The appointments of heads of departments on salary level 15 and others on salary level 16 is based on the service delivery model of the departments. Furthermore, the size of the departments is also taken into consideration, including client group, geographical distribution and the availability of funds within the Department. As a result, the upgrading of the Head of the Department leads to the upgrading of the lower level posts including the performer level and such leads to an increase in the compensation of employees (CoE), hence the discrepancies of salary levels.

4. This information resides with the Department of Basic Education and will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon it is available.

End

12 October 2022 - NW3384

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Sport Arts and Culture

What are the reasons that the (a) Mangaung African and Cultural Festival is held in Mangaung every year despite the Department making a loss and (b) same company from Johannesburg is awarded the rights to host and prepare the whole C Square, thereby overlooking local companies?

Reply:

(a). The Mangaung African and Cultural Festival is owned by the Free State Department of Sport, Arts, Culture, and Recreation. The Provincial Department will be in a better place to provide clarity on the rationale for hosting the event in Manguang without considering any other region in the Free State Province.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended with amendments.

QUESTION NO. 3431-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30 SEPTEMBER 2022: INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 37 2022

“Mr. B S Madlingozi (EFF) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. Having heard how the creativity of Solomon Linda was abused by white persons both locally and abroad, what measures have been taken to assist poor, vulnerable and uneducated artists, so that they are not exposed to the same exploitation and slavery by unscrupulous producers and record company executives? NW4233E

REPLY

We have vigorously supported the initiative by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition in the development of the Copyright Amendment Bill and Performers Protection Bill, which have since been by the National Assembly and has sent them to the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) for concurrence. The main aim of the two bills is to protect the interest of the creative workers.

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION NO. 3446-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30 SEPTEMBER 2022: INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 37 - 2022

Mr K Ceza (EFF) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) By what date will provisions be made for local platforms such as radio, television and museums through which artists will be able to express their craft within their communities and improve tourism and

(b) how will his department discourage artists from migrating to Johannesburg in order to build their profile? NW4251E

REPLY

(a). In as far as the craft sector is concerned the Department is looking to set up a permanent national exhibition, the Beautiful Things Exhibition (BTE), alongside an outlet for transactions, in City of Tshwane to provide craft practitioners from all parts of the country with an opportunity to showcase and derive economic benefit from their products by February of 2023. The last edition of BTE was at the Graskop Gorge in March of 2022, and now the Department intends to set this up as a permanent exhibition to provide a national platform for crafters.

In as far as performing arts are concerned the Department is engaged in consultative discussion with previously marginalized Provinces: (i) Northern Cape – Northern Cape Theatre was refurbished by DSAC and launched on 15 December 2021, (ii) Limpopo - Limpopo Theatre site has been identified, design approved and the Mpumalanga Theatre Feasibility Study Report has been submitted, (iv) Eastern Cape - Mandela Bay Theatre Complex was launched in May 2021 to establish creative spaces (provincial theatres). The intention is to retain talents within local spaces in these Provinces through the provision of theatres for development and promotion of local talents.

(b). The intention is to provide an opportunity for participation to craft producers without them seeing the need to migrate to the cities to build their profile. Furthermore, the Department, working with the Department of Small Business Development and other strategic partners collaborate better to support targeted market access platforms.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended with amendments.

QUESTION NO. 3494-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NUMBER 37 OF 2022 DATED 30 SEPTEMBER 2022

“Mr. D Joseph (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture;

(1). what is the status of (b) structures in each province; (2) what are the details of support programme offered by SA Rugby to the deaf sevens rugby team in view of their participation in the 2023 world cup in Cordoba, Argentina in 2023? NW4307E

REPLY

South African Rugby provided the following information in response to the question;

There are no deaf rugby clubs in South Africa, all deaf rugby players play for amateur clubs in their area of residence, which is understandably problematic. SADRA’s aim is to implement more programmes in future to enable player numbers to grow and to establish their own clubs.

The South African Deaf Rugby Association (SADRA) has a footprint in the following provinces:

  1. Eastern Cape
  2. Free State
  3. Gauteng
  4. KwaZulu-Natal
  5. Limpopo
  6. Mpumalanga
  7. Northwest
  8. Western Cape.

The relationship with SADRA is governed by a memorandum of agreement entered in 2018. SADRA has their own governance structures and is responsible to source its own money, sponsors, and partners. SADRA is responsible for their own development and building its footprint. SA Rugby assist SADRA on their request. The following is the support provided by SA Rugby to SADRA.

  1. Ensures access to BokSmart training programs and courses for all SADRA members. It was made accessible to deaf and hard-of-hearing people.
  2. Ensures SADRA participants have access to SA Rugby/World Rugby Coaching, Referee and Club administration courses.
  3. Supports SADRA events.
  4. SA Rugby provided SADRA with funds in 2022. This support will be repeated in 2023.
  5. SA Rugby has applied for funding to the Department for Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) for a grant in aid (Funding) on behalf of Deaf Rugby.
  6. SA Rugby is assisting SADRA with an application to the Lotto. Due to governance reasons at SADRA prior to the appointment of their new President, this is currently work in process.
  7. SA Rugby is committed to contributing certain items (kit) for the men and female teams for the 2023 World Cup Sevens in Cordoba, Argentina 2023.
  8. The participation of the female team is under consideration and subject to the availability of player resources that is currently being investigated by SADRA.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION NO. 3595-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NUMBER 37 OF 2022 DATED 30 SEPTEMBER 2022

Mr. T W Mhlongo (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport Arts and Culture:

(1) whether his department intends to facilitate a soccer and/or football indaba of the SA Football Association (SAFA); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how far are the preparations.

(2)(a) on what date is it envisaged that the football indaba will be held, (b) what is the total budget for the indaba, (c) what are the challenges his department is experiencing with regard to the indaba and (d) what steps has he taken to put pressure on safa to ensure that the soccer indaba takes place;

(3) how far are the negotiations with SAFA regarding school sports? NW4350E

REPLY

1. Yes. The Department is working with SAFA to host a Football Indaba. The goal of the National Football Indaba is to objectively assess all facets of the South African football system, identify the challenges, problems, critical failures, and success factors and formulate a turnaround plan and/or approach to reposition and restore South African football as a premier sport in the country. The concept documents and draft programme for the indaba are in place, however, a suitable date is yet to be confirmed.

2(a). No date has been confirmed as yet, however, on 03 October 2022, the Department met with SAFA and resolved that the Indaba would take place in the 4th quarter of 2022/23, ideally in February 2023. SAFA committed to confirm a date by 14 October 2022.

(c). The budget for Indaba has not been determined. The budget is dependent on the final plans, operations, and logistical arrangements.

(d).The challenge has been in terms of coordinating the diaries of all the key stakeholders considering a range of factors such as the National, Continental and International Football Calendar. It is worth noting that 2022 concludes the full cycle of SAFA Vision 2022 which would form the basis of the review and Indaba Agenda. This was resolved at the last meeting held with SAFA.

(e). There has not been any reason or need identified to pressure SAFA.

3. SAFA is working closely with the Department in terms of the implementation of Schools Football, whereby football is part of the Winter National School Sport Championship. Subsequently, both parties with the Department of Basic Education manage the participation of the two winning schools in the continental championship. Additionally, SAFA and the Department jointly launched the FIFA ‘Football for Schools’ programme, which is to be officially rolled out in the fourth quarter of the current fiscal year. SAFA further provides technical support by offering the training of educators and school-linked volunteers in coaching and refereeing.

11 October 2022 - NW2947

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What are the (a) relevant details and (b) dates of the roll-out of the implementation plan of the Agriculture and Agro-Processing Master Plan (AAMP); (2) Whether she has found that the provinces are ready for the roll-out of the implementation plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how is the reprioritisation of budget intended to work to ensure that there is a complete alignment and (b) from which budget line item will the reprioritised funds be sourced to implement the AAMP?

Reply:

(1) The Agriculture and Agro-Processing Master Plan (AAMP) was signed off on 12 May 2022, subject to an agreement among social partners, that all “unfinished business”, including details of the monitoring and implementation plan of the AAMP, be captured in Track 2 of the AAMP:

(a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has to date communicated and agreed to an approach towards the finalisation of Track 2 and await social partners’ responses for suitable dates to kick start the process. Social partners requested time to formulate a collective response to identified issues. DALRRD aims to finalise Track 2 for Cabinet approval by November 2022 subject to, and dependent on social partners reaching final agreement by end October.

(b) The roll-out of the AAMP will follow the sign off of Track 2, scheduled for November 2022. In preparation, the DALRRD is currently in the process of finalising the operational plan of all government related AAMP commitments. The operational plan of government commitments will be finalised for Cabinet approval, along with Track 2.

2) Yes. DALRRD is in the process of consulting on a new integrated approach to programme and project approvals and has found that provinces are not only capable, but eager to usher in the AAMP approach of aligning projects to identified AAMP related value chains.

(a) Unfunded AAMP commitments will be prioritised through DALRRD’s MTEF process, and unspent funds will be channelled towards AAMP priorities.

(b) The AAMP will not be funded by one specific line function but through the existing budgets of all line functions.

11 October 2022 - NW3377

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has found that the proposal of agri-villages as a solution to the problem of evictions is an indication of the failure of the Government to secure tenure rights for farm dwellers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. The Agri-village model is a programme that provides farm dwellers with an opportunity to have security of tenure, access to basic services, and sustainable livelihoods. The programme is not meant to address evictions. The Extension of Security of Tenure Act, 1997 (Act No. 62 of 1997) (ESTA) protects the rights of farm dwellers against unlawful evictions, and the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development working with Legal Aid SA provides legal representation to farm dwellers to defend them against such unlawful evictions.

11 October 2022 - NW3473

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Deputy President

In his capacity as the Chairperson of the Human Resources Development Council of South Africa, what has he found to be the (a) successes and (b) challenges in addressing the many issues that the Republic is faced with, in particular poverty and youth unemployment, since he took office?

Reply:

  1. The Ministry of Higher Education has advised us of the following successes in addressing Human Resource Development challenges which South Africa is faced with, relating to poverty and youth unemployment:
  •  

1.1 Regarding University Education

  • Two new Universities have been established in the Northern Cape (Sol Plaatjie University) and Mpumalanga (University of Mpumalanga) to expand access to post school opportunities.
  • Additional two Universities are in the process of being establishment (University of Science in Ekurhuleni and University of Crime Detection in Hammanskraal). Preliminary work on the location including the assessment of the demand and supply-side mapping for each University has been undertaken.
  • Preliminary enrolment data for the 2021 academic year shows 1 047 758 students have been enrolled, 29 percent of enrolments during 2020 were in Science, Engineering and Technology.
  • Eight (8) of the ten (10) accredited Universities to offer TVET related programmes to improve the qualifications of teachers at TVET colleges have since commenced with offering TVET programmes.
  •  

1.2 Regarding Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

  • Through the recommendations of the Human Resource Development Council (HRDC), measures were put in place to reposition TVET as an important skills development sector to incrementally produce the required numbers of artisans.
  • According to the Department of Higher Education, TVET sector has expanded, and enrolments amongst the youth has been recorded as follows:
  • Student enrolments in TVET colleges have reached 452 277 in 2020 and targeted to increase;
  • Eight (8) of the 13 new TVET college campuses have reached 100% completion (Msinga, Umzimkhulu, Nongoma, Aliwal North, Ngqungqushe, Graaf Reinet, Thabazimbi & Nkandla A). The remaining sites are 68-99% complete;
  • Thirty four (34) Centres of Specialisation have been established at TVET colleges focusing on 13 critical trades required for the economy;
  • 6 779 TVET graduates have been placed with industry and across government departments;
  • Seventeen (17) Entrepreneurial hubs have been established in 17 public TVET Colleges across the country;
  • Three (3) Water and Climate Smart Agriculture Greenhouses have been established in TVET Colleges.

1.3 Regarding Community Education and Training Colleges (CET)

  • According to the Ministry of Higher Education, the Community Education and Training institutional landscape has been reconfigured and rationalised from 3 279 community learning centres to 1791 learning sites (200 Community learning centres and 1691 satellite centres) in the interest of quality, access and available budget.
  • Nine (9) CET colleges have since been established and are functional.
  • All nine (9) Colleges have functional councils appointed in terms of the Continuing Education and Training Act, Act No 16 of 2006. Their term of office will end in October 2025.
  • Programme offering at CET colleges has been improved to include entrepreneurship and Digital programmes. A register of programmes approved by the Director-General is issued on an annual basis.
  • The Department of Higher Education hosted the first ever CET summit in March 2022 to position the CET sector to move into mass skills provision. R200 million has been made available through the National Skills Fund to assist colleges in this regard.

1.4 Interventions by the National Skills Fund (NSF)

  • According to the Ministry of Higher Education, the National Skills Fund has since 2018, disbursed a total of R7.97 billion to a variety of skills development programmes benefiting 407 495 individuals. Targeted areas included the following categories:
    • Agricultural and rural skills development;
    • Information technology;
    • Promotion of small, medium and micro enterprises;
    • Worker education;
    • Capacity development in the PSET sector;
    • Scholarships and bursaries (domestic and international);
    • Research efforts;
    • TVET infrastructure building;
    • Funding NSFAS shortfall;
    • People living with disabilities have also been funded by the NSF.

1.5 Artisan Development and Workplace Based Learning Opportunities

  • One of the major successes of HRDC is the Artisan Development. Through the recommendations of the Council, measures were put in place to reposition TVET as an important skills development sector to incrementally produce the required numbers of artisans. This was made possible by mobilising government to make funding available to improve access.
  • The HRDC established a Technical Task Team on Artisan Development which has assisted in ramping up the artisan development.

2. The following are key challenges in Human Resource Development as identified by the Ministry of Higher Education in addressing critical issues of poverty and youth unemployment:

2.1 One of the major challenges is the poor performance, and declining economy. This has had far reaching implications in opening up workplaces by the industry for workplace based learning opportunities. This has led to a decline in employment, especially among the youth. Government recognises the critical importance of capable human resources as a key driver of economic development. In an endeavour to mitigate the impact of the pandemic and the looming socio-economic ‘crisis’, government adopted an Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan with a view to address the challenge of the declining economy and youth unemployment, amongst others.

2.2 The outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic has worsened an already vulnerable economy, and it’s devastating effect has further deepened the crisis, largely affecting youth, in both relative and absolute terms.

-------------END-------------

11 October 2022 - NW2952

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1791 on 5 August 2022, and with regard to the status of each prosecution relating to the July 2021 uprising, what are the specific reasons and further relevant details, besides insufficient evidence, for withdrawing the charges against Mandla Mahlangu, Sibusiso Mavuso, Mbonani Clarance Tabane, Joe Bernington Mabaso and Montsamai Phineas Letsoalo, since the persons had already been arrested with cause during the uprising; (2) Whether (a) any evidence and/or docket was lost, destroyed and/or tampered with and/or (b) the chain of command was broken which led to the withdrawal of the charges; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) Whether he has found that any withdrawal of any of the cases was due to negligence on the part of the SA Police Service (a) in the handling of evidence and/or (b) the chain of command being broken; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, (i) in which cases and (ii) how in each case?

Reply:

1. Additional reasons for the withdrawal of cases infra:

a) Mandla Mahlangu

It was alleged that the suspect posted a video inciting violence. However, the person who took the video could not be traced. The matter was accordingly withdrawn by the Director of Public Prosecutions: Mpumalanga Division.

b) Sibusiso Mavuso

It was alleged that the suspect went to Westonaria Pick ‘n Pay and demanded that the manager close the store. He was not wearing a mask, contrary to the Disaster Management Act. It was further alleged that he posted a message on Facebook that allegedly incited violence.

The Director of Public Prosecutions: Gauteng Local Division cited the following reasons:

  • The conduct at Pick ‘n Pay did not comply with the definition of the crime of intimidation. There was however a failure to wear a mask. The witnesses were consulted and contradicted each other materially on the failure to wear a mask.
  • The Facebook post does not amount to any criminal offence at all. It is open to different interpretations and as such there is insufficient evidence with no reasonable prospects of success.

c) Mbonani Clarance Tabane

It was alleged that the suspect called for the blockading of roads and burning of tyres. The Director of Public Prosecutions: Gauteng Local Division reported that:

  • The young witnesses and the informant refused to submit statements.
  • No witness heard the accused instigate anyone.
  • The matter did not relate to the July unrest but a service delivery protest.
  • The matter was then withdrawn due to insufficient evidence.

d) Joe Bernington Mabaso

Allegedly charged for incitement based on information received from a whistle-blower. The Director of Public Prosecutions: Gauteng Local Division provisionally withdrew the matter pending a statement from the whistle-blower.

Investigations is still underway and guided by the NPA.

e) Montsamai Phineas Letsoalo

It was alleged that the suspect allegedly instigated looting. The matter was provisionally withdrawn by the Director of Public Prosecutions: Free State pending outstanding digital forensic investigations by the DPCI. The case docket has not yet been resubmitted to the prosecution for a decision.

2. In the Sibusiso Mavuso matter (as mentioned in 1(b) above), the detectives recently advised that the video footage of the suspect at Pick ‘n Pay had gone missing. They have been instructed to continue their search thereof.

3. There is no indication that any of the matters were withdrawn due to negligence on the part of the South African Police Service in the (a) handling of evidence and/or (b) the chain of command being broken.

END

11 October 2022 - NW3088

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with the President’s Fund having been established as a fund for economic restitution for individuals severely affected by Apartheid, with guidelines set out by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), he has found that there is a large number of South Africans who were excluded from the TRC restitution and who still suffer from the effects of Apartheid; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount of the President’s Fund has been used in providing economic restitution to the victims who were excluded?

Reply:

The guidelines set by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) on page 86 of volume 1 of the TRC of South Africa Report states the following:

a) The TRC Report stated that it adopted a closed-list approach in order not to impose a huge burden on government in that “there would be no value in simply handing the government a list which included a broad category of unidentified persons for consideration as victims deserving of reparations”.

b) The TRC Report further stated that the “Commission had made considerable efforts to reach all parts of the country and to disseminate information on how to make a statement. Those who had chosen not to do so should not, therefore, be included”.

c) The TRC did recognise that “some had elected not to make statements as a matter of political choice”.

d) nThe TRC indicated that “it would have been unrealistic to give the government what would in effect, have been an open-ended list and, on this basis, to expect the state to make a commitment to paying reparations”

The TRC resolved to confine the number of victims eligible for reparations to three (3) areas:

a) Victims who personally made statements to the Commission.

b) Victims named in a statement made by a relative or other interested person for example a colleague, friend or neighbour. These are statements made on behalf of and in the interests of specific persons.

c) Victims identified through the amnesty process.

What is the position in this regard to a large number of South Africans who were excluded from the TRC restitution and who still suffer from the effects of Apartheid?

In terms of current legislation, the President’s Fund effectively makes reparation payments only to victims who made statements to the TRC before 15 December 1997, and who are declared as TRC identified victims of gross human rights violations.

What amount of the President’s Fund has been used in providing economic restitution to the victims who were excluded?

There is no amount from the President’s Fund that has been used to provide reparations to victims who did not make statements to the TRC before 15 December 1997, and who are not declared TRC identified victims of gross human rights violations.

11 October 2022 - NW3367

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) steps has he taken recently to resolve the backlog at the Masters Office to allow families of deceased persons to move on with their lives and (b) has he found are the reasons that persons in the Eastern Cape, from as far away as Mt Ayliff, must travel to the Masters Office in Mthatha to have their estates resolved?

Reply:

a) Since the advent of democracy the services of Master had to cover all South African citizens, but that happened only some eight years later with the Constitutional Court’s decision in the Bhe-matter, declaring Reg. 200 of the Black Administration Act unconstitutional and ordering that the Master should now deal with all deceased estates in the country.

The Master’s Office received a huge influx of work since then, but the office is properly capacitated. This is where the Masters’ struggle against backlogs started. Years of being understaffed, ever increasing workload, COVID, system and network challenges, to name but a few, as well as lack of sufficient budget, undermine efforts of the Masters offices to function optimally.

In spite of all of this, the clearing of the backlog is included in indicator 5.9 of the approved Annual Performance Plan 2022/23 for the Master’s Branch, as one of the turnaround strategies to be implemented.

During Quarter 1, the offices determined their backlog and created the baseline lists of matters outstanding. During Quarters 2 and 3, the offices will attend to these matters, by also making use of overtime, in order to reach the Masters indicated target of 100% of the determined backlog cleared by 31 December 2022.

It should however be noted that this target can only be achieved in an enabling and stable work environment and can thus be negatively impacted by the following risk factors:

(i) Stability and availability of the electricity supply to offices (loadshedding is delaying finalisation of matters even during scheduled overtime periods);

(ii) The Department stabilizing and improving the IT systems to enable officials to work seamlessly and without downtime and system errors (e.g. for more than a month now, the Department has been experiencing network and hardware related problems, in which is affecting performance and connectivity to the applications used by the Masters – to date this has not been resolved);

(iii) Stability in the availability of the workforce, mindful of the fact that the wage negotiations have not been finalized and Labour Unions may still call on officials to down tools;

(iv) Finding the critical posts once a scientific determination of appropriate capacity for Masters. Some offices are critically understaffed and do not have the luxury of having time on hand to attend to extra work, whilst also adequately assisting the public, queues and correspondence on a daily basis;

(v) Successful and speedy procurement of new printers as well as multi-functional scanners to ensure better operations.

b) The Eastern Cape has four (4) Master’s Offices, namely Mthatha, Grahamstown, Bisho and Gqeberha.

Furthermore, the Paperless Estates Administration System (PEAS), which computerises the administration process related to deceased estates, has successfully been rolled out and is being used by 290 service points (Magistrate Courts) country wide, of which 27 (including Mt Ayliff) falls within the Mthatha Master’s Office jurisdiction, 11 in Grahamstown’s jurisdiction and 8 in Port Elizabeth’s jurisdiction, (please indicate number of Service Points for Bisho as well).

All Magistrate’s Offices are Service Points of the Master, but the rolling out PEAS to Service Points enables those Service Points to do estate of a higher value, as they are linked with the relevant Masters’ offices, who then are able to oversee the appointment process in those Service Points, and thus ensuring that the whole country receives the same service and are able to access the same quality of services provided directly at Master’s Offices, without the need to travel long distances to the 15 Master’s Offices countrywide. This is to bring services to the people and underscore the drive for access to justice.

The following estates may be reported at Service Points (Magistrate Courts):

- If the value of the assets is, or appears to be, below R125 000, and the deceased did not leave a will, it can be reported at any Magistrate’s Court in the region where the deceased resided prior to death;

- If the value of the assets is, or appears to be, below R250 000, and the deceased did not leave a will, it can be reported at any Magistrate’s Court in the region where the deceased resided prior to death, where the Paperless Estates Administration System (PEAS) has been rolled out.

All other estates need to be reported at the Master though, but it should be noted

that the reported documents can also be posted or couriered to the Master – the

family need not be physically present at a Masters to report an estate.

Future plan involves the online systems which will cause people with requisite knowledge to report estate from their knowledge to report estate from their homes or offices. Reducing footprint of walk-ins in the Masters offices.

END

11 October 2022 - NW2958

Profile picture: Engelbrecht, Mr J

Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether there is currently a dedicated legislative drafting unit within his department; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the current staff complement and (b) are the qualifications of each of the members who constitute the legislative drafting unit; (2) Whether there are any plans in place to augment and/or increase the capacity of the legislative drafting unit within his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes. The department does have a Unit that is responsible for the function of drafting legislation as part of the overall responsibilities within the Chief Directorate: Legal Services.

(1)(a)   The current staff complement constitutes of two posts of Director: Litigation and   Senior Legal Administration Officer (MR6).

(1)(b)   Qualifications of each member is as follows respectively:

  • Director: Litigation - B. Proc (Law) and National Senior Certificate;
  • Senior Legal Administration Officer: B- Tech Correctional Services Management, Bachelor of Law and National Senior Certificate.

2. The Department is in the process of capacitating the Unit responsible for the drafting/review of the departmental legislation through creation of a contract post(s) within the scope of Occupation Specific Dispensation for Legal Officers as applied in the Public Service.

It should also be noted that the Director Litigation reports directly to the member Senior Manager Service (Deputy Commissioner on salary level 14) responsible for the entire function of legal service in the Department.

The post establishment of the Chief Directorate Legal Services is a total of 24 posts, of this number 14 are filled and 10 are vacant.

11 October 2022 - NW2842

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the protection of whistleblowers in terms of the Protected Disclosures Act, Act 26 of 2000, his department has considered including other commercial relationships such as procurement corruption; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether his department will consider (a) a less restrictive witness protection system to offer protection and/or security for more whistleblowers and (b) the formation of a centralised and dedicated whistleblower institution; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. The Protected Disclosures Act, 2000 (Act No. 26 of 2000), as amended with effect from 2 August 2017, does not provide for offence-specific disclosures. The term “disclosure” is defined as any disclosure of information regarding any conduct of an employer or of an employee or of a worker of that employer, made by any employee or worker who has reason to believe that the information concerned shows or tends to show one or more of, amongst others, the following:

a) That a criminal offence has been committed, is being committed or is likely to be committed;

b) That a person has failed, is failing or is likely to fail to comply with any legal obligation to which that person is subject; and

c) That a miscarriage of justice has occurred, is occurring or is likely to occur.

The Act governs disclosures in all employer/employee relationships. The Act was amended in 2017 to extend the ambit of the Act beyond the ordinary employee/employer relationship by the introduction of two (2) new definitions, namely: that of “worker” and “temporary employment service”.

The amendment of the definition of “employee” was intended to clarify that persons who have worked for another person (for example: former employees) or assisted in carrying on the business of an employer are also included within the meaning of the definition.

The ambit of the Act was also extended to include persons who are employed by temporary employment services. The introduction of the definition of “worker” was based on two (2) reasons. Firstly, independent contractors are not considered as employees in terms of labour legislation and are expressly excluded from the reach of the remedies contained in the labour legislation. Secondly, by defining the term “worker” separately the protection offered by the Act has now been extended to independent contractors, agents and consultants.

The Protected Disclosures Amendment Act, 2017 (Act No. 5 of 2017), also amended the definition of “occupational detriment” to introduce two (2) additional forms of occupational detriment that an employee may be subjected to as a result of having made a protected disclosure, namely:

(i) reprisals such as defamation suits and suits based on the alleged breach of a confidentiality agreement or duty; and

(ii) to include a specific form of detriment typically experienced by contract workers, namely: the loss of a contract or the failure to be awarded a contract.

These amendments, among others, sought to provide protection to whistleblowers in any type of disclosure, not only procurement related, and intends to include the broadest possible protection when disclosures are made by not limiting it to specific actions. There is therefore no need to amend the Act to include procurement related matters as these matters may be disclosed in the context provided in the Act.

2. Research and a benchmarking exercise is being conducted by the Department into the current legal framework relating to witness protection. Proposals to include all whistleblowers within the ambit of the Witness Protection Act, 1998 (Act No. 112 of 2018), and not just witnesses, are being considered. There is currently an entity established in terms of this Act known as the Office for Witness Protection. We are considering the cost implications and an appropriate funding model for the expansion of the current framework.

END

11 October 2022 - NW3038

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, in respect of the Insolvency Act, Act 24 of 1936, which refers to a threshold of £50 to sequestrate any debtor, his department has any plans to introduce amending legislation to the specified Act to (a) raise the specified threshold and (b) provide for debts such as student loans, home loans and food to be excluded from the harsh reality of the consequences of sequestration?

Reply:

The Insolvency Act, 1936 (Act No. 24 of 1936) (“the Act”) is part of apartheid era legislation which the Department is currently reviewing with the aim of aligning the legislation with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 , and modernising the legislation.

One of the objectives of the draft Bill is to create a legislative framework that is based on the balancing of the conflicting interests of the stakeholders in insolvency proceedings, as opposed to the current legal framework that places emphasis on the best interest of the creditors.

The Department is currently processing a draft Insolvency Bill (the draft Bill”). The issue raised is provided for in section 9(1) of the Act. According to this section a creditor who has a liquidated claim for not less than fifty pounds against a debtor who has committed an act of insolvency, or who is insolvent, may petition the court for the sequestration of the estate of that debtor. Clause 2 of the draft Bill deals with this aspect of the question.

With the assistance of the Reserve Bank, the value of the 50 pounds was calculated at around R22 500 (and 100 pounds is estimated at R45 000) during the last quarter of 2019 (when the clause was crafted).

With regard to the second part of the question, clause 116 of the draft Bill intends to introduce pre-liquidation composition, which allows a debtor with debts not exceeding R300 000, irrespective of their source, to offer a composition to creditors, before the commencement of liquidation proceedings.

Rule 46A of the Uniform Rules of Court requires that judicial discretion be exercised before the primary residence of a judgement debtor is attached with a view to selling it in execution. Rule 46A is not applicable to a debtor whose estate is in sequestration. The Department will, as the Bill is processed further, review the current status, that is, the absence of judicial oversight with regards to the execution of the residential property of a debtor who is in sequestration the light of the provisions of section 26 of the Constitution, which provides for the right to access adequate housing.

Whilst the draft Bill is being processed there are measures in legislation available to persons who are over indebted. Section 74 of the Magistrates’ Courts Act, 1944 (Act No. 32 of 1944) provides for an administration order procedure, which has been described as a modified form of insolvency proceedings. The National Credit Act, 2005 (Act No. 34 of 2005) has introduced debt review as an alternative to sequestration. The Act makes provision for post liquidation composition, and if the offer of composition has been accepted by creditors the insolvent may apply for rehabilitation, which has the effect of putting an end to sequestration proceedings.

END

11 October 2022 - NW2953

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to his reply to question 1791 on 5 August 2022, what were the specified reasons for the delay of the trial which led to the matter and the case against Mr Orifile Oratile Sedika being struck off the roll; (2) Whether he has found that the negligence of the SA Police Service in any form and/or part caused the delay in the investigation and/or the trial; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in what way in each case; (3) What were the specified reasons for the decision that was taken not to prosecute Zamaswazi Zinhile Majozi; (4) Whether he has found that (a) any evidence was destroyed, lost and/or tampered with and/or (b) the chain of command was broken which contributed to the decision not to prosecute being taken in Majozi’s case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how and (b) what are the relevant details; (5) Whether the decision not to prosecute was due to the negligence and/or delay of the SAPS in any form and/or part; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) in what way and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. Mr Orifile Oratile Sedika

It was alleged that the suspect published social media posts calling for attacks on malls including the Waterfront Mall in Bloemfontein. The matter was struck from the roll due to the delays in finalising the investigations. It is reported that the investigation is now complete, and the matter is with the office of the Director of Public Prosecutions: Free Sate Division for a decision once again.

2. There is no reported evidence that the negligence of the South African Police Service in any form and/ or part caused the delay in the investigation.

3. Zamaswazi Zinhile Majozi

It was alleged that the suspect used her Twitter account to call for looting and public unrest. The Director of Public Prosecutions: Gauteng Local Division withdrew the matter and advised that although the suspect was opinionated, she had refrained from endorsing her followers’ violent actions. There was insufficient evidence to give the court an insight into the suspects state of mind.

4. There was no reported evidence that evidence was destroyed, lost and / or tampered with and / or that the chain of command was broken which contributed to the decision not to prosecute in the Majozi matter.

5. There is no reported evidence that the decision not to prosecute was due to the negligence and /or delay of the South African Police Service in any form.

11 October 2022 - NW3080

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the total number of drug rehabilitation centres in the Republic, (b) number of (i) the specified centres offer services for free and (ii) patients does each centre accommodate?

Reply:

a) In terms of the current database the total number of drug rehabilitation centres in the country is 297. It is very important to indicate that the database of registered drug rehabilitation centres is updated on an ongoing basis. The update is based on the number of registered centres in terms of the Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act, No.70 of 2008.

b) (i)The number of treatment and rehabilitation centres that offer services for free is 169.

(ii)The number of patients each centre accommodate depends on the centre’s bed capacity (see annexure A).

11 October 2022 - NW2832

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Considering that the current unemployment rate is 34,5% and that most of the recently listed critical skills emanate from the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), how will his department encourage the uptake of occupations in the specified fields; (2) (a)(i) what initiatives are in place to raise awareness around the employment opportunities in the STEM field and (ii) how will the initiatives be mainstreamed to all structures of higher education and (b) how will the budget of his department be adjusted to offer funding opportunities for studies geared at the STEM occupations?

Reply:

1. The month of August is dubbed TVET Month on the calendar of my department. During this month, all the 50 public TVET colleges embark on various activities, including but not limited to, having direct engagements with the youth and especially employers/industry with the aim of profiling TVET colleges and their programme offerings. The programme exposes and encourages young people to consider careers with artisanal, vocational and technical skills. The main target audience for the TVET College Month are Grade 9 to12 learners, out of school and unemployed youth, College students and industry. Furthermore, my department has open week awareness campaign and artisan week campaign both to encourage learners and particularly female learners and students to enrol for STEM careers.

2. (a)(i) Since 2018, my department has embarked on a plan to review and update programmes and qualifications offered at TVET Colleges in order to align them with the needs of the rapidly changing economy and society. In this regard, at least 60 subjects of the Report 191 programme since 2018 has been revised and updated. Furthermore, my Department offer bursaries such as NSFAS, NSF, SETAs, NRF and international scholarship to encourage learners and students to follow STEM. (ii) In 2013, my Department launched the Decade of Artisan campaign to promote artisanship as a career of choice for South Africa’s youth. The campaign was launched under the theme “It’s cool to be a 21st Century Artisan”. The importance of this programme is to ensure that we develop the required artisans to successfully implement our country’s strategic infrastructure projects, which included the building of roads, schools, universities, harbours, power stations and economic infrastructure. Public colleges and universities are working hard to establish partnerships with key role-players such as the industry and the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) for workplace opportunities.

 

(b) Mr Zondo, there are already STEM subjects offered in TVET colleges (i.e.science, technology, engineering and mathematics) across a number of programmes.

We already fund the Pre-Vocational Learning Programmes (PLP) which is to strengthen students who wish to pursue the STEM stream. A further significant step towards funding STEM initiatives is to provide laptops to lecturers and students. This is something that we must seriously pursue for IT and engineering students.

10 October 2022 - NW3404

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to remote working visas, (a) what research has been done in this regard, (b) what are the (i) results, (ii) outcomes and (iii) conclusions reached in the specified research, (c) by what date will such visas be introduced and (d)(i) how will this be marketed, (ii) who will be responsible for such marketing and (iii) to which markets will the marketing be directed?

Reply:

(a)

(b) (i) (ii) (iii)

(c)

(d) (i) (ii) (iii)

The Department has not conducted any research with reference to remote working visas. However, the President in his State of the Nation Address on 14 February 2022 announced that he had appointed former Department of Home Affairs Director-General, Mr Mavuso Msimang to review the Visa Regime.

I therefore request the Honourable De Freitas to await outcomes of the report.

END

10 October 2022 - NW3328

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What number of (i) wastewater treatment plants and (ii) pump stations connected and feeding to the wastewater treatment plants are functional in the (aa) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (bb) Senqu Local Municipality, (b) for those that are not working, what are the reasons that they are not working and (c) what plans has his department put in place in order to address the challenges?

Reply:

a)  The Joe Gqabi District Municipality (JGDM) operates twelve (12) Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) in the Walter Sisulu and Senqu Local Municipalities. The status of the WWTW and pump stations is as follows:

(i) Details regarding the state of the WWTW:

  • In the Walter Sisulu LM, there are six (6) wastewater treatment plants of which five (5) are functional and one (1) is non-functional
  • In the Senqu LM, there are six (6) wastewater treatment plants, five (5) are functional and one is non-functional.

(ii) Details regarding the state of the Pump Stations:

  • In the Walter Sisulu LM, there are eight (8) pumpstations, four (4) are funtional and the other four (4) are non-functional
  • In the Senqu LM, there are five (5) pumpstations that are all functional.

b) Reasons for failures of the WWTW were mostly due to mechanical and electrical failures as well as theft and vandalism of electrical equipment and cables, particularly at pump stations in the Walter Sisulu LM.

c) Funding has been availed from various sources; including the District Municipality’s internal funds, Water Services Infrastructure Grant and Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant from Department of Water and Sanitation; to facilitate the repairs of the non-functional plants. Progress is as follows:

  • New pumps have been purchased by the Walter Sisulu LM to replace the non-functional pumps
  • Repairs were recently completed to WWTWs in at Oviston, Venterstad in the Walter Sisulu LM and and Herschel in the Senqu LM
  • A contractor to refurbish the Steynsburg WWTW in the Walter Sisulu LM has been appointed and is already on site
  • Project plans are awaiting approval for the refurbishment of the Sterkspruit WWTW in the Senqu municipality
  • The Joe Gqabi DM has responded well to the notices and directives issued by the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) and will be reprioritising the WSIG funds to address the challenges

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10 October 2022 - NW3537

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to legal action against his department, what (a) is the total number of (i) cases and (ii) mandamus applications currently on various court rolls in the Republic, (b) has been the (i) average and (ii) total cost orders against his department in the 202122 financial year and (c) is the total quantum of legal fees incurred by his department in defending the specified cases and applications in the specified financial year?

Reply:

a) (i) During the financial year 2021/2022, the Department received a total number of 2371 court applications. It must be noted that not all 2371 applications seek relief against the Department and therefore, the Department does not oppose these matters. In some matters, the Department is cited to take note or implement the court order after the court outcomes. Matters such as registration of customary marriages, adoptions, etc are not opposed, the Department’s only role in these matters is to implement the court outcome.

(ii) The Department received a total number of 792 mandamus applications which are currently on various court rolls in the Republic. These matters include class actions or multiple applicants in one court application.

b) (i) The average of total cost orders in the Department is R33 062,69 legal costs.

(ii) The total cost orders against the Department is 846 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

c) The total quantum of legal fees incurred by the Department in defending court cases during the 2021/2022 financial year is R27 971 037,81.

END

10 October 2022 - NW3364

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilitie

With reference to the 12 shelters for persons who have suffered any form of gender based violence and femicide that have been opened in the Republic, with six being in Gauteng and six in KwaZulu-Natal, how far is the process of opening other shelters especially in rural areas where women have to fend for themselves against perpetrators and family members who care more about saving tfhe face of families than the wellbeing of the women?

Reply:

Find here: Reply
 

10 October 2022 - NW3295

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With reference to the National School Safety Framework (NSSF) and the systems in place to combat violence in schools, how does her department deem such measures as being effective to deal with the violence; (2) whether any improvements have been made to the NSSF since it was first published in 2015, to proactively counter the (a) heightened violence levels in schools recently and (b) changing nature of the violence in schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) how will her department ensure that schools in the rural areas, which are mostly always marginalised and neglected, also benefit fully from such systems and (b) what are the relevant details of the support that will be provided to (i) learners and (ii) teachers who experience the violence first hand?

Reply:

1. The NSSF remains our primary strategic response to school violence. It is a comprehensive approach that coordinates and consolidates all school safety interventions in the sector.  The NSSF is based on a social ecological systems model which locates the school within its broader community.  It relies on collaboration and partnerships for a more coordinated approach to responding to school violence. The NSSF provides the framework within which:

a) All schools have active school safety committees and school safety plans based on an audit of needs are in place and are reviewed frequently.

b) School perimeter is secured (fenced) and access controls (guard and/or surveillance) are in place and managed. Infrastructure plans for 2018/19 are informed by the Audit of the Districts’ school fencing coverage which highlights the schools that need to be prioritised.

c) School codes of conduct are aligned with the Constitution of South Africa and child-protection legislation; and is communicated and adopted/ agreed to by all school stakeholders.

d) Corporal punishment is prohibited by law and alternatives on positive discipline are implemented in all schools.

e) Protocols are in place to inforce consequence management timeously and is consistently applied when responding to contraventions that put the learning environment at risk.

f) Schools have systems in place to report violent incidences and criminal behaviour at local police station, to district and provincial office bearers and SACE.

g) Schools have established relationships with their intergovernmental counterparts: Departments of Social Development; Health and Justice, to progressively ensure services such as counselling services (SBSTs); medical examinations and access to justice are effective and in the best interest of the child.

2.(a)Since its inception in 2015, no formal review of the NSSF has been undertaken.  However, through the annual district monitoring process some challenges have been identified.  A major challenge includes the functionality of School Safety Committees.   To this end, measures have been undertaken to ensure that all School Safety Committees are trained, including all school personnel (educators and support staff).  There have also been additional Protocols developed to facilitates the implementation of the NSSF.  These include the Protocol to Deal with Incidences of Corporal Punishment in Schools and Positive Discipline; and the Protocol for the Management and Reporting of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in Schools. (b)The DBE intends to commission a new National School Violence Study (NSVS) which will inform the review of the NSSF.

3.(a) The DBE programmes are rolled out in ALL public schools (which includes schools in rural arears).  All seventy-five (75) districts are monitored and supported in the implementation of Safety in Education, Sport & Enrichment in Education and Social Cohesion & Equity in Education programmes.  Interventions are targeted at districts where challenges are identified and no school is left behind.  (b)  The interventions provided include training on the NSSF as well as the Protocol for the Management and Reporting of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in Schools for (i) learners (RCL) and (ii) educators.   All schools have School Based Support Teams (SBST) whose role is to ensure that there are mechanisms in place to report violence as well as ensure that support and referral systems are in place.

10 October 2022 - NW3308

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What are the reasons that she is removing the specific details of reporting requirements for provinces on infrastructure and (b) how will she ensure (i) compliance and (ii) accountability, should the reporting details for provinces be removed?

Reply:

The reporting requirements have not been removed on the draft Regulations relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure. The draft was published for comments by the public, and these comments are currently being consolidated. On completion of this exercise, the draft based on comments received will be taken through a process of consultation before a final document is gazetted.

10 October 2022 - NW3536

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether the announcement at the meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs on 13 September 2022 that foreign religious leaders would no longer qualify for work visas has been implemented as a regulation and/or directive; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of such a regulation and/or directive; (2) whether the work visa ban apply to foreign religious leaders already living and working in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on which constitutional provisions does his department rely in this regard; (3) whether foreign religious leaders are prohibited from applying for permanent residence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether his department engaged in a public participation process and/or consultations with religious organisations on how the ban would affect religious communities; if not, why not; if so, on what dates did the consultations and/or public participation processes take place?

Reply:

1. In 2018 the Department Gazetted the Immigration Regulations which allow Religious Workers to apply for a long-term section 11(1)(b)(iv) visitor’s visa for the prescribed activity of religious work. The terms and conditions of this visitor’s visa is that the holder may not apply for permanent residency using this visa, regardless of the period of continuous stay in South Africa. The statement to the Portfolio Committee is therefore supported by the 2018 Immigration regulations.

2. The introduction of Immigration Regulations is never applied or implemented retrospectively. Therefore, any Religious worker who is already living and working in the Republic, and is a holder of a validly issued work visa is not affected by the 2018 Immigration Regulations.

3. The Immigration Act stipulates various categories of visas with which the holder may apply for permanent residence. A work visa, with continuous residence for five years qualifies the holder to make an application for permanent residence. A holder of a validly issued work visa may apply for permanent residence regardless of their occupation. This also includes Religious Workers who are holders of valid work visas. Conversely, a Religious Worker who does not hold a work visa may not apply for permanent residence in terms of the Immigration Act.

4. The statement by Minister was not an announcement of a new piece of legislation, directive or regulations. It was an emphasis on what the current legislation already stipulates. There is, therefore, no need for public consultations.

END

10 October 2022 - NW3334

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What progress has his department made in providing a One-Stop Border Post in Beitbridge?

Reply:

Cabinet adopted and approved the One Stop Border Post (OSBP) policy in March 2022.

OSBP legislation must be enacted which should inter alia allow for the deployment of the employees in the foreign territory through a co-location principle. Draft legislation will still need to be prepared and considered by Cabinet. The Department is procuring the service a specialiset legistaive drafter to assist in this regard. The deadline for submission of the draft OSBP Bill to Cabinet is 31 March 2023 as per the Department’s 2022/23 Annual Performance Plan (APP). Should Cabinet approve, it will become the prerogative of Parliament to enact the legislation should it wish to do so.

Implementation of the OSBP at Beitbridge would be possible once the applicable legislation is in place and the border post is redesigned and redeveloped. In respect of the redevelopment of our key six land ports of entry, including Beit Bridge, the Department of Home Affairs has requested approval from National Treasury for TAII approval in accordance with the prescribed Public Private Partnership (PPP) process. This approval will enable the Department to issue a request for proposals (RfP) to the market.

To summarise, for a One-Stop Border Post to work at Beit Bridge, the enabling legal framework must be created and the physical layout of the port of entry changed, in consultation / agreement with the Zimbabwean government.

END

 

10 October 2022 - NW3405

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to digital nomad visas, (a) what research has been done in this regard, (b) what are the (i) results, (ii) outcomes and (iii) conclusions reached in the specified research, (c) by what date will such visas be introduced and (d)(i) how will this be marketed, (ii) who will be responsible for such marketing and (iii) to which markets will the marketing be directed?

Reply:

(a)

(b) (i) (ii) (iii)

(c)

(d) (i) (ii) (iii)

The Department has not conducted any research with reference to digital nomad visas. However, the President in his State of the Nation Address on 14 February 2022 announced that he had appointed former Department of Home Affairs Director-General, Mr Mavuso Msimang to review the Visa Regime.

I therefore request the Honourable De Freitas to await outcomes of the report.

END

10 October 2022 - NW3363

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

With reference to her reply to question 486 for oral reply on 14 September 2022, based on the national call centre of the National Gender-Based Violence helpline, what (a0 number of calls have been registered in each province by the call centre in the past 12 months and (b) assistance was given to the victims who have been assisted ?

Reply:

Find here: Reply
 

10 October 2022 - NW3391

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether his department undertook any studies to find out the reasons that water scarcity affects mainly rural areas where only black poor persons stay, but not the suburbs where rich persons stay; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether he has found that this was by design; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details of the findings and (b) is being done to reverse the situation?

Reply:

1.  South Africa is a water scarce country, where everyone is affected by the limited water resources. My department undertakes various water resources and services planning studies and implements interventions or programmes to provide water to all citizens.

Due to the holistic and inclusive approach, areas that had historically been unserved have gradually seen service level improvements, as shown from the STATSSA data reflected in the General Household Survey. Much remains to be done, but a lot has been accomplished.

  • The General Household Survey (GHS 2021) figures for basic water supply reflect a figure of 88% (64% in 1994) limited coverage of water infrastructure in South Africa. That is, drinking water from an improved source provided collection time is not more than 30 minutes for a roundtrip including queuing
  • The General Household Survey (GHS 2021) figures for basic Level of Service is currently at 83% (49% in 1994). This includes use of improved facilities which are not shared with other households.

The Water and Sanitation Master Plan launched by the Department in 2020; is the blueprint that was developed to identify key actions and allocate roles and responsibilities to all stakeholders in the water sector, including the various tiers of government, and the private sector. It is intended to guide the sector regarding investment planning for the development of water resources, delivery of water and sanitation services, and addressing service delivery backlogs services until 2030. The Master Plan also addresses the enabling requirements, such as the institutional and legal arrangements for implementation, operation and maintenance, funding requirements and models, and monitoring and evaluation models.

2. Although there are still evident backlogs in service delivery, particularly in rural areas; due to the legacy of apartheid; the democratic government has been turning the situation around by progressively ensuring access to water for all as mandated by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. It should be noted that the population of South Africa has grown from 40 to 60 million which make the percentage progress even better due to the ever-moving target. The National Water and Sanitation Master Plan therefore comprises of key programmes, projects, and actions to be implemented for the protection and development of the national water resources, as well as provision of adequate and reliable water services for all citizens.

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10 October 2022 - NW3540

Profile picture: George, Dr DT

George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether a Home Affairs office will be opened in Knysna; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date is it envisaged that the specified office will open and (b) what range of services will be offered?

Reply:

(a) The Department has been looking at establishing an office in Knysna for a few years now, amongst others, but due to the lack of funding was unable to do so. The Department has embarked on an extensive study to revise and align the department’s access model with service delivery demand. A funding proposal for newly proposed offices and service points as per the approved DHA Access Model were submitted to the National Treasury.

In the interim, to service Knysna and surrounding areas, an on line access point was established and capacitated with effect from 01 September 2022, at the Knysna Public Health Facility. The access point at the health facility will be issuing critical enabling documents such as (1) birth registration for children born within 30 days from the birth event and (2) render death registration functions.

Mobile Units, from the Plettenbergbay Office, also currently render services to the Knysna community and surrounding areas upon request from the Municipality. All schools in the area were serviced by Mobile Units earlier in the year to ensure that all matriculants were enabled with their ID documents. The Plettenbergbay Office also facilitated outreach programmes in collaboration with the Municipality. They recently serviced Khayalethu and was part of the Municipal Project for dealing with destitute persons living on the street.

The DHA Mobile Units will also form part of the upcoming Provincial Government Thusong Programme which is due to take place in the Knysna area on 18 and 19 October 2022.

(b) The range of services rendered through Mobile Units are birth registration, smart ID cards applications and collections, passport applications and collections, re-printing of birth, marriage and death certificates, rectifications and amendment applications and the issuance of temporary ID Certificates.

END

10 October 2022 - NW3333

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department will retain the opportunity on a permanent basis for asylum seekers to renew their asylum papers online like they did during the hard lockdown phase; if not, will his department revert to the in-person renewal process; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department will continue with the online renewal of documents and will over the next three months work to streamline the process in order to address some of the concerns raised by clients.

Those clients who are unable to use the online platform will be able to approach a Refugee Reception Office for assistance.

Furthermore, a stakeholder engagement drive within the refugee and asylum seeker communities will be undertaken in the next few months to address concerns as the department continues to improve servicing clients through digital platforms.

END

10 October 2022 - NW3307

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will provide an update of the new special purpose vehicle pilot projects of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in the (a) Eastern Cape and (b) Northern Cape; if not, why not, in each case; if so, (i)  where are the specified projects situated, (ii) what exactly does each project entail, (iii) what total amount has been spent on each project and (iv) how is the project being monitored?

Reply:

1. The Provincial Departments of Education in Eastern Cape and Northern Cape are managing these projects, in collaboration with Infrastructure South Africa.

2. Such Provinicial Departments will be able to assist with details on scope of work, budget and progress. 

10 October 2022 - NW3277

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In each month of the 2021-22 financial year, what (a) total number of persons were (i) detained at and (ii) deported from the Lindela Repatriation Centre, (b) total number of (i) refugees and (ii) asylum seekers were transported from the specified centre to the street outside the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Pretoria in May 2022, (c) total amount was paid to transport the deported persons and (d) are the reasons that the persons were transported to the specified place and not released?

Reply:

a) The total number of persons (i) detained and (ii) deported from the Lindela Repatriation Centre is as follows:

Month

Number of Detainees

Number of Deportees from Lindela

     

April 2021

1 058

881

May 2021

1 044

1 081

June 2021

879

926

July 2021

809

1 158

August 2021

865

476

September 2021

1 154

1 315

October 2021

1 184

1 217

November 2021

961

953

December 2021

951

872

January 2022

1 022

693

February 2022

775

1 065

March 2022

316

655

Total

10 018

11 292

b) A total of 85 of the refugee and asylum protestors requested to voluntarily leave the facility. The first group of 20 where transported to Sunnyside, Pretoria as per agreement with the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) that DHA would assist with transport for those who voluntarily opted for community re-integration. A similar process was followed of transporting the remainder of the 65 protesters to the park next to the UNHCR offices.

(c) The total cost R 3 374, relating to fuel for the vehicles.

(d) The first group of 20 protesters requested to leave the Lindela facility and to be assisted with transport to Sunnyside, Pretoria, as the majority of them had previously resided there.

The second group of 65 while being transported to Sunnyside, demanded to be dropped off at the park next to the UNHCR building, where they were staying in 2019 before they were transported to Lindela. The officials acceded to their demands to be dropped off at UNHCR as they were becoming hostile.

END