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17 October 2022 - NW2709

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1602 on 30 May 2022, what number of the 38 037 children has the department assisted to obtain documentation; (2) will she furnish Mrs G Opperman with a breakdown of the type of documentation that was provided for each child such as birth certificate, asylum seeker permit and/or study permit; (3) what number of the referred children received each of the specified documents; (4) what number of the referred children that have been documented so far (a) have been declared citizens of the Republic and (b) are still non-citizens? NW3099E

Reply:

1. All the 38 039 children were assisted with online applications by the Implementing Partners of the Children in the Move Project contracted by UNICEF in supporting the Department, for documents and through referral to the Department of Home Affairs.

The process of assisting children on the move is briefly outlined here and is more on care and protection of these children as per the provisions of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005:

The children are admitted in Child and Youth Care Centre through the Children’s Court Order as per the provisions of Section 151 and 152 of the Children’s Act. During the admission children usually undergo a panel review process to ensure a joint decision in the best interest of the child.

While in the Child and Youth Care Centres children are cared for by providing them with basic services to meet their immediate needs.

Services that are also provided relates to health education for improving hygiene and nutrition. Children are also provided with professional counselling and emotional support. Therapeutic services are also provided to them.

The following is the core component when assisting children on the move namely:

  • Identification

Identification of children on the move is part of the intervention by Social Service Professionals (SSPs). Outreach work is done by Outreach Workers who are mainly Child and Youth Care Workers (CYCWs). Children are identified through the Outreach Programme which is a programme that reaches out to children to empower them to express their rights and needs and to link them with the necessary resources when required. Some of the resources are: their families; Drop-in-Centres and Child and Youth Care Centres (CYCCs). Social Service interventions are used to engage with the children and explore the reasons that led them to be on the move.

The identification of children on the move is two-fold:

• Focus on those children who can be re-unified with their families; and

• Those who cannot be reunified and would therefore have to be admitted in a Child and Youth Care Centre for further interventions.

Information on the home circumstances of the child emerge as the Social Workers engages the child. Through the engagement the Social workers are able to obtain the details of the family which he/she uses to contact them. In this regard, the contact becomes extended to family to establish the home conditions and reasons for the child to end up on the move. At this point, the family also becomes the focus of intervention until the child is fully re-unified with them. When the child is re-unified, there are other services which are recommended for the well-being and psycho-social support of the child.

A decision about a child who cannot be re-unified with the family is based on the outcomes of the investigations done into the home circumstances. The impending danger that is posed by the child being on the move is also a reason for immediate removal of the child from the situation.

Social workers further facilitate the provision of documentation by linking them with the Department of Home Affairs.

2. The breakdown of the types of documentation provided for each child is not available as the Implementing Partners do not receive feedback from the Department of Home Affairs about the document applications that are completed.

3. The number of the referred children who received each of the specified documents can be confirmed by the Department of Home Affairs as this falls within their mandate.

4. The number of the referred children that have been documented so far and have been declared citizens of the Republic and those that are still non-citizens can be confirmed by the Department of Home Affairs.

17 October 2022 - NW2589

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to a tender that was awarded to a certain company (name furnished) in order to conduct a study known as a Systemic Evaluation, (a) what is the purpose of the Systemic Evaluation, (b) what number of (i) primary and (ii) secondary educators were employed and/or recruited for conducting the evaluation process, (c) how are the educators compensated for their work and (d) what number of schools (i) have been sampled thus far and (ii) must still be sampled?

Reply:

The written reply is indicated below:

a) The purpose of the Systemic Evaluation (SE)

The purpose of the SE is to monitor learner performance trends across years, which will be based on a curriculum test in Mathematics and Languages in Grades 3, 6 and 9. The assessment of learner performance will be evaluated in the context of in-school (school) and out-of-school (district) factors that influence learner performance. 

b) The number of fieldworkers

The requirement for the appointment of fieldworkers was a teacher qualification and teaching experience. Fieldworkers were appointed by the appointed service provider. Learners write the assessments on their own but are monitored closely by the fieldworker. In their recruitment, the company did not distinguish between primary and secondary teachers. A total of 710 fieldworkers were recruited.

c) How field workers are compensated for their work

The rates of payment were as follows:

    • Administration of assessment: R500.00 for every day worked (including attending training sessions),
    • Own car usage: mileage reimbursement is  R3.82 per kilometre.
    • Public transport Allowance: R150.00 per day worked
    • Data and airtime allowance: R200.00 once off

d) The number of sampled schools

Schools were randomly sampled per province before the administration of the study. A provincial breakdown of the sampled schools selected for the study is indicated in table below. The sampling has been completed and the data collection has been completed and there is no further sampling required.

 Province

Grade 3, 6 and 9 sampled schools

Eastern Cape

434

Free State

351

Gauteng

405

KwaZulu-Natal

450

Limpopo

418

Mpumalanga

373

Northern Cape

323

North West

387

Western Cape

398

Total

3 539

 

17 October 2022 - NW3040

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

In view of two employees of her department, Mr Sipho Dikhobe and Mr Reinet Gamede, who were caught stealing diesel from the department and appeared at the Johannesburg Specialised Commercial Crime Court in this regard, what (a) control measures have been put in place to monitor the use of diesel at her department and (b) are the reasons that her department took so long to notice the specified theft of diesel of more than a million rand?

Reply:

According to the information received from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Social Development, there is no information on the officials in question in their employment records. In the absence of such information, I am not able to provide any further details on the matter.

17 October 2022 - NW3061

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has been informed that the road from Matatiele to Maluti in the Eastern Cape stands incomplete, as the construction company that was paid out millions of rands by his department has vanished; if not, why not; if so, what steps have been taken by his department to retrieve the funds wasted?

Reply:

Yes, the road cited by the Honourable Ms B Mathulelwa was referred to the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Transport, who advised that

  • the company, Klus Civils, was appointed for the reseal of Provincial Road DR08012;
  • the contract was terminated due to non-performance on 20 July 2022. The Department followed all processes as applicable in General conditions of contract for construction works 2015 (GCC 2015);
  • Klus Civils was only paid for actual work done in terms of their contractual agreement; and
  • the process is underway of sourcing a replacement contractor

17 October 2022 - NW2581

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) What was the total amount that was allocated for the (a) Urban Settlement Development Grant, (b) Human Settlements Grant, (c) Development Grant, (d) Emergency Housing Programme Grant and (e) Informal Settlement Upgrading Programme Grant in KwaZulu-Natal in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years (2) what amounts have been transferred against the specified amounts of the grants as at the latest specified date for which information is available; (3) what are the relevant details of all approved reprioritisation from existing and future budget allocations from the grants for the specific purposes of flood relief in KwaZulu-Natal? NW3096E

Reply:

1). The allocations of Human Settlements Grants in the KwaZulu-Natal Province:

(i) 2021/22 Financial Year

Provincial Allocations- KwaZulu-Natal Province

Name of Grant

Allocations (R’000)

Human Settlements Development Grant

2 455 021

Informal Settlement Upgrading Programme Grant

714 375

Provincial Emergency Housing Grant

-

Municipal Allocations-eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

Name of Grant

Allocations (R’000)

Urban Settlements Development Grant

1 288 158

Informal Settlement Upgrading Programme Grant

686 369

(ii) 2022/23 Financial Year

Provincial Allocations- KwaZulu-Natal Province

Name of Grant

Allocations (R’000)

Human Settlements Development Grant

2 935 224

Informal Settlement Upgrading Programme Grant in KwaZulu-Natal

756 868

Provincial Emergency Housing Grant

-

Municipal Allocations- eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

Name of Grant

Allocations (R’000)

Urban Settlements Development Grant

1 279 036

Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant

727 265

2). Transferred Amounts

(i) 2021/22 Financial Year

Provincial Grant Transfers

Name of Grant

Allocations (R’000)

Transferred (R’000)

Human Settlements Development Grant

2 455 021

2 455 021

Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant

714 375

714 375

Provincial Emergency Housing Grant

-

-

Municipal Grant Transfers- eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

Name of Grant

Allocations (R’000)

Transferred Funds (R’000)

Urban Settlements Development Grant

1 288 158

1 288 158

Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant

686 369

686 369

Municipal Emergency Housing Grant

-

-

(ii) 2022/23 Financial Year

Provincial Grant Transfers as at 31 August 2022

Name of Grant

Allocations R’000)

Transferred Funds (R’000)

Human Settlements Development Grant

2 935 224

1 472 072

Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant

756 868

415 937

Provincial Emergency Housing Grant

325 764

140 003

Municipal Grant Transfers as at 31 August 2022

Name of Grant

Allocations (R’000)

Transferred (R’000)

Urban Settlements Development Grant

1 279 036

447 663

Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant

727 269

363 633

Municipal Emergency Housing Grant

-

-

3). Relevant details of all approved reprioritization from existing and future budget allocations from the grants for the specific purposes of flood relief in KwaZulu-Natal:

(i) KwaZulu-Natal Province

a) Human Settlements Development Grant

The natural disasters that occurred recently implied that the National Department had to approve the entire annual allocation of Provincial Emergency Housing Grant (PEHG) amounting to R326 million to assist the reported disaster of KwaZulu-Natal Province and therefore had no funds afterwards to assist any other Province with similar funding needs.

In the case of KwaZulu-Natal Province, an amount of R515 million (HSDG-R326 million and ISUPG – R189 million) was reprioritised by the Province to address the disaster and after the PEHG was approved, the Province decided to utilise the R326 million from PEHG and reverse the same amount which was reprioritised to address the disaster back to the HSDG.This implied that the Province still has the full annual allocation of HSDG of R2.9 billion to address human settlements needs for the 2022/23 financial year.

b) Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant

The Province had reprioritised R189 million from ISUPG and that amount remains to cater for the widely reported and declared disaster. The annual allocation of the grant amounts to R727 million for this current financial year.

(ii) eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

Municipal Reprioritised Funds from the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) and Informal Settlements Development Grant (ISUPG) for Municipalities are for the 2022/23 financial year as detailed below:

a) Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG)-R340.3 million

  1. Sundry replacements (Blocksum) and replacement of network to ensure security of supply to existing customers - R14.4 million;
  2. Repair of damaged road surface, sidewalks, manhole, storm recovery, bridges, catch pit, embankments Damaged gabion, road reinstatement and storm water repairs in various areas – R218.4 million;
  3. Marrianhill Storm Water Protection and Environments Protection, replacement of Leachate Treatment Plants, Sundry Replacements (Blocksum) Lovu Landfill cell PH and Infrastructure, Bisassar Road Landfill – R72.3 million; and
  4. Tongaat Water Treatment Works Remedial to storm damage – R35.2 million.

b) Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant – R124.4 million

  1. Purchase of land in Quarry Road West and Ezingwenyeni Informal Settlements – R8 million; and
  2. Three projects for refurbishment or rehabilitate the infrastructure damaged by storm in various informal settlements namely, Dassenhook Informal Settlement, Salvia Place Informal Settlement, Quarry Road Informal Settlement, Umlazi Z and Q Informal Settlement and Mayville Informal Settlement – R116.4 million.

17 October 2022 - NW2698

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Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What has his department done to improve the ill administration of some of the entities reporting to him, such as the SA National Roads Agency, that has failed to maintain the road infrastructure and (b) has there been prospects to privatise the institutions? NW2885E

Reply:

 

a) There is a Performance Agreement in place with the Boards of all Agencies, including South African Road Agency Limited (SANRAL) wherein there is need to have a Routine Maintenance programme in place for 100% of the network and the following are the Technical Performance Targets for the road maintenance

        • 95% for Smooth Travel Exposure (STE);
        • 95% for Low Rut Exposure (LRE);
        • 95% for High Texture Exposure (HTE);
        • 90% for Bridge Condition Exposure (BCE);

SANRAL is performing according to these targets and had challenges, with regards, conclusion of awarding projects mainly funded from their Capex Budget. I have engaged with their Board to ensure they put in measures to address this backlog.

Besides challenges SANRAL has particularly with regards to GFIP, it is a well ran entity and has also proven beyond doubt in assisting Provinces during floods. Provinces are also relying on SANRAL for road rehabilitation, hence handing over their strategic roads to SANRAL.

b) There are no plans to privatise SANRAL, who are already operating based on commercial business principles, in the sense they can raise funds through tolling and from external sources and also enter into concession agreements with the provide sector

17 October 2022 - NW3194

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

1. I have not attend any meeting of that nature.

2. None

17 October 2022 - NW2815

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) What number of Social Work posts are funded by her department within Non-profit Organisations (NPOs) in each province? (2) What number of Social Workers are employed by her department in each province? (3) What role do NPOs fulfil in the delivery of services as an extension of government services? NW3410E

Reply:

1. The department does not fund individual posts in any NPO. The department funds programmes in NPOs which is inclusive of operational costs to fill posts.

The table below reflects the number of Social Workers employed by NPOs in the nine provincial departments.

Table 1: Number of Social Workers employed in NPOs

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF SOCIAL WORKERS EMPLOYED AND FUNDED IN NPOs

Eastern Cape

0

Free State

0

Gauteng

2 311

KwaZulu Natal

1 111

Limpopo

136

Mpumalanga

328

Northern Cape

69

North West

-

Western Cape

1 100

Total

5 055

2. The number of Social Workers employed in provincial DSD are as follows:

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF SOCIAL WORKERS EMPLOYED

Eastern Cape

1 655

Free State

501

Gauteng

1 606

KwaZulu Natal

1 951

Limpopo

1 474

Mpumalanga

496

Northern Cape

231

North West

-

Western Cape

766

Total

8 680

3. The NPOs play a supporting role to the department in rendering social services to the most vulnerable citizens of this country. Since they operate within communities, they have direct access to the beneficiaries and are able to customize service provision according to specific target groups as per their founding constitutions, as well as localise according to the provincial/district/community needs. Their efforts contribute to the socio-economic development of the country in addressing the human development needs of society through their ability to provide developmental social services. The NPO-rendered services/programmes and interventions contribute towards improving the lives of the poor and most vulnerable. Below are some of the services and programmes rendered by NPOs:

  • Social Welfare Services (care and protection of persons with disabilities, older persons including residential care facilities, programmes for Orphans and Vulnerable Children etc.);
  • Children and Families Services (care and protection of children, community-based care services for children, support services to families, family preservation services, parenting programmes, adoption and foster care services etc.);
  • Restorative Services (crime prevention and support, victim empowerment and substance abuse prevention, treatment and rehabilitation services); and
  • Development and Research (community mobilisation programmes, institutional capacity building and support for NPOs, poverty alleviation and sustainable livelihoods, youth & women development (including food security, skills development, linking welfare beneficiaries to economic opportunities) and community-based research and planning.

17 October 2022 - NW3128

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 282 on 4 June 2021, wherein she indicated that there are two night shelters in Limpopo of which one is run by the Government and one is privately run, namely Huis Maroela in Phalaborwa with a bed capacity of 10 and Khuseleka One Stop Centre in Polokwane with a bed capacity of 40, and considering that in her recent reply to question 2173 on 5 August 2022, wherein it was reported that Limpopo has zero night shelters, what (a) has become of the two night shelters in Limpopo in the period between 1 February 2021 and 30 June 2022 and (b) is her position on the information provided by her in both written replies?

Reply:

Limpopo does not have homeless shelters. The shelters that were indicated in question 282 of 2021 are for Gender Based Violence, i.e. Khuseleka in Polokwane Welfare Complex and Huis Maroela in Phalaborwa.

17 October 2022 - NW2816

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) Whether her department intends to bridge the gap between the salaries of social workers of her department and the social workers that are employed by Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) in post funded by her department; if not why not; if so, what are the relevant (a) details and (b) timelines in this regard; (2) On what date did her department last review and/or benchmark salaries of the social workers employed by her department and funded by her department but employed by an NPO; (3) Whether this benchmarking was done at a provincial or national level; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the findings? NW3411E

Reply:

a) DSD partially funds NPOs for programmes which includes operations and staffing in terms of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) provisions governing transfer funding. The Department’s transfer funding budgets have been reduced along with all other budget items due to the current economic situation in the country, which has curtailed the prospects of funding increases to NPOs in the medium term.

b) Refer to (a) above

2. The funding of social worker programmes in the NPO sector is reviewed annually by the department at the provincial level in an effort to maximize the allocation within the department’s budget constraints. Benchmarking of social worker posts within the public sector is done nationally in terms of the relevant Occupational Specific Dispensation.

Salaries in the Public Service are reviewed centrally. In this regard, the Director-General issued DPSA Circular 21 of 2021, dated 04 November 2021. All salaries were adjusted by 1, 5% across all levels.

3. See response to question 2.

17 October 2022 - NW2582

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) What are the details of (a) any additional funding and/or (b) reprioritisation from her department that will be transferred to either the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial administration or the City of eThekwini for flood relief purposes over and above the different types of Human Settlements grants;

Reply:

a). Additional Funding

There is no additional funding for either the Province or the Metro of Human settlements grants provided in the current financial year.

b). Reprioritization

An amount of R340.3 million was reprioritised under Urban Settlement Development Grant (USDG) and R124.4 million under Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant (ISUPG). These reprioritised funds, as part of the 2022/23 annual allocations, have already been transferred to eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality for the reprioritization for the flooding disaster relief purposes. It should be noted that the above-stated funds are not additional funds but are part of the allocated 2022/23 financial year.

(2) What are the details of the impact of the above-mentioned local, provincial or national reprioritisation of any Human Settlements grants on the provision of housing and basic services in the (a) 2021-22 and (b) 2022-23 financial years? NW3097E

a) 2021-22 financial year

There were no declared disasters that necessitated the reprioritisation measure during the 2021/22 financial year. The Provinces and Metropolitan Municipalities were able to continue with the normal operational tasks as expected of them without any impact on the annual budgets allocated to the Province.

b) 2022-23 financial year

(i) KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements

The natural disasters that occurred recently implied that the National Department had to approve the entire annual allocation of Provincial Emergency Housing Grant (PEHG) amounting to R326 million to assist the reported disaster of KwaZulu-Natal Province and therefore had no funds afterwards to assist any other Province with similar funding needs.

In the case of KwaZulu-Natal Province, an amount of R515 million (HSDG-R326 million and ISUPG – R189 million) was reprioritised by the Province to address the disaster and after the PEHG was approved, the Province decided to utilise the R326 million from PEHG and reverse the same amount which was reprioritised to address the disaster back to the HSDG. This implied that the Province still has the full annual allocation of HSDG of R2.9 billion to address human settlements needs for the 2022/23 financial year

(ii) eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

The Metro reprioritised funds allocated under Urban Settlements Development Grant amounting to R340.3 million to cater for the following projects:

  • Sundry replacements (Blocksum) and replacement of network to ensure security of supply to existing customers - R14.4 million;
  • Repair of damaged road surface, sidewalks, manhole, storm recovery, bridges, catch pit, embankments Damaged gabion, road reinstatement and stormwater repairs in various areas – R218.4 million;
  • Marrianhill stormwater Protection and Environments Protection, replacement of Leachate Treatment Plants, Sundry Replacements (Blocksum) Lovu Landfill cell PH and Infrastructure, Bisassar Road Landfill – R72.3 million; and
  • Tongaat Water Treatment Works Remedial to storm damage – R35.2 million

Under the Informal Settlement Upgrading Partnership Grant, the Metro reprioritised an amount of R124.4 million to cater for:

  • Purchase of land in Quarry Road West and Ezingwenyeni Informal Settlements – R8 million; and
  • Three projects for refurbishment or rehabilitation of the infrastructure damaged by the storm in various informal settlements namely, Dassenhook Informal Settlement, Salvia Place Informal Settlement, Quarry Road Informal Settlement, Umlazi Z and Q Informal Settlement and Mayville Informal Settlement – R116.4 million.

17 October 2022 - NW3299

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

Noting that during the SA Local Government Association Council of Mayors conference held on 8 and 9 September 2022 in East London, the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, revealed that more than 300 municipal ward councillors have been murdered in the Republic in the few years, (a) what measured has the SA Police Service put in place to prevent the continuous killing of municipal ward councillors, (b) (i) what trends and/or patterns have been identified in the specified cases and (ii) how has the information been used to ensure the safety of municipal ward councillors and (c) will he furnish Ms Z Majozi with a report on the arrests that have been made in the cases in the past two years?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

17 October 2022 - NW2597

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the daily allowance that councillors get paid to attend activities of the SA Local Government Association (SALGA) and (b) (b) what (i) number of provincial SALGA activities were held for Western Cape municipalities in the 2019-20 financial year, (ii) type of activities took place and (iii) number of councillors attended each activity?

Reply:

(a) In terms of item 7 of the Notice on upper limits of salaries, allowances and benefits in respect of different members of municipal councils, a councillor designated by the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) to serve in its governance structures is entitled to an allowance not exceeding R1103.23 per day, irrespective of the number of meetings attended by such councillor on a specific day.

(b) (i)   According to information obtained from SALGA, fifteen (15) activities and thirty-four (34) meetings were held during the 2019/ 20 financial year, as follows:

 

No.

(b)(ii) 

Types of Activities/ Meetings

(b)(iii) 

Number of councillors attended each activity

1

PEC Meetings

59

2.

Municipal Finance and Fiscal Policy Working Group

41

3

Human Settlements and Municipal Planning Working Group

40

4.

Community Development and Social Cohesion Working Group

41

5.

Economic Empowerment and Public Employment Working Group

35

6.

Environment Planning and Climate Resilience Working Group

38

7.

Capacity Building and Institutional Resilience Working Group

43

8.

Water, Sanitation and Waste Management Working Group

43

9.

Public Transport and Road Working Group

38

10.

Governance and Inter-Governmental Relations Working Group

42

11.

Municipal Innovations and Information Technology Working Group

40

12.

SALGA Women’s Commission Meetings

81

13.

SALGA Women’s Commission Provincial Lekgotla

23

14.

Speakers Forum

56

15.

Provincial Members Assembly

39

 

17 October 2022 - NW2814

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) What number of Social Workers are (a) employed and (b) funded by her department, but are employed in a Non-profit Organisation (NPO) in each province? (2) What are the salaries of Social Workers at the different levels of seniority within her department in each province? (3) What are the salaries of Social Workers at the different levels of seniority within the NPO sector that are funded by her department in each province? (4) What are the reasons that the salaries of Social Workers employed by her department differ from the Social Workers who are funded by her department but are employed by an NPO?

Reply:

(a) (b) The department funds programmes in NPOs which is inclusive of operational costs to fill posts. The department does not fund individual posts in an NPO.

There are 7 102 social workers employed by the NPO Sector across the country.

The table below reflects the number of Social Workers employed by NPOs in the nine provincial departments based on the programme funding received from the Department.

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF SOCIAL WORKERS EMPLOYED IN NPOs

Eastern Cape

1 638

Free State

409

Gauteng

2 311

KwaZulu Natal

1 111

Limpopo

136

Mpumalanga

328

Northern Cape

69

North West

No response

Western Cape

1 100

Total

  1. 102

 

2. The salaries of Social Workers and Supervisors/managers employed in the public service range from grades 1 to 4 and 1 to 2 respectively as prescribed by the Occupational Specific Dispersion (OSD) for Social Service Professionals (SSPs). In every Province these would range within these scales.

The table below reflects the categories of Social Workers and their respective salaries within the Public Service.

OCCUPATIONAL CATEGORY

SALARY NOTCH

Social work

Grade 1

R261, 456 – R303, 093

 

Grade 2

R321, 546 – R369, 258

 

Grade 3

R389, 991 – R452, 106

 

Grade 4

R 479, 640 – R 589, 896

Social Work Supervisor

Grade 1

R 389, 991 – R 452, 106

 

Grade 2

R 479, 640 – R 725, 517

Social Work Manager

Grade 1

R 806, 811 – R 908, 085

 

Grade 2

R 806, 811 – R 1 116, 931

Social Work policy Developer

Grade 1

R 369, 268 – R 413, 739

 

Grade 2

R 439, 945 – R 589, 896

Social Work Policy Manager

Grade 1

R 806, 811 – R 908, 085

 

Grade 2

R 963, 387 – R 1 116, 831

3. Salaries of social Workers vary from NPO to NPO and Province to Province depending on the funds, sponsors and donations they receive.

Below are the examples of salaries paid to Social Workers in Gauteng, Western Cape and Eastern Cape based of DSD Programme funding.

Province

Professional Posts

Annual Allocation

Gauteng

Assistant Director

R 285, 084

 

Chief Social Work

R 233, 784

 

Social Work

R 174, 456

 

Social Auxiliary Work

R 141, 168

Western Cape

Social Work Manager

R 547, 884

 

Social Work Supervisor

R 299, 688

 

Social Work

R 198, 132

Eastern Cape

Social Work

R 135, 187

 

Principal Social Work

R 203, 553

4. Salaries in the Public Service are determined centrally by the Department of Public Service and Administration. Social Workers in the Public Service fall within the Occupation-Specific Dispensation (OSD) for Social Services Professionals (SSPs), which are tailor-made to ensure staff retention. `

The appointment of Social Workers in the NPO sector is guided by the employment policies of the various organisations and their respective management boards. The salaries of social workers are dependent on the subsidy that the department gives to the NPO, which is informed by the allocations it receives from National Treasury. It is also based on the ability of the NPO’s to source funding from other sources outside of government.

17 October 2022 - NW2523

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) Whether, given that the Umkomaas R102 bridge has collapsed and is posing an incredible danger to not only motorists who are using the specified bridge, but also to pedestrians who could fall into the embankment that is riddled with exposed electrical lines, his department has been informed of the current damage of the bridge; if not, why not; if so, what assessment(s) have been undertaken; (2) whether there are any plans for the reconstruction of the bridge; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the current proposed timelines for such reconstruction and (b) at what stage is the tender process? NW3024E

Reply:

1. The road damage at Umkomaas on R102 is a slip failure, not a bridge collapse. The slip failure was a result of the recent April 2022 floods. The site has been assessed, and only one lane was deemed safe to use. The affected portion has therefore been barricaded and the road is currently operating on a single lane in order to prevent total road closure.

2. Remedial works are inclusive of backfilling the failed slope and protecting the damaged embankment. Contractors have been invited to quote for the required repairs and the quotations closed on the 9th of September 2022, and the works will commence immediately after the appointment of a contractor, which is anticipated to be before December 2022.

17 October 2022 - NW3469

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What (a) steps has her department taken to monitor that women are equipped and empowered in order for women entrepreneurs to gain access to relevant business networks and funding opportunities and (b) initiatives, besides awareness campaigns, has her department supported to practically equip women entrepreneurs with the necessary skills they need in the business environment?

Reply:

The DWYPD assesses the draft APPs of departments to ensure that the plans are responsive to the priorities of WYPD and annually monitors the government progress towards the economic empowerment and promotion of the rights of WYPD. The 2019-2022 report has the following findings among others:

  • Women in Energy (WiE) Programme was developed to promote access to information and support women to participate in through workshops and business summit for Women Owned Entrepreneurs. The workshop was held with over 1000 women entrepreneurs from all nine provinces, as well as Women in Energy (WiE) Business Summit attended by over 2000 women.
  • 1 497 Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) were approved for funding under the SMME Debt Relief Fund, of these, 33% are women-owned and 21% owned by young people;
  • The DSI reported that 110 innovator youth business start-ups were supported as part of the Grassroots Innovation Programme. Thirteen (13) businesses for youths have been established. About thirty-one (31) of the 110 (29%) are women innovators who have been supported through the programme.
  • The Department of Tourism is implementing a three-year pilot project on Women in Tourism (WiT) in Limpopo Province. The Project is based in the following municipalities: Musina, Thulamela, Greater Giyani, Hoedspruit and Molemole;
  • Furthermore, the Department of Tourism supported the Green Tourism Incentive Programme with a total of 45 grants and 25 awarded to women-owned businesses. Tourism Transformation Fund grants were approved for 17 businesses, of which 8 are women-owned. Of these, 5 are 100% women-owned, 1 is 70% women-owned, 1 is 60% women-owned and 1 is 50% women-owned.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

14 October 2022 - NW3534

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the Public Protector’s report on the National Health Laboratory, dated 30 March 2022, what total number of officials have been (a) implicated in allegations of (i) conflicts of interest, (ii) misconduct and (iii) maladministration, (b) charged, (c) taken on review and (d) suspended with pay; (2) (a) on what basis are reviews allowed and (b) what consequence management measures will be put in place to ensure that this does not happen again?

Reply:

1. With reference to the Public Protector’s report on the National health Laboratory, dated 30 March 2022, what total number of officials have been;

Question

NHLS Response

(a)(i) implicated in allegation of conflict of interest

None of the NHLS officials

(a)(ii) implicated in allegations of misconduct

None of the NHLS officials

(a)(iii) implicated in allegations of maladministration

None of the NHLS officials

(b) what total number of officials have been charged

None of the NHLS officials

(c) what number of officials have been taken on review

None of the NHLS officials

(d) what number of officials have been suspended with pay

None of the NHLS officials

2. (a) Not applicable as no NHLS officials launched review proceedings;

(b) The NHLS board will, in exercising its oversight responsibilities over the NHLS’s affairs, effectively and sufficiently observe and apply the principles enunciated in Part 5 of the King IV Code on Corporate Governance. 

The NHLS board is implementing the following corrective measures arising from the Public Protector’s report:

  • Strengthening the NHLS internal controls on the application of the NHLS Supply Chain Management (SCM) Policy and NHLS Remuneration Policy with a view to prevent a recurrence of the improprieties referred to in the Public Protector’s Report. 
  • A training course or workshop in Public Procurement, with particular emphasis on fiduciary duties and general responsibilities of Accounting Authorities outlined in the PFMA, as well as a refresher course or workshop on the NHLS Board’s Terms of Reference and guiding principles in the King IV Code on Corporate Governance. 
  • Strengthening the monitoring system in line with the guiding principles outlined in Part IV of the King IV Code to monitor procurement and HR processes in the appointment of service providers and individuals. 
  • A training course or refresher workshop in public procurement with particular emphasis on sections 57 and 83 of the PFMA as well as section 217 of the Constitution.
  • A course on protected disclosure to ensure the proper identification of the requirements for a protected disclosure case and the proper handling thereof. 
  • A refresher course on labour relations processes relating to, discipline, in particular the code of good practice on suspensions and dismissals.
  • A provision/strategy in the Board’s Terms of Reference to include a prerequisite for compulsory submission of pertinent recommendations for any job grading and/or salary scales. 
  • Training on Treasury Regulations 16A9.1 and sections 50, 51, 54, 63, 83 and 84 of the PFMA to enhance oversight capacity over the NHLS affairs. 
  • Inclusion of a clause in the Code of Conduct, for the Board to promptly inform the Minister of any changes in the position of Board members.
  • Inclusion of a provision in the NHLS Code of Conduct that a member of the Board who discloses to the Board any direct or indirect personal or private business interest which that member may have in any matter before the Board, must withdraw from the proceedings of the Board when that matter is considered. 
  • Review the existing policy or the policy provisions on managing conflict of interest to ensure there is no ambiguity. 
  • Guidelines in line with Rule 11 of Chapter 2 of the NHLSGR, Rule A.2(c) of Part V of the NHLSGR, where appropriate, pertaining to special circumstances for deviation from implementing recommendations for the implementation of the job grading and remuneration. 
  • Guidelines to deal with the ambiguity relating to the proper disposal of NHLS Board documents. 
  • Ground rules and timelines within which allegations of fraud, corruption and recommendations of forensic investigation reports, ARC and Legal Services Unit should be dealt with. 
  • Management team to take cognizance of the findings of maladministration and improper conduct and to take corrective action to prevent a recurrence of the improprieties referred to in this Report. 
  • Formal contract or service level agreement with a contractor, legally sound to avoid potential litigation and to minimise possible fraud and corruption. Such contracts must include legal vetting and must be constantly managed to ensure that both the NHLS and the contractors meet their respective obligations. 
  • A monitoring system that ensures that proper procurement in appointing service providers by the SCM and recruitment processes in appointing individuals by the Human Resources Department.
  • Review the existing policy or the policy provisions on managing conflict of interest. 
  • Evaluation the effectiveness of the NHLS’s internal controls and monitoring system and introduction of strict measures for compliance with lawful, reasonable, and procedurally fair labour practices.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3268

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a)(i) total number of additional (aa) ventilators, (bb) beds and (cc) medical equipment was purchased by his department during the peak of COVID-19 and (ii) was the total cost in each specified case and (b) has happened to all the additional equipment?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still working with the Provincial Departments of Health to source the full details required by this Question. A full report and response will be furnished to the Honourable Member and Parliament as soon as the information has been collated from all the Provinces.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3517

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

When announcing the mobilisation of his countrymen to support his illegal invasion of Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin vowed to use all available means to deter future attacks, which was widely interpreted as a reference to the use of Russia nuclear weapons, the South African government condemn Putin veiled threat to use nuclear weapons in the Ukraine conflict; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South Africa has always opposed violations of the sovereignty and territorial integrity of member states, in keeping with the UN Charter. South Africa is continuing to encourage all the parties, through diplomatic channels, within all relevant international mechanisms and in various bilateral engagements to find a lasting solution to the current situation in Ukraine, in full compliance with the UN Charter and universally recognised human rights and fundamental freedoms.

South Africa believes that the mere possession of nuclear weapons constitutes a threat. The concept of nuclear deterrence, which is included in the military and security doctrines of all nuclear-weapon States, as well as States in nuclear security alliances and States under extended nuclear security guarantees, is itself a threat of use to convince another party to refrain from initiating some course of action. For this reason, any and all nuclear threats, whether they be explicit or implicit and irrespective of the circumstances are unequivocally opposed by South Africa.

14 October 2022 - NW3289

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department has been informed of the situation that, despite the landmark victory and the Gauteng High Court Order with regard to foreign-qualified doctors, such interns remain unplaced and the Health Professions Council of South Africa refuses to register the foreign-qualified doctors without an offer of employment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether his department has taken any measures to support the registration of foreign-qualified doctors in accordance with the Gauteng High Court Order; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)-(2) According to the information received from the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), the HPCSA has adhered to all court orders relating to foreign qualified applicants including the discontinuation of the “Pathway” that required foreign qualified applicants to go through an additional 12-month period for clinical exposure before they could be registered as interns.

Sub-regulation 3(2)(c) of the Regulations relating to the registration and training of interns in medicine published under Government Notice R.57 in Government Gazette 25938 of 23 January 2004 states that: “A person referred to in sub regulation (1) [intern] shall submit his or her application to the board in terms of section 17 of the Act for registration as an intern in medicine on an application form supplied by the board and duly completed”, prior to being registered.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3271

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) percentage and (b) number of public hospitals have (i) a psychiatrist, (ii) clinical psychologists, (iii) occupational therapists and (iv) child psychologists; (2) what is the (a) current vacancy rate at all public hospitals for the specified healthcare specialists and (b) total cost per annum to fill the specified vacancies; (3) what (a) number and (b) percentage of public health facilities offer mental health services?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still working with the Provincial Departments of Health to source the full details required by this Question. A full report and response will be furnished to the Honourable Member and Parliament as soon as the information has been collated from all the Provinces.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3519

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In light of the fact that Zimbabwe is heading to its watershed elections In 2023 while there are wide spread reports of alleged targeted harassment of opposition members by the government of President Emmerson Mnangagwa, which includes Mr Job Sikhala, a member of Parliament representing the Citizens Coalition for Change, who has been held in detention without trial in a maximum security prison for 100 days, what steps has the Government taken to (a) ensure that Zimbabwe’s political situation does not degenerate into full -blown political violence ahead of the 2023 elections and (b) appeal to the Zimbabwean government to release all political prisoners- unconditionally?

Reply:

a) South Africa and Zimbabwe use the Bi-National Commission (BNC) to discuss all matters of mutual interest, including political and security situations in both countries. It should be recalled that for the July 2018 harmonised elections in Zimbabwe, the Zimbabwean Government invited international observers, a move that was commended by the international community. It would also be recalled that the 2018 Elections were pronounced as having proceeded relatively quiet, free, and fair, notwithstanding recommended areas of improvement, as per AU and SADC Election Observer Missions. The violence erupted following the disputing of the election results by the leader of the then MDC-T, and the subsequent government response is well documented. President Mnangagwa established a Commission of Enquiry on the post-election violence, which was chaired by former President Kgalema Mothlanthe. The recommendations were released in public, which in South Africa’s view, was an indication of the commitment by the Zimbabwean Government to their implementation.

South Africa believes in peace, security, and stability in the region. Free and fair elections are a prerequisite of good governance for the attainment of the SADC Vision 2050, and the aspirations of the AU’s Agenda 2063. South Africa participates in electoral activities of the region through the SADC Electoral Advisory Council and is always part of the SADC Observer Mission.

b) With regard to the Job Sikhala matter, we will make further enquiries on the nature of his imprisonment. South Africa does not support any form of detention without trial or administrative detention as this is referred to in some jurisdictions. We will engage further with our counterparts on matters such as these.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: Mr MJ Gininda

CONTACT: 012 351 1663

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 3332

 

MR Z DANGOR

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 3332 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

DR GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

DATE:

Additional information

The Government of the Republic of South Africa has not yet received any communication for the Government of the Republic of Zimbabwe regarding the forthcoming harmonised elections to be held in 2023.

14 October 2022 - NW3235

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What kind of impact has load shedding had on public (i) hospitals and (ii) clinics that do not have electricity backup facilities since 1 January 2022 and (b) which provinces are affected the most?

Reply:

a) (i) Hospitals

All public hospitals have backup generators. Backup generators are only meant to run as backup for 2 to 3 hours for life saving equipment in emergency areas. Service delivery therefore gets negatively affected in areas which are not powered by generators.

(ii) Clinics and Community Health Centres (CHCS)

Backup power in the form of generators is available in 42% of clinics and 86% of CHCs nation-wide.

  • Impact of load shedding on PHC facilities that do not have backup power.
  • The electronic Health Patient Record System works on electrical power and during power failures staff cannot retrieve patients files and patients have to wait until power is on thus increasing patient waiting times
  • Patients physical examination and deliveries becomes impossible in dark consulting rooms resulting in unnecessary referrals of patients to hospitals.
  • Water interruption due to the water pumps in reservoirs requiring electricity to function.
  • Telecommunication break down affecting receiving calls from communities and contacting call centre for ambulance.

(b) Provinces that are affected the most:

Clinics: The Table below indicates that only Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal have more than 70% coverage with regard to backup power in clinics.

District

Total number of clinics

Facilities have backup electricity

Average % scored

ec Eastern Cape Province

723

145

20%

fs Free State Province

202

32

16%

gp Gauteng Province

326

267

82%

kz KwaZulu-Natal Province

580

418

72%

lp Limpopo Province

452

113

25%

mp Mpumalanga Province

226

88

39%

nc Northern Cape Province

124

24

19%

nw North West Province

259

80

31%

wc Western Cape Province

175

88

50%

Average / Total

3067

1288

42%

  • 1288 out of 3067 Clinics has backup electricity
  • 1779 clinics do not have backup electricity

Community Health Centres: The Table below indicates that only Free State Province (36%) has less than 70% coverage with regard to backup power in community Health Centres.

District

Total number of CHCs

Facilities having backup electricity

Average % scored

ec Eastern Cape Province

41

34

82%

fs Free State Province

10

4

36%

gp Gauteng Province

38

34

90%

kz KwaZulu-Natal Province

21

20

94%

lp Limpopo Province

26

20

77%

mp Mpumalanga Province

55

48

88%

nc Northern Cape Province

30

26

85%

nw North West Province

47

43

92%

wc Western Cape Province

48

42

87%

Average / Total

316

272

86%

  • 272 out of 316 CHCs has backup electricity
  • 44 CHCs do not have backup electricity

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3304

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What measures has his department put in place to address the (a) current yellow fever vaccine shortages plaguing the Republic and (b) contingency plans of the Republic to prevent future shortages; (2) (a) how is his department expediting the release of the Sanofi stock of yellow fever vaccines that is currently with the (i) National Control Laboratory and/or (ii) SA Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) in Bloemfontein and (b) by what date does his department envisage the release date of the Sanofi stock of yellow fever vaccines; (3) whether the SAHPRA has been approached to licence and/or register yellow fever vaccines from different manufactures; if not, why not; if so, what is the status of the Sanofi yellow fever vaccine?

Reply:

1. (a) The National Department of Health manages contracts for approximately 1 200 line items including vaccines. Currently, there are no supply constraints in the public sector related to yellow fever vaccines.

(b) To ensure that there are no supply constraints at facilities, a number of interventions are implemented. These interventions are informed by the cause of the supply challenge.

  • Where the supply constraint is due to operational matters, re is a delay e.g. machine breakdown, labour unrest, theft, post importation testing, etc., the National Department of Health (NDOH) would source products from alternative local suppliers with registered products using the quotation process.
  • Should the supply constraint result in a longer term supply challenge, such as regulatory matters including amendments to the dossier that requires approval from South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA), including a change/addition of an active pharmaceutical ingredient source and/or manufacturing site, the transfer of ownership of dossiers which results in a change of marketing authorization, delays in the issuing of the permits for imported medicines, manufactured products requiring additional quality checks by SAHPRA, etc. and no alternative local suppliers with registered products are available; an application would be made to SAHPRA for the acquisition of unregistered medicines for human use in South Africa Act use in terms of Section 21 of the Medicines and Related Substances Act.
  • During the contracting for medicines, it is a special contractual condition that suppliers provide the NDoH with information related to their buffer stock holding, plans within the pipeline and data related to deliveries made to facilities. The DoH uses this information to manage supplier performance including the imposition of penalties where appropriate. Furthermore, the data is used for planning purposes including demand and supply planning.

2. (a) It must be noted that the National Control Laboratory and SA Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) are independent of the NDoH. Nevertheless, written communication was sent to SAHPRA from the NDOH to request that the release of yellow fever vaccine stock be expedited.

(b) SAHPRA has subsequently approved the Yellow Fever Vaccine on the 23rd of September 2022 and the stock is currently with the distributor for delivery to facilities that have placed orders.

3. Yellow fever vaccine is a low volume product. The low demand for the vaccine resulted in the current contracted supplier writing-off 1 505 units. The low demand makes market entry very difficult.

With regard to the status of the Sanofi yellow fever vaccine, SAHPRA has subsequently approved the Yellow Fever Vaccine on the 23rd of September 2022 and the stock is currently with the distributor for delivery to facilities that have placed orders.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3387

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she has considered reviewing the size of the houses built under the Breaking New Ground; if not, why not; if so what are the relevant details.

Reply:

The Department has done a number of reviews and evaluations together with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) and has increased the size of the gross floor area for constructing subsidised houses.

The minimum and maximum size of the subsidised houses to be provided to beneficiaries of the Housing Subsidy Scheme are as follows:

  • 24 – 30 square metres of gross floor area for temporary residential units.
  • 30 square metres of gross floor area for social housing units
  • 40 square metres of gross floor area for persons without any disabilities.
  • 45 square metres of gross floor area for a person with disabilities using a wheelchair and
  • 45 square metres of gross floor area for the higher density designs in a form of different layouts such as a double storey semi-detached units; or three-storey walk-up units
  • 50m2 square metres house is provided for qualifying military veterans in line with the Regulations published by the Department of Military Veterans.

The subsidised houses have to be built in line with South African National Building Regulations Standards ( SANS) and the National Home Building Regulations Council has to ensure that these standards are met.

Effecting changes in the gross floor area (size) of the house to be constructed brings more cost over and above the changes that are brought by inflation. As it stands, the current subsidy amount available for financing a 40 square metre house is R141 294. In the case of subsidised houses for Disabled Persons and Military Veterans the subsidy amount increases to R209 072 and R240 608 respectively.

In light of the fact that the budget allocated to the Department becomes less every year and that any increases in the size of subsidised housing will result in a substantial increase in cost, it would not be advisable to implement such an increase as it would result in a decrease in the delivery of housing units.

14 October 2022 - NW3538

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to section 27(F) Financial Independent Applications, what is the total number of (a) applications received by his department that have not been finalised, (b) staff working on the specified applications and (c) applications (i) finalised and (ii) rejected in the six-month period from February to August 2022?

Reply:

a) The number of applications not finalised from July 2016 to September 2022 is 125, which is part of the backlog project.

b) 11 Adjudicators worked on this category of applications.

(c)(i) 36 applications have been finalised.

(c)(ii) 32 applications have been rejected.

END

14 October 2022 - NW3491

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference to each of the programmes that form part of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) of her department, what are the relevant details of (a) each specified programme within the EPWP framework, (b) the budget allocated to each programme, (c) the number of job opportunities created in each case, (d) the duration of the contracts of the beneficiaries, (e) the conversion to permanent employment of EPWP participants and (f) any skills development that were undertaken in each programme?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) is the overall coordinator of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP), comprised of the Infrastructure, Social, Environment and Culture and Non-State sectors. The DPWI leads the Infrastructure and Non-State sectors while the Department of Social Development (DSD) and Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) coordinate the Social Sector and Environment and Culture Sector, respectively. Further, the EPWP is implemented by various public bodies across all three spheres of Government.

The following response is specific to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure.

  • The EPWP Municipal Infrastructure programme focuses on promoting the use of labour-intensive methods in construction by municipalities during the implementation of infrastructure projects to create work opportunities.
  • The EPWP National Youth Service Programme (NYS) aims to train youth in built environment artisan trades. The programme is implemented by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and the provincial departments of public works.
  • The Vuk’uphile Learnership Programme is a two to three-year learnership programme aimed at training and developing emerging contractors to enhance their skills for bidding and the execution of labour-intensive construction projects under the EPWP, as well as conventional construction projects. The Vuk’uphile Learnership Programme is implemented in partnership with various stakeholders that include public bodies, i.e. Municipalities, Provincial Departments and State Owned Entities, the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) and a financial service provider (who provides bridging finance).
  • The EPWP Provincial Roads programme focuses on supporting provincial road departments to implement construction and maintenance projects labour-intensively. The support is provided by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in collaboration with the Department of Transport.
  • The EPWP, Large Projects programme, focuses on ensuring that significant portions of projects with a budget greater than R30 million are implemented labour-intensively. The Large Projects are implemented in the different spheres of Government.
  • The Non-State sector is a cross-cutting EPWP sector comprising Non-Profit Organisations (NPO) and Community Work Programmes which deliver infrastructure, social and environment-related services through non-state actors at local and community levels. The NPO component of the Non-State sector is implemented through the Independent Development Trust (IDT), an entity of the DPWI.

b) With regard to the budget allocated to each programme;

  • R 20 million was allocated for Municipal Infrastructure support at a national level in the 21/22 financial year to support leveraging off projects funded by municipalities through various grants like the Municipal Infrastructure Grant. In the 21/22 financial year, municipal infrastructure projects worth more than

R5 266,472,189 were reported through the EPWP.

    • For the National Youth Service programme, a budget of R600,000 was used for coordination at a national level in the 21/22 financial year. The National Youth Service was implemented on projects with an overall budget of R221,691,176 in the 21/22 financial year.
    • A budget of R 7.9 million for support of the implementation of the Vuk’uphile Learnership Programme at a national level in the 2021/22 financial year with projects public bodies implemented more than R46.5 million.
    • R15.48 million was available for provincial road coordination support at a national level in the 21/22 financial year. Funding for the Provincial Roads programme is from the Provincial Roads Maintenance Grant (PRMG) and equitable share from provinces. Over R3.5 billion worth of projects were reported through the provincial roads programmes in the 21/22 financial year.
    • The Large Projects programme had R300,000 for coordination at a national level in the 21/22 financial year. Large projects worth more than R342 million were reported in the 21/22 financial year from different public bodies.
    • During 2021/22 financial year utilising own funding, public bodies in the Social, Environment and Culture and Non-State (CWP) sectors spent R4,5 billion, R3 billion and R889,904,599 respectively. The DPWI through the Implementation Agent, the Independent Development Trust (IDT), spent R797 975 370 of the NPO implementation allocation on participants’ wages in the 21/22 financial year.

c) With regard to the number of job opportunities created in each case;

  • From the municipal infrastructure programme 88 462 work opportunities were reported in the 21/22 financial year.
  • On the National Youth Service programme, 9,195 work opportunities were reported in the 21/22 financial year.
  • For Vuk’uphile Learnership Programme, 618 work opportunities were reported during the 2021/22 financial year
  • For Provincial Roads Programme, 134,340 work opportunities were reported on the EPWP reporting system by provincial roads departments in the 2021/22 financial year.
  • For the 2021/22 financial year, 3,570 work opportunities were reported on the Large Projects programme from public bodies in the different spheres of Government.
  • The number of work opportunities reported in the Social, Environment and Culture and Non-State (CWP) sectors was 163 928, 176 979 and 222 587, respectively. The Non-Profit Organisations program reported 100 212 work opportunities.

d) With regard to the duration of the contracts of the beneficiaries;

  • Municipal Infrastructure projects in 2021/22 financial year had an average duration of 81 days.
  • The average duration of work opportunities on the National Youth Service programme was 136 days in the 21/22 financial year.
  • The Vuk’uphile learnership programme is implemented over a period of 2 to 3 years.
  • Provincial Roads Programme recorded an average duration of 162 days for participants on projects reported by provincial roads departments in the 21/22 financial year.
  • On the Large Projects programme, participants had an average duration of 101 days.
  • The duration of contracts of the beneficiaries vary per sector, depending on the project duration. In the Social Sector in 2021/22 across all programmes, the average duration of work opportunities was 161 person days of work. The Environment and Culture sector provided an average duration of 77.8 person days of work while the Community Work provided an average of 34 person days of work.
  • Due to the delayed start in the implementation of the NPO programme in 2021/22 financial year which resulted in a phased approach in October and November 2021, participants’ contracts were for six (6) and five (5) months ending in March 2022.

e) With regard to the conversion to permanent employment of EPWP participants;

  • On the municipal infrastructure programme, there are no recorded statistics on conversation to permanent employment.
  • On the National Youth Service Programme, 36 learners were permanently employed by contractors on the DPWI projects in the 21/22 financial year.
  • The contractors in Vuk’uphile are not converted into permanent employment, however the training focusses on developing the emerging contractors such that they are better able to sustain their business.
  • EPWP Participants on projects implemented under the Provincial Roads Programme are not converted into permanent employment but are capacitated through skills development for opportunities in the active construction labour market.
  • On the EPWP Large Projects, there are no recorded conversion of participants into permanent employment.
  • No formal reports in respect of conversion to permanent employment of EPWP participants were received from the implementing public bodies of the Social, Environment and Culture and Non-State sectors in 2021/22.
  • Interestingly, a longitudinal study conducted by the EPWP Branch to determine the employment status of participants after their participation in the EPWP; the wave one of the study found that 21% of the participants that left the programme found employment elsewhere. This was confirmed by the Q1 2021 Quarter Labour Force Survey (QLFS) report which found that 22% of those that worked in the EPWP in the 2019/20 financial year and have left the programme found employment elsewhere after leaving the programme.

f) With regard to skills development that were undertaken in each programme;

  • DPWI has to apply for funding to the National Skills Development Fund.
  • On the municipal infrastructure programme, on-site training is conducted during project implementation which participant can then use it elsewhere when they exit the programme.
  • Under NYS programme, the 9,195 participants in the 21/22 financial year undertook skills development (theoretical and practical training) in different artisan trades. There was also skills transferred to the general labourers who were employed in the projects.
  • Contractors developed through the Vuk’uphile Learnership Programme are trained through Construction Education and Training Authority accredited training provider that offers them an NQF level 4 qualification called Supervision of Construction Processes. A total of 30 contractors were supported in the 21/22 financial year.
  • A number of skills training courses and on the job practical training opportunities were given to participants on road construction and maintenance trades across all provinces during projects implementation.
  • On the Large Projects programme, participants were provided with on the job training to be able to implement different activities on the infrastructure projects implemented.
  • Training did not take place in respect of the Non-State sector NPO programme.
  • The Social, Environment and Culture sectors reported 546 118 and 383 905 work opportunities with training days respectively across all sector programmes while the Non-State sector (CWP) reported 5 484 work opportunities with training.

14 October 2022 - NW3316

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With reference to the litigation report that was presented to the Portfolio Committee on Public Works and Infrastructure on 24 August 2022, what are the details of the R2, 5 million that was reported as containment measures to prevent further land invasions costs of the Sheriff in respect of the (a) property address, (b) relevant dates, (c) incident-specific costs and (d) current status of the properties in terms of land invasions; (2) What are the ongoing costs related to the protection of properties of her Department from unlawful occupation; (3)What measures are being implemented to prevent further land invasions?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. I was informed in February 2021 the Department of Public Works & Infrastructure issued instructions to State Attorney to facilitate the obtaining of a court order preventing further invasion of the Grabouw state-owned property and, in the process, incurred the costs through the Office of the State Attorney by engaging the services of the Sheriff of the Court to assist through serving the papers and executing the court order concerning the following:

a) Grabouw FARMS 336, 445 and 335

b) Since the final containment Court Order was granted on 21 September 2021. containment measures have been carried out throughout the period to contain further invasions by conducting surveys on the portions of farms from time to time, with the Sheriff's survey report in July 2022 revealing that the total amount of completed structures on all the properties is 5599 and the incomplete/damaged/half-built structures amount to 177.

c) Sheriff of the Court is mainly instructed to survey the properties as part of the containment measures to prevent further invasions and provide the report to the State Attorney and the Department on the recommended measures required.

d) Based on the Sheriff's survey report, it is essential to note that the figures will move upward as there are still people erecting structures on all the properties listed and some areas are very well hidden..

2. Court Orders - as part of containment measures, require the Department to, amongst others, consider demolishing incomplete structures and the additional labour to assist the Sheriff in doing so, and also storage of personal belongings for a week. Included in the Sheriff's cost are the putting up of notices in all three local languages, the reading out thereof, and serving the applications and Court Orders on all relevant parties regarding the Rules of Court.

3. The Department has initiated a Grabouw State Land Steering Committee to address the challenges experienced as a result of land invasion within the Grabouw District. The first meeting is set to take place before the end of November 2022. The Department has subsequently extended an invitation to Department Forestry, Fisheries and Environment, the Western Cape Provincial Government, the Local and District Municipalities, and the SAPS. The Steering Committee will address issues such as equitable and sustainable land dispensation that promotes both social and economic development.

 

14 October 2022 - NW3438

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What plan has she put in place to ensure that the housing project in ward 24 in the Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality is completed by her department?

Reply:

The Limpopo Provincial Department of Cooperative Government, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs (CoGHSTA) has advised that it has appointed Kgawana Construction and Enterprise CC to construct ten (10) houses in Ward 24 and that the contractor is currently on site. It has further indicated that the contractor is anticipating to complete all the houses as per Implementation Plan by the end of January 2023.

14 October 2022 - NW3362

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in view of the time that had lapsed since he was advised of the issue of Mr Sipho Bulose, prison number 201181097, any steps have been taken in this regard; if not, why not; if so, on what date does he intend to intervene and ensure adequate medical care is granted to the person?

Reply:

The KwaZulu Department of Health indicates that the Honourable Member was informed of the difficulty to trace the complainant, as the contact number that the complainant was not reachable on the contact number that the Honourable Member had provided to the department. The hospital as well as the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial office contacted the complainant on several occasions to obtain additional information from the complainant as the information provided was not sufficient to facilitate investigation. Mr Thulani Bulose did not answer his cell phone every time he was contacted, the calls went to voicemail. The following information is required to enable King Edward hospital to investigate the complaint:

  • Alternative contact details of the complainant, Mr Thulani Bulose (e-mail address or another cell number)
  • ID number of patient (Mr Sipho Bulose)
  • Hospital number of patient (Mr Sipho Bulose)
  • Dates and ward/s at which patient (Mr Sipho Bulose) was admitted at King Edward Hospital
  • Clarity on the assistance that is sought from King Edward Hospital

A request was made to the Honourable Member to provide alternative contact details of the complainant to enable the hospital to contact the complainant to obtain the additional information. The Honourable Member provided a prison number of the patient instead. The hospital could not trace the patient file using the prison number as prison numbers are not used as a unique identifier for filing of patient files. The complaint was therefore closed as guided by the National Guideline to manage complaints, compliments and suggestions (2022) that states the following: When additional information is required from the patient or family/supporting person to enable further investigation of the complaint, the patient or family/supporting person should be contacted to obtain the information. In instances where the patient or family/supporting person could not be reached on the first attempt, he/ she should be contacted at least twice thereafter for two consecutive weeks. If the patient or family/supporting person could still not be traced, the complaint can be seen as resolved (closed). In such circumstance the dates and the methods used to contact the patient or family/supporting person should be documented. The same applies when a patient or family/supporting person cannot be traced to conduct redress.

A new complaint will be opened to investigate the complaint lodged by Mr Thulani Bulose when the information requested as outline is submitted.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3504

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) total amount does her department owe to the (i) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (ii) Senqu Local Municipality and (b) is the age analysis of the monies owed in each case; (2) What (a) are the specific details of the buildings in respect of which her department owes the specified municipalities and (b) is the use of each specified building; (3) Whether her department has any plans to address the debts; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of her department’s plan and (b) is the time frame in which the debts will be settled? NW4317E

Reply:

1. (a) I am informed as follows by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(i) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality (Gqeberha/PE Region):

The age analysis obtained from the Municipality as at 30 June 2022 reflects an outstanding amount of R 7.6 million, the engagements have commenced with the Municipal Manager and DPWI Senior Managers to verify and reconcile, after which DPWI will then make payment within 30 days of receipt of invoices. The amount owed is broken down as follows:

      • DPWI accounts: R 5.2 million; and
      • Unknown accounts: R 2.4 million.

Unknown accounts are the accounts that do not belong to DPWI and the Municipality continue to bill DPWI.

Walter Sisulu Local Municipality (Umtata Region):

The age analysis obtained from municipalities as at 30 September 2022 reflects an outstanding amount R436 675.32. The amount owed relates to the current month billing for rates and taxes for 2022/2023 financial year (age analysis attached with the confirmation letter from the Municipality). The accounts outstanding are current and up to date.

DPWI does not pay annual property rates in advance but pays them programmatically on a monthly basis which is also applicable for Senqu Local Municipality. While municipalities may be reflecting the annual property rates as due and payable, and invariably overdue, there are few instances where invoices are not paid within 30 days.

(ii) Senqu Local Municipality:

As per the age analysis obtained from municipalities as at 31 August 2022 reflects an outstanding amount of R1.2 million broken down as follows:

      • Municipal services: R415 217.25 (with R349 000 not yet allocated after the payment run).

R66 217.25 (R415 217.25 – R349 000) is part of the payment that cleared in September 2022 but not yet allocated.

      • Property rates: R557 505.20 annual claim as outlined above for 2022/2023 financial year; and
      • Leased building: R231 285.33 long overdue lease rental accounts that is currently being investigated.

(2)

Walter Sisulu Local Municipality (Gqeberha)

#

User Department

Category

No. of Accounts

Mun. Services

Rates & Taxes

Arrear Amount

       

R

1

Correctional Services

Known Accounts

4

627 431,55

1 985 255,02

2 612 686,57

2

Justice

Known Accounts

7

305 609,28

146 724,28

452 333,57

3

NDPWI

Known Accounts

10

0,00

561 410,18

561 410,18

4

SANDF

Known Accounts

6

0,00

76 882,58

76 882,58

5

SAPS

Known Accounts

18

72 898,77

902 687,41

975 586,19

6

Water Affairs

Known Accounts

34

0,00

510 348,50

510 348,50

7

Unknown

 

49

   

2 418 234,24

TOTAL

128

1 005 939,61

4 183 307,98

  1. 607 481,83

Walter Sisulu Local Municipality (Mthatha)

The Municipality has confirmed that the Mthatha regional office is up to date with the payments.

Senqu Local Municipality:

#

User Department

Category

No. of Accounts

Municipal Services

1

Correctional Services

Known Accounts

4

95 281,18

2

Justice

Known Accounts

4

55 980.99

3

labour

Known Accounts

2

9 850.2

4

SAPS

Known Accounts

12

188 569,69

5

Home Affairs

Known Accounts

2

65 535,19

TOTAL

24

415 217,25

  • Rates and Taxes: R557 505.20 that relates to property rates for 2022/2023 financial year (See confirmation letter from the Municipality); and
  • Leased building: R231 285.33 long overdue lease rental accounts that is currently being investigated.

 

(3)

Walter Sisulu Local Municipality (Gqeberha)

DPWI’s Gqeberha Regional Office has been in contact with the Municipality and a visit to perform an extensive reconciliation of the known accounts is arranged for 17- 21 October 2022. The objective is to conclude the reconciliation and settle the reconciled outstanding amount by the end of November 2022.

However, DPWI will only process the amount due upon the completion of the reconciliations and the submission of accurate invoices and supporting documents by the Municipality.

Notwithstanding the above, DPWI made payments of R 734 479, 41 for Rates & Taxes, and R 213 267, 43 for municipal services (utilities) during September 2022. This is a clear demonstration and continuous endeavours by DPWI to ensure that all valid invoices from municipalities – as it is with other creditors – are settled timeously.

Walter Sisulu Local Municipality (Mthatha)

DPWI has no arrear debt on municipal services and property rates and is busy with the current billing.

Senqu Local Municipality:

The Department’s Mthatha Regional Office will meet with the Senqu Municipality and perform an extensive reconciliation for the overdue amount relating to the leased building on 1 November 2022, to resolve and conclude the matter by 30 November 2022.

14 October 2022 - NW3518

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, with regard to the Human Rights Watch, an international nongovernmental organisation that has documented several cases of Russian military forces committing war violations against civilians in occupied areas of the Chernihiv, Kharkiv and Kyiv regions of Ukraine, which include a case of repeated rape, two cases of summary executions of seven men and other cases of unlawful violence that include threats against civilians between 27 February and 14 March 2022, the Government has condemned the specified war crimes by the invading Russian army; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South Africa is not indifferent to what is going on in Ukraine. We are deeply concerned about the continuing conflict, the loss of lives and the deteriorating human rights and humanitarian situation. As a matter of urgency, there must be a cessation of hostilities, which would be the first step in a comprehensive response to the humanitarian crisis. We continue to stress that dialogue, mediation, and diplomacy are the only means to end the current conflict. As South Africa stated in the United Nations General Assembly, wars end when dialogue begins, and wars endure when there is no dialogue.

We have in our statements made calls for all parties in this conflict to respect The Laws of Wars, including respect for the Principles of Distinction, which enjoins all combatants to ensure civilians are not harmed.

14 October 2022 - NW3479

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether her department has any plans to ensure that the infrastructure of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) is (a) refurbished and (b) maintained; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; a. What amount has her department spent on refurbishing the SANDF buildings in the past 2 years?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. I am informed the immovable infrastructure maintenance approach in the Department of Public and Infrastructure (DPWI) is a blend of Preventative and Corrective. It is per the National Immovable Asset Maintenance Management (NIAMM) Framework, and facilities refurbishment and repair fall under Corrective maintenance.

a) Under Corrective maintenance, two asset renewal programmes ensure the upkeep of DoD facilities. These are Repair and Refurbishment (R&R) and Capital programmes. DPWI always has a myriad of repair and upgrade projects being carried out on the DoD portfolio. The current challenge is the decentralised budget that resides with the client. This model has bottlenecks that lead to delays in timeously carrying out refurbishment and capital projects due to unavailability or delay in funding confirmation.

Furthermore, in recent times DoD has prohibited DPWI from carrying out any Repair and Refurbishment projects in their facilities. The current DoD portfolio is relatively old, and the current prohibition of refurbishment by the DoD will accelerate the deterioration of the facilities resulting in a burden on the normal preventative and corrective maintenance budget. This could put the accounting officer in a precarious position if something were to go wrong due to the lack of refurbishment on these facilities.

b) DPWI continue to carry out Corrective (Day-to-Day) maintenance through various DPWI regional offices. Furthermore, there is an R1 million delegation assigned to the client to perform corrective maintenance as per the Day-to-Day guidelines. The department has already implemented the Total Facility Management (TFM) approach at one of the DoD key strategy facilities, 1 Military Hospital. The TFM implementation for 2 Military Hospital is imminent, and the site visit comprised of DPWI, management of 2 Military Hospital and potential service providers took place on 04 October 2022. TFM is a maintenance approach where the facilities' services are packaged by combining technical maintenance and soft services.

2. Refurbishment expenditure for the past two years on DoD facilities.

 

Maintenance

Repair

Refurbishment

DoD funded Refurbishment

2019/20

473 329 770

94 966 731

20 056 739

R 463 066 106

2020/21

342 495 058

80 322 416

5 676 461

R 320 936 571

 

DoD has another Refurbishment budget over and above its normal Capital budget, and DPWI also executes the projects on a recoverable basis.

14 October 2022 - NW3407

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Considering that there are reports of shortages of 150 medications in the Republic, what are the relevant details of the (a) list of medications that have stock shortages, (b) plans that his department has in place to address the critical shortages and (c) date by which the shortages will be eradicated; (2) what are the treatment plans for patients who have chronic conditions, but have run out of their medications?

Reply:

1. (a) It is the Departments of Health’s policy to ensure equitable access to quality healthcare through availability of safe, effective and cost-effective medicines at the appropriate level of care. The National Department of Health (NDoH) manages contracts for approximately 1 200 line items. During the contracting for medicines, it is a special contractual condition that suppliers provide the NDoH with information related to their buffer stock holding, plans within the pipeline and data related to deliveries made to facilities. The NDoH uses this information to manage supplier performance including the imposition of penalties where appropriate. Furthermore, the data is used for planning purposes including demand and supply planning.

Medicine availability is monitored using supplier and provincial level data and this allows visibility of stock availability and as such allows for risk mitigation by the National Department of Health.

However, the recent media reports are of shortages related to availability in the private sector. Availability of the medicines referred to in these reports was above 90% in the public sector. There were no public sector supply challenges of chronic medicines for first and second line agents as reported recently in the media.

(b) There are a number of interventions implemented to reduce supply shortages at facilities. These interventions are informed by the cause of the supply challenge.

  • Where the supply constraint may result in a longer term supply challenge, such as regulatory matters including amendments to the dossier that requires approval from South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA), including a change/addition of an active pharmaceutical ingredient source and/or manufacturing site, the transfer of ownership of dossiers which results in a change of marketing authorization, delays in the issuing of the permits for imported medicines, manufactured products requiring additional quality checks by SAHPRA, etc. and no alternative local suppliers with registered products are available; an application would be made to SAHPRA for the acquisition of unregistered medicines for human use in South Africa Act use in terms of Section 21 of the Medicines and Related Substances Act.
  • Should the supply constraint be due to operational matters, e.g. machine breakdown, labour unrest, theft, post importation testing, etc., the National Department of Health (NDOH) would source products from alternative local suppliers with registered products using the quotation process.

(c) In any supply chain, shortages can never be eradicated. However, actions can be taken to identify problems that could lead to a supply challenge and to deal with each challenge as it arises. See response in (b) above. Each case is treated individually depending on the root cause, and the magnitude of the supply challenge.

2. In the event that a supply challenge cannot be resolved, a circular is sent to all provinces indicating therapeutic alternatives as per the Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) which will guide clinicians to manage patients until supply is sourced.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3420

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) plans have been put in place to make the Pan – African Parliament an overarching legislative body for the continent and (b) deadline has been set in this regard?

Reply:

a) The Pan-African Parliament (PAP) as one of the organs of the African Union (AU) was established in terms of Article 2 of the Protocol to the Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community Relating to the Pan-African Parliament. In terms of this Protocol, the PAP shall evolve into an institution with full legislative powers. However, this Protocol only confers the PAP with consultative and advisory powers.

To fulfil the aim of the PAP of becoming an institution with full legislative powers, the African Union Assembly during its Summit in June 2014 adopted the Protocol to the Constitutive Act of the African Union Relating to the Pan-African Parliament.

Article 8 of this Protocol provides that the PAP shall be the legislative organ of the AU to draft Model Laws. Meaning that the PAP is vested with the quasi-legislative power of formulating Model Laws for the AU Member States. However, as of April 2022, the Protocol had 22 signatures and 14 ratifications, and it requires simple majority of ratifications by the AU Member States to enter into force. The Republic of South Africa signed the Protocol in January 2019 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A presentation on the Malabo Protocol was delivered by DIRCO to the Portfolio Committee in the National Assembly on 1 June 2022. In this regard, the National Assembly is busy finalizing the Protocol's ratification through its internal processes.

b) As an advisory and consultative organ of the African Union, the current mandate of the PAP is wide enough to empower it to propose and formulate model laws. As of 2018, the PAP has formulated or contributed to the formulation of two model laws and is planning to kick-start the formulation of about five other model laws.

Furthermore, DIRCO’s role regarding the PAP is only limited to providing support as guided by the Host Country Agreement entered into between the African Union and South Africa in 2004. The Agreement and its seven Annexes thereto, place an obligation on South Africa, through DIRCO, to provide accommodation for the premises, fixtures, fittings and furniture for the premises, security, accreditation and transport services to the PAP. Due to the separation of powers as is the case with South Africa under its democratic constitution, DIRCO does not participate in substantive meetings of the PAP. 

Also, the founding instruments of the PAP assert its independence and non-interference by Executives of member states. This precludes DIRCO playing any active role in the proceedings of the PAP.

14 October 2022 - NW3305

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) research has been conducted to determine the decline in fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) within each province, (b) is the current level of FAS in each province and (c) was the previous available FAS statistics within each province?

Reply:

Foetal alcohol syndrome is a congenital disorder caused by alcohol exposure on the foetus during pregnancy. Though it is a congenital disorder which manifests post-delivery (anywhere from birth to eight years based on the severity of the condition), FAS is not a genetic condition but rather the consequence of a socio-behavioural matter.

The diagnosis of FAS is purely clinical and has many complexities. To be diagnosed with FAS, some or all of a set of criteria must be met including, the presence of characteristic physical features of FAS, documented prenatal alcohol exposure, pre and post-natal growth deficiencies, brain growth deficiencies, neurobehavioral/developmental impairment which may include or exclude cognitive impairments.

The National Department of Health is reimplementing the birth defects notification system following the approval of the Clinical Genetic Service Guideline in November 2021. The aim of this system is to collect, analyse, interpret and disseminate congenital disorders data. This system reports on data collected at birth, making reporting of FAS through this system a challenge as the physical features of FAS (which initiate further assessment) only become more pronounced as the child grows delaying diagnosis.

To strengthen the identification of FAS and other congenital disorders, NDOH is incorporating the prevention and management of congenital disorders in the Integrated School Health Program training, ensuring that School Health Nurses are capacitated in screening learners for congenital disorders including FAS. It is through this platform that data for preliminary FAS cases and other congenital conditions will be reported.

a) The Department of Health has not conducted a research to determine fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) rates in the provinces. The department relies on research conducted by academia from the different tertiary institutions for statistics on FAS. Research on FAS and other fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) was conducted by the Universities of Cape Town and Stellenbosch, in collaboration with Foundation for Alcohol related Research (FARR).

b) The current level of FAS in the province is not immediately known.

c) The previous national research was conducted by FARR in collaboration with Stellenbosch University in 2016. This research focused only on 3 provinces: Gauteng, Northern Cape and Western Cape, and it reported national fetal alcohol spectrum disorders prevalence rates ranging from 29 – 290 per 1000 live births.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3288

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Considering that foreign-qualified doctors who have applied and paid for a remark of their examination results have not been attended to, forcing such candidates to retake costly examinations due to a lack of response from the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), what monitoring and/or evaluation programmes are in place to provide oversight and assure accountability in the HPCSA in accordance with the Gauteng High Court Order on foreign-qualified doctors?

Reply:

Governance oversight over statutory health professional councils is conducted through monitoring compliance with legislative requirements based on council’s enabling legislation and other applicable legislative prescripts and/or policies.

However, on further inquiry regarding the matter raised, the Department was informed that foreign qualified doctors who require a remark on their examination results engage the institution (currently, Sefako Makgatho University - SMU) that handles board examinations on behalf of the HPCSA directly. The HPCSA is not aware of candidates who may have paid for a remark, but subsequently denied same. Specific details can be provided if there have been such occurrences so that the HPCSA may take the matter up with SMU.

Further to the above, the HPCSA has advised that all court orders relating to foreign qualified applicants have been adhered to, in particular, the discontinuation of the “Pathway” that required foreign qualified applicants to go through an additional 12-month period for clinical exposure before they could be registered as interns.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3421

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) plans have been put in place to withdraw the Republic from the Commonwealth of Nations and (b) are the relevant details in this regard?NW 4223E

Reply:

(a) Since re-joining the Commonwealth in 1994, South Africa has not made any plans to withdraw from the Commonwealth. South Africa continues to actively participate in the Commonwealth Ministerial and Heads of Government Meetings to make sure that the needs and the voice of Africa and the countries of the South are heard. The Commonwealth is a growing Organisation. During the recent Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting held in Kigali, Rwanda in June 2022, Gabon and Togo, joined the Commonwealth. Membership has now grown from 54 to 56 members. The opening of the membership of the Commonwealth to former French and Portuguese colonies will ensure that the Commonwealth will remain growing in the future.

(b) Not applicable.

14 October 2022 - NW3250

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Health

On what date is it envisaged the Taylor Bequest Hospital in Matatiele, which is without basic tools, will be equipped?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is in consultation with the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health to establish the issues that the Honourable Member is raising in this Question. The full report and response will be furnished to the Honourable Member as soon as the full details are received from the Province.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3490

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What (a) was the budget for newly constructed SA Police Service building in Steytlerville, Eastern Cape, (2) whether the predicted final cost is different from the original budgeted cost; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons for the difference in the costs; (3) what (a) were the original dates and/or time frames for the completion of the project and (b) new dates and/or time frames have been set for completion?NW4303E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)

(a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure informed me the accepted contract amount at tender was R 71 822 928.02 incl. 14% VAT. The current contract value is R 83 658 783.56 as a result of Contract Price Adjustment (CPAP) = R 8 117 795, 50; the re-measurements (mobile offices rental, 1% VAT increase, excavations for foundations and plumbing) = R 2 683 137.07; additional P&G (for extension of time claims) = R 1 239 397.91

(b) Current expenditure is R 81 062 474.13 inclusive of the R 5 931 200.00 penalties for late completion.

(2) Predicted final cost will differ slightly from the current contract value as some items on the initially measured quantities will be adjusted in the Final Account.

(3) The original completion date was 12 August 2019, and the approved extension was 07 July 2020. The project was completed on 25 August 2022, and penalties were imposed for late completion.

14 October 2022 - NW3388

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(a) What are the reasons that the National Empowerment Fund (NEF) took so long to process the funding application of the Appetite Land and Agri company, as the offer to purchase has now expired and there seems to be reluctance by the seller to renew it, (b) how will his department intervene in this regard, (c) what measures will his department put in place to compensate the specified company when the seller refuses completely due to the delay, as it can be viewed as a lost opportunity by the company due to NEF incompetence and (d) who is the NEF fund manager responsible for the account?

Reply:

The CEO of the National Empowerment Fund (NEF) has furnished me with a detailed reply, which disputes the version apparently put to the Honourable Member.

In the reply, the CEO advises that the NEF “discussed the investment opportunity with the client to prepare the investment report and potential investment terms. Some key challenges arose during the due diligence stage of the application. Consequentially, in terms of due process, the application did not proceed to the Investment Committee of the NEF for final approval. A solution is being explored with the seller to address the outstanding information required to finalise the due diligence process and to ensure that the rights of all parties are protected. The opportunity is still available, and the seller is willing to work with the NEF to find a solution to the impasse emanating from his past reluctance to share the required information.”

I will be happy to arrange a discussion between the Honourable member and the NEF to provide more details.

-END-

14 October 2022 - NW3276

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the (a) total number of hospital beds that are available for mental health illness patients and (b) breakdown of the beds in each province; (2) what is the total number of (a) mental health related admissions and (b) public healthcare facilities? NW4034E

Reply:

1. (a) There are 14004 number of beds available for mental health patients

(b) The following table reflects the details in this regard, according to the Provincial Departments of Health:

Breakdown of the beds in each province

Table 1.

Province

Total beds

Eastern Cape

1816

Free State

927

Gauteng

2478

KwaZulu-Natal

3028

Limpopo

1569

Mpumalanga

329

Northern Cape

344

North West

1446

Western Cape

2067

TOTAL

14004

2. (a) The information from the District Health Information System indicates that there were 131 837 mental health separations (admissions) during 2021.

(b) There are 328 public mental health facilities in the country

Stand-alone specialized psychiatric hospitals

Psychiatric units attached to general hospitals

Facilities listed to conduct 72-hours assessments

24

40

264

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3406

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What indicators are used to determine the (i) best and (ii) worst performing health districts and (b) when last was the specified assessment conducted; (2) what are the relevant details of the complete list of the ranking of health districts, including the (a) name and (b) province in which they are situated?

Reply:

1. (a) District Health Services currently use the Ideal Clinic Framework’s indicators to assess district performance. The reason for using this framework is because it covers aspects of services that districts should provide to persons in the community setting, in PHC facilities to the level of referral to higher level care if needed. The Framework is a comprehensive evaluation measure and it’s elements cover administrative processes, aspects of clinical care, medicines supplies, access to laboratory tests, human resources, finance, security, cleanliness, referral, transport, EMS, infrastructure, health information management, internal communication, external communication, governance and intersectoral collaboration.

(b) The specified assessments were conducted in the 4th quarter (January – March 2022) of the previous (2021/2022) financial year. Peer reviews and therefor the collation of data is done only once a year in the fourth quarter and the next review will be January to March 2023.

2. Details of complete list according to the 2022 review is in the table below:

  • (a) Best performing district are from numbers 1 to 20; and
  • (b) Worst performing districts are from numbers 35 to 52

Ranking No for 2021/22 financial year

Province

District

% of Facilities with IC status 2021/22

1

FS

Xhariep District Municipality

100%

2

GP

City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

100%

3

KZN

Amajuba District Municipality

100%

4

KZN

Zululand District Municipality

100%

5

KZN

Umzinyathi District Municipality

98%

6

GP

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

96%

7

LP

Capricorn District Municipality

95%

8

WC

Garden Route District Municipality

95%

9

KZN

Uthukela District Municipality

95%

10

KZN

iLembe District Municipality

92%

11

KZN

uMgungundlovu District Municipality

90%

12

GP

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

89%

13

KZN

Harry Gwala District Municipality

85%

14

WC

City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

85%

15

KZN

King Cetshwayo District Municipality

84%

16

GP

West Rand District Municipality

84%

17

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana District Municipality

83%

18

GP

Sedibeng District Municipality

82%

19

MP

Gert Sibande District Municipality

81%

20

NW

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality

80%

21

EC

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

77%

22

FS

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality

76%

23

KZN

eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

74%

24

WC

Overberg District Municipality

74%

25

WC

Cape Winelands District Municipality

70%

26

KZN

Umkhanyakude District Municipality

69%

27

MP

Nkangala District Municipality

67%

28

NW

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality

63%

29

KZN

Ugu District Municipality

58%

30

NC

Pixley ka Seme District Municipality

58%

31

NW

Bojanala Platinum District Municipality

55%

32

FS

Fezile Dabi District Municipality

51%

33

NW

Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality

49%

34

MP

Ehlanzeni District Municipality

40%

35

EC

Sarah Baartman District Municipality

39%

36

WC

Central Karoo District Municipality

33%

37

WC

West Coast District Municipality

33%

38

LP

Waterberg District Municipality

30%

39

EC

Amathole District Municipality

28%

40

FS

Lejweleputswa District Municipality

26%

41

LP

Vhembe District Municipality

20%

42

EC

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

20%

43

EC

Chris Hani District Municipality

20%

44

NC

Frances Baard District Municipality

20%

45

EC

Joe Gqabi District Municipality

19%

46

LP

Mopani District Municipality

17%

47

NC

Namakwa District Municipality

16%

48

LP

Sekhukhune District Municipality

10%

49

NC

Zwelentlanga Fatman Mgcawu District Municipality

10%

50

EC

Alfred Nzo District Municipality

9%

51

EC

Oliver Tambo District Municipality

7%

52

NC

John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality

2%

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3521

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the 13,65 billion dollars that was contributed towards the Global Fund for HIV/AIDS (a) from which budget and/or line item was the contribution made and (b) how will the contribution be (i) used and (ii) of benefit to the Republic?

Reply:

It is not correct that the Department has contributed 13,65 Billion dollars towards the Global Fund for HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria. In order to put the record straight. South Africa has pledged 13,65 million dollars to the Global Fund as a contribution towards the Global Fund for HIV/AIDS. This is part of the country’s role as a member the global community in making a contribution towards addressing the challenges that are faced by the world in the fight against HIV/AIDS and Malaria, which is 36,5% more than our previous pledge.

a) The Global Fund Pledge of US$13 million was sourced from the Department of Health budget under the HIV/AIDS allocation as part of the pledge to Multi-National and Regional bodies/structures (United Nations and SADC). The Department provides for this allocation under Goods and Services, Posting Item Code: Membership & Professional Bodies. The US$650 thousand portion of the pledge was contributed by the South African National AIDS Council sourced from the private sector, as one of their 17 Sectors that support the country in shaping and implementing the HIV/AIDS and TB response.

b) (i) The contribution will be used to support the global intervention in the fight against HIV/AIDS in order to meet the global targets of 95-95-95 and Malaria elimination.

(ii) The benefits are as follows: South Africa is an implementor of Global Fund supported projects. Currently, the country received US$515 million through 4 Primary Recipients for implementation of various projects and programmes addressing HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria. Included in the above figure, the National Department of Health is awarded US$364,357 million to implement the health driven interventions. Through the support from Global Fund, we will increase our drive to institutionalize granular, targeted, and gender-sensitive data systems and community-led approaches to monitor and address new HIV infections, especially among key populations and younger populations. Further to the attainment of the HIV/AIDS targets, the country will continue to improve the fight against Malaria, as part of the 8 countries that are called Malaria Elimination 8 or called E8 for short. It is our view further that the Global Fund support for Malaria programme, will include the prevention, surveillance, and treatment.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3373

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) (a) Who was the service provider for the 50 housing shack structures in Burgersfort in the Sekhukhune region project which was ultimately cancelled, (b) what total amount did the Government pay before the specified project was halted and (c) who approved the deal to build shoddy houses in Burgersfort: (2) Whether any consequences management measures were applied to any of the officials involved; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Limpopo Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs has indicated that Aventino Group had been appointed as the service provider for the project.

(b) The Limpopo Provincial Department also advised that no payment was made on the Burgersfort project that was halted.

(c) It further advised that the Housing Development Agency had been appointed as the implementing agent for the project, and therefore it was responsible for the appointment of the service provider.

(2) The Limpopo Provincial Department has advised that as part of consequence management three officials that were involved in the contract were placed on precautionary leave and subjected to a disciplinary process.

14 October 2022 - NW3393

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Health

What plans have been put in place to insource security guards working in Taylor Bequest Provincial Hospital in Matatiele?

Reply:

According to the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health, where this hospital is located, the Provinces indicates that there are no plans in-source security services at this facility.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3512

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

In light of the fact that farmers in general are faced with poor roads infrastructures due to lack of local government support, resulting in higher vehicle maintenance and other inflationary costs, what collaborative steps has she taken to address the problems relating to the roads infrastructure maintenance with other Ministers?

Reply:

In line with Pillar 2 of the Agriculture and Agro-Processing Master Plan (AAMP), which prioritizes the provision of enabling infrastructure to support and grow the Agriculture sector, earlier this year the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development formally communicated with major agricultural organisations and Agribusiness from around the country, requesting them to submit details of rural roads requiring repairs, rehabilitation and surface upgrading. In response the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) received several lists of critically challenged rural roads that are affecting the efficient movement of agricultural produce in the country. These lists allowed DALRRD to map a status profile per Province and District municipality of the critical roads that require resurfacing and rehabilitation.

On analysis of the data and mapping it was found that the majority of the roads requiring attention are national, provincial and regional/municipal roads which are the mandate of the Department of Transport. The Minister of Transport has pronounced that his department will be attending to these. DALRRD will continue to work with other national sector departments and stakeholders to ensure that this work is completed with the urgency it requires.

Further, DALRRD is coordinating engagements between Agricultural Organisations and Agribusiness, sector departments and government stakeholders, in an effort to create a legislative provision for non-governmental organizations to render road rehabilitation services in partnership with rural municipalities. Commercial sector farmers have expressed their willingness, capacity and recourses to fix and maintain municipal roads that affect their businesses. Legislation, however, prevents them from doing so, as municipal roads are public responsibility. The DALRRD is coordinating a process with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and the Agricultural Business Chamber to identify roads that fall within this category and create a legislative framework for private farmers in partnership with local municipalities to undertake road repair and maintenance. Official correspondence has been sent to COGTA, Agriculture Chamber of Business and AgriSA in pursuance of this.

Finally, in line with Pillar 2 of the Agriculture and Agro-Processing Master Plan (AAMP), The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has directed DALRRD to commence with a Rural Roads Rehabilitation Program that will prioritise farm access roads to land reform farms, village access roads in communal areas and access roads to Farmer Production Support Units (FPSU) that support community based agriculture in rural areas. This program aims to start implementation in partnership with other stakeholders within the current financial year.

14 October 2022 - NW3455

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the (a) total bed capacity of public hospitals in the Republic and (b) backlog in this regard; (2) whether there are any plans to build new hospitals; if not, why not; if so, (a) what number of hospitals is envisaged to be built and (b) in which (i) provinces and (ii) towns?

Reply:

1.(a) In terms of the regulations relating to categories of hospitals, there are 100 656 approved beds in the republic and as of July 2022 the total number of usable beds was 85 126:

Province

Approved beds as per regulations relating to categories of hospitals

Usable beds as of July 2022

Eastern Cape

15436

13201

Free State

5372

4786

Gauteng

18833

18000

Kwa-Zulu

26213

20512

Limpopo

10603

7660

Mpumalanga

5848

4747

Northwest

5738

4461

Northern Cape

2287

1785

Western Cape

10326

9974

South Africa

100 656

85126

(b) There is no backlog in terms of new bed capacity that must be provided in the public hospitals.

The total bed capacity is determined using the beds per population ratio (the difference between the current bed capacity (approved) of public hospitals and the optimal bed capacity). According to Statistic South Africa mid- year population estimates of 2019, the total population in South Africa was 58,606,416 and this translated into 1.7 beds per 1000 population. The international benchmark for optimal beds per population is 1.5.

While the overall number of hospital beds per 1,000 population is in line with international references, the distribution of beds across the districts and levels of care appear to be extremely unequal (District Health Barometer 2019/20).

The table below provides a breakdown according to provinces.

Province

Approved beds as per regulations relating to categories of hospitals

StatsSA mid-year population estimates

Beds per 1000 population

Eastern Cape

15436

6,533,465

2,4

Free State

5372

2,971,708

1,8

Gauteng

18833

15,099,801

1,2

Kwa-Zulu

26213

11,503,917

2,3

Limpopo

10603

5,853,193

1,8

Mpumalanga

5848

4,598,333

1,3

Northwest

5738

4,053,179

1,4

Northern Cape

2287

1,240,254

1,8

Western Cape

10326

6,760,561

1,5

South Africa

100 656

58,606,416

1,7

 

The value of the indicator decreased to a lesser degree (less beds/population) for Gauteng, Mpumalanga and North West.

(2) Below is a list of new hospitals in the pipeline to be constructed: 2 (a) and (b) (i) (ii)

PROVINCE

HOSPITAL NAME

NUMBER OF BEDS

STATUS

TOWN

Eastern Cape

Greenville District Hospital

100 Beds

Design

Bizana

 

Sipetu District

100 Beds

Construction

Mount Frere

 

Khutsong TB Hospital

124 Beds

Construction

Matatiele

 

Bambisana District Hospital

100 Beds

Construction Started

Nyandeni

 

Zithulele District Hospital

157 Beds

Construction Started

King Dalindyebo

 

Nelson Mandela Academic

To be confirmed

Feasibility Study

Queberha

Free State

Managaung District Hospital

330 Beds

Clinical Brief

Bloemfontein

 

Free State Psychiatric Hospital

877 Beds

Clinical Brief

Bloemfontein

 

Parys Hospital

To be confirmed

Feasibility Study

Parys

 

Dihlabeng District Hospital

212 Beds

Tender

Kroonstad

Gauteng

Lilian Ngoyi Regional Hospital

556 Beds

Tender

Johannesburg

 

Soshanguve Hospital

400 Beds

Land Acquisition

Pretoria (Soshanguve)

 

George Mukhari Academic Hospital

To be confirmed

Feasibility Study

Pretoria

(Ga-rankua)

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

To be confirmed

Feasibility Study

Johannesburg (Soweto)

KwaZulu Natal

UMzimkhulu Mental Hospital

90 Beds

Design

UMzimkhulu

 

King Edward 8th

To be confirmed

Feasibility Study

Durban

 

Northern KZN Tertiary Hospital

To be confirmed

Feasibility Study

Durban

Limpopo

Limpopo Academic Hospital

488 Beds

Tender

Polokwane

 

Siloam Hospital

244 Beds

Construction started

Siloam

 

Tshilidzini Hospital

535 Beds

Design

Thohoyandou

 

Elim Hospital

416 Beds

Design

Elim

Mpumalanga

Witbank Tertiary Hospital

400 Beds

Tender

Witbank

 

Witbank Psychiatric Hospital

400 Beds

Design

Witbank

 

Mapulaneng District Hospital

400 Beds

Construction

Bushbuckridge

 

Middelburg District Hospital

200 Beds

Construction

Middelburg

North West

Bophelong General Psychiatric Hospital

244 Beds

Construction started

Mafikeng

Western Cape

Swaartland District Hospital

132 Beds

Design

Swaartland

 

Belhar Regional Hospital

596 Beds

Design

Belhar

 

Klipfontein (GF Jooste) Regional Hospital

To be confirmed

Design

Klipfontein

 

Tygerberg Hospital

800 Beds

Feasibility Study

Cape Town

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3361

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) are the reasons that he has not responded to grievances and cases reported to him telephonically via SMS, calls and/or whatsapp and (b) steps must be taken to ensure that he is able to respond to cases pertaining to his Ministry and healthcare facilities?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is kindly requested to provide us with specifics of this question. The Honourable Member is also requested to utilize the available processes of Parliament in raising the issues with the department, in order to obtain the information and assistance required.

END.

14 October 2022 - NW3360

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What number of cases pertaining to the adverse effects of COVID-19 vaccines have been reported since the vaccination programme started, (b) to which vaccines do they relate, (c) what number of the specified reports have been investigated, (d) what is the investigation process and (e) at what point does the investigation conclude whether the cause of adverse effects and/or death is related to the vaccine?

Reply:

a) From 17th May 2021 up to the 31th August 2022 a total number of  6731 AEFI (total minor and severe) following the use of either the Comirnaty or COVID-19 vaccine Janssen has been reported to the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA)

b) 5241 (total minor and severe) AEFI related to the Comirnaty vaccine (28274053 doses administered) and 1490 (total minor and severe) AEFI related to the Janssen vaccine (8440418 doses administered)

c) Only severe and serious AEFI is investigated, a total number of 2771 investigations are either concluded or under way.

d) A multi-disciplinary team of health professionals in the district investigate all severe and serious AEFI.The purpose of investigating AEFI/AESI cases are as follows: 1. To confirm the reported diagnosis and/or propose other possible diagnoses as well as clarify the outcome of the medical incident comprising the AEFI. 2. To ascertain the particulars, circumstances and procedures around the vaccine used to immunise the affected recipient. Most importantly, identify any potential vaccine-related link to the given AEFI. 3.To review immunisation practices, logistics and other operational aspects of the programme to ensure programme related issues are not contributing to adverse events following immunisation, even if an event seems to be vaccine product-induced or coincidental.4. To determine whether a reported event was a single incident or one of a cluster and if it is a cluster, confirm that the suspected immunisations were indeed given and the individual vaccines that were used. 5. To determine whether unimmunised people are experiencing the same medical incidents. 6. To gather more information pertaining to the case to inform causality assessment. The process of AEFI investigation thus include visits to the vaccination site, interviews with relevant health care workers, interviews with family, care givers or the vaccine injured party if required. Throughout all relevant clinical records, previous medical history, all relevant lab results and diagnostic test outcomes is collected. In a few cases further clinical assessment or medical treatment may be advised.

e) The investigation is concluded when sufficient information has been collected to conduct causality assessment, or when investigation team confirm no further information is available.

END.