Questions and Replies

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24 October 2022 - NW2069

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number of nonprofit organisations (NPOs), has she found, have closed down in the past five financial years due to her department not subsidising the salaries of social workers in the NPO sector?

Reply:

PROVINCE

2017/18

2018/19

2019/

20

2020/21

2021/

22

EASTERN CAPE

NO RESPONSE RECEIVED

FREE STATE

0

0

0

0

0

GAUTENG

0

0

0

0

0

KWAZULU NATAL

0

0

0

0

0

LIMPOPO

0

0

0

0

0

MPUMALANGA

0

0

0

0

0

NORTH WEST

NO RESPONSE RECEIVED

NORTHERN CAPE

0

0

0

0

0

WESTERN CAPE

0

0

0

0

0

At the time of responding to this question, no response was received from Eastern Cape and North West provinces.

No NPOs were closed down in the past five financial years. The department does not subsidise salaries for Social Workers in NPOs but subsidises DSD programmes owned by NPOs that talk to the mandate of DSD.

 

24 October 2022 - NW1515

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Following the devastating floods in KwaZulu-Natal, during which information and communications technology infrastructure suffered extensive damage, (a) from which budget will money be sourced to pay for the work needed to restore connectivity and (b) what is the projected (i) cost and (ii) time frame of the specified repairs; 2. Whether any checks and balances have been put in place to ensure that the repairs do not (a) go over budget and/or (b) experience delays; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department did not set aside budget for connectivity restoration on the affected network sites. In our engagements with the affected parties, which mostly consists of the Mobile Network Operators (MNO’s), they have indicated that they will work from their operational plans to restore connectivity on the affected sites.

(b) (i) The restorations and repair costs will be covered by the affected parties (ii) time frame has not been specified as the dependency is on restoration of power by Eskom and respective authorities on affected areas

2. Not applicable.

Authorised for submission by

 

MR T NGOBENI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

24 October 2022 - NW2386

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Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

In view of the fact that Universal Services and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) is currently winding down its operations, what (a) is the total of legal costs that Universal Services and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) has incurred in the 2021/22 Financial Year and (b) plans does her department has in place to address the legal cases and costs thereof in relation to the winding down the specific entity?

Reply:

I have been advised by the USAASA as follows:

(a) The legal fees spent for the financial year 2021/22 amounted to R 2 535 000.00.

(b) The agency made a provision in its financial statements for the contingent liabilities in respect of the legal cases. Upon winding down of USAASA, the liabilities relating to legal cases will be dealt with in line with the National Treasury’s Guidelines for the Disestablishment of entities.

Authorised for submission by

 

MR T NGOBENI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

24 October 2022 - NW1896

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What (a) are the reasons for the lack of mail delivery for the residents of the Farrarmere surburb of Benoni in the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) plans does her department have in place in order to deliver mail to the mailboxes as the Post Office in Sheridan Centre is closed?

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

(a) Farramere Post Office was temporarily closed due to non-payment of rent however the branch is now open and all services are rendered.

(b) The mail is being sorted at the Post Box lobby.

 

 

Authorised for submission by

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

24 October 2022 - NW1898

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether she has been informed that mailboxes and their enclosure at the corner of Rooihuiskraal and Panorama Road in the Reeds, Centurion, have been occupied as a makeshift housing shelter without the requisite facilities for water and sanitation, and that this effectively prevents customers of the Post Office from using the specified facility; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what action will be taken to restore and/or relocate the facility for its intended purpose?

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

Plans are afoot to relocate and combine the mailboxes with the Wierda Park Box Lobby.

 

Authorised for submission by

 

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

24 October 2022 - NW1075

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What amount has (a) Independent Communications Authority of South Africa, (b) Sentech, (c) the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa, (d) the Films and Publication Board, spent on (i) flowers, (ii) cards, (iii) wreaths and (iv) gifts in the past eight financial years?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SOEs as follows:

SOEs

(i) Flowers

(ii) Cards

(iii) Wreaths

(iv) Gifts

ICASA

R500.00

-

-

R8 250.00

Sentech

R63 905.00

R15 878.00

R4 322.00

R55 273.00

USAASA

-

-

-

-

FPB

-

-

-

-

  • ICASA implemented the cost cutting measures as issued by National Treasury under Instruction Note 03 of 2017/18. The spending for flowers, cards, wreaths and gifts are classified under the staff welfare account. The above expenditure is as per ICASA’s employee value proposition and in terms of the then applicable HR Policies.
  • Sentech has an employee benefits policy which regulates the buying of gifts and arrangement of long service and retirement functions. As part of their employee wellness and support initiatives the company normally hosts memorial services for deceased employees as well as buying flowers and wreaths for their employees who have passed away.
  • USAASA and FPB indicated that no flowers, cards, wreaths and gifts were bought in the past eight (8) years.

Authorised for submission by

 

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

21 October 2022 - NW3286

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether his department has been informed that the residents of some suburbs in the Polokwane Local Municipality have been without water supply since the first week of August 2022 and that the specified municipality has apparently informed residents that water supply would probably only be restored by December 2022; if not, why not; if so, what measures is his department taking to intervene in the specified matter; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Minister of Water and Sanitation is aware of the water supply shortages of water supply within the Polokwane Local Municipality particularly within the Polokwane City, the surrounding suburbs and Seshego township.

Polokwane LM receives daily water supply from three major sources comprising of the Ebenezer Water Treatment Works (WTW), Olifantspoort WTW and Dalmada WTW. The Ebenezer and Olifasproot plants are operated by the Lepelle Northern Water Board (LNWB) while Dalmada WTW is operated by Polokwane LM.

Polokwane City and Seshego has a total demand of 96.5 Ml/d and all possible sources can only supply the city with 88.4Ml/d and currently there is a deficit of 8.1 Ml/d. The city is authorized to abstract and or to treat 29.4 Ml/d while LNWB supplies 27 Ml/d from Olifastsproot WTW and 32 Ml/d from Ebenezer WTW.

Water supply to the Polokwane LM is also augmented through boreholes, some of which are non-operation and require repairs as indicated below:

  • Sand River North: all fifteen (15) Boreholes are operational. Polokwane LM is pumping the boreholes in alternative to allow some of the boreholes to recharge and the total yield of the boreholes is 4.8 Ml/d
  • Seshego Boreholes (Direct to Reticulation): out of six (6) boreholes, two (2) are not operational due to vandalism and the municipality is currently repairing the borehole.
  • Marshall Boreholes: all five (5) boreholes are operational and currently producing 3.8 Ml/d

The WTWs supplying Polokwane are faced with challenges that impact on the ability of the municipality to supply water consistently to all residents as follows:

  • The Ebenezer WTW
    • The plant is operated by LNWB and is highly affected by general interruption of electricity, currently affecting optimal water supply countrywide, which is supplied by the Greater Tzaneen LM
    • Greater Tzaneen LM is currently upgrading electricity infrastructure which supplies the Ebenezer WTW and discussions to explore whether Greater Tzaneen LM can isolate Ebenezer WTW from load shedding are underway
  • Olifanspoort WTW
    • The plant is operated by LNWB is impacted negatively by the Olifantspoort ageing bulk water supply network contributes significantly to the interruption of water supply in the City of Polokwane.
    • The main cause of the water supply challenges in Polokwane City was due to deficiencies of the pumping systems of the Olifantspoort scheme. There were mechanical breakdowns within Pump Station No 2 and Pump Station No 3 which have since been repaired.
      • The LNWB has already commissioned Phase 1 for the upgrade and refurbishment of this bulk pipeline, a cost of R 32 million. Phase 2 which has been allocated R 38 and is meant to refurbish aging infrastructure will be completed by the end of October 2022
  • The Dalmada WTW
    • This plant, which is operated by the City of Polokwane, has a pipeline that conveys raw water from Dap Naude sections of which is critically dilapidated.
    • A study that was done in 2019 has confirmed a need for refurbishment and upgrade of the pipeline to enable Polokwane LM to safely abstract of 14Ml/d from the dam, which would add 4.1Ml to the supply
    • The Implementation Readiness Studies for the refurbishment and upgrades is under consideration by the department.
  • Seshego WTW
    • There is a 1.8 Ml/d deficiency in the system due to the new Seshego WTW Plant currently being non-operational while under construction.

To ensure proper resolution of the water supply plaguing the Polokwane LM, a task team led by both Deputy Ministers, the Executive Major of Polokwane and Chairperson of the Board of LNWB has been set up to resolve water supply challenges in the Polokwane LM. A technical task team led by the Municipal Manager of Polokwane LM, the Chief Executive Officer of LNWB and DWS officials has also been established. The task team will meet weekly to track progress on the restoration of water supply to Polokwane City including the Seshego township. The implementation of the action plan is at 85% and all major challenges are being resolved.

2. A joint media briefing was held by both Polokwane LM, LNWB and the department on 5 September 2022. Furthermore, the Polokwane LM continues to update residents of Polokwane City including Seshego township on any development regarding the state of water supply.

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21 October 2022 - NW2708

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How is her department (i) assisting and (ii) involved in (aa) Vilakazi Street in Soweto and (bb) the Liliesleaf Farm heritage sites as tourist attractions, (b) what amount has been budgeted for each place, (c) what amount has been spent on each place in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2022 and (d) how was the money spent in each case?

Reply:

(aa) Vilakazi Street in Soweto

(a) (i) Assisting and (ii) involved

  • Supported the process to refine the City of Johannesburg’s Vilakazi Street Precinct Plan since 2017.
  • Developed architectural designs for one (1) prioritised element on the Vilakazi Street precinct plan, but for ease-of-use in various precincts across the country.
  • The scope of the project entailed the development of three (3) sets of architectural solutions for the Canopy/Structure/Shelter for informal traders, public/street market square/space, including restaurant in 2021/2022.
  • Initiated implementation of Phase 3a of the Tourism Precinct Methodology for township tourism precincts at Vilakazi Street Precinct in 2022/2023. This project pertains to working with the established Stakeholder Forum to confirm prioritised elements, finalise costing on these elements, confirm the development lead, as well as facilitate budget mobilisation processes and statutory planning processes to implement the project.

(b) Total Amount Budgeted for Vilakazi Street: R442 925.00

(c) (i) Vilakazi Street spend in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2022

(i) 2019-2020

(i) 2020-2021

(i) 2021-2022

(ii) since 1 January 2022

Non-financial support

Non-financial support

R442 925.00

R243 608.75

(d) How was the money spent?

The scope of the project entailed the development of three (3) sets of architectural solutions for the Canopy/Structure/Shelter for informal traders, public/street market square/space, including restaurant in 2021/2022.

(bb) Lilies Leaf Farm

(a) i) and (ii) The Department of Tourism is not involved.

(b) No budget has been allocated to Liliesleaf.

(c) (i) and (ii) Not applicable

(d) Not Applicable

21 October 2022 - NW2840

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) steps have been taken by her department to help rebuild tourism in areas in KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape that were impacted by the flooding disaster earlier this year and (b) programmes have been implemented by her department to help businesses that depend on tourism?

Reply:

a) The Department, worked with KwaZulu-Natal to undertake preliminary assessment of the damages to tourism facilities. In this regard, the Eastern Cape had indicated that it had the requisite capacity to undertake such assessments through the Eastern Cape Parks and Tourism Board. The North West Province indicated that neither public nor private tourism facilities were affected. Upon conclusion of the preliminary assessments, the Department has provided support for technical professional assessments of the required technical work and associated costs that will inform the actual interventions and responsibilities between the parties.

b) From engagements with stakeholders, it was determined that there has not been a fundamental disruption of private sector tourism facilities in both Provinces. Affected businesses have indicated that they are covered by insurance, and in the main want the speedy restoration of affected bulk infrastructure. In light of this, no separate interventions were required from the Department.

21 October 2022 - NW3463

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, in light of the fact that regular water quality monitoring and water infrastructure assessments are crucial to reduce the increased risk of the contraction of water-borne diseases, the degradation of ecosystems and major physical water losses and the blue and green dot reports that show clearly that monitoring does not take place consistently, he has been informed of the lapse in the water quality monitoring function of his department; if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, what steps will his department take to rectify the issue?

Reply:

There are several programmes through which the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) monitors adverse water quality impact on the country’s water resources such as the:

  • National Chemical Monitoring Programme (NCMP)
  • National Eutrophication Monitoring Programme (NEMP)
  • National Microbial Monitoring Programme (NMMP)
  • River Eco-status Monitoring Programme (REMP)
  • National Estuaries Monitoring Programme (NEsMP)

Sludge monitoring is also essential as poor sludge handling is the root cause of many Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTWs) failing to meet final effluent standards. The results indicate that the municipalities on average are not achieving regulatory norms and standards. The data from the Green Drop Report indicated that 64% of all Water Services Authorities (WSAs) have access to credible laboratories for compliance and operational analysis. These in-house or contracted laboratories have been accredited and have Proficiency Testing Schemes with suitable analytical methods and quality assurance. The remaining 46% of WSAs are not meeting the regulatory norms and standards in terms of which they should have access to analytical services for compliance, operational and sludge monitoring.

To improve this situation, the department has developed the Water Services Improvement Programme and is progressively implementing programmes to support municipalities together with the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) and South Africa Local Government Association (SALGA).

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21 October 2022 - NW3009

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether she and/or her department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Mrs N I Tarabella Marchesi with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?”

Reply:

The department’s policies are guided by the African National Congress’ (ANC) policy resolutions, being the majority party in Parliament, having consulted broadly with all critical stakeholders.

The National Small Enterprise Act, 1996 (No. 102 of 1996) as amended defines the National Small Business Support Strategy (NSBSS) as the national policy in respect of small enterprise support and includes the policy as stated in the White Paper on National Strategy for the Development and Promotion of Small Business in South Africa.

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) was guided by the Integrated Strategy on the Promotion of Entrepreneurship and Small Enterprises (ISPESE) from 2005 – 2014 as an iteration of the NSBSS. Currently the DSBD is in the process of developing the National Integrated Small Enterprise Development (NISED) Masterplan, which will be the third iteration of the NSBSS. The draft NISED Masterplan as a national strategy on small enterprise development gives provision for further policy levers, such as, the Localization Policy Framework, Incubation and Business Development Services Policy, SMME and Co-operatives Funding Policy and the Red Tape Reduction. These policy levers have further been and continue to be consulted and engaged on in different public forums.

The NISED Masterplan was consulted and engaged on in public forums in the 2020/2021 financial year, the Economic Sectors, Investment, Employment, and Infrastructure Development (ESIEID) Cluster and Cabinet Committee in the 2021/2022 financial year.

The Department led a Stakeholder consultation session – Small Enterprise and Cooperatives Policy Dialogue on 4-5 August as means of sharing and consolidating inputs to the NISED Masterplan and being a launchpad to the planned Annual National Small Enterprise and Cooperatives Summit during the entrepreneurship month in November.

In addition, the NISED Masterplan was published in the Gazette for public comment for a 30-day period from 10 May 2022. Furthermore, the NISED Masterplan was submitted and presented to the Trade and Industry Chamber of the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC), as part of engaging Social Partners (Labour, Business, Government and Community) on the 25 August 2022. The NISED Masterplan will further be presented to the SMME Workstream at NEDLAC.

Consultation is a key part of any policy development process and all DSBD policy development processes have been observed under public consultation, engagement, and negotiation, particularly with key role players such as small, medium, and micro enterprises (SMMEs) as well as co-operatives and with private sector representatives.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

21 October 2022 - NW3322

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has been at the brunt of any other litigation by suppliers as the SA Tourism is being sued for a balance of payments by a supplier; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what was the nature of the litigation, (b) on what date was the litigation and (c) what was the outcome?

Reply:

1. First case is case number: 39031/16 – Service Provider failed to comply with procurement prescripts and as such the Department could not proceed with the Service Level Agreement

a) The nature of the litigation:

1.1  This is a claim for contractual damages amounting to R41 040.00, following conclusion of a Service Level Agreement by the Department and the Service Provider (Plaintiff) on 21 August 2015, for procurement of goods and services.

1.2 The Plaintiff did not comply with pertinent procurement prescripts including Supply Chain Management Policy, Supply Chain Management Guide for Accounting Officers/Authorities, Public Finance Management Act, 1999 and Treasury Regulations, which provide for, amongst others, the registration of suppliers on the Central Supplier Database system. Thus, the Department could not proceed with an agreement which contradicted applicable procurement prescripts, hence this lawsuit, which the Department is defending.

(b) Commencement date: Legal action commenced on 17 October 2016.

(c) Outcome: Litigation is proceeding.

2. Second case is case number: 15206/21 – Service Provider claims 10% retention fee and administration costs whereas retention fee and administration costs are covered under management fee in the signed Service Level Agreement

a) The nature of the litigation:

2.1 This case emanated from a Service Level Agreement concluded between the Department and the Service Provider (Plaintiff) on 4 June 2018, for training of unemployed youth on National Certificate in Fast Food Services (NQF level 3) and placement of the training graduates in various hospitality establishments in Limpopo province, for experiential learning, for the duration of the project. The Department would in return pay, amongst others, management fee.

2.2 The Plaintiff is claiming payment of R246 675.00 which is 10% retention fee and R825 700.00 for administration of stipends, quarterly attendance registers and annual financial statement. The Department is defending this action on the basis that the management fee agreed to by the Department and the Plaintiff in the signed Service Level Agreement, covers retention fee and administration costs.

(b) Commencement date: Legal action commenced on 15 April 2021.

(c) Outcome: Litigation is proceeding.

21 October 2022 - NW3488

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Regarding the report on Gravelotte Mines Geotechnical Concerns Pertaining to Flooding in April 2022, what (a) is the reason that his department did not resolve the issue of pumps that were not functioning for the duration of all the respective months, (b)(i) are the details of the service-level agreement for the maintenance of the pumps, (ii) steps were taken in this regard and (iii) were the costs and (c) entity is tasked with restoring the pumps; (2) whether any local companies have been given tenders for the restoration of the pumps; if not, why not; if so, (a)(i) who are the companies and (ii) what are the details and/or terms of reference of the tenders, (b) what is the timeline of the process at the moment and (c) on what date can pumping resume; (3) what quantity of acid mine drainage has he found is being released into the Blesbokspruit at the moment?

Reply:

1.  The department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is aware of water from the mine void in the Eastern Basin entering an opencast pit. It should be noted that mining operations are responsible for dewatering their own operations, not the DWS. This responsibility has been recognised by Gold One who are procuring pumps to assist in the pumping and treatment of acid mine drainage in the Eastern Basin.

The Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA) is the implementing agent for DWS on this project. The pumps were procured from Andritz in Germany. Andritz had a proven track record in the supply of these submersible pumps worldwide and the first 2 pumps were donated by Central Rand Gold, who at that stage wished to mine to a depth of 450 m in the Central Basin. Additional pumps were sourced from the same supplier to ensure compatibility and to allow the pumps to be moved between the basins as required.

(a) Due to Covid-19 and the related global supply chain challenges, TCTA was not able to secure all the spares from Andritz in time to enable the continued pumping at the Eastern Basin AMD Plant. A decision was made to concentrate pumping and treatment in the Western and Central Basins as once the Eastern Basin becomes operational again it has the capacity to recover.

(b) (i)Nafasi Water Technologies (Pty) Ltd was appointed by the TCTA through a competitive process, on a 5-year contract to operate and maintain the AMD Plants for the Central and Eastern Basins including the AMD pumps.

(ii) The spares for the first motor were received in June 2022 (planned for December 2021) and the refurbishment of the first motor commenced in July 2022 by Marthinus and Coutts and was completed mid-August 2022 as planned. The motor was installed and commissioned by Carl Harm in August 2022 but was only in operation for 1 week before it started stalling and this necessitated the motor to be taken back to the workshop for a detailed inspection.   

(iii) The cost of operations and maintenance in the Eastern Basin for the financial year 2021-2022 was R72 million

2. The TCTA is responsible for the sourcing of critical spares from the original equipment suppliers in order to maintain the warranties for the various installed equipment.  

((i)In addition, the refurbishment of the motors and pumps is being done locally through the following service providers:

  • Marthinus & Coutts based in Cleverland, Johannesburg.
  • Sulzer - Local Branch
  • Carl Harm (Andritz local installer)

(ii-iii) The TCTA in partnership with Gold-One has procured 3 new motors in July 2022 and the factory acceptance tests for the new motors were conducted successfully on 29 September 2022 in China and the motors will be shipped to RSA on 7 October 2022. TCTA is evaluating the option to airfreight one of these motors so that it can be delivered to site within 10 days. Parallel to this process, Sulzer is busy reassembling the pump to be compatible with the new motor from China. If successful, these plans will enable the TCTA to commission one pump by the end of October 2022 and the other two pumps will be commissioned early December 2022.  

3. TCTA has not released any non-treated acid mine water to the Blesbokspruit since the commencement of operations.

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21 October 2022 - NW3124

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Which departmental officials, especially senior officials, are presently under suspension, (b) what is the nature of their suspension and (c)(i) at what stage of investigation is each suspension presently and (ii) what are their timelines for finalisation?

Reply:

a) Deputy Director-General: Corporate Management,

b) Precautionary,

c) (i) The investigator was appointed and commenced with the investigation, and

(ii) The matter is a priority, however investigation conclusion is not within the control of the department but dependent on the process, the investigator and the affected parties.

21 October 2022 - NW3300

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Given that the Green Drop report indicates that half of the wastewater treatment works in the Republic fail to treat sewage properly and, in many cases, fail to treat it at all, (a) what steps have been taken by his department to capacitate Water Service Authorities in the Republic and (b)(i) which key focus areas has his department isolated from the specified report and (ii) how will they be addressed?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) recently published the 2022 Green Drop Report which gives a detailed overview of the state of Wastewater Management in the country. The report presents an extremely concerning situation across the country, and that wastewater management has deteriorated notably since 2014.

a) The Department of Water and Sanitation has taken steps to capacitate Water Service Authorities in collaboration with the South Africa Local Government Association (SALGA) through:

  • Capacitating the Water and Sanitation Portfolio based Councillors throughout their term.
  • Ensuring adequate wastewater operations and maintenance capacity through the training of Process Controllers. The department will, in collaboration with the Energy and Water Sector Training Authority (EWSETA) facilitate training of Process Controllers in order to comply with the required Wastewater Quality Management regulations.
  • Ensuring that all wastewater management environmental hazards are mapped and mitigated

Furthermore, the department together with SALGA embarked on the Water and Sanitation Councillor Induction from May to August 2022 across the country. Wastewater Quality Management and Drinking Water Management themes were part of the inductions.

b) (i) Key focus areas identified in the report include the following:

  • Technical competence
  • Treatment capacity
  • Wastewater monitoring and compliance
  • Operation, Maintenance and Refurbishment of Assets

(ii) Key areas of concern identified during the Green Drop Assessments will be addressed in the following ways:

  • The DWS is in the process of finalising the amendments to regulations relating to compulsory national standards for process controllers and water services works. The regulations seek to ensure that the water services works are classified according to their technology type to determine the level of skill required for operations by process controllers.
  • Process controllers who are skilled in both qualifications and years of experience must be registered to operate a relevant water service works based on their class of certificate.
  • The DWS is putting in place a Water Services Improvement Programme (WSIP) to strengthen its support and intervention at municipal level based on actual data or most available data. The aim of the programme is to ensure that support and intervention at municipal level is proactive, consistent, and systematic.
  • Maintenance and refurbishment of Wastewater Treatment Works is the primary responsibility of the responsible Water Service Authorities (WSAs). However, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) works together with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) to ensure that municipalities receive the necessary support and grant funding to refurbish and maintain their assets.
  • The DWS also funds certain refurbishment and upgrading projects that meet the criteria of the different funding programs such as Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG). Some of the specified WWTW have been gradually included in these programs depending on availability of funds availed to the Regions.
  • COGTA also supports WSAs through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) for water and sanitation services, amongst other. Some of the funding has been allocated for the refurbishment of some of WWTW.

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21 October 2022 - NW2778

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What number of water use licences have been issued to existing iron ore and manganese mines and/or plants in the Northern Cape since 2016, (b) what are the names of the individuals and/or companies who hold the licences and (c) where are the mines and/or plants located?

Reply:

a)  Twenty-one (21) licences are allocated to mining plants in the Northern Cape for iron ore (9), manganese (10) as well as manganese and iron ore (2) as indicated in the table below:

No

Name

Property

Activity

Date of issuance

1

West coast resource (Pty) Ltd: Namaqualand Mine

Land Parcel Lang Klip 689

iron ore

2017-06-23

2

Sishen Iron Ore Company (Pty) Ltd: Sishen Mine Operation HEF Plant

Lylyveld 545; Sekgamane 461; Woon 469; Sacha 468; Sims462

iron ore

2016-03-17

3

Kudumane Manganese Resources (Pty) Ltd

Ptn 2 and 11 of Farm York A279

manganese

2016-05-29

4

Hautian SA Mining and Investments (Pty) Ltd

Ptn 1 of Lemoteng 669

manganese ore and iron ore

2016-03-17

5

Con-Ellen Pty Ltd

Land Parcel Kanguru 115

iron ore

2017-09-20

6

Hondeklip Bay Mine (Pty) Ltd

Remainder of the Farm Richtersveld no. 11 portion 0

manganese

2018-01-16

7

Sishen Ore Company (Pty) Ltd: Heuninigkranz & Langverwacht

Land Parcel Heuningkranz 364

iron ore

2018-05-17

8

Kudumane Manganese Resources (Pty) Ltd

Portion 2 of farm York A279

manganese

2018-07-23

9

Assmang (PTY) Ltd: Beeshoek Iron Ore Mine

Portion 4 of the Farm Olynfontein 475

iron ore

2018-08-21

10

Kadgame Mining (Pty) Ltd

Portion 2 of the farm Kadgame 558

manganese

2018-11-19

11

Northern Cape Mining Pty Ltd

Remaining extent of Lohatlha 673

manganese

2019-02-22

12

Sishen Iron Ore Company (Pty) Ltd: Kolomela mine

Leeuwfontein 448, portion 0 (RE), Hay RD

iron ore

2019-03-20

13

Assmang Chrome: Black Rock Mine Operations

Portion 0 of the farm Belgravia 264

manganese

2019-04-10

14

Sedex Desalination (Pty) Ltd

Land Parcel Strandfontein 559

Iron ore

2019-07-31

15

Sebilo Resources (Pty) Ltd: Perth Manganese Mine

Remaining extent of portion 0 of the farm Perth 276

iron ore

2019-11-19

16

Sishen Iron Ore Company (Pty) Ltd: Sishen Mine Operation

Sekgame 461 Remaining extent

iron ore

2019-12-18

17

Mokala Manganese (Pty) Ltd

Land Parcel Gloria 266 of the Major Region KURUMAN

manganese

2020-08-14

18

Tshipi e Ntle Manganese Mining (Pty) Ltd: Tshipi Borwa Mine

Portion 8 of the farm Mamatwana 331

manganese

2020-11-05

19

Sitatunga East Manganese (Pty)Ltd

Remaining Extent of Farm East no.270, Kuruman

manganese

2022-03-11

20

Aquila Steel (S Africa) Pty Ltd

Farm Gravenhage 703, Portion114

manganese

2022-06-30

21

Black Mountain

Portion 1 Sand Kolkjes No.194

prospecting diamonds, manganese, iron, nickel

2022-06-30

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21 October 2022 - NW3321

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

In terms of the forensic investigation into the business-to-business and business-to-consumer portal supplier, what is the nature of the consequence management meted out to the executives who were implicated?

Reply:

Upon conclusion of the forensic investigation, the Board identified individuals implicated in the report and investigation. In line with the organisations’ internal processes as well as Disciplinary Code and Procedure, the Board and respective line managers wrote to the implicated parties who then had to submit representations in response to the allegations levelled against them as per the forensic investigation report.

Allegations against all implicated parties were done on a case-by-case basis where each individual had to submit their representations on their part in the matter. Representations were considered on an individual basis based on the severity of the allegations and level of involvement in the matter.

Once representations were received, consequence management action was effected on some officials and continuing with respect to others.

21 October 2022 - NW3025

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the reports that tourists from African states, especially Zimbabwe, have been the largest number of visitors to the Republic, what (a) impact will the Zimbabwe Exemption Permit that will be cancelled in 2023 have on tourism and (b) measures has her department, along with Department of Home Affairs, put in place to mitigate any downscaling of tourism from Zimbabwe?

Reply:

(a) The Zimbabwe Exemption Permits are for Zimbabwean nationals to work in South Africa. Thus, permit holders are not tourists and decisions related to such permits should not have a direct bearing on tourism, if anything, as those who would still want to come to South Africa for shopping in particular post the validity period of their permits would add to tourist numbers as they would not be coming for work but as tourists.

(b) The biggest source of arrivals for South Africa In the 2020/21 financial year was the Africa region with 2,3 million arrivals. South African Tourism, which is an entity of the Department, continues to drive its marketing efforts in the Africa Land markets to:

  • Encourage repeat travelers to visit more frequently by providing relevant value for money deals and discounts that show new, fun and varied experience.
  • Activate deal driven campaigns through social media, digital advertising and radio platforms.
  • Reprioritise the distribution channels to build their knowledge and familiarity of South Africa’s leisure and business event experiences through reinvented tools and platforms that are in line with the evolution of the consumer.

21 October 2022 - NW3280

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the fact that the uMngeni Local Municipality has estimated that the revamp of the Howick Falls tourist site will cost R109 million, what steps is she taking to restore the site which is in urgent need of restoring and revamping?

Reply:

As indicated in the response to question 2568 of 2021 this project is led at a provincial level working with local government. The Department of Tourism is not familiar with the stated estimation of R109 million for the restoration of the site. It is suggested that the Honourable Member addresses the inquiry about the R109 million to the responsible local authority.

21 October 2022 - NW2494

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Prosecuting Authority is conducting investigations into any matters related to the theft of an estimated $4 million from the Phala Phala game farm of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the current status of each investigation?

Reply:

The National Prosecuting Authority is not conducting criminal investigations on the allegations of theft of an estimated $4 million at the Phala Phala game farm. Such investigations are conducted by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI).

The Office of the relevant Director of Public Prosecutions will commence assessing the evidence once the case docket is formally handed over by the DPCI.

21 October 2022 - NW3060

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What steps have been taken to register permits for street vendors and/or hawkers, as was promised during the 2021 July unrest?”

Reply:

The Department de-coupled the Business Recovery Process from the requirement for a business license or Permit. Our pronouncement on this is contained in the Business Recovery Programme. Our relief assistance focused on ensuring that SMMEs both formal and informal accessed the funds speedily, but that non-financial support was available including assistance with all compliance requirements.

Notwithstanding the above, the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has engaged the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) to assist with supporting municipalities to streamline the process of issuing permits to street vendors. This process is currently ongoing. The DSBD is also reviewing the Businesses Act no.71 of 1991 with the intention of amending the legislation to provide for norms and standards, a common business licensing framework and better protection for informal traders. The proposed amendments would also include proposed provisions for the Minister to issue regulations and directives necessary for the effective implementation of the Act. The process by SALGA is expected to be initiated and implemented during the current financial year.

The processes outlined above are ongoing as of end-September 2022. DSBD and SALGA are continuing to align all processes that will lead to a streamlined implementation process. Further updates will be availed once consultation processes involving Informal Trader organisations, SALGA, municipalities and other relevant roleplayers has been concluded. Related processes such as the reviewing of Municipal Red Tape and improving the ease of doing business are proceeding in parallel and in anticipated outcome of the afore-mentioned initiatives.

The Informal Traders Support Program provided 4 844 informal traders with grants of R3 500. There are currently a further 7 000 clients in the pipeline and it is anticipated that these traders would be funded by the end of the year. Working through Seda and supported by Informal Trader’s Association and Local Municipalities, the DSBD is able to channel those that have been assisted towards additional support of a non-financial nature such registration of the business licensing and acquisition of trading permits. There is ongoing refinement of these support measures as our support programmes are constantly monitored and evaluated internally.

In order to develop a more sustainable approach to funding informal traders, sefa is in the process of supporting the growth and development of micro finance institutions to provide long term institutional access to financial and non-financial support as described above, specifically by sector-based Micro Finance Institutions (MFIs). Currently we are assisting the establishment of an MFI for fruit and vegetable hawkers, this is starting out as a pilot in the Buffalo City municipality.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

21 October 2022 - NW3012

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she and/or her department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Dr N V Khumalo with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

a) There are specific prescribed procedures for the development on any policy review - but all entail consultation with structures/private entities/stakeholders outside of Government, including civil society. Such consultations and advocacy programmes contribute to shaping government policies and strategies. The inputs received by the Department, following wide consultations, were used to develop a draft review document which will be released for broader consultation in due course.

b) Not applicable

 

21 October 2022 - NW3123

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What are the relevant details of the work done in each of the 30 community-based tourism projects supported by her department, given that a strategic decision was taken to move funds from the other three programmes to the specified programme; (2) with reference to the community-based tourism projects her department has been supporting, (a) how were the specified projects selected and (b) were any local community tourism organisations engaged?

Reply:

(1)

No.

Project Name

Project Progress

1

LP Matsila Lodge

These projects are currently at the tender evaluation stage for the appointment of contractors.

2

LP Phiphidi Waterfall

 

3

LP The Oaks Lodge

 

4

LP Ngove

 

5

LP Tisane

 

6

FS Vredefort Dome

 

7

KZN Muzi Pan

 

8

EC Mthonsi Lodge

 

9

EC Qatywa Lodge

 

10

LP Nandoni Dam

 

11

FS QwaQwa Guest House

These project sites have been handed over to contractors who are busy with site establishment and compliance with Legal, Health & Safety and Regulatory requirements.

12

FS Monontsha

 

13

NW Manyane Lodge

For all these projects, tender documents are currently being finalised for the procurement of contractors.

14

NW Lotlamoreng Dam

 

15

MP Numbi Gate (Two separate pojects i.e. Numbi Nkambeni and Numbi Mdluli)

 

16

LP VhaTsonga

 

17

NC Platfontein Lodge

Concept reports are being finalized by the Professional Service Providers for these projects.

18

NC Kamiesberg

 

19

KZN Anton Lembede Museum eThekwini Municipality

Design Development is currently being finalized for these projects.

20

NC McGregor Museum

 

21

KZN AmaHlubi Cultural Heritage

 

22

NW Sol Plaatjie Exhibition at Mafikeng Museum

 

23

NW Lehurutshe Liberation Heritage Museum

 

24

EC Maluti Hiking Trail

Construction works have commenced on site for these projects

25

EC Nyandeni Chalets

 

26

EC Western Tembuland

 

27

LP Tshathogwe Game Farm

 

28

LP Mtititi Game Farm

 

29

LP Mapate Recreational Social Tourism Facility

 

30

MP Mnisi Resort

The community had secured separate funding and commenced construction on this project. The project was therefore handed over to the Community and removed from the list of projects to be implemented by the Department.

(2) (a) The projects were selected based on their alignment to the department’s strategic objectives of inclusive tourism growth, focus on rural tourism and the diversification of tourism offerings.

(b) The benefiting owning entities, Provincial and Local Government of those projects were consulted on these projects. No local community organisations were engaged.

21 October 2022 - NW3375

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

By what date will provisions for adequate water supply be made for residents of Makhado, in Louis Trichardt, who have been without water for a period of over three months?

Reply:

Sources of water supply to Makhado in Louis Trichardt are the Albasini Water Treatment Works (WTW) and fourteen (14) supplementary boreholes. Of the fourteen (14) boreholes, only four (4) are currently operational asthe remaining ten (10) are non-functional as they have been vandalized. The design capacity of the WTW plant is 10ML/ day and is currently producing 7ML/day.

The Albasini Water Treatment Works was forced to shut down on 02 October 2022 due to failure of booster pump station number 3 and leaking of a galvanised pipe at the plant. This resulted in a shortage of water supply to Makhado. However, the repairs have been effected and the WTW has been functioning from 05 October 2022.

The DWS and the Vhembe District Municipality are currently constructing a bulk pipeline from Nandoni via Vuwani and Valdezia to Makhado to supply water to Makhado Area. The project scope includes the construction of a 88Km bulk pipeline, five reservoirs and three pumpstations.

Progress on the project is currently at 90% and completion is planned by March 2023. This project will also incorporate the Albasini water supply system, and replacement of the aged pipeline that is contributing to high water losses.

The department has initiated planning for the upgrade of Nandoni Water Treatment Works from 60Ml/d to 120ML/d to augment water supply as part of a long-term solution for water supply to the Makhado Area.

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21 October 2022 - NW2691

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has been advised that 5 000 standpipes and water meters were installed in 2018 in 40 villages in Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga, but that the treated water does not reach the reservoir as farmers and residents, including those persons who recently obtained land from chiefs, unlawfully tap into the bulk water pipe of 62 km; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details. (2) whether he has been advised that half of the potable water is regarded as captured and that the municipality says that they cannot stop this damage to state infrastructure and theft of water that is treated at a high cost; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details. (3) On what date (a) is it anticipated that water would reach the standpipes and asbestos bulk pipe that was replaced, as it now has over 5 000 illegal connections and (b) will he ensure that criminal charges are laid?

Reply:

(1-2) The Bushbuckridge Local Municipality (LM) has advised the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) that there are villages that do not have reliable access to water due to leakages caused by illegal connections, which results in the the supply system not being able to cater for all villages. The municipality has implemented a rationing programme to ensure that all residents have access to water. The Bushbuckridge Local Municipality is implementing a project to replace the asbestos pipeline which is due for completion during the 2024/25 financial year.

(3)(a) It is anticipated that the project to replace the asbestos pipeline will be completed during the 2024/25 financial year. The municipality is currently implementing a project to install an additional clear water pump at the Hoxane WTW which will increase the volumes pumped by the plant from 22 Ml/day to 31 Ml/day to the Ndonga reservoir that supplies all the villages being enquired about.

(b) The municipality has a duty to ensure that the farmers and residents are connected legally and to take legal actions against individuals that are vandalising infrastructure.

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21 October 2022 - NW2946

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What (a) total number of persons visited the SA Pavilion at the Dubai World Expo 2022 on each day of the expo and (b) country did the visitors represent in each case; (2) what (a) number of follow-up visits took place and (b) is the estimated value of the business generated based on the number of (i) visitors to the SA Pavilion and (ii) follow-up visits?

Reply:

The lead department for the South African Pavilion at the Dubai Expo was the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC), as explained by the Acting CEO of SA Tourism during the Question and Answer session of the meeting with the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on 6 September 2022.

It was also indicated that DTIC are the lead Department in the reply to Question no 2340, tabled on 6 July 2022, and the reply to Question 2442 of Hon. MSF De Freitas asked on 26 August 2022. It is therefore suggested that the Honourable member redirect her question to the relevant Minister.

(1) and (2) Not applicable

 

21 October 2022 - NW3195

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

The Honourable member is kindly referred to the response to his previous similar Question no 2683 dated 26 Augustus 2022 (Internal Question Paper no 27).

Appointment and recruitment of officials in Government Departments and Entities is done in accordance to the provision of the Public Service Act and Regulations as well as applicable Policies for entities.

19 October 2022 - NW2484

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What number of cases of rape have been heard in courts in the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19, (c) 2019-20, (d) 2020-21 and (e) 2021-22 financial years. 2) What number of cases of rape have (a) been prosecuted successfully and (b) failed to secure a guilty verdict in each of the specified financial years; 3) What (a) has he found were the different reasons why cases could not be prosecuted successfully and (b) total number of cases failed to reach a successful prosecution due to each of the specified reasons; 4) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The only courts that have jurisdiction to hear rape cases are the Regional and High courts. The following number of verdict cases related to rape were heard in the Regional courts, and were extracted from the Electronic Case Management System in the Lower courts:

YEAR

VERDICTS

2018/19

4 215

2019/20

3 984

2020/21

617

2021/22

2 789

2. The following table reflects the number of cases finalised in the past five (5) years, both with convictions as well as acquittals in the Regional courts:

YEAR

CONVICTIONS

ACQUITTALS

CONVICTION RATE

2018/19

2 820

1 395

67%

2019/20

2 684

1 300

67%

2020/21

435

182

71%

2021/22

1 821

968

65%

Although no electronic system for the recording of court cases have been introduced for the High courts, the general conviction rates of the High courts, which include the charges of rape, is reflected in the table below:

YEAR

CONVICTIONS

ACQUITTALS

CONVICTION RATE

2018/19

868

97

90%

2019/20

782

78

91%

2020/21

542

36

94%

2021/22

647

65

91%

3. (a) The reasons for acquittals are not recorded in each case. The prosecution will

present its case and lead evidence regarding the charges as contained in the police docket. The evidence of witnesses will then be tested during cross-examination in court by the defence. The presiding officer, after also hearing the evidence by the accused and/or defence when they have witnesses, will then make a judgement in the case. The burden of proof is beyond a reasonable doubt in criminal cases. It is important to note in this regard that the judgement of the court is based on all the evidence in court, considering as well circumstantial evidence, evidentiary rules and reliability of the evidence. There is seldom only one reason for either any acquittal or conviction as the court needs to weigh all the evidence before a conclusion may be reached. Some of the more common reasons that are included where convictions are not achieved include:

  1. Consent – it is often difficult to disprove consent where the rape has not resulted in any injuries or where circumstances may not support an inference to be drawn from the facts of the case;
  2. Identity – where the accused was not previously known to the victim, the identity may often be difficult to prove, especially in the absence of DNA or other evidence to support the identification of the accused. Unlike theft where articles may be found in possession of an accused to link them to an offence, there is seldom physical evidence to link the accused and the court has to e satisfied that the way identification took place, the method and circumstances in which the identification was made and reasons for identification are reliable and is trustworthy.
  3. Witness(es) in some cases either detract from their statements, deviate from consultation, or make concessions during cross-examination.
  4. Credibility findings are very important as in most instances with rape charges, the victim is the only witness that can testify on behalf of the State regarding the elements of the crime to be proved which include the identity, absence of consent, the place, and circumstances in which the crime was performed and the first reporting of the incident.
  5. Less common reasons include key witnesses not being available for testimony, contradictions in evidence by State witnesses and alibi evidence of accused that cannot be disproved.
  6. The complainant changes his or her version exonerating the accused.
  7. Forensic evidence exonerates the accused.
  8. Other evidence exonerates the accused.
  9. Complainant not in a fit mental state due to the trauma she/he endured.

b) The numbers of acquittals have been reflected above. However, as indicated in paragraph 3 (a) above, it is not possible to record each reason in isolation, it is important to note that even where the court may not be satisfied that the evidence is insufficient to prove the commission of an offence of rape, the court may still convict and often does, convict the accused on a competent verdict such as indecent assault, assault to do grievous bodily harm or assault common.

4. The State is aware of the difficulties in proving cases of rape, as well as similar sexual offence charges, including general Gender Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) related offences. The National Prosecuting Authority as well as the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, in cooperation with other Government departments are doing a lot of work in this regard. One of the most important initiatives in this regard is the establishment of the various Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) in the country where victims are being assisted, evidential support is provided including counselling for victims and matters can be reported. The prosecution is also assisting victims at court by means of Court Preparation Officers to prepare witnesses for court and facilitate victim impact statements in sexual offences matters.

It is also important to note that rape is one of the most difficult offences to prove beyond reasonable doubt, the crime has been committed by the specific accused. The conviction rate in general sexual offences, all crimes in terms of the Sexual Offences Act, Act No. 32 of 2007, is remarkably higher as indicated in the table below:

YEAR

CONVICTIONS

CONVICTION RATE

2018/19

4 724

74.4%

2019/20

4 098

75.2%

2020/21

2 539

75.8%

2021/22

3 402

74.2%

19 October 2022 - NW2588

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What number of buildings housing the (i) Magistrates Courts, (ii) High Courts, (iii) Supreme Court of Appeal and (iv) Constitutional Court have (aa) internet, (bb) air-conditioning and (cc) access for disabled persons and (b) of the courts which have the specified facilities, what number is functional?

Reply:

The tables below provide details of number of buildings housing the Magistrates Courts, High Courts, Supreme Court of Appeal and Constitutional Court that have internet, air-conditioning and access for disabled persons, and that are functional.

   

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate courts

 

460

456

455

434

433

398

394

High Courts

 

14

14

14

14

13

14

14

Supreme Court of Appeal

 

1

1

1

1

0

1

1

Constitutional Court

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Province: Eastern Cape

 

Number of buildings

Internet

(Number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection)

Air conditioning

(Number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (Number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (Number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate Courts

90

90

90

68

68

76

76

High Courts

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Supreme Court of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province: Free State

Districts

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate Courts

67

67

67

67

67

 

67

67

High Courts

1

1

1

1

0

1

1

Supreme Court of Appeal

1

1

1

1

0

1

1

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province: Gauteng

 

Number of Buildings

Internet (Number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional internet (Number of buildings with functional internet connection)

Air-Conditioning (Number of court buildings with HVAC system)

Air-Conditioning (Number of court buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (Number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (Number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate Courts

55

55

55

55

55

55

55

High Courts

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

Supreme Courts of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Courts

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Province: Kwa-Zulu Natal

 

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air-conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate courts

76

76

76

76

76

39

39

High Courts

02

02

02

02

02

02

02

Supreme Court of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province: Limpopo

 

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate courts

54

50

49

50

50

51

47

High Courts

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Supreme Court of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province: Mpumalanga

 

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate courts

46

46

46

46

46

46

46

High Courts

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

Supreme Court of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province: North West

 

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate courts

34

34

34

34

34

26

26

High Courts

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Supreme Court of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province: Northern Cape

 

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate courts

38

38

38

38

37

38

.

38

High Courts

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Supreme Court of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province: Western Cape

 

Number of buildings

Internet (number of buildings with internet connection)

Functional

Internet (number of buildings with functional internet connection

Air conditioning (number of buildings with HVAC system)

Functional HVAC (number of buildings with functional HVAC system)

Access for disabled people (number of buildings with access for the disabled)

Functional disabled facilities (number of buildings with functional facilities for the disabled)

Magistrate courts

72

72

72

72

72

62

62

High Courts

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Supreme Court of Appeal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constitutional Court

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

END

19 October 2022 - NW2654

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has a budget allocation for training on maintenance matters; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the curriculum used for the training and (b) how often does the training take place; 2) Whether the budget is influenced by the use of data; if not, how is the budget allocated; if so, what method does his department use to obtain the data?

Reply:

1. The Department has a budget for training.

a) The following topics are covered on the beginners course for Maintenance Investigators and Officers:

  1. Maintenance Act No. 99 of 1998;
  2. Maintenance Regulations;
  3. Prescribed Forms;
  4. Discussion of other applicable legislation and case law;
  5. Formal and informal enquiries Conflict; and
  6. Listening and Communication Skills.

The following topics are covered on the advanced course for Maintenance Investigators and Officers:

  1. Maintenance Act No. 99 of 1998;
  2. Social Context;
  3. Investigation of Maintenance Complaints;
  4. Receiving and Evaluating Evidence;
  5. Jurisdiction;
  6. Regulations and Forms;
  7. Mediation; and
  8. Listening and Communication Skills.

b) The training interventions are conducted on a quarterly basis.

2. (i) The budget is influence by the Training Need Analysis’ input from the Workplace

Skills Plan (WSP) from Human Resource Development (HRD).

(ii) The base-line budget allocation to Justice College for training on all the courses offered by the Justice College. The College distributes the budget allocated per Directorate based on the WSP/Training Need Analysis from HRD. Regional/Provincial Offices indicate their training needs on a particular course, after the publication of the prospectus, on the courses offered in that particular financial year. Regional/Provincial Offices also indicate additional training needs during the year especially with newly appointed officials that need training interventions post the completion of the WSP by HRD.

(iii) Data collection is through an Attendance Register, and the Annual Training Report by HRD that indicates how many delegates were trained per training intervention.

18 October 2022 - NW3350

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether, according to the Ministerial Task Team report, allowances to National Student Financial Aid Scheme will be increased to factor in the rise in food and transportation cost?

Reply:

The modelling conducted by the Ministerial Task Team was used to assist the Department, NSFAS and National Treasury as part of the medium-term budget discussions in preparation for the 2022/23 MTEF process. The model used the inflation estimates outlined in the 2022/23 MTEF Guidelines sent out by the National Treasury. This resulted in the shortfall for 2022/23 being addressed in the 2022/23 budget vote, with reprioritisation from across government, as well as an additional amount required from the Department’s budget. However, the discussion on whether allowances can be changed is dependent on funding available and anticipated costs for 2023. 

The MTEF allocations to NSFAS for university students are as follows:

  MTEF - Allocation

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

 

 

 

 

University allocation: Baseline

37 151 442

40 711 784

   44 399 325

Reprioritisation-Universities

1 207 665

 

 

Sub-total: Universities

38 359 107

40 711 784

44 399 325

18 October 2022 - NW3178

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his weekly newsletter of Monday, 30 May 2022, and his announcement that he would appoint a council to advise on broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE), (a) who is on the advisory council and (b) what are the specific terms of reference of the council; (2) whether the terms of reference will include an honest assessment of whether the BBBEE is doing the Republic more harm than good; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the cost of the advisory council to the taxpayer, given that the Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition already exist?

Reply:

(1)(a) In terms of section 6(1) of the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Act, 2003, as amended, the B-BBEE Advisory Council consists of members of the Executive and individuals appointed by the President, drawn from a wide range of persons with experience and expertise relevant to the work of the Council.

The members of the Council are:

  • President, who is the Chairperson,
  • Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition, who is the Deputy Chairperson,
  • Minister of Employment and Labour,
  • Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development,
  • Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies,
  • Ms Gloria Serobe,
  • Mr Kganki Matabane,
  • Dr Nthabiseng Moleko,
  • Ms Sibongile Sambo,
  • Mr Sibusiso Maphatiane,
  • Mr Ajay Lalu,
  • Ms Louise Thipe,
  • Ms Makale Ngwenya,
  • Mr Kashief Wicomb,
  • Mr Thulani Tshefuta,
  • Mr James Hodge,
  • Ms Khathu Lambani Makwela,
  • Ms Irene Dimakatso Morati,
  • Dr Lulu Gwagwa.

(1)(b) The terms of reference of the Council are set out in Section 5 of the Act:

  • advise government on black economic empowerment;
  • review progress in achieving black economic empowerment;
  • advise on draft codes of good practice which the Minister intends publishing for comment;
  • advise on the development, amendment or replacement of the strategy referred to in section 11 of the B-BBEE Act;
  • if requested to do so, advise on draft transformation charters; and
  • facilitate partnerships between organs of state and the private sector that will advance the objectives of this Act.

(2) The Advisory Council is a statutory body and one of its functions is to review progress on B-BBEE implementation. Advances made in implementing this constitutional imperative include the increasing number of success stories of black entrepreneurs and industrialists who are adding to South Africa’s GDP and to job creation. As a consequence of governments’ empowerment programmes, more than 400,000 workers are now shareholders in their companies or are covered by agreements committing to introducing share ownership. An increasing number of black South Africans are occupying key management positions or serve as board members of leading South African companies and thousands of workers have benefited from skills development.

(3) The Council provides advice that can assist the work of government departments and entities and it does not therefore duplicate the work of any department, as it is not an executing structure. It does however provide Government with the independent perspectives of experts and persons with insights from different constituencies. The annual budget of the Advisory Council for the execution of its mandate and the legislated functions mentioned above is R734,000.

18 October 2022 - NW3643

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the nature of the present dispute over the chieftaincy in Ba-Phalaborwa in Limpopo involving members of the (a) Malatji and (b) Shai families; (2) what (a) is the progress of the High Court case currently underway to resolve the specified dispute and (b) are the reasons for the delay in the case being brought to a hearing? NW4461E

Reply:

The Honourable Member is requested to note that the Department does not have at its disposal the information he is requesting. However, he will be furnished with the information as soon as it is received from the Province as matters relating to chieftaincies (senior traditional leadership) are the competence of provincial government.

18 October 2022 - NW3046

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In light of the annual problem of South African students who are left without funding through study abroad programmes which are initiated by provincial governments, what contingency plans does his department have in place in cases where provinces that initiate study abroad programmes, fail to meet their financial obligations towards students?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) coordinates several international scholarships that are offered by international partners, while others are managed by other international, national and provincial departments or government agencies or private entities. The project initiation, administration, budgeting and funding of scholarship programmes are the responsibility of each provincial or national department that embarks on and implements these programmes as per the provincial or national department objectives.

All funding resources for any project including international scholarships have to be secured by the responsible sponsoring department before students are recruited and sent abroad. However, despite this clear separation of financial responsibilities of project implementation and funding between provincial and national department, DHET has put in several structures to promote and strengthen good practice, coordination and management of international scholarships.

The DHET established the International Scholarships Intergovernmental Forum, which it chairs and serves as secretariat. The DHET plays a national oversight and advisory role on international scholarship programmes in which different government departments at both national and provincial levels are involved. The Forum includes all government departments that administer international scholarships and meets biannually.

To further strengthen the Implementation of International Scholarships by the different government entities, the Minister of Higher Education and Training developed a strategy to strengthen the coordination, management and implementation of international scholarships. These Guidelines are geared towards facilitating the effective coordination and to address a range of persisting issues and challenges that have emerged in the implementation of international scholarships by South African Government entities. Furthermore, in order to strengthen the application of International Scholarships Guidelines, the guidelines are currently being processed into a National Policy to strengthen scholarship coordination, implementation and good practice.

18 October 2022 - NW3193

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?”

Reply:

  1. The only meeting discussing appointments within the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) that I attended within my role as Executive Authority of the DSBD was with the departmental officials duly appointed and authorised to engage on the appointment of personnel within the DSBD.
  2. All appointments within the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) are in line with the relevant Public Service Regulations as published by the Department of Public Service and Administration. Appointments within the DSBD follows the processes and guidelines contained within the regulations. As such these appointments do not get discussed at forums or external structures that are not regulated by the Public Service Regulations.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

18 October 2022 - NW3353

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector, including Organs of State now being completed, with the focus now shifting to the reality of holding people accountable for the grand corruption, and in view of the fact that the National Director of Public Prosecutions, Advocate Shamila Batohi, highlighted the need for a greater budget allocation for the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) so that the institution can employ individuals with the high level of expertise needed to achieve successful prosecutions for state capture-related corruption, he will direct the Minister of Finance to use the opportunity of the upcoming Medium-Term Budget Policy Statement to allocate sufficient budget to the NPA for adequate capacitation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government will continue, within a constrained fiscal environment, to support measures to intensify the fight against corruption and ensure that there is sufficient capacity for the investigation and prosecution of criminal cases emanating from the State Capture Commission. Recommendations from the State Capture Commission that require additional financial resources are being considered by the National Treasury as part of the budget process.

18 October 2022 - NW3500

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) number of skills development programmes for entrepreneurs does her department have and (b) amount has her department spent on each specified skills development programme for entrepreneurs in each of the past five financial years?”

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) through its entity, the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) provides business development support to SMMEs and Co-operatives with Information & Business Advice, Business Plans, Mentoring and Training etc.

b) With limited resources, Seda has over the past five financial years provided the following skills development programmes for SMMEs and Co-operatives as per table below:

TRAININGS

2021/22

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

Total

             

Start Up 1

R1,014,111

R438,178

R566,617

R903,389

R774,003

R3,696,298

Small business Start Up

R150,844

R157,365

R409,954

R440,347

R497,540

R1,656,050

Basic Business Skills

R2,363,054

R2,610,713

R1,216,157

R1,224,240

R1,070,592

R8,484,756

Other Training

R20,011,593

R7,270,968

R1,435,190

R1,879,117

R2,631,256

R33,228,124

Co-Op Training

R203,920

R269,310

R384,764

R130,220

R380,542

R1,368,756

Total

R23,743,522

R10,746,534

R4,012,682

R4,577,313

R5,353,933

R48,433,984

Other training” in table above includes amongst others: Productivity improvement, Capacity Building training, Customer Service training, Labour Employer training, financial wellness and sector specific training which was introduced in 2021/22 FY.

Seda through its Learning Academy has developed different training programmes. These programmes are credit bearing and accredited by the Services Seta. Quality training aims to assist organisations of all types to implement and operate the Quality Management System (QMS) to increase effectiveness, consistency and customer satisfaction, explain the benefits of implementing QMS and understand the quality, management principles. Whilst food safety introduces Food Safety, Understand Pre-Requisite programme, Hazard Analysis, Critical, Control, Point system (HACCP) and HACCP principles and Implementing a Food Safety Management System (SANS 22000:2019.).

The table below provides Seda’s spent for the past five financial years:

Quality Training and Food Safety

2021/22

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

Total

               
 

R10,140,769

R7,107,300

R5,337,100

R4,706,400

R5,660,400

R38,612,369

 

Seda also has an Export Orientation Course (EOC) which focuses on Export Development. These courses focus on the business with the aim of helping the business assess its export readiness. The trainings target SMMEs that have the intention and the potential to enter the export business or those already involved in exports but wanted to strengthen their knowledge in this field of business. Seda has over the past five financial years provided Export Orientation courses for SMMEs and Co-operatives as per table below:

Export Development - Export Orientation courses

2021/22

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

Total

               
 

R730,000

R291,845

R150,000

R380,000

R220,000

R1,771,845

 

Furthermore, Seda has an Entrepreneurship in Schools Programme that encourages learners to consider entrepreneurship as an alternative career to employment. The main objective of the programme is:

  1. To influence the mind set of learners by encouraging them to become job creators instead of job seekers once they leave the schooling system.
  2. To equip learners with entrepreneurial knowledge and skills needed to start and manage their businesses; and
  3. To improve entrepreneurial activity amongst the learners and educators.

The table below provides Seda’s spent for the past five financial years:

Entrepreneurship in schools

2021/22

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

Total

 

R3,260,000

R1,893,242

R2,072,671

R2,060,364

R2,103,817

R11,390,093

Seda is also in partnership with the United Nations Conference on Trade & Development’s (UNCTAD) Division of Investment and Enterprise United Nation’s Empretec training Programme. The following are details about the programme:

  1. Empretec is a 6 Day programme aimed based on a unique Harvard University methodology focusing on behavioural approach to entrepreneurship.
  2. The programme is interactive, experience and self-assessment based and takes 25-30 participants per workshop. Participants learn by doing.
  3. Participants on this programme receive an UNCTAD endorsed certificate.
  4. Programme develops Personal Entrepreneurial Competencies (PECs) such as Opportunity Seeking, Persistence, Goal setting, risk taking, fulfilling commitments, planning etc. for participants.

The table below provides Seda’s spent for the past five financial years:

Empretec

2021/22

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

Total

 

R1,050,000.00

R1,155,000.00

R1080000

R1710000

R810000

R5,805,000.00

Seda also has a dedicated programme, The Basic Entrepreneurship Skills Development (BESD) which was jointly developed by Seda and German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development via Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) since 2012. GIZ left the programme in December 2016. The programme is funded by the National Skills Fund for an amount of R84 million. The BESD approach utilises coaching as an innovative methodology to facilitate and reinforce learning and development support to emerging entrepreneurs. A total of 260 undergraduates and 1998 Emerging Entrepreneurs successfully completed the training initiative.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

18 October 2022 - NW2987

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

On Monday, 29 August 2022, he appointed a council to advise on corruption and how to tackle it, titled the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC), what (a) are the specific terms of reference of the specified council, (b) total amount will the advisory council cost the taxpayer and (c) are the reasons that he needs a council to give recommendations on the recommendations given by Chief Justice R Zondo; (2) whether the recommendations of the NACAC will be any more binding than the recommendations of the Report on The Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State; if not, would the money spent on the NACAC not be better spent on capacitating the National Prosecuting Authority; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) was established as part of the institutional arrangements contained in the National Anti-Corruption Strategy (NACS), which was developed through an extensive and inclusive participatory process.

The establishment of the council is a reflection of government’s commitment to work with all sections of society to fight corruption, promote integrity in the work of government and advancing Priority 1 of the Medium Term Strategic Framework – building a capable, ethical and developmental state.

The specific terms of reference for the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) are as follows:

  • Advise on the effective implementation of the National Anti-Corruption Strategy (NACS) by government, civil society and the private sector.
  • Advise key role-players on the overarching thrust and six pillars of the NACS.
  • Advise on the strengthening of South Africa’s anti-corruption architecture.
  • Host the National Anti-Corruption Summit(s), bringing together government, civil society, business and academia to set the country’s anti-corruption agenda and evaluate progress in the implementation of the NACS; and
  • Advise on public awareness about corruption in all its facets.

The NACAC is an advisory council to the President. The Presidency has budgeted for operational costs that may arise.

Given its terms of reference, mandate and broad representivity, the NACAC has a valuable contribution to make to the consideration and implementation of the recommendations of the State Capture Commission.

18 October 2022 - NW3499

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What was the allocated budget of the Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority on skills development for small businesses for each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

The allocated budget of the Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority on skills development for small and medium businesses for each of the past financial years is as follows:

Financial year

Number of SMEs Supported

Budget Allocated

2018/19

910

R16 380 000.00

2019/20

3 608

R64 944 000.00

2020/21

2 446

R44 028 000.00

2021/22

2 508

R23 826 000.00

2022/23

2 700 (in progress)

R25 650 000.00

 

18 October 2022 - NW3141

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What total number of (a) small, (b) medium and (c) micro enterprises have registered as formal businesses (i) in each year and (ii) for each industry since she took Office?”

Reply:

Since the Minister took office (August 2021) no study has been conducted on SMMEs that have registered as formal businesses. The only study which was conducted was in partnership with Fin scope South Africa during 2021/22 financial year which has estimated the total number of SMMEs that have registered as formal businesses at 2 615 715. The study segmented micro enterprises at 2 219 026, small enterprises at 375 809 and medium-sized enterprises at 20 916, full details of each category are outlined below.

Table 1: Small Enterprises by category and number of employees

Additionally, small enterprises operate mainly within the services and trade industries whilst medium-sized enterprises are predominantly within the industrial sector. In terms of the study the industries/sectors of operation are as follows: majority of micro and small enterprises operate within the services sector/industry as well as trade, whilst medium enterprises are within the industrial sector.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

18 October 2022 - NW2795

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What number of business incubators that are funded by the (a) State, (b) private sector and (c) international actors exist in each province?”

Reply:

(a) The following Incubators are funded by the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) through funding allocation from Department of Small Business Development (DSBD):

No.

Province

Number of Incubation Centres

1

Eastern Cape

17

2

Free State

6

3

Gauteng

36

4

Kwa Zulu Natal

19

5

Limpopo

7

6

Mpumalanga

10

7

Northern Cape

5

8

North West

8

9

Western Cape

14

122

(b) According to data collected during 2019/20 financial year, a total of 106 incubators in the private sector were recorded. See below breakdown:

Type

No

Accelerators

49

Incubators

57

Total

106

It is however difficult to get real time numbers since state funded and private sector incubators are not governed and or affiliated to a body. Seda is in a process of resuscitating the Southern African Business and Technology Incubation Association (SABTIA) which will address the intention of assessing the overall number of incubators in the country.

(c) Seda does not have data on international players per province, however Seda is co-funding an incubator with the French Embassy called French South African Tech Labs in Cape Town.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

18 October 2022 - NW3126

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

What are the relevant details of (a) all compensation amounts to be provided to the nine members of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) and (b) the highest qualification levels of all members of NACAC?

Reply:

As with all Advisory Councils, the members of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) only receive remuneration for the time spent for the preparation and attendance of the meetings and such other tasks as may be delegated by the NACAC.

Members of the NACAC shall be remunerated according to the remuneration category and scale recommended by the National Treasury’s Central Evaluation Committee. The Presidency has budgeted for operational costs that may arise.

The National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council members have been drawn from civil society, academia, business and labour, based on a list of publicly nominated individuals.

18 October 2022 - NW2472

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the President of the Republic

Given the state of the economy, high levels of poverty, joblessness, poor living conditions, corruption at all spheres of government, service delivery protests and the closure of both big and small businesses, what plans does the Government have to (a) address the failures of previous plans and policies and (b) engage all role players to forge a new path to prosperity?

Reply:

There are several reasons for the severe economic challenges our country is experiencing today. The accumulated legacy of colonialism and apartheid has been compounded by the effects of state capture and corruption, by the devastating COVID-19 pandemic, by an energy crisis that has lasted for more than a decade, and now by global instability.

The Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP), crafted in partnership with social partners at NEDLAC, is government’s response to these economic challenges. Since it was launched in October 2020, this plan has helped to restore some of the jobs that were lost, support vulnerable households and firms, and place the economy on a path to growth.

The plan includes the following key areas of intervention:

  • A massive rollout of infrastructure, which will be achieved by unlocking new public and private infrastructure investment through building capability in Infrastructure SA and the Infrastructure Fund, reviewing procurement frameworks, and providing catalytic funding through blended finance instruments.

To date, 34 out of 50 strategic infrastructure projects are in implementation stages, accounting for R281 billion out of a total budget of R340 billion.

  • Achieving energy security, by improving Eskom’s performance and rapidly expanding generation capacity through a diverse energy mix.

In addition to the measures in the ERRP, in July 2022, I announced further measures to ensure Eskom achieves an acceptable energy availability factor, to accelerate the procurement of new capacity from renewables, gas and battery storage, facilitate greater private investment in generation capacity and transform the electricity sector.

While government is accelerating and expanding its power procurement programme, there are currently over 80 private generation projects, with around 6,000 MW of capacity, at various stages of development.

  • An employment stimulus to create jobs and support livelihoods through public and social employment.

Since its inception in October 2022, the Presidential Employment Stimulus has created over a million work and livelihood opportunities for unemployed South Africans. Of the participants, over 80% are youth and over 62% are women.

  • Renewed support to grow South African businesses, by pursuing new areas of growth through industrialisation, localisation and export promotion, helping SA businesses to thrive and expand.

As part of this work, master plans have been finalised in eight industries – clothing, textiles, footwear and leather, poultry, sugar, automotive, furniture, steel, tourism and forestry – resulting in total investment commitments of R82.5 billion and the creation of 6,500 jobs.

The 4th South Africa Investment Conference in March 2022 raised investment pledges to the value of R332 billion. This brings the total value of investment commitments since 2018 to over R1.1 trillion.

  • Implementing economic reform measures to reduce the cost of doing business, lower barriers to entry and create a more competitive and inclusive economy.

Some of the progress to date includes the auction of high-demand broadband spectrum, the identification of possible private sector partners for container terminals at the Durban and Ngqura ports, enabling third-party access to the freight rail network, clearing the water use licence backlog and significantly improving turnaround times, publishing a revised Critical Skills List and completing a comprehensive review of the work visa system.

Given the severe economic and social challenges our country is facing, government has been working with social partners towards consensus on the key tasks that we need to undertake together to address these challenges.

Underpinned by the ERRP, negotiations are underway through NEDLAC to finalise a ‘Framework for a Social Compact in South Africa’. This will form the basis for a broader engagement with all stakeholders and all South Africans on decisive actions to address unemployment, poverty and inequality.

18 October 2022 - NW3180

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

In light of the fact that he has established 25 task teams since he became the President of the Republic on 15 February 2018, (a) who is serving on each task team, (b) what total amount has each task team cost, (c) what were the terms of reference of each task team, including the specific objectives to be achieved, (d)(i) what number of meetings has each task team had and (ii) will he furnish the Leader of the Opposition with the minutes of each meeting, (e) what specific criteria are used to assess the progress of each task team in achieving its objectives and (f) what progress has he found each task team has made in achieving its objectives?

Reply:

It is not correct to say that I have established 25 task teams since becoming President of the Republic on 15 February 2018.

However, a number of advisory councils, commissions, panels and working groups have been established since 2018. Some of these continue to function as per their stated terms of reference, while others were established for a specific purpose and were therefore terminated upon completion of their work and submission of their reports.

The relevant information on these bodies is contained in the reply to NA Question 2292 submitted by Ms S Gwarube (DA) on 10 June 2022.

Cabinet Committees, including Inter-Ministerial Committees, have also been established and there are no costs attendant on these structures. The minutes of Cabinet Committees and Inter-Ministerial Committees are classified.

Where task teams are established, they are generally for a specific time-limited purpose, consist mostly of government officials and do not require additional costs.

Where applicable, the records of the relevant bodies may be obtained from the relevant secretariat departments.

18 October 2022 - NW3366

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, in view of the fact that correctional service centres generate lots of food from farming and making furniture, there is any plan in place that will see to it that the system produces for the rest of the Republic, thereby insourcing the skills and turning it into a state-owned entity; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department is currently implementing the Strategic Framework on Self-sufficiency and sustainability (launched 01 April 2021), with the aim to increase the generation of food and other products. This is derived from the Correctional Services Act Section 3(2)(b) of the Correctional Services Act, Act No. 111 of 1998 as amended: “the department must as far as practicable be self-sufficient and operate according to business principles”.

DCS embarked on a process to incrementally increase self-produce food stuff and provide furniture and other products for own use and as ordered by other government departments. However, we have not been able to provide 100% in all of the needs of the inmates. The following progress has been recorded since the launch of the Strategic Framework on Self-sufficiency and sustainability:

  • Vegetables from DCS farms, we recorded an 89% self-sufficiency;
  • Fruit 78;
  • Red meat and pork in access of 90%; &
  • 100% self-sufficient in provisioning of eggs for inmate meals (ration)

This is an ongoing process of DCS investing in machinery and equipment in order to increase the level of sufficiency with the aim to eventually provide for the majority of food and other products to be used and or consumed by inmates.

Research is being conducted regarding the possibility and capacity to in source completely, which will then guide the possibility to provide outside of DCS.

END

18 October 2022 - NW3351

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

In view of the fact that South African households and businesses have already suffered more power blackouts in just the first seven months of 2022 than in any other year previously, and noting that the Government is controlling the Republic’s extremely vulnerable electricity supply system with an iron first, which is deterring investment in the economy of the Republic and thereby hampering job creation, (a) what action has the Government taken against the Eskom workers whose illegal strike cost the country billions of Rands in July 2022, (b) contingency plan does the Government have for Stage 8 loadshedding and (c) action is the Government taking to get the implementation of the electricity crisis plan back on track after it has stalled?

Reply:

During the recent strike action, 2,186 Eskom employees were reported to have participated in the unprotected strike action. Eskom has served all identified employees with a notification to institute disciplinary action, and the cases are at different stages of the disciplinary process.

The System Operator determines the stage of load shedding required at any particular point in time in consultation with Generation. Stage 6 has been the highest level of load shedding to date and load shedding equates to approximately 5% of the load in a particular area per stage. The industry document that guides how load shedding is carried out is the NRS048 standard and it currently goes up to Stage 8 load shedding. Load shedding is executed in a controlled manner to ensure system stability across the country.

Since the announcement on 25 July 2022 of additional measures to tackle load shedding, the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM) has been established to oversee measures to improve the performance of Eskom’s existing fleet of power stations; accelerate the procurement of new generation capacity; increase private investment in electricity generation; enable businesses and households to invest in rooftop solar; and fundamentally transform the electricity sector to position it for future sustainability. Significant progress has been made in several key areas, including the following:

  • The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) has published an amendment to Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act for public comment in line with the announcement made by the President to remove the licencing threshold for embedded generation projects. The schedule was previously amended to raise the licensing threshold to 100 MW, a reform which has already unlocked significant private investment.

The new amendment will remove the licensing requirement for generation projects of any size and allow investment in larger, utility-scale projects to rapidly add new generation capacity to the grid.

  • Various actions have been implemented to streamline regulatory processes for energy projects with more activities under review. The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) has waived the need to obtain an environmental authorisation for transmission infrastructure in areas of low and medium environmental sensitivity and in strategic transmission corridors. Average timeframes have been reduced for various regulatory processes, including grid connection, NERSA registration, water use licensing, environmental impact assessment and land use authorisation.
  • Eskom is taking steps to address challenges at power station level, including by deploying former power station managers and skilled experts to improve operational performance and reduce partial load losses.
  • A new Ministerial determination has been sent to NERSA for concurrence for over 18,000 MW of new generation capacity from wind, solar and battery storage.
  • A revised RFP has been published for Bid Window 6 to increase the amount of generation capacity procured from 2,600 MW to 5,200 MW.
  • An additional 200 MW has been procured through the Southern African Power Pool as of September 2022, with work underway to increase imports from the region.
  • A standard offer approach has been developed for Eskom to procure up to 1,000 MW of additional capacity from existing generators, contingent on market response.
  • Work is underway within Eskom to develop a mechanism to procure surplus energy from customers to increase uptake of rooftop solar installations.
  • The Electricity Regulation Amendment Bill, which provides for the establishment of an independent transmission company and the emergence of a competitive electricity market, is being finalised for tabling in Parliament.
  • The Integrated Resource Plan 2019 is being reviewed, with a completion target of March 2023, to update assumptions regarding energy availability and technological changes.

These and other measures currently underway will make a significant difference in reducing the risk of load shedding and achieving long-term energy security.

18 October 2022 - NW2762

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What total amount has her department spent on external consultants in the period 1 May 2019 to 31 May 2022?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) spent a total of R4 512 571.93 on consultants from 1 May 2019 to 31 May 2022, as tabulated below:

DSBD Consultants services - 1 May 2019 to 31 May 2022

 Item

Purpose

Amount in Rands

Audit committee

  • Audit related functions

773 254,15

HRM services

  • Employee, Health and Wellness related matters

307 570,81

Occupational health

  • Training

7 900,00

Organisational structure

  • BBBEE Verification

54 625,00

Qualification verification

  • Payment for candidate verification

146 980,38

Research and advisory

  • Appointment of a service provider to provide an overview of the economic challenges experienced by SMME's cooperatives in South Africa and a comparative analysis of policy responses of at least three (3) countries at a similar stage of development and propose suitable policy responses to DSBD for a period of six (6) months.
  • Appointment of a service provider to undertake a study on an analysis and assessment of barriers to entry for small, macro and medium enterprise and cooperatives to economic opportunities and to draft a policy framework.
  • Update the IDBS Policy and Package for Gazzette.
  • Appointment of a service provider to assist the Department with the strengthening of the Red Tape Reduction strategy.
  • SMME Annual Review.
  • Financial Literature and Context Review.
  • Provision of human resources within the Office of the Director-General to render Secretariat functions for a period of 12 months.

3 118 601,60

Translate and transcription

  • Interpretation and sign language services

103 639,99

TOTAL

 

4 512 571,93

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOMENT

18 October 2022 - NW2544

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total number of cases of abuse (sexual and psychological) of inmates by correctional officers have been reported to his department over the past five years and (b) steps has his department taken to resolve the phenomenon of the abuse of inmates by those who are meant to protect them?

Reply:

Any abuse of inmates is against the departmental code of conduct.

a) Department of Correctional Services has the following reported incidents of abuse on inmates by the officials reported over a period of five (05) years:

Period

Type of complaint

Alleged number of officials

2017/18

None

None

2018/19

None

None

2019/20

None

None

2020/21

None

None

2021/22

02: sexual abuse

02

 

01: psychological abuse

 

b) In line with the departmental code of conduct, disciplinary processes were undertaken with the following outcomes:

Period

Type of complaint

Outcome of disciplinary process

2017/18

None

None

2018/19

None

None

2019/20

None

None

2020/21

None

None

2021/22

02: sexual abuse

01 official was not found guilty.

01 official was dismissed.

 

01: psychological abuse

02 officials were given written warnings

END

18 October 2022 - NW2794

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What plans has she put in place to support the small, medium and micro enterprises sector to participate in the Small-Scale Embedded Energy (SSEG) value chain?”

Reply:

A general approach adopted by the Department is to understand the quantum of financing and activity in specific value-chains within the sector. With this perspective, it was noted that renewable energy is clearly the most substantial sector currently, and opportunities were identified for specialised SMMEs who provide the technical services and products required at different stages of development and operation. Technologies such as solar water heating, bioenergy, smart grids and smart meters provide considerable opportunities across the board for SMMEs. Beyond the various product and service sectors and value chains, another key area of intervention is to support SMMEs to make them greener, more sustainable and thereby more competitive.

The Department has looked at mechanisms to support SMMEs within targeted sectors, using all instruments at their disposal. This includes:

  1. Business Development Support, incubation.
  2. Ensuring specialised technical and quality support for SMMEs.
  3. Plans are afoot to look at preferential and specialised financial assistance and incentives.
  4. Policies to set-aside or ringfence a percentage of the value of projects or products for SMMEs in defined value-chains, sub-sectors and state procurement.
  5. Localisation and demand-side policies.
  6. Export support.

The Department is also looking at supporting SMMEs to become more sustainable and to adopt green practices through partnership with the Department of Fisheries Forestry and the Environment (DFFE) and the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) looking at the following specific measures:

1. To publicise, support and facilitate access by SMMEs to the full range of energy and resource- saving services.

2. Encourage and incentivise SMMEs to install embedded power generation technologies as it becomes economically feasible.

3. Promote the concept of circularity and the efficient manufacture and sustainable use of materials and resources.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

17 October 2022 - NW3470

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1)How has her department collaborated with other relevant departments to address the gaps in legislation and noncompliant employers in order to ensure that women who are domestic workers do not lose their income for the months that they are on maternity leave; (2) whether her department intends to advocate for measures to be put in place to ensure that some form of health-care benefits is granted to domestic workers by their employers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4275E

Reply:

1. The Department is engaging with the Department of Labour and Employment on the issue of Domestic Workers. In August 2022, the DWYPD participated in a dialogue session organized by the Department of Labour and Employment, where its main purpose was to bring together policymakers and partners to build and/or strengthen strategic partnerships that will collaboratively work towards improving access to the Unemployment Insurance Fund and Compensation Fund and other benefits for Domestic Workers in South Africa.

The main challenge the Domestic Sector is experiencing is that majority of domestic workers are not registered, which makes it very difficult for the department of Labour to monitor in terms of the implementation of the labour law.

In this dialogue process, the DWYPD engaged with different National Departments such as the Departments of Social Development; Employment and Labour, as well as with Representatives from the Joint SDG Fund in South Africa: viz. ILO, UNICEF, UN WOMEN; Representatives from civil society, private sector; and Domestic Workers representatives.

This work is ongoing.

2. The Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities made a recommendation that the that Department of Labour working with DWYPD deploys inspectors to the households to check if they are registered and check compliance in terms of the minimum wage agreement, maternity benefits, medical benefits and other related issues. The DWYPD will continue engaging the Department of Labour and Employment in this regard.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date: