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23 September 2020 - NW1104

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Which training courses, conducted through her department, have been run (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) where were the training courses run, (c) how were students identified, (d) what number of students attended, completed and did not complete each training course, (e) what exams were written in each case, (f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams, (g) where is each course recognised and (h) which of these graduates were employed?

Reply:

a) (i)The department has provided the following training in the past three financial years:

(i) 2017/ 2018 FOOD SAFETY SKILLS PROGRAMME: (1 YEAR LEARNERSHIPtargeting 500 and implement over recruited to manage drop outs).

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h)which of these graduates were employed?

1. Food Safety Skills

Programme consisting of the following:

  • Hygiene and Food Safety Practices: NQF Level 2
  • Conduct Audits and Optimise Product and Process Quality within a Quality Management System in a Food Processing Environment:
  • Occupational Health & Safety Unit standards

Eastern Cape: 53

  • Buffalo City Metro
  • Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

After the 2010 World Cup there were media reports of food poisoning in hotels. Research was conducted by an internal team from the HRD Unit within the Domestic Tourism Branch and report was compiled regarding this matter. The Food Safety programme was identified as a need through this process.

Eastern Cape:38

_____________

Limpopo:

75

____________

Gauteng:

124

_____________

Free State:18

_____________

KwaZuluNatal:94

_____________

Mpumalanga:

69

_____________

North West:

20

Western Cape:38

_____________

Northern Cape:11

Formative and Summative assessment written by the learners and POE and learner logbook submitted for moderation.

Eastern Cape:38 _____________

Limpopo:

75

_____________

Gauteng:

124

_____________

Free State:18

_____________

KwaZuluNatal:94

_____________

Mpumalanga:

69

_____________

North West:

20

Western Cape:38

_____________

Northern Cape:11

CATHSSETA &

Food and Bev SETA

Permanent employment: 133

Graduated: 483

Drop-outs: 90

 

Limpopo: 75

  • Polokwane
  • Waterberg
           
 

Gauteng: 141

  • City of Johannesburg
  • Ekurhuleni
  • City of Tshwane

______________________________

Free State: 25

  • Mangaung
           
 

KwaZulu Natal: 102

  • Ethekwini
           
 

Mpumalanga: 75

  • Mbombela
  • Emalahleni
  • Nkomazi
  • Emakhazeni
  • Bushbuckridge
           
 

North West: 25

  • Ruth SegomotsiMompati
  • Dr Kenneth Kaunda
  • Bojanala Platinum
           
 

Western Cape: 65

  • City of Cape Town,

_____________________________

Northern Cape: 12

Sol Plaatjie

           

2018/2019:HOSPITALITY YOUTH TRAINING PROGRAMME: NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICES: 1 YEAR LEARNERSHIP

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

HYTP: Food and Beverage Services 2018/19

600 Youth were enrolled in the Food and Beverage Programme

NW:

  • Dr Kenneth Kaunda DM, Bojanala Platinum DM, NgakaModiriMolema& Dr Ruth SegomotsiMompati

Provincial Departments and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

The training programme was identified through the CATHSSETA Sector Skills Plan.

North West Target :200

239 learners enrolled

____________

Limpopo Target: 300

300 learners enrolled

____________

Free State Target :100

106 learners enrolled

Formative and Summative assessment written by the learners and POE and learner logbook submitted for moderation.

NW

203(3 additional learners to mitigate drop outs)

________

Limpopo

281 passed

_____________

Free State

91 passed

15 failed/drop out

CATHSSETA

North West:

Graduated:203

Employed:37

Drop out:36

____________________

Limpopo:

Graduated: 281

Employed: 45

Drop out: 19

___________________

Free State:

Graduated: 91

Employed: 20

Drop out: 15

 

Limpopo:

  • Capricorn, Mopani and Vhembe, Sekhukhune & Waterberg districts.
           
 

Free State:

  • Thabo-Mofutsanyane, Lejweleputswa, & Xhariep
           

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FAST FOOD SERVICES: 1 Year learnership programme

2018/19

Implementation commenced in 2018

Gauteng: Target 575

  • West Rand,City of Ekurhuleni, Sedibeng (Emfuleni and Lesedi Local Municipalities), City of Tshwane and City of Johannesburg

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

The training programme was identified through the CATHSSETA Sector Skills Plan.

GP:

Enrolled 575

Completed:

_____________

MP:

Enrolled: 350

Completed 296

_____________

EC:

Enrolled 216

Completed:181

____________

WC:800

Cluster1: 400

Still under implementation

Cluster 2: 400

_____________

KZN:

Enrolled: 661

Completed: 610

Formative and Summative assessments, POE and learner logbook completed & submitted for moderation.

Learners complete the 30% practicals at the assigned workplaces and the 70% theory classroom work.

_____________

MP: 296

_____________

EC: 181

_____________

WC

Still under implementation

___________

KZN: 610

CATHSSETA

_________________

MP

Graduated:296

Employed:53

Drop outs:54

____________________

EC

Competent: 181 (No graduations)

Employed: N/A

Drop outs: 32

____________________

WC

Still under implementation

____________________

KZN

Graduation postponed due to COVID 19

 

Mpumalanga: Target:350

  • KwaMhlanga, Witbank, Nkomazi, Badplaas, Ermelo, Bushbuckridge, Mbombela and Lekwa
           
 

Eastern Cape: Target 200 (Addition 16)

  • Buffalo City Municipality, Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and

OR Tambo District Municipality

           
 

Western Cape: Target 800

  • City of Cape Town, Winelands, Overstrand and West Coast
  • Eden District and Central Karoo District
           
 

Kwa-Zulu Natal:Target 575 (Addition 86)

  • Big 5 Hlabisa Municipality, Jozini-, Mtubatuba-, Umhlabayalingana-, Nongama, Phongola-, Umhlathuze-, Ethekwini-, Umgeni- , Okhamhlamba-, Umtshedzi-, Ray Nkonyeni-, Greater Kokstad& Dr NkosazannaDlamini-Zuma Municipalities
           

2019/2020 (HYP)

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FAST FOOD SERVICES

2019/20

Projectscommenced in 2019 and projects are still under implementation.

Limpopo: Target 550

  • Capricorn, Mopani and Vhembe, Sekhukhune & Waterberg districts.

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

LP:

550 attended

___________

NC: 200

___________

North West: 400

FS

250

-Currently amending the SLA to amend the project duration as implementation is delayed due to COVID 19

-Interviews scheduled for November 2020.

Learners complete the 30% practicals at the assigned workplaces and the 70% theory classroom work.

LP

Still under implementation

________

NC

Still under implementation

North West

Still under implementation

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19.

CATHSSETA

LP

Still under implementation

________________

NC

Still under implementation

____________________

North West

Still under implementation

___________________

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

 

Northern Cape: Target 200

  • Namakwa Local Municipality – Springbok, Ga Segonyana& John TaoloGaetsewe, Kuruman, Sol Plaatje – Kimberly, Umsobomvu – Colesbergand DawidKruiper – Upington
           
 

North West:Target 400

  • Dr Kenneth Kaunda DM, Bojanala Platinum DM, NgakaModiriMolema& Dr Ruth SegomotsiMompati
           
 

Free State: Target 250(Not yet implemented due to COVID 19).

  • Mangaung
  • Thabo-Mofutsanyane,
  • Maloti a Phofung
  • Dihlabeng
           

2020/21 HYTP: National Certificate in Fast Food Services

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FAST FOOD SERVICES

2020/21

Targeting 500 youth in all nine provinces

.

Q1 HYTP implemented utilising e- learning

  • LP: Capricorn, Mopani and Vhembe, Sekhukhune & Waterberg districts.

Finalisation of HYTP in implemented in KZN, WC, NW, GP and MP

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

LP:

550 attended

___________

NC: 200

___________

North West: 400

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

250

Learners complete the 30% practical’s at the assigned workplaces and the 70% theory classroom work.

LP

Still under implementation

________

NC

Still under implementation

North West

Still under implementation

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

CATHSSETA

LP

Still under implementation

________________

NC

Still under implementation

____________________

North West

Still under implementation

___________________

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

2017/2018: WINE SERVICES / SOMMELIER TRAINING PROGRAMME TARGETING 300 UNEMPLOYED YOUTH (May 2017 – April 2018)3 YEAR PROGRAMME

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service /Sommelier Training Commencement (Year 1)

2017/18

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

NC- ZF Mgcawu

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

NC – Unemployed database from the Municipality

WC- Unemployed database from the Municipality

GP – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

KZN – 100

NC – 20

WC – 150

GP – 30

1)Bar Attendant Skills Programmes

2)Drink Service Skills Programme

3) Sommelier Module one (Wine Level 1)

1)Bar Attendant – 267 Wrote, 267 Passed

2) Drink Service – 247 Wrote

247 Passed

3) Sommelier Module 1 – 281 Wrote

281 Passed

CATHSSETA (Bar Attendant & Drink Services)

Sommelier Academy (Module 1)

This is a 3 year Programme

2018/2019 (May 2018 – April 2019) WINE SERVICES/ SOMMELIER TRAINING: 3 YEAR PROGRAMME

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service/ Sommelier: Training continuation (Year 2)

2018/19

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

NC- ZF Mgcawu

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases NC – Unemployed database from the Municipality

WC- Unemployed database from the Municipality

GP - –Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

Enrolled 280

Completed 270

1)Sommelier Module two (Wine Ambassador)

2)SommelierModule 3 (Wine Level 2)

3)Sommelier Module 4 (Wine & Beverage Services)

1) Sommelier Module 2 – 280 Wrote

280 Passed

2) Sommelier Module 3

275 Wrote

275 Passed

3)Sommelier Module 4

270 Wrote

270 Passed

Sommelier Academy (Module 2, 3 and 4)

This is a 3 year Programme

2019/20 (MAY 2019 – APRIL 2020) WINE SERVICE /SOMMELIER TRAINING

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service/ Sommelier: Training continuation for 300 target

Year 3:

2019/20

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases of the municipality?

WC- Unemployed database from the Municipality

GP - –Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

Enrolled: 269

Completed: 242

1)Sommelier Module five (Wine Level 3 International Wines)

2). SommelierModule 6 (SASA Wine Steward)

3) Event Support Assistant, Customer Care, Culture and Nature Site Guide

1). Sommelier Module 5 

2). Sommelier Module 6

3). Cathsseta Skills Programme

(EXAMS STILL IN PROGRESS)

Sommelier Academy

(Module 5)

SASA (South African Sommelier Association) (Module 6)

CATHSSETA (Event Support, CustomerCare, Nature and Culture Site Guide)

40 – Employed and

4 started their own business

NB:

59 dropped out

2020/21 WINE SERVICE /SOMMELIER TRAINING

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service/ Sommelier: Training continuation for 300 target-2019/20

Targeting 252 Youth for 2020/21

Q1 Implemented in 3 Provinces GP,KZN and WC

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

Q2 Completion of Wine Service training Programme (Sommelier)

Project planning finalised, currently under procurement and commencement in Q4

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases of the municipalities

WC- Unemployed database from the District Municipality

GP - –Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Database of the City of Johannesburg

Enrolled: 269

Completed: 242

1)Sommelier Module five (Wine Level 3 International Wines)

2)SommelierModule 6 (SASA Wine Steward)

3) Event Support Assistant, Customer Care, Culture and Nature Site Guide

1)Sommelier Module 5 

2) Sommelier Module 6

3). Cathsseta Skills Programme

(EXAMS STILL IN PROGRESS)

Sommelier Academy

(Module 5)

SASA(South African Sommelier Association)(Module 6)

CATHSSETA (Event Support, Customer Care, Nature and Culture Site Guide)

40 – Employed and

4 started their own business

NB:

59 dropped out

2017/18 YEAR ONE: NATIONAL YOUTH CHEF TRAINING PROGRAMME: (The programme was implemented for a period of three years)

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NYCTP

2017/2018

Targeting 577 trainees was implemented

Certificate – 250

Diploma- 227

Pastry - 100

Limpopo

  • Vhembe Municipality
  • Mogalakwena Municipality
  • Capricorn Municipality
  • Sekhukhune Municipality
  • Greater Tzaneen
  • Thabazimbi Municipality
  • Maruleng Municipality
  • Blouberg Municipality

Mpumalanga

  • City of Mbombela
  • Nkomazi Local Municipality
  • Emakhazeni Local Municipality

Gauteng

  • City of Tshwane
  • City of Johannesburg
  • Merafong Local Municipality
  • Ekhurhuleni Local Municipality
  • Midvaal local Municipality
  • Emfuleni Municipality

North West

  • Mafikeng Local Municipality
  • Bojanala Platinum District
  • Rusternburg Local Municipality
  • JB Marks Municiplaity

Western Cape

  • Cape Town Municipality
  • George Municipality
  • Knysna Local Municipality
  • Overstarnd Municipality
  • Swellendam Municipality

Eastern Cape

  • Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality
  • Buffalo City Municipality

Northern Cape

  • Sol PlaatjieMunicipality

Free State

  • Mangaung Municipality

Kwazulu Natal

  • Ethekwini Municipality
  • Zululand District Municipality
  • Umgungundhlovu Municipality
  • Ray Nkonyeni Local Municipality
  • Uthukela Local Municipality

Advertised:

  • Department of Tourism Media and Website
  • SA Chefs Media

Enrolled – 766

Dropped out - 74

Completed – 692

Certificate graduates -429

Diploma graduates –121

Pastry graduates – 40

  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Certificate (8065-01)
  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Diploma (8065-02)
  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Patisserie (8065-03)

Wrote - 692

Passed – 590

Failed – 99

Absent - 3

City & Guilds Qualification

Recognised Internationally:

London

Africa – including Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Seychelles, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

ASEAN and Greater China – including Brunei Darussalam, Burma, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Macau, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam.

Caribbean and the Americas – including Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos Islands.

India and Nepal

Middle East and North Africa (MENA) – including Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, UAE.

South Asia – including Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka.

46 employed as follows:

Diploma - 6

Pastry - 40

2018/2019: YEAR TWO: NATIONAL YOUTH CHEF TRAINING PROGRAMME (Continuation of the programme with certificates and diploma graduates only)

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

The NYCTP

2018/19

Targeting 477 unemployed youth trainees was implemented

(561 learners enrolled)

Diploma – 250

Pastry- 227

 

No advertisement was released as the students were already in the system and continued to Diploma and Pastry

Diploma Learners – 392

Pastry Learners -169

Completed - 561 learners

  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Diploma (8065-02)
  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Patisserie (8065-03)

Successful – 536

Failed – 16

Exams Absentees (both levels) - 9

Diploma Passed– 375

Pastry Passed – 161

Diploma Failed – 9

Pastry Failed – 7

City & Guilds Qualification

Recognised Internationally:

Pastry employed -76

2019/20: YEAR THREE: NATIONAL YOUTH CHEF TRAINING PROGRAMME (Continuation of the programme with certificates and diploma graduates

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(c) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

The NYCTP

2019/20

Targeting 250 unemployed youth trainees was implemented

Pastry- 250

All 9 provinces

No advertisement was released as the students were already in the system and were continued to Diploma and Pastry

Still in progress – 368 Pastry learners

Not yet completed

Not yet completed

Exams to be written:

  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Patisserie (8065-03)

Not yet completed

City & Guilds Qualification

Recognised Internationally:

Learners to complete the programme in December 2020

2017/2018 Training for Tourist Guides - Upskilling

a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Adventure Guiding (NQF2)

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu District

Interviews

12

Adventure Guiding: Hiking (NQF2)

All 12 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu District

Interviews

15

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

10 passed

5 dropped out

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

North West

Dr Ruth SegomotsiMompati District

Interviews

10

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

10 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance

Adventure Guiding (NQF4)

KwaZulu-Natal

uThukela District

Identified by Ukhahlamba Drakensberg World Heritage Site, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife

16

Adventure Guiding: Hiking (NQF4)

16 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were registered community guides operating on a freelance basis for Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife

Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training

Limpopo

Vhembe District

Identified by Mapungubwe World Heritage Site, SANParks.

8

Culture Guiding (NQF2) and Customer Service

8 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were registered tourist guides fully employed by SANParks

2018/2019 Tourist Guides Training and upskilling

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Adventure Guiding (NQF4)

Eastern Cape

O.R.Tambo District

Identified by Eastern Cape Parks & Tourism Agency

20

Adventure Guiding: Hiking (NQF4)

20 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2)

Limpopo

Waterberg District

Interviews

16

Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2)

16 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Nature Guiding (NQF4)

Kwazulu-Natal

Umkhanyakude District

Identified by iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority

10

Nature Guiding (NQF4)

10 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were operating on a freelance basis.

2019/20 TouristGuides Trainingand upskilling

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Mandarin Language Training

HSK Level 1

Beneficiaries were from

  • Western Cape,
  • Gauteng &
  • Eastern Cape

Interviews

20

HSK 1 Equivalent Exam

20 passed

Confucius Institute

( International recognised)

Out of the 20 beneficiaries, two (2) are business owners, 6 are employed and the remaining operating on a freelance basis.

2020/21Tourist GuidesTraining and upskilling

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Mandarin Language Training

HSK Level 1

Beneficiaries are from

  • Limpopo
  • Mpumalanga &
  • KwaZulu-Natal

Interviews

20 students are expected to attend and complete the training

HSK 1 Equivalent Exam will be written

TBC as training will be implemented during Q3 and Q4

Confucius Institute (International recognised

To be determined.

2016/17 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

  1. Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2017

Training was open for all 9 provinces.

Selected learners came from KZN, Gauteng, Western Cape, NW

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

20 attended

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

19 wrote exams as 1 student passed during the programme

16 graduated

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

A branch manager for Avis Car Rental in Menlyn (Pretoria). Promoted to an Area Manager overseeing 7 Avis Car Rental branches in Limpopo,

Operations Department, to Operations Duty Manager at Sun Times Square (Sun International)

Rooms Divisions Manager at Protea Hotel Fire and Ice! Melrose Arch to General Manager at Protea Hotel Karridene

2018 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2018

Training was open for all 9 provinces.

Selected learners came fromGauteng,Western Cape,North West,Mpumalanga,Kwa – Zulu Natal,Eastern Cape

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

40 attended

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

40 wrote exams

32 graduated

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

Assistant General Manager: City Lode Hotel Groups to General Manager: Road Lodge Kimberly

Deputy Manager: Bidvest Prestige to General Manager Regional (North West Hospitality Region): Bidvest Prestige

Branch Manager: Illios Travel to Head of Operations: Illios Travel Head Office Johannesburg

Assistant General Manager: City Lodge Hotel Group to Senior Assistant General Manager: Town Lodge Greyston, Sandton

Assistant front office manager: Hilton Cape Town to Guest Relation Manager – Hilton Worldwide Luxury Brand Dubai

2019 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2019/20

Training was open for all 9 provinces.

Selected learners came from Gauteng, KZN, EC, NW, Limpopo

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

20 attended

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

20 wrote exams

12 graduated

( 3 dropped out due to ill health, the other 5 have modules outstanding, hence only 12 was eligible to graduate)

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

2020 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2020

20 black women enrolled in executive Development Programme for WiT

Training has not commence however it will be conducted in Gauteng

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

The intake for 2020/21 commencement date was postponed from July 2020 to January 2021 due to the

COVID-19 pandemic. The selection process for 20 candidates is still in progress.

NA

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

NA

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

23 September 2020 - NW2096

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of social workers who are employed by her department that are employed (i) on a permanent basis, (ii) on a fixed-term and/or (iii) temporary contract in each province, (b) is the total number of social worker vacancies in her department in each province and (c) are the reasons that the positions are still vacant?

Reply:

(a) - (c) The National Department of Basic Education does not employ Social Workers. This is the function that resides with the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs)

23 September 2020 - NW1921

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether all the schools in the Republic have a compliance officer assigned and/or employed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how often do the officers submit reports of their findings on issues in their schools, (b) who do the officers submit their report to and (c) what are the details of the common findings in the schools across the Republic in each province?

Reply:

(a) The position of Compliance Officer is not part of employees in the post establishments of public schools.  The Honourable Member is advised to refer her questions to the Provinces.

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

22 September 2020 - NW1455

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to the fact that most municipalities do not apply the principle of no-work-no-pay, resulting in unprotected illegal strikes, the Government engaged with the trade unions to protect the taxpayers and ensure that they receive value for money for taxes and rates that they pay by allowing municipal employees to rather claim from the Unemployment Insurance Fund during the period of lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 in line with other citizens who are on a no-work-no-pay arrangement; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Municipalities’ employees are legible to apply for Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)benefits if the employer has registered them using a reference number.

UIF Covid-19 TERS, are funds that a meant for employees who have been temporary laid-off due to lockdown as everybody is adhering to health and safety protocols having occasioned by the outbreak of devastating Covid-19. Attempting to curb the spread of Covid-19 and flatten the curve, many employees had to stay at home, so, to mitigate against the hardship of not earning whilst staying at home, employers on behalf of employees or employees themselves had to apply for UIF Covid-19 Temporary Employer-Employee Relief Scheme (TERS).Ifworkers were on strike and notat work it would not be possible for them to qualify for COVID-19 TERS benefits.

The employees could qualify for other UIF benefits as and when they getunemployed, dismissed, retrenched deceased, on maternity leave etc.

Municipalities have the right to register for the Unemployment Insurance and pay contribution to the Fund.

22 September 2020 - NW2145

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to the financial problems experienced by Denel, the Department of Defence and Armscor which hinder their delivery on their mandates, especially Denel’s challenges to deliver on contractual obligations to the SANDF, there are any considerations to restructure Denel and Armscor; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether a decision has been made to cancel the project considering the challenges to fund and deliver on Project Hoefyster; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, with reference to the reduced budget of the department, specifically the Special Defence Account allocation to Denel and Armscor, she is able to confirm (a) if projects Biro and Hotel will not be delayed and (b) that no payment will be defaulted; if not, why not; if so, (i) how will the management of the dockyard activities be impacted and (ii) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The performance of Denel against contracts for the DOD is currently being hindered to a great extent as a result of their financial distress which is impeding the procurement of subsystems and components required for meeting their contractual deliveries, as well as a significant loss of capability in certain critical areas.

Armscor and the DOD have developed alternative options with respect to the future of Denel, which will be presented for consideration by decision makers within government. It is clear that, without a significant bailout by Government, Denel will not be in a position to exist in its current form, nor will it be in a position to meet its contractual obligations to Armscor.

Denel possesses specific critical strategic and sovereign capabilities that are not duplicated elsewhere in the RSA, and the proposed options for going forward are aimed at maintaining at least those identified strategic and sovereign capabilities.

At present there is no imperative to restructure Armscor. Armscor recently completed a turnaround process which resulted in a restructuring that was aimed at optimising the performance of the organisation and which furthermore focussed on increased revenue generation in view of the decrease in the Defence budget and anticipated decreases in the transfer payment allocated to Armscor.

(2) Over the past few years, Project Hoefyster has suffered from significant delays and Denel is currently reneging on their contractual deliveries on this project. During 2018, Denel formally indicated to Armscor that it cannot complete the project within timescales, specifications or within budget, and requested a reset of the contract.

Armscor has presented several options with respect to going forward with the project to all relevant forums within the DOD. These options were thoroughly considered by both Armscor and the DOD, and a preferred option of deferment of the project was further developed and motivated. This option was supported by the SA Army, and has been presented to the respective governance forums within the DOD and was eventually recommended to the Armaments Acquisition Council (AAC) which is chaired by the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans. The AAC is the final decision making authority on projects, and it will provide guidance with respect to the preferred option regarding going forward with the project.

(3) In spite of the decline in the Capital Budget of the DOD which forms part of the Special Defence Account, sufficient funding is available to fund both projects Biro and Hotel. Neither of the projects will thus be delayed as a result of insufficient funding and Armscor will not be defaulting on any of the contractual payments. The worsening Rate of Exchange of the South African Rand against the Euro and other major currencies is placing significant pressure on the available budget for both projects, but the DOD has to date been able to provide sufficient funding to maintain the required budget for the projects.

Some delays on both projects have however been incurred as a result of the COVID-19 Lockdown and the resultant inability to import certain critical subsystems, but both projects are endeavouring to make up the delays that have been suffered. At present, project Biro is still expected to deliver the first vessel on time (January 2020), while a number of the contractual deliverables on project Hotel have been completed ahead of time.

In this regard, it is not expected that there will be any negative impact on the management of the anticipated Dockyard activities.

22 September 2020 - NW1897

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of persons have lost their jobs in the mining industry since the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 and (b) engagements has he had with the mining sector to reduce the number of job losses in the mining industry?

Reply:

a) Honourable Member would recall that Statistics South Africa is responsible for collection, collating and releasing of the official employment statistics through the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) and the Quarterly Employment Statistics (QES).

The number of jobs lost in the mining industry since the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 is not yet available because the QLSF 2nd Quarter will be released around the dates of 29th September 2020 and the QES will be released around the 15th of October 2020.

We will therefore request that we humbly await the publication of the official data in the country.

22 September 2020 - NW1922

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of (i) learners and (ii) teachers who had comorbidities have died from Covid-19 in each province and (b) was the specific illness and/or condition that the learners and/or teachers had?

Reply:

(a) The reporting of death relating to COVID-19 does not seek to check whether the deceased had comorbidities or not. Attached are the COVID-19 related fatalities as reported by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs)

(b) The Department of Basic Education does not collect the requested data. 

22 September 2020 - NW481

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) Who are the financial contributors to the Sanitation Appropriate for Education campaign since its launch, (b) what is the total monetary value of each contribution since the launch and (c) how were the contributions spent in each case since the launch?

Reply:

Partner

Number of Projects

Completed to date

Assupol

10

10

Adopt-a-school/AFRISAM

4

4

AVBOB

6

4

LONMIN

13

0

Department of Environment Affairs                  

30

19

Department of Water and Sanitation                           

3

0

Nelson Mandela Foundation

1

1

NORCOS

5

1

Tiger Brands

5

4

Unilever

3

2

Total

80

45

The financial contributors were allocated schools; at which the contributors conducted the necessary condition assessments, compile the scope of work for the sanitation infrastructure, aligned to the Norms and Standards, and proceed to construct the sanitation infrastructure.  No funding was managed by the department. Upon the completion of the ablution facilities, the completed assets were officially handed to the department and the school.

21 September 2020 - NW1197

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What are the relevant details of private shareholders who (a) have held shares in the SA Express Airways SOC Ltd (SA Express) since it was established and (b) currently hold shares; (2) What are the relevant details of shares traded during the life of SA Express, including the details of the (a) shares traded, (b) share sellers, (c) share purchasers and (d) amounts paid for shares? NW1502E

Reply:

 

  1. (a) In 2007, Transnet divested its interest in SA Express when the airline was established in terms of the SA Express Act (No. 34 of 2007), promulgated in December 2007, which provided for the transfer of SA Express shares and interests from Transnet to the state. The Act further granted the conversion of SA Express into a public company with share capital. In 2009, Government took 100% shareholding in SA Express.

 

The Company is a pre-existing company as contemplated in Item 2 of Schedule 5 of the Companies Act, (No 71 of 2008), as amended, and was incorporated in accordance with the Legal Succession to the South African Transport Services Act No. 9 of 1989 to and, in terms of its enabling legislation.

(b) There are no private shareholders who currently hold shares in SA Express. The company is also subject to the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999, (PFMA) as amended. The government is the sole shareholder of the shares in the company and the rights attached to those shares are exercised by the Minister of Public Enterprises.

 

  1. The Memorandum of Incorporation (MOI) provides that the company is authorised to issue 1000 (one thousand) Shares. The 2013 MOI provides that the shares in issue are 452 (four hundred and fifty two) ordinary shares, all of which are held by the shareholder, as represented by the Minister of Public Enterprises.
    1. shares traded where 102 shares
    2. share seller was Transnet

c). share purchaser was Government, represented by the Minister of Public Enterprises

d) amount paid was R140 million.

The company received a total of R1 549 000 000.00 during the 2018/19 and 2019/20 financial years. The company was required to provide the Minister with a commensurate request to increase the authorised and issued shares, accordingly. The process was not finalised and the provisional liquidator will only be able to address the matter, subject to prescribed requirements.

21 September 2020 - NW2151

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he will furnish Mr M Cuthbert with a list of official overseas trips that a certain person (name furnished) has taken during her tenure at his department, including the (a) cost, (b) destination and (c) purpose of each trip; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, 2) whether the specified person ever received any gifts from Ithuba; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, 3) whether the gifts were declared to his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. I am advised that according to the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) records, the specified person travelled overseas as detailed below and that all trips undertaken were aligned to the functions for which the official is responsible and were duly authorised by the delegated authority.

No

Destination (b)

Date

Cost (a) in Rand (R)

Purpose of each trip (c)

1

Boston

Oct 2011

73 727,00

Learning and development intervention.

2

Beijing and Shanghai

Nov 2011

61 661,00

Attended the SA EXPO in Beijing and Shanghai as part of the Dept’s trade promotion programme.

3

Boston

Mar 2012

73 596,00

Learning and development intervention.

4

Boston

Apr 2013

63 296,00

Attended the 2013 Governance, Risk Management and Compliance Summit.

5

Kuala Lumpur

Jun 2013

35 454,00

Invited to attend The Global Summit for Women 2013 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

6

Brazil

Aug 2013

57 077,00

Conducted an international benchmarking study in Brazil pertaining to Public Entities and Statutory Institutions.

7

Washington

Nov 2013

75 843,00

Attended the 17th Annual KM World Conference & Exposition in Washington.

8

Paris

Jun 2014

59 026,00

Attended the Global Summit of Women in Paris.

9

Washington

Jul 2014

77 898,00

Attended and participated in the AGOA Forum and the business engagements on the margins of US-Africa Leaders’ Summit. Provided support to the Minister.

10

Brazil

Oct 2014

69 708,00

Led the delegation for the 6th Investment and Trade Initiative (ITI) in Brazil.

11

Washington

Nov 2014

96 567,39

Learning and Development Conference in Washington.

12

Atlanta and Santa Fe

Jul 2015

100 311,72

Trade promotion programme to Atlanta & Santa Fe. Supported the Deputy Minister.

13

California and St Louis

Oct 2015

104 453,72

Learning and Development intervention.

Also met with Showroom Management Company regarding the trade promotion Hub in Atlanta.

14

Hong Kong

Mar 2016

60 916,72

Participated in the Trade Promotion Expo.

15

Atlanta

Jul 2016

119 081,23

Participated and attended the trade promotion programme in Atlanta.

16

Moscow

Sept 2016

48 688,23

Attended and participated in the national Pavilion in Moscow.

17

Washington

Nov 2016

64 713,23

Learning and development intervention.

18

Atlanta and Miami

Nov 2016

100 375,23

Participated in the trade promotion programme.

19

San Diego

Apr 2017

125 456,23

Meeting with institutional buyers regarding the trade promotion programme.

20

Doha Qatar

Apr 2017

60 793,23

Attended the International Conference on Chemical Disarmament and Security as part of council function.

21

Atlanta

Jul 2017

97 586,29

Participated in the Trade Promotion programme.

22

Atlanta

Jan 2018

80 163,29

Participated in the Trade Promotion programme.

23

Atlanta

Jul 2018

64 021,68

Participated in the Trade Promotion programme.

24

New York, Philadelphia and Orlando

Oct 2018

119 116,68

Participated in the outward mission as part of the Trade Promotion programme.

25

Atlanta

Sept 2019

90 927,93

Facilitated the Trade Promotion project closure.

26

Geneva, Germany and the United Kingdom

Nov 2019

101 427,93

Part of SABS administration function to address a session of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Working Party on Regulatory Cooperation and Standardisation Policies and undertook benchmarking visits to the British Standards Institute (BSI), German National Standards Body (DIN) and Swiss Standards Body (SNV).

2. The specified person received the following gifts from Ithuba in 2016 when representing the Department at the launch of Ithuba’s new “Raffle” game:

  • 1 box of chocolates;
  • Two wine glasses;
  • 1 pair of Jenna Clifford earrings; and
  • Soap.

3. I am advised that the gifts were disclosed to the Department in 2016.

-END-

21 September 2020 - NW1095

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)(a) What total number of the 19 000 inmates designated for release as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic have been released and (b) from which prisons have such inmates been released; (2) what is the percentage of overcrowding in each specified prison (a) before and(b) after the release; 3) what systems have been put in place to increase the resources of community corrections in those areas in which inmates have been released or are still to be released; (4) what is the percentage increase of the workload per capita of community corrections in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) As on24 June 2020 the total number offenders released was4138.

(1)(b) & (2) The breakdown of releases and percentage per region and correctional centre is as follows:

EASTERN CAPE REGION

 

Correctional Centre

(1)(b)Total releases DUE TO SPECIAL PAROLE DISPENSATION

24 JUNE 2020

(2)(a) Percentage of overcrowding before releases

(2)(b)Percentage of overcrowding after releases

24 JUNE 2020

Fort Beaufort

6

25.60%

22.02%

Grahamstown

12

158.25%

151.78%

King William's Town

0

136.57%

136.38%

Middledrift

13

177.71%

174.61%

Stutterheim

3

78.00%

64.00%

East London Medium. A

0

162.56%

161.84%

East London Medium. B

0

178.82%

169.98%

East London Medium. C

13

93.77%

79.12%

Mdantsane

29

214.09%

205.50%

Graaff-Reinet

0

242.86%

223.81%

Jansenville

15

90.32%

41.94%

Kirkwood

12

133.04%

125.79%

Somerset-East

13

91.62%

71.26%

Bizana

1

229.79%

234.04%

Elliotdale

0

30.61%

30.61%

Flagstaff

4

221.62%

200.00%

Lusikisiki

3

265.14%

260.55%

Mount Ayliff

2

158.82%

156.47%

Mount Fletcher

0

196.51%

194.19%

Mount Frere

3

193.75%

181.25%

Mqanduli

4

99.07%

95.33%

Nqgeleni

1

107.41%

102.78%

Tabankulu

3

164.06%

150.00%

Mthatha Remand

0

198.11%

200.47%

Mthatha Medium

0

215.14%

212.08%

Barkly-East

0

116.42%

104.48%

Burgersdorp

7

292.62%

259.73%

Butterworth

0

104.14%

92.48%

Cofimvaba

5

33.66%

24.75%

Cradock

13

168.77%

154.94%

Dodrecht

7

142.39%

127.17%

Engcobo

1

121.21%

114.14%

Idutywa

2

240.32%

233.87%

Lady Frere

0

71.74%

50.00%

Middelburg

12

149.84%

145.11%

Nqamakwe

0

0.00%

0.00%

Queenstown

0

275.20%

236.00%

Sada

3

165.52%

162.84%

Sterkspruit

8

62.90%

24.19%

Willowvale

20

107.69%

55.77%

St Albans Maximum

0

128.61%

128.81%

St Albans Medium A

1

235.13%

214.16%

St Albans Medium B

34

136.17%

132.29%

Patensie

29

84.42%

73.65%

Port Elizabeth

50

91.36%

78.72%

Regional Total

329

150%

147.80%

GAUTENG REGION

 

Correctional Centre

(1)(b)Total releases DUE TO SPECIAL PAROLE DISPENSATION

24 JUNE 2020

(2)(a) Percentage of overcrowding before releases

(2)(b)Percentage of overcrowding after releases

24 JUNE 2020

Baviaanspoort Maximum

0

148.48%

148.25%

Baviaanspoort Medium

14

129.64%

124.37%

Emthonjeni

32

31.88%

26.88%

Boksburg Medium A

46

139.45%

132.15%

Boksburg Juveniles

0

146.35%

141.61%

Heidelberg Male

25

96.75%

86.26%

Johannesburg Medium A

7

248.90%

247.11%

Johannesburg Medium B

42

159.97%

157.43%

Johannesburg Medium C

0

141.74%

141.45%

Johannesburg Female

31

155.79%

144.21%

Krugersdorp

74

164.92%

165.48%

Leeuwkop Max

42

151.08%

151.46%

Leeuwkop Med A

37

102.20%

98.03%

Leeuwkop Med B

7

113.74%

106.80%

Leeuwkop Med C

0

148.93%

147.50%

Modderbee

27

167.34%

164.33%

Devon

40

24.45%

16.05%

Nigel

33

118.02%

115.02%

KgošiMampuru II Maximum

0

99.65%

98.59%

KgošiMampuru II Local

3

173.24%

162.41%

KgošiMampuru II Central

35

142.39%

141.28%

KgošiMampuru II Female

33

145.78%

123.49%

ODI

43

118.17%

112.42%

Atteridgeville

102

96.06%

67.82%

Zonderwater Medium A

0

149.54%

149.54%

Zonderwater Medium B

57

121.73%

114.10%

Grand Total

730

149.03%

144.09%

KWAZULU NATAL REGION 

Correctional Centre

(1)(b)Total releases DUE TO SPECIAL PAROLE DISPENSATION

24 JUNE 2020

(2)(a) Percentage of overcrowding before releases

(2)(b)Percentage of overcrowding after releases

24 JUNE 2020

Durban Medium A

0

172.13%

165.33%

Durban Medium B

28

151.95%

150.23%

Durban Medium C

33

59.51%

41.94%

Durban Female

39

142.63%

121.12%

Durban Youth

44

49.76%

41.02%

Umzinto

22

129.77%

120.55%

Ingwavuma

4

42.20%

41.28%

Mtunzini

16

47.83%

39.13%

Stanger

10

56.39%

45.86%

Maphumulo

3

54.55%

46.75%

Eshowe

28

114.66%

109.58%

Empangeni

68

60.9%

50.81%

Qalakabusha

53

148.46%

137.63%

Glencoe

51

113.06%

110.36%

Dundee

26

42.48%

28.32%

Pomeroy

10

33.33%

17.24%

Ladysmith

11

188.66%

170.06%

Bergville

19

113.79%

86.21%

Greytown

21

55.24%

29.52%

Estcourt

7

52.34%

50.00%

Kranskop

5

46.49%

42.11%

Ebongweni

0

74.4%

73.33%

Port Shepstone

35

80%

52.00%

Kokstad Medium

30

133.24%

127.94%

Matatiele

10

79.5%

63.86%

Nongoma

13

120.37%

100.00%

Ncome Medium A

9

160.37%

157.29%

Ncome Medium B

18

128.82%

125.10%

Melmoth

18

117.39%

93.48%

Vryheid

21

146.89%

133.33%

Nkandla

4

111.11%

100.00%

Pietermaritzburg Medium A

28

142.25%

137.39%

Pietermaritzburg Medium B

40

70.2%

68.26%

Sevontein

19

128.83%

124.52%

New Hanover

12

101.30%

93.51%

Ixopo

26

81.8%

66.67%

Waterval Medium A

45

142.29%

133.50%

Waterval Medium B

15

89.6%

83.41%

Uthrect

15

48.78%

43.90%

Newcastle

5

142.21%

125.10%

Ekuseni

21

27.83%

24.33%

Grand Total

882

119.73%

112.87%

LIMPOPO/MPUMALANG/NORTH WEST REGION

Correctional Centre

(1)(b)Total releases DUE TO SPECIAL PAROLE DISPENSATION

24 JUNE 2020

(2)(a) Percentage of overcrowding before releases

(2)(b)Percentage of overcrowding after releases

24 JUNE 2020

Rooigrond Medium B

10

135.71%

156.02%

Lichtenburg

5

60.82%

67.35%

Zeerust

15

123.08%

159.35%

Mafikeng

0

129.63%

74.07%

Losperfontein

14

117.33%

126.49%

Rustenburg

29

102.83%

60%

Rustenburg COE

13

44.19%

38.60%

Mogwase

18

122.33%

132.28%

Bethal

56

137.48%

137.48%

Ermelo

28

142.15%

123.78%

Piet Retief

38

142.15%

159.39%

Standerton

20

132.48%

125.48%

Volkrust

13

122.75%

111.85%

Modimolle

21

136.54%

126.10%

Polokwane

33

166.80%

182.65%

Tzaneen

18

34.33%

44.78%

Thohoyandou Medium A

14

143.13%

137.92%

Thohoyandou Females/Juveniles

32

115.67%

114.18%

MakhadoCoE

27

152.47%

148.46%

Belfast

5

37.93%

29.31%

Carolina

6

20.00%

52.85%

Middelburg

9

104.42%

85.80%

Witbank

2

134.57%

130.24%

Wolmaransstad

9

99.07%

36.11%

Christiana

6

90.65%

100%

Potchefstroom RDF

18

230.33%

219.15%

Klerksdorp

25

127.50%

126.23%

Barberton Maximum

0

150.65%

150.77%

Barberton Medium A

0

0.00%

0%

Barberton Medium B

45

166.88%

166.24%

Barberton Town

19

102.42%

94.62%

Lydenburg

17

160.49%

158.02%

Grand Total

565

133.84%

129.23%

FREE STATE / NORTHERN CAPE REGION 

Correctional Centre

(1)(b) Total releases DUE TO SPECIAL PAROLE DISPENSATION

24 JUNE 2020

(2)(a) Percentage of overcrowding before releases

(2)(b) Percentage of overcrowding after releases 24 JUNE 2020

Colesberg

19

106.45%

97.31%

De Aar Male

63

122.35%

89.77%

De Aar Female

3

93.94%

81.82%

Hopetown

12

85.94%

73.44%

Richmond

13

116.28%

95.35%

Victoria West

22

165.22%

133.33%

Goedemoed A

34

87.21%

81.06%

Goedemoed B

37

96.47%

88.68%

Bethulie

3

123.53%

103.92%

Edenburg

5

89.80%

73.47%

Fauresmith

5

71.93%

56.14%

Zastron

1

20.31%

42.19%

Groenpunt Maximum

3

143.02%

142.95%

Groenpunt Medium

7

71.29%

71.97%

Groenpunt Youth

6

72.60%

70.82%

Frankfort

13

52.44%

50.00%

Heilbron

5

116.67%

113.64%

Parys

6

82.76%

89.66%

Sasolburg

11

122.11%

105.26%

Vereeniging

0

132.32%

129.26%

Grootvlei A

14

172.99%

170.54%

Grootvlei B

1

120.08%

118.44%

Brandfort

13

42.55%

4.96%

Boshof

6

83.33%

63.33%

Ladybrand

1

103.70%

74.07%

Wepener

11

36.05%

23.13%

Winburg

13

69.59%

60.81%

Mangaung

0

100.00%

100.00%

Kimberley

18

121.97%

104.12%

Tswelopele

25

75.50%

73.25%

Barkley West

9

32.79%

47.54%

Douglas

11

84.85%

72.05%

BizzaMakhate A

17

82.50%

75.61%

BizzaMakhate B

2

100.19%

106.44%

BizzaMakhate C

38

137.50%

120.83%

BizzaMakhate D

0

0.00%

0.00%

Bethlehem

12

148.89%

141.67%

Ficksburg

6

139.08%

132.18%

Harrismith

33

146.8%

130.53%

Hennenman

18

49.05%

36.19%

Hoopstad

0

35.86%

26.21%

Lindley

7

58.54%

31.71%

Odendaalsrus

0

160.49%

142.38%

Senekal

8

49.25%

42.54%

Venterburg

6

70.87%

55.91%

Virginia

33

84.83%

98.60%

Upington Males

45

73.04%

65.67%

Upington Females

3

50.68%

39.73%

Kuruman

12

125.91%

100.24%

Springbok

4

62.67%

50.67%

Grand Total

634

99.15%

93.61%

WESTERN CAPE REGION 

Correctional centres

(1)(b)Total releases DUE TO SPECIAL PAROLE DISPENSATION

24 JUNE 2020

(2)(a) Percentage of overcrowding before releases

(2)(b)Percentage of overcrowding after releases

24 JUNE 2020

Allandale

38

226.79%

238.10%

Hawequa

7

105.29%

14.42%

Obiqua

39

117.52%

117.52%

Paardeberg

43

134.87%

106.90%

Brandvlei (New Centre)

2

95.37%

71.36%

Brandvlei Medium C

86

95.00%

64.21%

Brandvlei Youth

41

103.76%

108.33%

Drakenstein Medium A

39

132.37%

109.03%

Drakenstein Medium B

32

112.03%

117.30%

Drakenstein Maximum

1

148.96%

153.37%

Stellenbosch

3

211.27%

121.13%

Beaufort-West

10

239.47%

188.16%

George

26

187.03%

184.72%

Knysna

13

177.65%

145.25%

Ladismith

2

205.56%

185.19%

Mosselbaai

68

128.32%

136.99%

Oudtshoorn Medium A

43

186.33%

155.33%

Oudtshoorn Medium B (f)

19

153.85%

91.03%

Prince Albert

8

157.69%

86.54%

Uniondale

9

150.00%

140.38%

Goodwood

38

156.85%

121.09%

Buffeljagsrivier

23

144.49%

134.69%

Caledon RDF

6

196.69%

154.88%

Helderstroom Medium A

51

129.54%

128.48%

Helderstroom Maximum

0

143.80%

145.16%

Malmesbury Medium A

39

97.84%

98.49%

Malmesbury RDF

4

229.21%

253.37%

Riebeeck-Wes

1

29.76%

6.34%

Pollsmoor RDF

5

177.27%

173.57%

Pollsmoor Medium A

1

153.66%

131.50%

Pollsmoor Medium B

100

161.02%

177.35%

Pollsmoor Medium C

38

83.54%

34.66%

Pollsmoor Females

46

186.12%

79.79%

Calvinia

1

100.00%

121.95%

Vanrhynsdorp Males

12

265.24%

100.20%

Vanrhynsdorp Females

0

128.00%

93.75%

Voorberg Medium A

25

56.32%

48.50%

Voorberg Medium B (new)

4

110.13%

107.95%

Dwarsrivier

27

136.36%

130.80%

Robertson

19

102.14%

87.61%

Warmbokkeveld

21

199.56%

73.85%

Worcester Males

1

180.67%

186.91%

Worcester Females

7

180.00%

161.97%

Grant Total

998

140.15%

120.15%

Overcrowding level

The percentage of inmates in excess to the available bed space in percentage.

Occupancy level

The number of occupied bed space at a given timecompared to the total number of bed space available in percentage.

(3) There are 1854 officials employed at community corrections to deal with the current situation. Officials are rotated within priority tasks that are presented by the pandemic at this time.195 vacant positions are still to be filled through human resource process.

The increased strategic partnerships within communities and in Government (District Delivery Model (DDM) model assist in this regard.

There are 958 service points established nationally through partnerships with external stakeholders to enhance the accessibility of community corrections services for parolees and probationers.

Twenty one (21) halfway houses were established through partnerships in order to successfully reintegrate probationers and parolees.

(4)

Filled

Offender caseload

28 May 2020

Ratio: number of Offenders per Official

Ratio: number of Offenders per Social Worker

1854

55882

1:30

1:485

Filled

Offender caseload

28 May 2020 PLUS

19 000 releases

Ratio

No of offenders per Official

Ratio

No of offenders per Social Worker

1854

74882

1:40

1:651

Percentage increase

25.37% caseload increase

25% per correctional official

25.49 % increase Per Social Worker

END

21 September 2020 - NW698

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, in view of the recognition of customary law and its practice in sections 211 and 212 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, any steps have been taken to codify this law for the sake of common understanding and common application; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Customary law is mostly unwritten, with no dedicated body of persons tasked with making rules or with the authority to define its norms. This body of law covers all matters regulating personal and family life, and only certain aspects of customary law have been codified, for example the recognition of customary marriages, and parts of the law on succession, especially that dealing with the abolition of the principle of primogeniture. Often, this codification emanates from court orders on disputes lodged with the courts.

 

2. The Recognition of Customary Marriages Act,1998(Act No. 120 of 1998) defines customary law as the customs and usages traditionally observed among the indigenous African peoples of South Africa and form part of the culture of those peoples. Section 211 protects those institutions that are unique to customary law. It follows from this that customary law must be interpreted by the courts, as first and foremost answering to the contents of the Constitution. Specifically, section 211(3) of the Constitution orders the application of customary law by the courts, where this law is applicable. Customary law is protected by and subject to the Constitution in its own right, and may be tested only against the Constitution, and not the common law or legislation. While many South Africans subscribe to and live according to customary law, sections 30 and 31 of the Constitution provide for the right to cultural diversity. The recognition and application of customary law rests on the right to culture of the particular community. Customary law in South Africa is tied to ethnicity, therefore the law regulating the lives of people will differ across communities, ethnicities and provinces.

3. Living customary law exists in the system of living norms that regulate everyday lives of people who live according to customary law. This type of customary law is seen as dynamic, evolving and context specific as it changes in the beliefs and circumstances it applies to.

4. Also, in Pilane and Another v Pilane and Another 2013 (4) BCLR 431(CC) the Constitutional Court confirmed the notion of living customary law as follows:

‘the true nature of customary law is as a living body of law, active and dynamic, with an inherent capacity to evolve in keeping with the changing lives of the people whom it governs’.

5. Since the advent of democracy, the Department has through the South African Law Reform Commission, codified certain Branches of customary law, and this includes Customary Marriages and the Law that relates to the Customary Marriages Act.

6. The Traditional Courts Bill which seeks to create a uniform traditional court system, is currently with the National Council of Provinces, after having been passed by the National Assembly.

This is part of the ongoing Project of Transformation of Customary Law, because customary law is living law. Codification is not do-able in a once-off project.

 

21 September 2020 - NW1849

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she has been informed of the allegations that some councillors and politicians at the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality are alleged to have taken and kept for themselves the JoJo water tanks which were meant for communities without water; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what action has she taken to recover the JoJo water tanks?

Reply:

No I have not been informed about the allegations referred to in the question. The Honourable Member is requested to urgently report the matter to the nearby police station and the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. Further, the Member is requested to provide me with details of this alleged crime.

I wish to state categorically that we are enjoined to deliver a service to our people and for a greater good. As public representatives, the duty of our office requires that we must take legal action against the wrong doing when brought to our attention and not wait for sharing such information through parliamentary questions. In doing so, we run the risk of losing crucial evidence that law enforcement agencies might require. If proven to be true, this is a serious offence and it will not be tolerated.

21 September 2020 - NW1350

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of food parcels did her department distribute in the City of Ekurhuleni since 26 March 2020 and (b) is the total breakdown of the number of food parcels distributed in each ward?

Reply:

a) The total number of food parcels distributed by SASSA and DSD in the City of Ekurhuleni since 26 March 2020 is 73 089 as reflected below, 2 929 by SASSA and 70 160by DSD.

b) Breakdown per ward of SASSA food parcels distributed is detailed in the table below:

Local Office Name

Number of parcels = 2929

Ward Number(s) or Local Office

Germiston

9

W33=1,W35=1, W38=1, W40=1, W41=1, W42=2, W45=2                

Benoni

12

Benoni/Daveyton

Tsakane

30

Tsakane

Vosloorus

43

W44=16, W46=11, W47=9, W107=7

Thokoza

118

W40=8, W47=6, W50=13, W54=14, W56=19, W58=21, W60=18, W109=19                

Benoni

24

Benoni/Daveyton

Germiston

27

W21=4, W41=4, W43=12, W93=7,                              

Tsakane

86

W84=86                          

Thokoza

66

W40=1, W45=1, W48=11, W49=4, W50=2, W51=12, W56=6, W57=5, W60=24                

Benoni

19

Benoni/Daveyton

Tembisa

50

W91=5, W13=9, W6=23, W104=7, W10=6                

Germiston

27

W35=19 , W42=3, W93=5

Germiston

18

W34=1 , W35=13 , W41=3, W45=1             

Benoni

30

Benoni/Daveyton

Springs

44

Springs

Kwa-Thema

62

Kwa-Thema

Thokoza

115

W37=4, W40=5, W48=9, W50=7, W51=10, W52=6, W53=6, W54=8, W57=9, W58=12, W60=7  (Thokoza)                             

Tembisa

40

W1=6, W91=8, W104=4, W5=22                             

Germiston

28

W21=14 , W34=3, W35=7, W36=2, W45=1, W32=1                                  

Benoni

38

Benoni/Daveyton

Vosloorus

135

W35=1, W41=3, W43=4, W44=39,W45=25, W46=2,W48=10,W47=2, W50=2,W58=1,W60=1, W64=3, W95=22   (Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe)                                

Tsakane

22

W83=5, W82=7, W81=10,                

Springs

16

W75=16                              

Kwa-Thema

11

W75=11                         

Duduza

21

W86=9, W87=7, W89=5                

Vosloorus

72

 Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

Tembisa

37

W104=23, W14=4, W91=2, W13=4, W5=3, W7=1                                

Tembisa

47

W6=34, W14=5, W2=1, W11=1, W10=2, W102=1, W91=1, W1=1, W10=1                                

Thokoza

130

W37=3, W40=3, W48=9, W49=24,W50=24, W51=1,W52=20,W53=2, W54=6,W55=1,W56=4, W57=4, W58=2, W60=13, W61=7, W63=1, W103=2, W107=4                                   

Germiston

42

W21=10, W33=13, W34=10, W35=3, W40=1, W42=2, W53=1, W93=2                                                             

Benoni

21

W24=1, W25=2, W28=1, W29=1, W31=2, W68=2, W69=4, W70=3, W90=1, Benoni/Daveyton

Germiston

35

W21=12, W35=3, W38=1, W40=16, W93=2, W99=1                                                              

Tembisa

73

W2=3, W11=4, W14=20, W6=10, W12=9, W19=2, W90=2, W104=17, W5=3, W3=3, W9=2  (Tembisa)                                                           

Duduza

6

Duduza/Nigel

Tsakane

39

Tsakane

Kwa-Thema

17

W78=7, W79=10                         

Springs

37

Springs

Benoni

46

W24=1, W28=3, W29=9, W30=3, W31=5, W65=3, W66=1, W69=14, Benoni/Daveyton/Actonville

Vosloorus

62

Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

Vosloorus

130

W95=31, W107=22, W41=8, W47=4, W45=10, W65=5, W63=1, W62=1, W61=1, (Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe)

Tembisa

61

W9=14, W5=4, W11=2, W91=17, W3=3, W6=3, W2=3, W1=6, W14=1, W4=4, W12=1, w9=3                                                     

Thokoza

139

W47=1, W48=5, W49=5, W50=40, W52=7, W55=7, W58=16, W63=45, W95=1, W103=1, W107=11   (Thokoza)                                                

Germiston

27

W21=8, W34=3, W35=5, W38=1, W40=3, W41=2, W42=1, W93=1, (Germiston/Reiger Park/Primrose)

Duduza

7

Duduza/Nigel

Kwa-Thema

8

Kwa-Thema

Springs

18

Springs

Tsakane

21

Tsakane

Benoni

35

W24=4, W35=2, W28=3, W29=2, W30=10, W65=6, W69=4, W71=2, W92=1, W125=1                               

Thokoza

57

W56=57                                                       

Vosloorus

71

W61=50, W62=21                                                      

Vosloorus

54

W95=54                                                      

Germiston

37

W15=1, W19=1, W21=3, W32=3, W34=5, W35=2, W39=2, W40=4, W41=1, W42=1, W53=1, W93=2, W99=4, (Germiston/Primrose/Reiger Park/Boksburg)                                                     

Germiston

39

W32=1, W35=14, W40=15, W41=1, (Germiston/Primrose/Reiger Park/Boksburg)                                  

Benoni

26

Benoni/Daveyton/Actonville

Benoni

60

W24=1, W25=1, W28=5, W29=5, W30=23, W31=1, W32=1, W65=8, W69=14, Benoni/Daveyton/Actonville

Germiston

9

W18=1, W21=2, W33=1, W35=2, W34=1, W40=2

Thokoza

40

Thokoza/Katlehong/Palm Ridge

Thokoza

50

Thokoza/Katlehong

Thokoza

50

Thokoza/Katlehong/Palm Ridge

Thokoza

50

Eden Park/Thokoza

Thokoza

52

Eden Park/Thokoza

Vosloorus

49

Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

Vosloorus

84

Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

                 

Total number of food parcels delivered

Ward Number(s)

883

1

3

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

7853

2

6

7

9

10

11

 

 

 

323

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

93

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

404

13

66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

745

15

16

17

90

106

 

 

 

 

158

15

91

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

68

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

446

18

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

769

21

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

353

21

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

430

22

32

73

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

766

24

110

108

 

 

 

 

 

 

511

25

96

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

1205

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

598

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5895

26

69

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

136

27

28

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

935

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

442

33

93

34

 

 

 

 

 

 

1040

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

885

34

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

552

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2745

36

35

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

332

36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

173

39

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

441

40

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

940

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

883

41

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2554

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

42

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1998

43

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3485

44

64

45

94

102

47

 

 

 

33

49

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1836

52

50

51

56

59

 

 

 

 

372

53

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

54

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

358

57

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1441

58

111

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

102

60

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1481

61

62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600

62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1052

68

67

70

26

65

 

 

 

 

254

69

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21

70

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

110

71

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

554

72

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

250

76

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

793

77

80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

498

78

77

112

 

 

 

 

 

 

319

78

109

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

684

79

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3479

81

85

84

83

86

 

 

 

 

755

82

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1246

84

87

98

 

 

 

 

 

 

919

88

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1657

89

49

103

102

94

52

58

57

40

7568

89

57

55

63

58

40

49

46

48

871

92

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

439

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

123

94

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

891

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

394

97

105

74

 

 

 

 

 

 

912

99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

101

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

107

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

206

110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70 160

Total Number of Food Parcels Distributed from April 2020- July 2020

 

 

National Assembly written Reply: 1350 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

21 September 2020 - NW2148

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) are the details of any organisation that has been supported by her department in the past three financial years to date, (b) is the nature of the support provided to each organisation, (c) is the total amount of monetary support given to each organisation, (d)(i) are the details of the criteria used to decide which organisation to support and (ii) are the reasons that the specified organisations were supported, (e) outcomes (i) were expected from the organisations respectively in each instance and (ii) did each organisation deliver in each case, (f) monitoring mechanisms are in place to monitor outcomes and expenditure and (g) criteria were used to categorise outcomes as successes and/or failures?

Reply:

The Department does not provide support to organisations.

(a) to (g) not applicable

21 September 2020 - NW1870

Profile picture: Newhoudt-Druchen, Ms WS

Newhoudt-Druchen, Ms WS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What assistance is being given to child victims of sexual abuse?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development offers assistance to child victims of sexual violence in a number of ways.

Over the years, the justice system has moved towards an approach tailored to prevent and minimize any further hardships and trauma often encountered by child victims of sex crimes when seeking redress for violation of their rights.

Since 2013, the Department has been establishing Sexual Offences Courts founded on a best practice model that offers a wide range of child support services. This model seeks to give children a court experience that is age-appropriate, caring, and responsive to their needs for dignity, respect and privacy.

In line with the 2019 Presidential Summit Declaration against Gender-based Violence and Femicide, the Department facilitated a process which, in February 2020, culminated in the promulgation of section 55A of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act of 2007 and accompanying Regulations. The Regulations provide for required facilities, devices, equipment, and services that these courts have to offer to be a designated Sexual Offences Court.

The Regulations provide for a range of victim support services - amongst these are services for children which include the court preparation service, the pre-trial and post-trial emotional containment service, the child-friendly private waiting room service, the private testifying service, the intermediary service, counseling services, as well as travelling and food allowances. This package also offers support to children with disabilities. The Regulations further incorporate the court support and accompaniment services, mostly offered by Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) to children.

The Sexual Offences Courts offer these services in a sequential value process to prevent any incidence of secondary traumatization. The child is kept safe in a private waiting room which is furnished to respond to the psychosomatic needs of the child. The room offers a play area to keep the child entertained, and is also attached to a private toilet facility to protect the child from exposure to the accused person and other court users.

From a private room, the child testifies with the assistance of an intermediary via a dual-view closed circuit TV (CCTV) system. The goal is to save the child from hearing communication directly from the courtroom. The intermediary therefore serves as the conduit between the courtroom and the child, and conveys questions to the child. When the child is tired during testimony, the court adjourns for the child to take a nap on a custom-made sofa-bed provided for in the testifying room.

The Regulations also make provision for the use of anatomical dolls for use by the prosecutor and the intermediary.

Provision is also made for a court preparation programme which is programme developed by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) and accredited with the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority which is aimed at familiarizing complainants and witnesses in sexual offence cases with the court environment, with a view to preparing them to testify in court and providing assistance and support to them.

Services are also offered at the Thuthuzela Care Centres and victim assistance officers are employed on the establishment of the National Prosecuting Authority and attached to a Thuthuzela Care Centre.

The Department and the NPA progressively improve these services to ensure that child victims of sexual offences receive the support they need.

21 September 2020 - NW2156

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 737 on 25 May 2020, he received the information requested from the provinces; if not, by what date does he envisage to receive such information; if so, will he furnish Mr. M Waters with the further relevant details? [

Reply:

Following my reply to PQ 737, I requested the Department to contact the provincial regulators and ask for information to advise on further steps that national government may need to take.

Information was received from the Eastern Cape, Gauteng, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, North West, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape provinces. I am advised that no information was received as yet from the Free State and Northern Cape.

The provincial liquor regulators form part of the National Liquor Regulators Forum (NLRF), which also consist of the South African Police Services (SAPS). SAPS indicated that in order to address liquor abuse as a contributor to contact crime as well as serious violent crimes, the National Crime Combatting Forum (NCCF) Instruction 2 of 2019 was issued to address the policing of the legal and illegal liquor trade from 01 April 2019 to 31 March 2020.

All provinces were instructed to plan and execute joint liquor control operations to ensure compliance by liquor traders with the provisions of national and provincial liquor legislation, focusing specifically on licensed liquor premises and illegal liquor outlets in close proximity of schools. This focused operational approach ensured the termination of illegal liquor trade at 2 279 unlicensed liquor outlets which were located in close proximity of schools.

With the country now at Level 1 and with the return of full government functions, further steps will be taken to request the outstanding information from the two provinces. The replies from provinces will form the basis for consideration by national government and where challenges were identified (e.g. the need for a clear and empowering legislative framework to enable provinces to take additional action), this is currently under consideration. On completion of these processes, a report will be prepared.

-END-

21 September 2020 - NW2080

Profile picture: Maotwe, Ms OMC

Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to his department’s appearance before the Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises on 19 August 2020, where the Director-General indicated that Rand Merchant Bank has been appointed as transaction advisors to ensure that the best option of securing funding is chosen, what (a) process was followed to appoint Rand Merchant Bank as the transaction advisors, (b) is the contract value of the specified agreement, (c) are the deliverables in the agreement and (d) are the timelines of the contract?

Reply:

(a) The Rand Merchant Bank had been appointed as transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner (SEP) transaction of Air Chefs by SAA, the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) expanded the scope in line with procurement prescripts to include a similar scope on the SAA group, in line with Treasury Regulation 16A6.6.

(b)The contract value is capped at R12 million as retainer fee and R25 million as success fee for concluding a partnership for S

(c) The deliverables are;
i. Initial evaluation
ii. Due diligence and agreeing heads of agreement
iii. Final Due Diligence, definitive Transaction agreements, Transaction approvals and closing

(d) The timeline for the contract is 12 months. But the project may be concluded earlier due to the urgency of the matter, and the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) has an option of exiting within 15 days, a month’s notice or by mutual agreement.

21 September 2020 - NW1879

Profile picture: Maseko-Jele, Ms NH

Maseko-Jele, Ms NH to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Service

In order to address the issue of secondary victimisation, how will his department streamline and centralise reporting, investigative and court processes between the SA Police Service, the National Prosecuting Authority and judiciary so as to avoid repetitive statement-taking from the victim?

Reply:

Every effort is made to minimize and prevent any secondary trauma of the victim and a number of procedures and measures are in place to prevent this.

However, whilst the prosecution guard against additional statements from the same witness, in some instances there may be a need for supplementary statements to be provided and filed in the relevant police docket. This is to ensure that a comprehensive and detailed investigated docket and trial-ready case is put forward for prosecution where a prima facie case exists.

All relevant stakeholders in relation to Gender-based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) matters – such as for the South African Police Service in respect to investigations, Department of Social Development and non-governmental organisations on trauma containment services, the Department of Health regarding forensic medical examinations, National Prosecuting Authority as the prosecution, and the judiciary – all play a crucial collective role towards enhancing a victim-centric approach and minimising secondary victimisation.

The following initiatives, as implemented by the NPA, play a specific role towards minimizing any secondary victimization and ensuring a victim-centric approach in improving service delivery and support to victims of GBV:

The Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) have specifically been established as a mechanism to minimize secondary victimization, as the objective of the TCC model is to provide all related services (medical, psycho-social, statement taking, follow-up services) at a 24-hour One Stop Centre. There are currently 55 TCC-sites nationally, with six (6) additional sites in the process of being added to the list.

Measures such as quality trauma containment assistance to victims, forensic medical examinations, specifically designed court preparation programmes to collectively increase the quality of prosecutions and achieve higher conviction rates all play a role.

 

The current court preparation model provides essential services to all witnesses to appear in courts, and 50% of their focus is specifically on victims of sexual offences.

In addition, the NPA Sexual Offences and Community Affairs (SOCA) Unit has developed a comprehensive training module (as part of the advanced sexual offences training curriculum) dealing with all related aspects on social context sensitivity awareness in a prosecutorial decision-making environment. The training manual specifically includes a module on secondary victimisation, its possible impact and how prosecutors should avoid it in GBVF matters.

Our dedicated Sexual Offences Courts make use of a number of interventions to reduce secondary trauma for victims, such as preparation services, pre-and post-trial trauma debriefing services, intermediary services, private testifying room/closed court services (via a closed-circuit TV system) and private waiting rooms for adult and child victims.

The aforementioned initiatives and activities are specifically aimed at constantly improving service delivery, which includes minimising any secondary victimization.

The recently promulgated Regulations give further impetus to section 55A of the Sexual Offences Act, 2007 and provide for the required facilities, devices, equipment, and services that these courts have to offer to be a designated Sexual Offences Court. All these measures are aimed at reducing secondary victimization.

In addition thereto, we are pleased to inform this House that three new Bills pertaining to preventing and combating GBV have recently been approved by Cabinet for introduction into Parliament and these Bills, once passed, will go a long way in further reducing and preventing secondary victimization.

21 September 2020 - NW1983

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 829 on 11 June 2020, and the indication by the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) in a Portfolio Committee on Social Development on 13 May 2020 that it was in the process of restructuring its operating model, which will likely include a reduction in the number of SASSA’s regional offices, what (a) is the current organogram of SASSA which includes (i) regional, (ii) provincial and (iii) district offices, (b) are the full names and titles of the current managers at each specified office, (c) are the reporting lines for the managers in the offices and (d) is the physical addresses of the regional, provincial and district offices?

Reply:

(a)(b)and (c)

In line with the reply provided in Question 829, SASSA’s proposed operating model has not been implemented. However, the three existing Regional Executive Managers have been seconded on a temporary basis to manage additional Regions each for a period of six months. The secondments are in line with the Staffing Practices Policy of SASSA.

The full names and titles of the current managers at each specified office, and (c) the reporting lines for the managers in the offices are listed on the attached list (Annexures A1-A10)

The current Organisational Structure as approved by the Minister of Social Development comprises of Head Office (Pretoria) and nine (9) Regional Offices.The Agency’s organogram caters for 9 Regional (Provincial) Executive Managers that report directly to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO)of SASSA (i.e., 1 Regional Executive Manager for each province). For ease of reference, the Organisational structure is attached below.

In each province/region there are a number of District Managers that are appointed and they report to the Regional Executive of the province/region. The diagram below depicts the high-level structure as approved which includes 9 provincial/regional offices. Attached are organograms demonstrating reporting lines of all the regional,provincial and districts offices, including reporting lines for managers.

Vacant posts;

  • Ms Dunkerley is managing functions of Grants operations and Policy implementation
  • Vacant Regional Executive Managers posts (6) have the 3 Regional Managers seconded as incumbents acting in clusters positions
  • GM Office of the CEO position is vacant, but has been advertised.
  • The position of COO is identified as a key and critical position,and funded, but currently vacant.

d) Physical Addresses Regional, Provincial and District Offices, please refer to (Annexure B)

National Assembly Written Reply: 1983 of 2020

_______________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

21 September 2020 - NW2147

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) steps has her department taken to ensure accessibility of tourism sites in the past three financial years to date, (b) are the details of the success achieved in this regard, (c) are the details of how accessibility of tourism sites is measured, (d) are the details of the road infrastructure that was (i) developed, (ii) upgraded and (iii) maintained in the past three financial years to date and (e) are the additional tourism offers that have been added in this regard in each instance?

Reply:

Various role players contribute to tourism. Tourism will always benefit from any maintenances, upgrades or new developments to any infrastructure.

Road infrastructure is not the competency of the Department of Tourism nor does the department keep the requested information pertaining to the road infrastructure of the country.The Honourable member may refer the question to the Minister of Transport.

(a) to (e) Not applicable.

21 September 2020 - NW1878

Profile picture: Mofokeng, Ms JM

Mofokeng, Ms JM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services:

What (a) total number of criminal cases were included in the backlogged court roll on 14 August 2020 and (b) are the relevant details of his department’s plans to deal with the backlog?

Reply:

a) According to our records, the number and percentage of backlog cases in the District and Regional Magistrates’ Courts as at the end of July 2020. It is to be noted that the total percentage (%) of backlog cases in the District Courts stands at 39% whereas the percentage in the Regional Courts stands at 75%.

The tables below provide details of the cases on the court roll exceeding nine (9) months from end of July 2020 in District and Regional Courts:

District Courts

Admin Region

Backlog

Outstanding

% Backlog

Administrative Region 05 (Gauteng) Pretoria

8 44

2 537

33%

Administrative Region 05A (Gauteng) Johannesburg

7229

20 546

35%

Administrative Region 08 (Mpumalanga) Nelspruit

3 336

9 608

35%

Administrative Region 09 (North West) Mmabatho

2 955

7 204

41%

Administrative Region 1 (Eastern Cape A) Port Elizabeth

7 133

15 513

46%

Administrative Region 10 (Northern Cape) Kimberley

1 178

3 988

30%

Administrative Region 11 (Limpopo) Polokwane

4 719

11 986

39%

Administrative Region 12 (Western Cape A) Cape Town

6 124

12 300

50%

Administrative Region 13 (Western Cape B) Wynberg

8 599

18 699

46%

Administrative Region 2 (Eastern Cape B) Mthatha

3 730

7 786

48%

Administrative Region 3 (Free State A) Bloemfontein

1 412

4 578

31%

Administrative Region 4 (Free State B) Welkom

830

3 780

22%

Administrative Region 6 (KwaZulu Natal A) Durban

5 430

17 314

31%

Administrative Region 7 (KwaZulu Natal B) Pietermaritzburg

2 439

7 991

31%

Grand Total

55 958

143 830

39%

Regional Courts

Region

Backlog

Open

% Backlog

Eastern Cape

5 172

6 135

84%

Free State

1 827

2 881

63%

Gauteng

7 233

11 525

63%

KwaZulu Natal

5 103

6 415

80%

Limpopo

2 563

3 067

84%

Mpumalanga

2 424

3 042

80%

North West

2 698

3 155

86%

Northern Cape

1 014

1 516

67%

Western Cape

6 661

8 342

80%

Grand Total

34 695

46 078

75%

b) The Covid-19 context has posed many challenges for court efficiency with 268 courts having to close down, as at end of July 2020, for days at a time for decontamination when one (1) or more positive COVID-19 cases are detected, leading to self-isolation and/or self–quarantine for a period of time. Due to an increase in the number of positive COVID-19 cases, some of the courts had to close more than once. The same challenges are being equally experienced by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), South African Police Service (SAPS) and Legal Aid South Africa (SA). It must be understood that ‘business as usual’ has not been possible since the declaration of the State of Disaster due to the Covid-19 pandemic. However, the Department has sought to optimize court efficiency in order to reduce the number of backlog criminal cases. Engagements with the Lower Court Judicial Forums, Regional Court Heads, NPA, Legal Aid SA, SAPS, and Department of Correctional Services have taken place to identify and resolve blockages impeding the processing of criminal cases. These engagements have been formalized under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development, and will continue to take place on a frequent basis.

Projects are underway to facilitate court processes through digitalization, and many of these are at a developed stage which will soon proceed to roll-out. Protocols have been developed to ensure that courts operate as optimally as possible in the current Covid-19 context, and these include guidance on when and for how long court closures should take place.

A national plan to manage these backlogs is in the process of being developed in order to address the backlog.

21 September 2020 - NW2152

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether his department ever investigated allegations of the awarding of incentives through the Industrial Financing Branch to family members of certain persons (names furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what was the outcome in each case and (b) will he furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with the further relevant details? [

Reply:

I am advised by the Director-General that the Department has not received any allegations of the awarding of incentives through the Industrial Financing Branch to family members of the officials mentioned.Therefore, no investigations have been necessary.

-END-

21 September 2020 - NW2136

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What are the reasons that the Government has not ratified the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime, commonly known as the Budapest Convention, after becoming a signatory on 23 November 2001 and (b) by what date does the Government intend to ratify the Budapest Convention?

Reply:

a) The Government does not intend to ratify the Budapest Convention, despite the fact that South Africa (SA) participated in negotiations on the Budapest Convention on Cybercrime, and signed the instrument on 23 November 2001. The Government took the decision to not ratify this instrument on the basis that the country’s policy on cybercrime did not comply with the provisions of the Convention. Even with the recent adoption of the Cybercrimes Bill by both Houses of Parliament, SA will not ratify this regional instrument, as a matter of principle, as the country would have little influence of shaping the instrument because non-EU members are only allowed to make submissions which the CoE considers in their absence. This is a position held by all Government departments.

b) Not applicable.

21 September 2020 - NW1853

Profile picture: Ngwenya, Ms DB

Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Social Development

The SA Social Security Agency has reported that over 7 million Social Relief of Distress grant applications were received from May 2020 with just over 5 million applications approved and out of the 5 million approved applications, only 4 million applicants have been paid out, by what date will she ensure that all the approved applications are paid out?

Reply:

For the month of May the following represents the applications received and paid:

Many applications and queries were received after the special relief grant was announced, but after all duplicate applications were removed, 6 605 445 applications remained that represented a single, complete application per applicant.

These 6 605 445 applications were all validated against databases such as UIF, NSFAS, IRP-5, National Population Register, Social Grants, and Correctional Services. After reconsideration, 2 180 725 applications were rejected as they were found on the aforementioned databases as provided by the relevant Departments.

SASSA approved 4 424 720 applications to receive the grant.(The just over 5 million approved in the above question is only from June 2020). Clients whose applications failed as the personal information did not match that held by Home Affairs were then requested to correct their personal details (it must be reflected as per the National Population Register) and to provide their banking preferences. Once the clients provided their banking preferences the bank details are verified through National Treasury with the Banks. The delay in providing either updated personal details or banking details delays the payment process.

A number of clients requested their money to be paid into the accounts of other people (family members or spouses). SASSA can only pay into an account which is registered to the client. In an attempt to expedite matters, SASSA requested Post Bank to open accounts for the clients where the account details could not be verified.

Challenges experienced with the provision of banking details include the capturing of incorrect banking details (wrong account numbers, which could be attributed to finger faults or wrong account types). Unfortunately this delays the process of being able to pay the clients.

To date SASSA has paid 4 423 387 clients of the 4 424 720 approved for May. There are currently 1 333 clients who qualify for payment for the month of May which SASSA still needs to pay. The breakdown of this number is as follows:

826 clients who have recently provided SASSA with their banking details are with National Treasury for account verification with the banks.

The 507 remaining clients for May have been sent to a team of SASSA officials who are currently actively assisting these clients to provide SASSA with their banking details and correct personal details. They will be paid as and when the required information has been received and verified.

It is extremely important to note that the number of May applicants who are approved and paid for the grant might still increase as more applicants correct their banking information or even as SASSA proceeds with its reconsideration process. It therefor does not mean that SASSA did not pay all people months later, but should rather be seen as SASSA being able to increase the accessibility to the grant as SASSA assists these clients through reconsideration.

The validation process for every application is redone monthly, to ensure that everyone paid does indeed qualify for the grant.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 1853 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

21 September 2020 - NW1871

Profile picture: Mofokeng, Ms JM

Mofokeng, Ms JM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Regarding the legislation which will be dealing with gender-based violence and femicide (GBVF)(details furnished), what (a) progress has his department made with regard to drafting the legislation and (b) will be the classification of GBVF in the Schedule?

Reply:

a) In September 2019, President Ramaphosa announced a 5-point emergency plan to tackle gender-based violence and one of the key elements is enhancing the legal framework in order to strengthen the response of the State to GBV.

With this in mind, Department of Justice and Constitutional Development is intensifying the fight against GBV and femicide and have prepared three pieces of draft legislation. The three Bills were approved by Cabinet on the 5th of August and will be introduced into Parliament soon.

The Bills are aimed at amending a number of Acts to prevent and combat GBV and offences committed against vulnerable persons, and to provide for additional procedures to reduce secondary victimisation of vulnerable persons in court proceedings. These Bills are -

1. The Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act Amendment Bill:

This Bill seeks to give further effect to the 5-point emergency plan by, amongst others, introducing a new offence of sexual intimidation.

Currently the law provides that there is an obligation to report to the police the commission of a sexual offence against a child or a person who is mentally disabled. A person who has “knowledge” that a sexual offence was committed against a child must immediately report such knowledge. On the other hand, a person who has “knowledge, reasonable belief or suspicion” that a sexual offence was committed against a person who is mentally disabled must immediately report it to the police. The Bill now aims to ensure that the reporting duty is the same in respect of both groups.

With regards to the National Register for Sex Offenders (“the NRSO”), the law currently provides that the particulars of persons who have been convicted of sexual offences against children and persons who are mentally disabled, are to be registered on the NRSO and it prohibits persons whose particulars are on the NRSO from working with or having access to children or persons who are mentally disabled.

The Bill expands the scope of the NRSO to include the particulars of all sex offenders, in other words not only sex offenders against children and persons who are mentally disabled. It expands the ambit to include other vulnerable persons, such as female persons between the ages of 18 and 25, persons with disabilities and persons who are 60 years of age or older who, for example, receive community based care and support services.

It also makes provision for certain particulars of persons who have been convicted of sexual offences to be made publicly available and increases the periods for which sex offenders’ particulars must remain on the NRSO before they can be removed.

2. The Domestic Violence Amendment Bill

In 1999 the Domestic Violence Act was lauded as a progressive tool in the armoury against the abuse of women, but since then challenges relating to implementation of the Act have been identified.

This Amendment Bill will amend the Domestic Violence Act, in order to address practical challenges, gaps and anomalies which have been identified in practice during the implementation of the Act. It aims to optimise collaboration between relevant functionaries to streamline the provision of services to survivors. Interventions included in the Bill are the mandatory reporting of cases of domestic violence, screening, counseling, a referral to suitable shelters and the provision of medical treatment.

It also introduces electronic applications for protection orders which will allow for applications for protection orders to be made outside of ordinary court hours, thereby giving complainants of domestic violence speedy relief.

It also extends the protection for domestic violence to the elderly, places a duty on anyone who is aware that an act of domestic violence has been committed to report it, provides for mandatory arrest and prosecution where there is physical violence or a weapon is used, and increases the penalties for convictions for offences emanating from domestic violence.

Alcohol abuse fuels domestic violence. The Amendment Bill obliges a court to order the seizure of any weapon, recognises the role that alcohol plays in violence and enables the court to hold an enquiry whereby a perpetrator can be referred for treatment. It further aligns itself with mirror provisions in the Protection from Harassment Act.

3. The Criminal and Related Matters Amendment Bill:

This Amendment Bill seeks to amend numerous Acts intended to address GBV and offences committed against vulnerable persons and aims to reduce secondary victimization of vulnerable persons in court proceedings.


Currently, the intermediary service is available to a child witness or complainant in criminal proceedings. The intermediary service is currently not available to any other witness or complainant who may be exposed to similar undue mental stress or trauma. The proposed new amendments aim to extend the intermediary service.

It provides that a presiding judicial officer may appoint an intermediary in order to enable a witness under the biological or mental age of eighteen years, a witness who suffers from a physical, psychological, mental or emotional condition, or a witness who is an older person to give their evidence through that intermediary, if it appears to the court that the proceedings would expose the witness to undue stress, trauma or suffering if he or she testifies.

The Bill further provides that in respect of an offence against a person in a domestic relationship an accused may not be released on bail before his or her first appearance in a lower court. The definition of a "domestic relationship" is wide and provides for many different types of relationships.

The Bill further tightens up provisions relating to the granting of bail in respect of such offences, the placement of a person who has been sentenced in respect of such offences on parole, the powers of the State to appeal inadequate sentences that are imposed for such offences, the ability of the SAPS to arrest, the prescribed discretionary minimum sentences that may be imposed for such offences, and the protection of victims of such offences against victimisation during legal proceedings.

b) GBV comes in different forms, depending on the circumstances of each case. It can therefore take the form of various different offences, such as assault, assault with the intent to do grievous bodily harm, attempted murder, intimidation, stalking, various sexual offences and so forth. The different offences will therefore fall under different Schedules in the legislation.

What is important to note is that the Criminal and Related Matters Amendment Bill aims to ensure that the discretionary minimum sentences dispensation would apply, amongst others, to the offences of murder, where the death of the victim resulted from physical or sexual abuse as contemplated in the definition of “domestic violence”.

21 September 2020 - NW1889

Profile picture: Maotwe, Ms OMC

Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the reasons that (a) The grievance lodged by a certain person (name furnished) regarding the interdict of the appointment of Eskom Group Treasurer was ignored, (b) Eskom misled the chairperson of the grievance process by supplying an incorrect advert of the position and (c) A certain person (name furnished) was a member of the interview panel that appointed Eskom Treasurer when the specified person is not a member of the board or an employee of Eskom? NW2397E

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a) The Grievance was attended to in line with the Eskom HR Management priscipts and the outcome was provided to the aggrieved employee.

(b) The advert that had been provided initially was the copy of the working draft. The error was corrected when it was posted out. There were no material differences between the working draft and final version published.

 

Table 1: Comparison of pdf copy of the advert vs advert on the Eskom recruitment site

 

Advert on the pdf copy

Advert  on       the  Eskom        recruitment

portal

Position: GM TREASURY

Position Task Grade: EEE – GENERAL MANAGER

Purpose: Ensure Eskom has necessary policies, strategies, processes and systems to optimize Eskom’s financial liquidity through providing an effective Treasury function.

Business Unit: Office of the CE/Chairman

Location: Megawatt Park Reference Number: 041120191 Closing Date: 07 November 2019 Line Manager: Jabu Mabuza

Position : GM Treasury Task Grade : E-Band

Area of Specialization: Ensure Eskom has necessary policies, strategies, processes and systems to optimize Eskom’s financial liquidity through providing an effective Treasury function.

Department : Chief Financial Officer Business Unit : Office of the CFO              Location : South Africa (Gauteng)              Reference Number : 041120191 Closing Date : Monday, 11 November 2019

 

(c) The Eskom recruitment and selection process make provision for a subject matter expect to form part of an interview panel. Ms Ramos was brought in on this basis.

None of the candidates of the candidates interviewed expressed discomfort or objected to discomfort with the composition of the interview panel.

21 September 2020 - NW2150

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1107 on 22 June 2020, a certain person (name furnished) (a) took and (b) was approved for sabbatical leave on more than one occasion prior to 9 February 2018 to 8 February 2019; if so, what are the relevant details (2) whether the sabbatical leave of the specified person was approved in line with the regulations of the Department of Public Service and Administration; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) for how long was the leave taken and (b) on what date was each leave segment taken?

Reply:

I am advised by the Department that:

1. The sabbatical leave was not taken. The employee in question was granted an International Scholarship and sabbatical leave was approved for this purpose for the period 1 October 2017 until 30 September 2018. Due to personal circumstances, the employee could not take up the scholarship and returned to work on 27 November 2017 and the sabbatical leave for the period 1 October 2017 until 24 November 2017 was subsequently converted to unpaid leave and is being recovered.

2. The sabbatical leave for the period 9 February 2018 to 8 February 2019 was approved in line with the Departmental policy on sabbatical leave as the Department of Public Service and Administration does not specifically provide for sabbatical leave, but allows departments to determine their own sabbatical leave policies.

a) The original approval was granted for a period of 12 months, from 9 February 2018 until 8 February 2019. The Accouting Officer did, however, approve a deviation from the 12 months consecutive sabbatical leave to allow for taking the leave in non-consecutive intervals as and when required, provided that the total period of leave taken does not exceed 12 months (261 working days). However, the employee took 249 working days out of the 261 working days; and

b) A breakdown of each period taken is provided in the table below:

2018

Period

No. of working days

09.02.2018 – 22.02.2018

10

27.02.2018 – 07.03.2018

7

29.03.2018 – 10.05.2018

27

01.06.2018 – 22.06.2018

16

02.07.2018 – 06.07.2018

5

13.08.2018 – 31.08.2018

15

10.09.2018 – 18.09.2018

7

12.11.2018 – 26.11.2018

11

 

98 working days

2019

21.01.2019 – 08.02.2019

15

18.02.2019 – 29.03.2019

29

08.04.2019 – 16.04.2019

7

06.05.2019 – 14.05.2019

6

10.06.2019 – 21.06.2019

9

26.06.2019 – 28.06.2019

3

08.07.2019 - 30.07.2019

17

31.07.2019 – 04.09.2019

25

06.09.2019 – 20.09.2019

11

23.09.2019

1

25.09.2019

1

03.10.2019 – 08.11.2019

27

 

151 working days

Total working days taken

249 working days

-END-

21 September 2020 - NW1093

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the current status of the special Covid-19 Anti-Corruption unit; (2) whether the specified unit has been set up; if not, why not; if so, (a) to whom does it report and (b) what number of cases are currently under investigation and/or being prosecuted?

Reply:

1. No dedicated COVID-19 Anti-Corruption Unit has been established.

2. Instead, the President has requested the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) Cluster to consider establishing measures through which corruption emanating from COVID-19, both in terms of procurement as well as the implementation of the COVID-19 stimulus package announced by the President, could be dealt with.

a) The NatJoints Command Centre which comprises Directors-General in the Security Cluster and the Directors-General from other Departments directly affected by COVID-19, including National Treasury, have discussed measures meant to prioritize measures aimed at COVID-19 Anti-Corruption cases. The coordination is done through the Anti-Corruption Task Team (ACTT).

The Special Investigating Unit (SIU), the Financial Intelligence Centre and the National Prosecuting Authority, are members of the ACTT.

b) In addition, the SIU has requested that the President issue a Proclamation to enable the SIU to investigate COVID-19 related corruption.

It can therefore be deduced from the work under way that the existing law enforcement agencies have the ability and the competence to deal with COVID-19 related corruption.

Therefore, there is no compelling reason for the establishment of a Special COVID-19 Anti-Corruption Unit at this stage.

21 September 2020 - NW1746

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether his department and/or the entities reporting to him currently provide free basic electricity under programmes other than the Free Basic Electricity programme; if not, why not; if so, (a) to whom and (b) what are the relevant details; (2) whether the installation and maintenance of electricity prepaid meters would be (a) subsidised or (b) free under certain parameters; if not, why not; if so, (i) under what parameters and (ii) what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department and/or the entities reporting to him prescribe electricity tariffs and rates to municipalities in order to ensure that the most vulnerable and indigent communities receive free basic electricity; if not, why not; if so, (a) in what manner and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No the Department of Public Enterprises and its entities do not provide free basic electricity under programmes other than the Free Basic Electricity (FBE) programme.

(1)(a) Not applicable (1)(b) Not applicable

(2)(a) Under the FBE programme, installation and maintenance of electricity prepaid meters is not subsidised.

(2)(a)(i) and (ii) Not applicable

(2)(b)(i) and (ii) The installation of electricity prepaid meters is free under the Government’s Integrated National Electrification Programme (INEP). INEP is funded by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as per the Division of Revenue Act, 2013 (Act No.2 of 2013) schedule 6.

Eskom maintains prepaid electricity meters. Eskom has a maintenance budget for repairs and maintenance for its infrastructure and this is allocated from the tariff.

(3) Eskom does not prescribe electricity tariffs and rates to any of its customers but charge all its customers tariffs approved by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA). The Electricity Regulation Act prohibits Eskom from charging its customers any other tariffs other than those approved by NERSA.

(3) (a) Not Applicable

(3) (b) Not Applicable

18 September 2020 - NW2085

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether, given that not much has changed between this year and the last in terms of the gender-based violence (GBV) cases reported in the Republic, her Office has taken any additional steps at monitoring incidents of GBV in order to protect the most vulnerable members of society, which is also aimed to yield different results; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

Gender-based violence (GBV) is a social ill which continues to plaque South Africa and Government and civil society have to remain committed to making our country safe for women across ages, gender and sexual identities, disability and geographic location. Cases of GBV are reported to service delivery departments such as the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the Department of Social Development.

In March 2020 Cabinet approved the National Strategic Plan on Gender-based Violence (NSPGBVF) and the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities was tasked to Chair an Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) on the implementation of the NSP on GBVF and the National Council for GBVF (NCGBVF). Further, the IMC also include the Ministers of Justice and Correctional Services, Police, Pubic Service and Administration Social Development and Finance.

The IMC is responsible for providing leadership, enforcing and coordinating all efforts towards the implementation of NSPGBVF by all government departments. The Departments of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities and Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation have put in place a Monitoring and Evaluation Plan which ensures that weekly reports on GBVF are provided to the President.

Through the Emergency Response Action Plan (ERAPP) that was launched by the President towards the end of 2019, the number of shelters and care centres for GBV survivors were increased, the capacity of the police to deal with crimes of sexual violence as well as services to women who have to go through the criminal justice system were improved. All efforts are contributing in protecting the most vulnerable members of our society.

Since May 2020 the IMC have started implementing the NSPGBVF and all government departments will be accountable to Parliament on implementing the NSPGBVF.

18 September 2020 - NW1065

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has taken into account that due to more movement under alert level 3 and the increased number of commuters who will be using the extremely limited public transport system, the percentage limits on buses and taxis remain the same and yet only one train line has been opened in each area with Metrorail; if so, has (a) he found that the percentage limits and limited train lines will meet the transport needs of commuters and (b) the cost discrepancy between taking the subsidised bus and/or train versus the unsubsidised taxis been considered, especially since the poorest members of the public make up the bulk of commuters?

Reply:

a) In Alert level 3 taxis and buses were allowed to carry 100% of their licensed capacity, there were no limitations.

PRASA resumed its Metrorail Operation on 01 July 2020, in all Regions (Western Cape, Eastern Cape, KwaZulu Natal and Gauteng) in line with the level 3 lockdown regulations, governed by the risk adjustment strategy implemented by the Government in an attempt to limit the spread of Corona virus pandemic. The Metrorail services resumed in the following corridors at 30% capacity in line with the regulations:

Western Cape: Cape Town - Retreat (Wynberg)

KwaZulu-Natal: Durban – Umlazi, Durban - Kwamashu

Gauteng Pienaarspoort - Pretoria

Eastern Cape Port Elizabeth –Uitenhage and East London - Berlin

In response to the increase in public transport demand the loading capacity of Metrorail has been increased from 50% to 70% on 22 July 2020.The provision of Metrorail services has, however, been constraint due to the high level of vandalism and theft of rail infrastructure and assets.

Metrorail services will gradually resume in line with the PRASA adopted infrastructure and security plan and in compliance with COVID-19 Directions. The focus will be on corridors with high passenger demand and with less repair work required on vandalised infrastructure and station facilities.

18 September 2020 - NW2013

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa is currently engaged in any process of insourcing security personnel; if so, what is the total number of (a) security personnel to be insourced and (b) the existing security personnel that will be insourced?

Reply:

a) The number of security officers to be insourced are 3100; and

b) The existing number of insourced security officials are 2420.

17 September 2020 - NW1971

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) How many tonnes of ammunition that is currently stored at 97 Ammunition Depot in De Aar have become old and less accurate, have reached the end of their shelf life-span and/or the explosives have supposedly begun to crystallise, (b) what are the calibres of the specified ammunition, (c) what number of each type of ammunition is at the depot and (d) what are the manufacturing dates of the ammunition; (2) whether her department intends to take steps to remove the ageing ammunition; if not, why not; if so, (a) what steps and (b) how long will it take to complete the specified steps; (3) whether the lightning conductors at the specified depot is serviced annually; If not, (a) why not and (b) what number of ammunition depots’ lightning conductors (i) have been fully serviced and/or (ii) must still be serviced this year; (4) whether the security of the area complies with all requirements for ammunition depots; if not, why not; if so, who is responsible for the security?

Reply:

(1) Most of the ammunition at the depot is old, but the ammunition is however not unstable. The life cycle of ammunition is not given in years, and it cannot be predetermined when ammunition reaches the end of life, or even when it will start to become unstable. For that reason annual inspections and functional testing are executed by the South African National Defence Force (SANDF). Various factors however influence the time span on how ammunition age and potentially become unsafe. The two worst case environments for explosives are heat and humidity, and therefore the controlled storage inside the licensed ammunition warehouses is. Annual inspections and testing are executed against specifications, designed for each type and configuration of ammunition to ensure both functioning as well as safety. Furthermore unserviceable ammunition is ammunition that is not functioning within specification, but it is still safe for storage, handling and transport. There are serviceable and unserviceable ammunition in the depot, where the backlog on disposal is on the unserviceable ammunition. There is no unstable ammunition in the depot. As soon as there is an indication from the annual testing and inspection that the possibility of ammunition become unsafe is there, these ammunition is destroyed or even sold back to the original equipment manufacturer before it could become unstable, in order to ensure that there is no safety implication from old ammunition in the depots.

At 97 Ammunition Depot there are approximately 8 000 tons (Nett Explosive Content) of unserviceable ammunition, measured in the explosive weight of the ammunition. This is primarily made up of small arms ammunition, mortar ammunition, hand and rifle grenades, aircraft bombs, artillery shells and medium calibre ammunition. The tonnage changes on a daily basis as ammunition is sold or destroyed, or as ammunition are regraded due to the inspections and dynamic testing. The phase out of weapon systems also has an influence on these tonnages.

(2) Ammunition is stored according to predetermined safety groupings in various designed for and licenced ammunition warehouses. These are designed to contain a possible explosion to those specific warehouses, and are thus traversed with a minimum safety distance to the next warehouse. The licence of each warehouse will indicate what types of ammunition can be stored there, as well as the maximum quantity of each type, in order to ensure the containment of a possible explosion. There are also an outside safety distance, taking into account all ammunition and explosives in all warehouses, to ensure the safety of personnel and infrastructure outside the depot. There is furthermore no ammunition or explosives stored in field storage, which could nullify this safety distances.

The department will carry on with the following steps to manage and reduce the ageing of ammunition. While the under mentioned steps will drastically reduce the old ammunition in the depot during the next 8 years, the ammunition will be able to be stored, handled and transported safely due to the storage conditions and annual management and prioritisation of the ammunition processes :

a. Continue with the annual inspections and dynamic testing in order to prioritise the disposal of potential unsafe ammunition.

b. Continue with the annual surveillance and chemical analyses of the propellant program, as was done for more than 10 years already, in conjunction with the industry.

c. Continue with ammunition disposal of approximately 1000 tons a year by means of sales through Armscor, which include aircraft bombs, 68mm

obsolete rockets, medium calibre ammunition and 90mm redundant ammunition, as well as conventional destruction of all other types of ammunition.

d. The conclusion of the upgrading and maintenance contract of the inert deforming facility, which was done over the past three years, followed by the already planned expansion of the facility to include explosive filled breakdown of ammunition, with the 140mm ammunition as a pilot project, over the next 4 years.

e. The rework of the mortar bombs on a new charge and tail configuration, which will upgrade the bombs from an obsolete and unserviceable condition to a serviceable condition for force preparation and force employment.

f. The placement of a destruction contract for small arms ammunition on the original equipment manufacturer is also in process as was twice done in the past.

(3) All ammunition depots and installations are to meet the requirements in terms of SANS Code of Practice 10313 of 2012, in conjunction with SANS 62305 and IEC Standards. Currently the lightning conductors are not certified. During April 2019 a process commenced to rectify these requirements. A Scope of Work and motivations were submitted to the Procurement Board, and service providers were invited on various occasions during 2020 for quotations in order to certify the lightning conductors. All three ammunition depots’ contracts have been approved for the annual service of the lightning conductors, and contractors has thus already been appointed. All funding has been put in place for these contracts, and all lightning conductors at the various depots will be certified and serviceable after the completion of this process by the contracted supplier. The Department of Defence is in the process of outsourcing the training of members in the assessment, testing, repair, maintenance and certification of the lightning conductors within the Department. The capability would thus be beneficial to the Department in the long term, as all other facilities would also be internally serviced in terms of laid down prescripts. This training should be completed in the next academic year.

(4) At the depot there is an outside perimeter fence, a three tier high security fence, guards as well as a two lock system on each of the ammunition warehouses, with all ammunition locked in warehouses. The high security fence consists of a three tier fence system, of which the middle fence is an electrical fence. The lapse of a maintenance contract entails that electricity of this fence is shut down. The three tier fence, inclusive of the gates, are however still serviceable and in working condition. Additional guards have been put in place to enhance security while the electrical fence is switched off. The maintenance of the high security fence is currently effectively executed by SANDF personnel. Once the project to upgrade the high security fences is finalised, a maintenance contract for the new fences and systems will be awarded again, as the SANDF does not have the capability to manage the electrical fence.

17 September 2020 - NW1999

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether she has been informed that soldiers belonging to the 4 Parachute Battalion which was established in 2014 have invested in houses and established their families in schools and the community; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, has consideration been given to (a) costs and (b) trauma that will come as a result of resettling the families in Bulembu; (2) whether her department will assist with the costs to resettle the families in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the costs involved?

Reply:

1. 4 Parachute Battalion was never established in 2014, members of 44 Parachute Regiment were sent to the North West from Bloemfontein as part of the team to compile a feasibility study for the establishment of 4 Parachute Battalion, (a) and (b) all members of the SANDF, on enrolment into the organisation, are fully aware that they will be utilised where the organisation requires their services and cannot be declared area-bound.

2. Whenever the ministerial authority is obtained for the establishment of 4 Parachute Battalion, or any other unit, anywhere in the Republic, members have access, through HR policies to resettle their families, within prescripts of the DOD. Resettlement benefits to which members are entitled to include: subsistence and travel expenses for the official and one direct member of his/her family to the new place of work prior to the date of transfer; subsistence and travel of the official and the household arising from the transfer to the new place of work; removal of household and personal effects from the old place of work to the new workplace in the Republic, resettlement costs; transfer fees and bond cost, if the official purchases a dwelling or building site at the new place of work within the same metropolitan area (subject to policy requirements); for each school-going child who must change school and who is dependent on the official, the DOD may provide a once-off amount for new school uniforms (clothing and footwear); interim accommodation, if the official and the immediate family must rent interim furnished accommodation at the old and/or new place of work; travel expenses of dependent schoolchildren and 50% financial assistance with boarding school and lodging fees on transfer, if the child must remain in a school near the official’s former place of work.

17 September 2020 - NW2027

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to reports that hospitals in North West do not have adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) to handle deceased persons, what quantity of PPEs have been provided to North West hospitals; (2) what are the details of the breakdown of the supply of PPEs that were delivered to each public health facility in the North West?

Reply:

1. Provincial Departments of Health must order PPEs from suppliers listed on the Central Supplier Database in accordance with National Treasury guidelines on specifications and price. The National Department of Health does not order or pay for the PPEs ordered.

The information below was extracted from the provincial stock visibility system from the North West Province. The table includes the quantities of the various PPEs by facility as at 11 September 2020.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW1976

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of doctors in the Public Service are unable to perform their duties, because they are either over the age of 60 or have underlying illnesses that make them vulnerable to Covid-19 and (b) steps has he taken to replace them?

Reply:

(a) The total number of Medical Doctors in the Public Health Sector, reported by the Provincial Departments of Health as being over the age of 60 is 810, and the number of doctors that are over the age of 60 and/or have underlying illnesses that make them vulnerable to Covid-19 is 250;

(b) The table outlines the steps taken by Provinces in each affected District/Regions to replace them:

 

EASTERN CAPE

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

Alfred Ndzo

2

During this Covid-19 pandemic period the Province appointed an additional 81 (on either permanent or short term contract) medical doctors to strengthen services during Surge.

 

Joe Gqabi:

2

 

Dora Nginza Regional Hospital:

1

 

TOTAL

5

 

FREE STATE

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

 Free State Province

0

Not applicable

 

Total

0

 

GAUTENG

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

Gauteng Province

102

During this Covid-19 pandemic period the Province appointed an additional 473 (on either permanent or short term contract) medical doctors to strengthen services during Surge.

Total

102

 

KWAZULU NATAL

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

 KwaZulu Natal

0

Not applicable

 

Total

0

 

LIMPOPO

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

 Limpopo

0

Not applicable

 

Total

0

 

MPUMALANGA

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

Mpumalanga Province

0

Not applicable

 

Total

0

 

NORTH WEST

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

NgakaModiriMolema

3

During this Covid-19 pandemic period the Province appointed an additional 128 (on either permanent or short term contract) medical doctors to strengthen services during Surge.                        

 

Bojanala

17

 

Dr KK

1

 

Dr RSM

0

 

Total

21

 

NORTHERN CAPE

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

PixleyKaSeme District

1

During this Covid-19 pandemic period the Province appointed an additional 166 (on either permanent or short term contract) medical doctors to strengthen services during Surge.                        

 

Total

1

 

WESTERN CAPE

Institution/District/Region

Total number of doctors recorded

Steps taken to replace them:

GENSES and EMS

6

During this Covid-19 pandemic period the Province appointed an additional 82 (on either permanent or short term contract) medical doctors to strengthen services during Surge.                        

 

GSH

20

 

Metro

29

 

Rural

29

 

RXH

14

 

Tygerberg Hospital

23

 

Total

121

 

END.

17 September 2020 - NW2030

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

In view of many recent reports of family members burying the wrong body instead of their loved ones, what (a) measures are put in place to ensure that undertakers do not mix up dead bodies as strain on the sector increases with the steep rise in Covid-19 deaths and (b) security measures are placed at the mortuaries to ensure the safety of bodies?

Reply:

a) The Department has made provision in the Health Directions published on the 17 July 2020, paragraph 9(5) which states that: “once in the hospital or private mortuary, the body bag may be opened for family members (one at a time) to view the human remains”. This provision allows family members to view their loved ones and the current standard of labelling human remains still applies and there should not be challenges if everyone plays their roles. The normal practice of viewing human remains at home out of the mortuary is considered high risk and therefore prohibited to protect the funeral attendees.

b) All funeral undetakers are required to have a certificate of competence in order to operate. This certificate ensures that mortuary premises meet the minimum standards provided in the regulations. Government cannot provide security services to these facilities as they are privately operated but owners can provide such security services. Government mortuaries are within health facilities and most of these facilites have access control.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW2025

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) are the reasons for performing Covid-19 tests on corpses and (b)(i) are the full details and (ii) is the total number of Covid-19 tests that were performed on corpses; (2) whether he has found this practice to be a waste of resources; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a)-(b) (i) The testing of deceased persons applies only to persons that have died of natural causes outside of a health facility where their COVID status is not known. The reason for performing this test is to protect the close contacts of the deceased should the person have been positive then the close contacts may be infected. Secondly our death statistics for COVID do not include persons that had died of COVID outside of a health facility since nobody was aware if they were infected with COVID. This data will allow us to include deaths of persons outside of health facilities that are COVID positive.

(b) (ii) The NHLS informs us that there were 86 tests performed on deceased persons to date, of which 13 tests were positive.

(2) The practice cannot be considered to be a waste of resources given that testing a deceased person for COVID-19 would assist in halting the spread of the infection from their contacts to others.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW2008

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether the credit limit on any of the credit cards issued to any staff member employed by any entity reporting to her has ever been exceeded since it was issued; if so, in each case, what (a) (i) was the limit and (ii) by what amount was the limit exceeded and (b) is the current balance of each of the specified credit cards?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SOEs as follows:

Except for .zaDNA, the entities have indicated that credit cards were not issued to staff members. The .zaDNA credit card was never used.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

           

17 September 2020 - NW1972

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What are the details of the criminal complaint lodged against the Surgeon-general in terms of case number 275/5/2020 at the Temba Police Station; (2) whether the Surgeon-general has already appeared in court in this regard; if so, (a) what number of times and (b) on which dates; (3) whether the Surgeon-general is still in service; if not, what (a) type of leave has been granted to him and (b) are the starting and end dates of the specified leave; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Surgeon General was arrested and charged for possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition on 17 May 2020. It was later found that the firearm was licenced and belonged to his late father who had passed away four weeks prior the incident. Through his legal representative, the Surgeon General provided all the proof needed by the prosecuting authority which included the following:

The deceased licence of firearm.

His father’s death certificate.

Proof that he was nominated as the executor of his late father’s estate.

The above, and also the fact that all this occurred at a time during which there was a firearm amnesty for the handing over of any illegal firearms to the South African Police Service, prompted the Senior Prosecutor to withdraw the charges against the Surgeon General for lack of evidence to prosecute.

The Surgeon General appeared in court after the day of arrest and was due to appear again on the 7th of August 2020, but due to COVID-19, could not attend and the case was postponed to 20 August 2020. It was on this date that the charges against the Surgeon General were formally withdrawn.

The Surgeon General is currently on sick leave and he is still in full service and has never been put on special leave.

17 September 2020 - NW2056

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there is Covid-19 testing in mortuaries for deaths by natural causes not determined in other facilities such as hospitals; if so, what number of Covid-19-related deaths have been determined at the mortuaries, besides the number of deaths that were already confirmed to be related to Covid-19?

Reply:

COVID-19 testing of the deceased persons is not conducted in mortuaries, however, specimen collection is done at mortuaries according to the Guidelines for COVID-19 Postmortem Testing. The specimens for COVID-19 Postmortem Testing are transported to the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) for testing.

The testing of the deceased persons applies only to persons that have died of natural causes outside of a health facility where their COVID status is not known. The reason for performing this test is to protect the close contacts of the deceased should the person have been positive then the close contacts may be infected. Secondly our death statistics for COVID do not include persons that had died of COVID outside of a health facility since nobody was aware if they were infected with COVID or not. This data will allow us to include deaths of persons outside of health facilities that are COVID positive.

According to the data from the NHLS there were 75 COVID-19 tests performed on deceased persons to date, of which 12 tests were positive.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW1968

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the concerns he raised on the harmful effects of alcohol, he will consider moving for an alcohol tax to fund the impact of alcohol on the budget of his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, can such funds be used to build treatment centres, especially for use over weekends?

Reply:

The proposal of using taxes from alcohol to fund healthcare services is referring to as earmarking. The earmarking is usually legislated and would usually lead to all or a portion of the funds being used to finance healthcare services in general or a specific aspect of healthcare, e.g messaging on the harmful effects of alcohol. This legislative mandate lies with the Minister of Finance.

Historically the National Department of Health has raised the earmarking of sin taxes (alcohol, tobacco, sugar) as an option with the National Treasury. The National Treasury has been reluctant to accept the earmarking proposal citing the following reasons:

  • It introduces rigidities in the budgetary process, limiting availability of funds for alternative and (sometimes) more urgent purposes;
  • Can lead to waste of resources when not carefully planned by recipient institution/ programme;
  • When tax revenue collection is low then the dependent programme will be negatively affected;
  • This may result in fragmentation of pooling and similar demands from other sectors;
  • Will eventually shrink as consumption of harmful/unhealthy products declines.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW1959

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) By what date does his department intend to build the gateway clinic that the George Mukhari Hospital management requested his department to build in order to take care of the health needs of the community and lessen the burden on the hospital and (b) what plans are put in place to ease the pressure on the George Mukhari Hospital?

Reply:

a) The estimated time-frame for the completion of the project is 6-8 months including the planning, budget allocation, approval of drawings, submission and approval of site development plans to the City of Tshwane.

b) The Project Initiation report (PIR) was submitted to the end-user for approval in early 2020 with several subsequent revisions. The plan at this time includes an Onsite birthing unit, short stay ward and 24-hour clinic with a Radiology unit. Currently the final PIR is drafted following meetings held with the end-users and some concept drawings that were provided to the end-user for approval. The final draft of the PIR was submitted to the end-user for approval on the 10th September 2020. The planned unit will be a modular Alternative Built Technology structure. The budget allocation will only be approved once the PIR is approved by the HOD.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW1965

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)From which (a) countries and/or (b) organisations did the Republic receive relief for Covid-19, including donations of medical equipment and personal protective equipment and materials; (2) (a) what was the extent of such donations in terms of items and quantities in each case and (b)(i) where were the specified items deployed and (ii) in what quantities; (3) whether any assistance was rendered to other countries in the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what (a) was the extent of the assistance and (b) are the relevant details in each case; (4) whether any of the material received as foreign aid was diverted to other countries in the form of assistance; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. (a) List of Countries from which donations were received
  • Peoples Republic of China
  • Germany
  • Denmark
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Republic of Korea
  • United States of America
  • Turkey
  • France

(b) List of organisations from whom donations were received

  • The African Union
  • Naspers
  • First National Bank
  • United Pharmaceutical Distributers
  • Gift of the Givers
  • European Union
  • World Health Organization (WHO)
  • Ford Motor Company
  • Solidarity Fund
  • S A Society of Anaesthesiology
  • Motsepe Foundation
  • Jack Ma Foundation
  • Bank of Republic of China
  • Province of Hannan
  • Hikvision (Pty) Ltd S A
  • Right to Care (CHW Programme)
  • AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals (Pty) Ltd
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Days
  • Old Mutual
  • Luke International
  • Syntech Love Technology
  • Huawei
  • UVEX Safety SA (PTY) LTD
  • Frasers
  • Phillips
  • KFW
  • Global Energy Interconnection Dev & Co-op
  • The Foundation for Professional Development (funded by KFW German Development Bank)
  • Individual donors

(2) (a)-(b) The table belows reflect the details in this regard.

(3) Yes, the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) donated nasopharyngeal swabs and viral transport media to Namibia

a) extent of the donation

b) details of the donation

5 000

Nasopharyngeal swabs

2 000

Viral transport media

(4) No, no material received was diverted to other countries as foreign aid.

a) Not applicable

bb) Not applicable

(5) We do make statements when receiving donations and we will continue doing so as and when required.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW1975

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Health

Given that in Pacaltsdorp in George in the Western Cape there is only one clinic that must serve four wards, how does he intend to ensure that everyone in the specified area will have access to good and proper medical care?

Reply:

Pacaltsdorp Clinic is centrally located in Pacaltsdorp and provides a comprehensive service to a community of about 23 000 people.

Plans are afoot to upgrade the facility through the NHI project funded by the National Department of Health. In the proposed new clinic, the following upgrading will be included: eleven (11) consultation rooms, a pharmacy with a chronic dispensing unit, an emergency room and a multi-purpose room for meetings. These will all form part of the project. It is envisaged that the upgrades to the facility will extend infrastructure capacity to continue providing quality comprehensive primary health services to the community.

END.

17 September 2020 - NW1998

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether she has been informed of the (a) closure of the 4 Parachute Battalion at Bofulanare, Mafikeng, and (b) re-establishing of these as 2nd Regular Parachute Battalion at Bulembu, Eastern Cape; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so; what are the strategic benefits of the specified closure and re-establishment given the expected resettlement cost of approximately R10 to R20 million; (2) given the financial and budget deficit of her department and the SA National Defence Force, how does she justify the expense which can be regarded as non-essential in this period?

Reply:

1. No, as no ministerial authority has been obtained, yet. (a) there can be no closure of 4 Parachute Battalion as it was never established in Bofulanare, Mafikeng and (b) No, the establishment of a Parachute Battalion in Bulembu, Eastern Cape, is yet to obtain ministerial authority, the project is currently at a feasibility study stage and its strategic benefits will be made visible on the conclusion of the feasibility study.

2. While the SANDF is cognisant of the prevailing budgetary constraints, it has the Constitutional mandate to deliver on the protection of the country, its territorial integrity and its people, therefore, the conduct of this feasibility study is in the spirit of fulfilling this mandate.

17 September 2020 - NW1987

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether she and/or the State Information Technology Agency (SITA) have been informed of these two tenders (a) SAT154/19 for Google Marketing platform licence and implementation and (b) SAT149/20 for the provision of support and maintenance of a Microsoft CRM solution; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) did SITA participate in the tenders and (ii) what are the reasons that the agency was unsuccessful in securing the bids if SITA did participate?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department and SITA as follows:

(a) & (b) The Minister and SITA were not informed of the two tenders. The South African Tourism (SAT) is not bound by the SITA Act and is not obliged by the Act to procure from or through SITA unless SAT request to do so.

(i) No, SITA has not participated in these tenders.

(ii) Not applicable.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

          

17 September 2020 - NW2007

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What are the relevant details of each official credit card issued to any staff member employed by any entity reporting to her; (2) in respect of each specified credit card, (a) what is the (i) name and (ii) organogram position of the user, (iii) maximum permissible value of each purchase and (iv) total credit limit of the card and (b) what are the (i) relevant details of permissible purchases for which each credit card may be used and (ii) reasons that each specified person was issued with a credit card? NW2568E

Reply:

I have been advised by the SOEs as follows:

1.

Entity

Details of official credit card issued

zaDNA

The official credit card issued to Mr Peter Madavhu in his capacity as Acting CEO

SAPO

No official credit card issued to any employee

Postbank

No official credit card issued to any employee

Nemisa

No official credit card issued to any employee

USAASA

No official credit card issued to employees

FPB

No official credit card issued to any employee

BBI

No official credit card issued to any employee

SITA

No official credit card issued to any employee

ICASA

No official credit card issued to any employee

SABC

No official credit card issued to any employee

Sentech

No official credit card issued to any employee

2. (a)

Entity

(i)Name

(ii)Organogram

(iii)

(iv)

zaDNA

Mr Peter Madavhu

Acting CEO

Never used

R200 000

USAASA

Not applicable

     

Nemisa

Not applicable

     

BBI

Not applicable

     

SABC

Not applicable

     

ICASA

Not applicable

     

Postbank

Not Applicable

     

FPB

Not Applicable

     

Sentech

Not applicable

     

SITA

Not applicable

     

SAPO

Not applicable

     

(b) (i) (ii) zaDNA indicated that the official credit card was never utilised by Mr Madavhu who was the Acting CEO. This section of the Parliamentary Question is not applicable to other entities based on their response to number 1.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

17 September 2020 - NW2009

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

In respect of purchases made with each official credit card issued to any staff member employed by any entity reporting to her, (a) what is the (i) name and (ii) designation of the user and (b)(i) what is the value of the purchases made in each month since the credit card was issued, (ii) what are the details of each item purchased and (iii) for what purpose was each purchase made?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SOEs as follows:

zaDNA indicated that there were no purchases made on the credit card issued.

All other entities reporting to the department did not issue credit cards to their staff members.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES