Hansard: NCOP: Unrevised hansard

House: National Council of Provinces

Date of Meeting: 21 Oct 2010

Summary

No summary available.


Minutes

UNREVISED HANSARD

 

THURSDAY, 21 OCTOBER 2010

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PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF PROVINCES

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The Council met at 14:03.

 

The House Chairperson (Mr R J Tau) took the Chair and requested members to observe a moment of silence for prayers or meditation.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS, TABLINGS AND COMMITTEE REPORTS –see col 000.

 

NEW MEMBERS

 

(Announcement)

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): Hon members, before we proceed, I would like to take this opportunity to inform the House that we have been joined by two members, that is the hon B L Abrahams and hon T B Beyleveldt, who have already been sworn in. Could those members please stand so that the House can see them. [Applause.] Thank you, hon members.

 

Hon Abrahams and hon Beyleveldt, you are welcome. We hope that your presence in this House will further enrich its capacity to deliver and improve the lives of all South Africans. You are welcome.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION

 

Mr D A WORTH: Hon House Chairperson, on behalf of the DA I hereby give notice that at the next sitting of the Council I shall move:

 

That the Council –

 

  1. notes that video conferencing facilities between Parliament and the provincial legislatures launched a year ago with great fanfare are still not being utilised;

 

  1. further notes that whilst this system was fully funded by the European Union Donor Funding Support Programme, it has now become a parliamentary embarrassment since it is not in operation; and

 

  1. requests Parliament to inform it as to –

 

  1. what the problems are;

 

  1. whether the system will eventually be utilised;

 

  1. when will it be operational, if it is going to be utilised; and

 

  1. if the system will be scrapped, at what cost.

 

Mrs E C VAN LINGEN: House Chairperson, on a point of order: Do we have a quorum, and what is the quorum?

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): What is the quorum for? Do we have a quorum for motions?

 

Mrs E C VAN LINGEN: No, Chair. Do we have a quorum in this House today or not, and what is the quorum? And it’s not a malicious or vindictive question; it’s merely a question of clarity.

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): Okay, we have the Chief Whip of the Council. Chief Whip, can you respond to that?

 

The CHIEF WHIP OF THE COUNCIL: House Chairperson, yes, we do. She must do her own calculations in so far as what the number is. She can calculate that, but, as far as we know, we have checked that. That is why we agreed that you must come in because we have a quorum. I don’t remember anywhere in the Rules where it says you need a quorum for motions. However, the House will pass legislation because there is a quorum.

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): Thank you, hon Chief Whip, that’s why I wanted to establish whether we needed a quorum for motions.

 

Mr H B GROENEWALD: House Chair, I hereby give notice that at the next sitting of the Council I shall move on behalf of the DA:

 

That the Council –

 

  1. notes that the North West province was officially labelled as South Africa’s most corrupt province by the Minister for Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Mr Sicelo Shiceka;

 

  1. further notes that the North West premier continues to showcase her “anticorruption” stance by feeding snippets to the media of a status report about the ongoing forensic and other investigations into municipalities but fails to table any report about fraud and corruption in the North West provincial legislature; and

 

  1. acknowledges that the premier, Maureen Modiselle, was not prepared to expose criminal individuals in almost all cases involving ANC deployed cadres.

 

Mr R A LEES: House Chair, I hereby give notice that at the next sitting of the Council I shall move on behalf of the DA:

That the Council –

 

  1. notes with deep concern and abhorrence the ANC-proposed Media Appeals Tribunal and the Protection of Information Bill, which constitutes a direct attack on South Africa’s fledgling democracy; and

 

  1. rejects both the proposed Media Appeals Tribunal and the Protection of Information Bill and calls upon the ANC to withdraw these apartheid-type proposals and to reassure all South Africans that it will not again make any further threats to the hard-fought-for democracy.

 

Mr K A SINCLAIR: Hon House Chairperson, I hereby give notice ...

[Interjections.]

 

Chair, hon Gunda is struggling with his identity, and now he wants to victimise me. [Laughter.]

 

... that at the next sitting of the Council I shall move on behalf of Cope:

 

That the Council debates the imminent threat of load-shedding that South Africa is once again confronted with and the effect that this will have on society as well as our economy, all because of poor planning and management by those who, in spite of their failures, get extraordinary remuneration and unwarranted performance bonuses.

 

Mr M W MAKHUBELA: Chair, I hereby give notice on behalf of Cope that on the next sitting day of the Council I shall move:

 

That the Council debates the lack of equitable measures by the parole board, as was evident in its granting of parole to Mark Scott-Crossley, whilst permitting fellow accomplice Mr Mathebula to languish in prison.

 

Mr O DE BEER: Deputy Chair, I give notice on behalf of Cope that on the next sitting day of the Council I shall move:

 

That the Council debates the recent incident of Mpumalanga's MEC for human settlements, Mr Madala Masuku, and two of his bodyguards being shot at while travelling and subsequently being robbed by three people masquerading as policemen, driving a car with a flashing blue light, which is cause for the utmost concern and determined police counteraction.

 

Mr R A LEES: Hon Chairperson, I give notice on behalf of the DA that on the next sitting day of the Council I shall move:

 

That the Council –

  1. notes the intention of global mining giant Xstrata to build its own power station in Limpopo, which is a clear indication of Xstrata’s commitment to doing business in South Africa; and

 

  1. therefore congratulates Xstrata for this bold move, a move that has been forced upon it by the threat of Eskom power shortages, a power crisis which has resulted from Eskom’s poor planning together with short-sightedness on the part of the ANC government when it was warned of power shortages by the DA as long ago as the early 2000s.

 

Mrs E C VAN LINGEN: Deputy Chairperson, I hereby give notice on behalf of the DA that on the next sitting day of the Council I shall move:

 

That the Council –

 

  1. notes that –

 

  1. European Union donor funding of €850 million was made available in previous financial years since 2005 for economic development and similar programmes, of which tourism development and upgrading programmes formed part;

 

  1. these funds have been managed by Treasury through a project called Thina Sinakho, with an office in each of the nine provinces;

 

  1. all parliamentary questions, further queries and contact directly with the officials responsible in Treasury for the Thina Sinakho fund or those managing donor funding have not delivered any results;

 

  1. requests that –

 

  1. the annual report for the Thina Sinakho fund for the Eastern Cape province be submitted to this House;

 

  1. the Eastern Cape provincial treasury provides a quarterly report on the spending pattern of the Thina Sinakho fund to this House; and

 

  1. any other province that also has a similar programme or fund must submit the same as above.

 

ANC WINS OCTOBER BY-ELECTIONS

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mr M H MOKGOBI: Chairperson, I move without notice:

That the Council –

 

  1. notes and welcomes the outcome of the by-elections that were held across four provinces on 6 October 2010, where the ANC won 17 of the 18 contested wards;

 

  1. further notes that the ANC made inroads in the Western Cape, where the first test of the DA-ID pact crumbled, showing clear signs of cracking when the ANC took over two wards in Oudtshoorn, which formerly belonged to the Independent Democrats, ID; and

 

  1. takes this opportunity to congratulate the people of South Africa for demonstrating their loyalty and trust in the ANC and its public office bearers.

 

There being an objection, the motion without notice became a notice of motion.

 

CELEBRATION OF AFRICAN HUMAN RIGHTS DAY

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mrs N W Magadla): Chairperson, I move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

(1)        notes that today, 21 October, marks African Human Rights Day and the celebration of the 24th year after the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Charter) entered into force;

 

(2)        further notes that the African Charter created the first regional human rights framework for Africa and, through the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights, is able to hold governments accountable for their human rights obligations;

 

(3)      acknowledges that although Africa has made a lot of progress in the promotion and protection of human rights over the past 24 years, including the respect for democratic principles, human rights, the rule of law and principles of good governance, millions of people in Africa are still denied ..

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): Hon member, there is one thing I forgot to do. If I may just disturb you for a second, I would like to welcome members back after the constituency period and recess. In doing so, may I just quickly establish whether the motion, as presented by the hon Mokgobi, has been agreed to?

 

An HON MEMBER: No!

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): In the light of the objection, the motion may not be proceeded with. The motion without notice will now become a notice of motion. Therefore, in confirming that welcome, you may proceed, hon Magadla.

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mrs N W Magadla): Chairperson, I move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

(3)      acknowledges that although Africa has made a lot of progress in the promotion and protection of human rights over the past 24 years, including the respect for democratic principles, human rights, the rule of law and principles of good governance, millions of people in Africa are still denied their basic human rights and are subjected to the harshest political and socioeconomic conditions in the world;

 

(4)  further acknowledges that despite significant progress that African states have made in putting into practice the principles of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, millions of people across the African continent are still faced with the highest proportions of poverty, poor health, hunger, underdevelopment and socioeconomic marginalisation, and that women and children remain the largest victims of civil wars, illiteracy and violence; and

(5)      takes this opportunity to make a renewed call to all African states, leaders and civil society to do everything within their powers to promote and protect the political and socioeconomic rights of their citizens and take decisive action to prevent civil and political conflict on our continent.

 

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

Mrs E C VAN LINGEN: Chairperson, I passed my motion on to a colleague, so my colleague will proceed with the motion. I am sorry for the confusion.

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): All right.

 

Mr R A LEES: Chairperson, I did not indicate. I apologise. I might have raised my hand to scratch my nose or something, but I haven’t got a motion.

 

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): You see, hon members, what I am trying to do is share the little time that we have as much as possible. That is why, as you raise your hands, I note them and then call you accordingly. I don’t want to find a situation where other members feel marginalised in the process of motions. So, please don’t scratch your head or your nose to a point where I would think that you have raised your hand.

RE-ELECTION OF SOUTH AFRICA AS NONPERMANENT MEMBER OF THE UNITED NATIONS SECURITY COUNCIL

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mr M C MAINE: Chairperson, I move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes with profound jubilation and great sense of pride the re-election of South Africa as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, UNSC, for the period 2011-2012;

 

  1. acknowledges that the re-election of South Africa to the United Nations’ most powerful seat signals a global vote of confidence in the role the country continues to play in international diplomacy, particularly in championing the African Renaissance in such areas as peacekeeping, security, human rights and economic development in the African continent; and

 

  1. takes this opportunity to congratulate all the South Africans, particularly our ambassadors and the Department of International Relations and Co-operation, for their dedication and great sense of commitment to diligently serve our nation and ensure that we continue to move decisively from our divided past to stand tall on the shoulders of the world.

 

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

DUMPING OF BABIES IN WESTERN CAPE

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mrs A N D QIKANI: Chairperson, I move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes a recent survey by Child Welfare Cape Town, which showed that approximately 500 babies have been dumped by their mothers around Cape Town in the Western Cape and that most of them survived the ordeal and are currently in care homes;

 

  1. further notes that in the latest of many incidents ―

 

  1. a newborn baby boy was pulled alive from a manhole near Killarney Gardens by a truck driver who had earlier seen a woman cradling an infant at the drain;

 

  1. a 17-year-old mother was charged with murder and perjury in connection with the murder of her six-week-old baby whom she earlier claimed was kidnapped from the Khayelitsha Day Hospital, and

 

  1. a Khayelitsha woman discovered a dumped baby in a drain in the Green Point informal settlement in Khayelitsha;

 

  1. acknowledges that although in most cases it has been found that babies are dumped for various reasons, including teen pregnancies, drugs and alcohol abuse, rape, and other socioeconomic factors, the dumping of a baby is a gross and repulsive violation of their rights and a criminal offence; and

 

  1. takes this opportunity to condemn in the strongest possible terms this inhumane and hideous criminality and calls on communities to create social networks that will embrace the principles of ubuntu and humanity by caring for each other and encouraging those who need assistance to seek help from the avenues made available by the government and civil society.

 

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

NEW MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF PROVINCES

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mr M J R DE VILLIERS: Hon Chairperson, I hereby move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes the two new hon members in the NCOP, hon T Beyleveldt and hon B Abrahams;

 

  1. further notes that hon Beyleveldt is from the Western Cape and is also the Whip for the Western Cape in the NCOP, while hon Abrahams represents Gauteng in the NCOP;

 

  1. acknowledges that these two members are also representing the Democratic Alliance in the NCOP; and

 

  1. takes this opportunity to wish them well and fruitful deliberations in the NCOP.

 

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

RACISM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mr M P JACOBS: Chairperson, on behalf of the ANC, I hereby move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes with utter disdain reports of the explicit prevalence of racism in the University of Stellenbosch and allegations of racial profiling of black students by the local police station;

 

  1. takes this opportunity to —

 

  1. condemn in the strongest possible terms such blatant attacks and violation of our constitutional principles and ideals; and

 

  1. reject with contempt any misguided insinuation from the police that seems to suggest that black students must carry their student cards all the time when the university policy clearly stipulates that students are not required to carry student cards when on campus; and

 

  1. calls on the Minister of Higher Education and Training, the hon Mr B Nzimande and the Minister of Police, the hon Mr N Mthethwa, to ensure that this issue receives expedient attention.

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

ANC NATIONAL GENERAL COUNCIL

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mr G G MOKGORO: Chairperson, I hereby move without notice:

 

That the Council ―

 

  1. notes that the African National Congress held a successful national general council, NGC, over five days from 20 to 24 September 2010 at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli International Convention Centre in Durban;

 

  1. further notes that the NGC, which was attended by 2 840 delegates, observers, dignitaries, members of the diplomatic corps, and the media, came out united and highly resolute in the quest to retain the historical character and carry the national duty to advance the lives of the people of South Africa, and

 

  1. takes this opportunity to congratulate all the delegates and officials who showed a strong sense of commitment, dedication and loyalty to this life-time organisation by making sure that the NGC remains a resounding success.

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr R J Tau): In light of the objection the motion may not be proceeded with. The motion without notice will now become a notice of motion.

 

STERLING WORK DONE BY MS ELIZABETH SKABATE

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mr S D MONTSITSI: Modulasetulo ya kgabane [Hon Chairperson], I hereby move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes the sterling work done by Ms Elizabeth Skabate in Orange Farm in Gauteng, where she gives haven to poverty-stricken children and orphans;

 

  1. further notes that Ms Skabate’s makeshift shack has reignited a great sense of hope and security for the children who are largely from poverty-stricken households and some without parents;

 

  1. takes this opportunity to congratulate Ms Skabate for her dedication and spirit of ubuntu and calls on South Africans to open their hearts and assist Ms Skabane to build a solid structure for the children.

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

MIRACULOUS SURVIVAL OF TWO-YEAR-OLD BABY

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Ms B P MABE: Chairperson, I hereby move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes the heart-rending story of a two-year-old baby who miraculously survived on the back of her 27-year-old mother who jumped to her death from a five-storey building in Berea, Johannesburg;

 

  1. further notes that the baby is currently in a stable condition at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital; and

 

  1. takes this opportunity to wish the little baby a speedy recovery and calls on all South Africans who experience social problems to seek support.

 

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

BURNING OF A 16-YEAR-OLD IN HEINZ PARK, CAPE TOWN

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mrs R N RASMENI: Hon Chairperson, I hereby move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes the inhumane and cruel burning of a 16-year-old in Heinz Park near Philippi in Cape Town just over three weeks ago in a horrible incident which has been described as gang related;

 

  1. further notes that the 16-year-old girl was dragged into a house and severely beaten by several men and women who burnt her with a flammable liquid, which resulted in her sustaining serious burns to her face, breasts and hands;

 

  1. takes this opportunity to condemn in the harshest possible terms this senseless, inhumane and brutal act and congratulate the girl for her determination and courage to fight her attackers for survival and wishes her a speedy recovery.

 

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

ROAD ACCIDENTS AND FATALITIES

 

(Draft Resolution)

 

Mr S S MAZOSIWE: Chair, I move without notice:

 

That the Council —

 

  1. notes that 75 commuters, including schoolchildren, were injured when one Golden Arrow bus crashed into the back of another in Cape Town on Wednesday, 20 October 2010;

 

  1. further notes that this accident comes barely a month after 13 people were killed and 32 others, including three children, were injured in a head-on taxi collision about 35 km outside Laingsburg in the Western Cape;

 

  1. acknowledges that the national statistics show horrific carnage on our national and provincials roads, with private cars responsible for by far the largest share of fatalities and that most of the drivers who die on the road are young – 51% are between the ages of 20 and 39 years; and

 

  1. takes this opportunity to call on all South African road users to be responsible as we approach the festive season by declaring its commitment to National Transport Month and the national road safety programmes of all the provinces by declaring: “Be safe; stay alert to be alive.”

Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of the Constitution.

 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: WORKING TOGETHER TO INTENSIFY THE WAR ON POVERTY, HUNGER AND SOCIOECONOMIC MARGINALISATION

 

(Subject for Discussion)

 

The MINISTER OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: Hon House Chair, hon colleagues and guests in the gallery, it is indeed an honour and privilege for me to address this august House on such a critical, topical theme: “Working together to intensify the war on poverty, hunger and socioeconomic marginalisation”.

 

Similar to all other years since the existence of this democratic government, in 2007 at the 52nd national conference of the ANC, the ruling party resolved that the central and most pressing challenges that we face in our country are unemployment, poverty and inequality. In this regard, we reiterate our determination to halve unemployment and poverty from the levels where they were back in 2004 and very substantially reduce social and economic inequality as well.

 

Helping our people to escape poverty is one of the key priorities of the ANC government. It is something that we are passionate about, and we should ensure that we achieve it. Similar to other countries, our government also faces the challenge of limited resources. We are determined that, irrespective of a lack of adequate resources, we will not act in a way that will leave anybody behind, not even some of the most poor and vulnerable people in our society.

 

This government has also taken a firm stance against poverty and social exclusion. This is well reflected in our government’s legislative and nonlegislative work, including several major policy resolutions which we have adopted in the past few years of our existence. I sincerely believe that our people voted for this government because they wanted us to adhere most closely to the principles of the Freedom Charter and our beautiful Constitution.

 

To translate this political obligation into concrete actions and results, our government has undertaken a number of key actions to date. One such policy that our government has successfully implemented over the past 16 years is the increased provision of social transfers. The gradual expansion of the social assistance programme has helped us suppress the increase in income inequality, particularly for people living in rural areas.

 

Numerous studies have confirmed that our social assistance programme is well targeted and contributes considerably to poverty reduction. Without social security grants as a source of income, many households within the distribution curve would have experienced abject poverty.

 

This government is also undertaking a process of comprehensive social security and retirement reforms in order to ensure that we include all people who otherwise would have very little, if any, income support for themselves and their dependants.

 

I would like to ask hon members to really study the comprehensive social security submission, because it has several pillars – four or so. It is not just a social assistance programme.

 

As government, it is our responsibility to ensure that South Africans from all walks of life have the resources necessary to live a better and a decent life. Given the impact of social grants on the poor, it goes without saying that no meaningful and sustained economic growth can be achieved in the absence of social protection.

 

I need to point out that providing adequate social protection is not just about giving handouts, as some of our hon members in here, in the other House and throughout society always and repeatedly suggest. The provision of social protection is one of the four pillars of the International Labour Organisation’s definition of decent work. Social protection is as important as an industrial policy, a skills policy, investment incentives, trade and fiscal policies in our government’s continued efforts to promote decent jobs.

 

Our social protection framework includes the provision of shelter to those denied decent human settlements for many decades in this country. The three million houses that we built for poor people in South Africa shielded them from the threat of homelessness and destitution that other poor and middle classes across the world experience, particularly now recently in the wake of the recent global economic and financial crisis.

 

At the same time, as this government, we transferred over R86 billion to eligible households, enabling them to participate in the economy and meet some of their basic needs in one of the worst economic crises the modern world has experienced. People then had money to travel to cities and sometimes even do a little bit of business here and there, in order to sustain their livelihoods.

 

Recently, President Lula da Silva of Brazil, one of the world’s emerging economic powerhouses, as we know it to be, stated that the social transfers that the Brazilian government gave to its poorest citizens allowed them to continue to stimulate demand in a very difficult economic climate and, in the process, helped to stabilise the economy. Like all of us, Brazil has close to a quarter of its population on some form of social assistance programme and, like them, we see this as an investment in people and the economy for the long-term good of our society.

 

Esteemed ladies and gentlemen, our nation was built on the foundations of a deep and abiding commitment to the values of social solidarity, the principle of equity, the principle of social justice and the rule of law. If there is any yardstick by which our country should be defined and measured, then it is that of being a caring, democratic and inclusive society. Therefore, we have an obligation to history and mankind to show that democracy can and does work. As elected representatives of our people, we must show that democracy can deliver development and also empower the marginalised.

 

At no time, no matter what the situation was or is, must we allow people to doubt the ability of our democratic institutions to improve the lives of our people. Approaches to tackling poverty are highly subjective and often form part of deeply embedded ideological frameworks. We know that.

 

In a recent publication, the Centre for Development and Enterprise, CDE, suggested that the South African government should not spend resources on a redistributive policy that seeks to address inequalities. They suggested that we should develop policies that would allow an unfettered market to maximise economic growth and thereby create jobs.

 

This kind of thinking – which is known as the trickle-down effect – goes against most of the recent research and literature that indicates that, if countries do not deal with inequalities, their abilities to increase economic growth and create a better society are severely limited.

 

In a recent publication entitled The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone, Wilkinson and Pickett postulate that countries with high levels of inequality tend to have higher levels of social unrest, poor educational outcomes despite high levels of investment, and a range of other social ills which threaten the social fabric.

 

Their assertion is based on extensive studies in the developed countries. Indeed, cumulative research suggests that high levels of social and economic inequalities reverberate through societies on many levels, correlating with, if not causing, more social disruptions. Therefore, it is not surprising that these social ills are amplified in a country such as ours with its high levels of social and economic inequalities due to development and economic frameworks such as those espoused by the CDE report.

 

The conclusions of Wilkinson and Pickett are that equality matters for all in our society, and that all of us benefit with increased levels of equality. We know that is not true. We need to ensure that there is sustainable development in our country. Sustainable development does not necessarily mean that everyone else will benefit, as Wilkinson and Pickett and that report said.

 

The excluded and the vulnerable have as much stake in the development of an equal and sustainable economic system as the rich and the better-off. We are supposed to have all these people, including those whom we sometimes think are vulnerable and tend to think that those policies will help. This is the essence of partnership and solidarity. We need both to deal with economic growth and reduce inequality. We cannot afford to pursue one at the expense of the other. We need to work together on this. We need partnerships between business, civil society and government for this to be a very successful project.

 

It is in this spirit that I welcome the recent declaration on poverty and inequality made by a South African civil society organisation that we know and which included the community-based organisation Proudly Manenberg, the South African Council of Churches and academics.

 

Their declaration, which is known as the Birchwood Declaration on Inequality and Poverty in South Africa, noted that inequality has a range of psychosocial consequences that complicate South Africa’s ability to build social cohesion and deal with the structural nature of the country’s poverty. They further noted that growing levels of inequality within and amongst nations has been one of the primary drivers of the current global crisis.

 

Most of the organisations that signed this declaration work with communities at grass-roots level. I think we should listen to their analyses and engage with their proposed solutions which, among others, include the strengthening and implementation of redistribution instruments and programmes that bridge the inequality divide, including social security and the community works programme. This government should also work together with these institutions if we are to be successful in our endeavour to eradicate poverty. We will definitely do so.

 

The opportunity is now at hand for each of us in this House to join together and ensure that our actions are guided by the vision of a better and greater South Africa. Helen Keller wrote:

 

Until the great mass of the people shall be filled with the sense of responsibility for each other’s welfare, social justice can never be attained.

 

Unless we address the problems of poverty, hunger and the socioeconomic marginalisation of the poor now – and I say now – none of the great goals that our government has set – peace, stability, human rights for all, the preservation of the environment – are achievable in a world where one half of our people finds themselves shut out of the opportunities and benefits of the global society. We have seen it happening in other countries and it shouldn’t happen here.

 

Therefore, it is our conviction that everyone, regardless of their social status, should be able to live his or her life with dignity. As Jeffrey Sachs correctly pointed out in his book, The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time, we are the first generation that can end poverty in our lifetime. History has repeatedly taught us that social and economic development are not mutually exclusive, but rather complementary.

 

José Antonio Ocampo once stated that:

 

Ignoring inequality in the pursuit of development is perilous. Focusing exclusively on economic growth and income generation as a development strategy is ineffective as it leads to the accumulation of wealth by a few and deepens the poverty of the many.

 

It is for this reason that the ANC has persistently pursued social programmes that give the poor the opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty.

 

Former President Nelson Mandela also cautioned that massive poverty and obscene inequality are such terrible scourges of our times, and that they have to rank alongside slavery and apartheid as social evils. With Mandela’s spirit as our guide and inspiration, our government is helping to forge a partnership geared towards eradicating poverty completely and replacing it with equity and social inclusion. We have set our goals to provide sustainable livelihoods and to advance the wellbeing of all South Africans. That is why the ANC, together with its social partners, has made the fight against poverty its central and overriding priority.

As I conclude, I would like to say that we have committed the full force of all our energies to the gravest human challenge of our time ― an effort that will also galvanise the energies and the various efforts of our society around a great and just cause. I thank you. [Applause.]

 

Mrs R N RASMENI: Hon Chairperson and hon members, the ANC, in keeping with its general commitment to an egalitarian society, rejects the dictum that the poor will always be with us. It believes that poverty is created by society and can, therefore, be eliminated by society. People are the fundamental resource of the country since they have the capacity to develop personally and are central to the development of the economy, and the nation as a whole.

 

Eradicating poverty includes ensuring that the basic rights to shelter, food, health, employment, education and all those aspects that promote the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of all in our society are met. Eradicating poverty means providing a social safety net for those who are unable to care for themselves: the disabled, women, children, youth, families in need of care, the aged and those in chronic emotional distress.

 

In eradicating poverty, the ANC pursues this programme within the context of economic and social reconstruction, as well as the building of a national democratic society. The encouragement of economic growth and the development of economic policies that ensure equitable redistribution through social services that are not only seen as forms of consumption, but also as a means of social investment, are critical.

 

The developmental state plays a major role in meeting the legitimate and realistic expectations of all, especially the poor, the disadvantaged and the other vulnerable persons, in the light of the need to eradicate poverty. As we move away from a welfare state towards a developmental state trajectory that addresses the root causes of social problems as part of an integrated strategy of development on the one hand and ensuring a safety net on the other hand, we believe in the importance of the family, as it is understood within social and cultural norms, and promote the reconstruction of family life.

 

Our strategic approach in eradicating poverty and enhancing service delivery hinges on seven critical principles. These are equity, accessibility, democracy, community participation, accountability, equality and social services as a right. All those who require services should feel free to apply for such services without fear or favour.

 

The ANC, in government, has made unprecedented progress over the past five years, and also since Polokwane, to address the legacies of apartheid which reproduce patterns of development and underdevelopment in our society.

This notwithstanding, South Africa is faced with severe social problems stemming from systemic developmental deficiencies. In large part, development is hampered by the interaction of complex factors which will take time to resolve. This includes rapid and ongoing urbanisation – the intensifying movement of people from rural to urban areas, which has fundamentally transformed the organisation of society and reconfigured the economy.

 

The relative decline in the primary economic sector coupled with reduced labour intensity has resulted in an employment bias unfavourable to a generally unskilled workforce. Pre-existing levels of abject poverty and the levels of deprivation have severe intergenerational impacts on affected individuals and families, with long-term social and economic consequences. In large part, this poverty stems from systemic factors limiting the natural expansion of formal employment. Both the causes and the consequences of poverty are challenges which need to be met.

 

The provision of public goods and services, as well as related interventions, form the cornerstone of responses to the nation’s unbalanced development, with education, health, social security, basic services, social cohesion, youth and women development as key interventions.

 

Government’s resilience in its efforts to develop social safety nets like improved health care, access to education, etc, continues to protect the most vulnerable South Africans from the adverse effects of the economic downturn since late 2008 and throughout 2009. The effective implementation of Polokwane resolutions also required appropriate allocation of responsibilities to relevant departments or Ministries, some of which have only come into existence in the current administration.

 

Overall, the ANC has focused on overseeing effective implementation of government’s mandate which underscores the need to create a democratic, nonracial, nonsexist and prosperous society under the theme, “Now is the time together to do more, better”.

 

The ANC’s programme for social transformation must therefore ensure that it builds a better life by providing land and houses; comprehensive health and social security; basic services which include water and sanitation; human resource and capacity-building; clean and safe environments; food security; an improvement in the nation’s health profile, including dealing with communicable and noncommunicable disease causes; mortality; and sport and recreation.

 

At our recently held national general council in September 2010, we recommended, amongst many other matters, the following: improving the alignment between plans and promises of all spheres of government and the abilities of local governments to fund and implement such plans and promises; ensuring that funding allocations from national and provincial governments address social infrastructure backlogs; undertaking a comprehensive assessment of the extent to which people fall through the cracks of public and private service delivery as a result of the application of income thresholds and ceilings that are aimed at targeting service provision, but are exclusionary and create poverty gaps.

 

For us, as southern Africans, the fight against poverty and unemployment; bridging the gap between the rich and the poor; and generally the need to improve the living conditions of our people, remain uppermost on our list of priorities. Our people want action on jobs, growth and poverty. We must build a new common purpose so that we can use all our talents, skills and resources to tackle our economic and social challenges. Ndiyabulela. [Thank you.] [Applause.]

 

Mr M J R DE VILLIERS: Hon Chairperson, Minister, members and guests in this august House today, to understand the topic of this debate, one must take cognisance of the very important issues of poverty, hunger and education, as well as the socioeconomic position and health of the population. Poverty, hunger and unemployment are worrying matters for us, as South Africans.

 

For the purpose of analysis, poverty is defined as an income below R4 560 per person per year. That is R308 per month. Taken from The South African Child Gauge 2008, 3,3 million children ― that is 18% - living in households were reported as hungry. According to 2008 statistics, the provinces reporting the highest rates of child hunger are the North West, with 18% in 2007 and 25% in 2008; and KwaZulu-Natal, with 15% in 2007 and 25% in 2008. The province with the highest unemployment rate is the Eastern Cape. By race categorisation, 20% of the children reported as hungry are African, followed by coloured children at 10%, white children at 2%, and Asian children at 1%.

 

According to the EU-funded Municipal Outreach Project, poverty is mostly found to be very severe amongst children, at 65,5%, with adults at 45,2%. The total number of poor children is 11,8 million. A breakdown of the child population reported as hungry is as follows: aged 0 to 4 years, 66%; aged 5 to 14 years, 65,7%; and aged 15 to 17 years, 63,8%. Although the child support grant is provided to children up to the age of 18, it is surprising that poverty rates are higher amongst children. It is most likely that the child support grant does not move the child above the poverty line. In short, it brings alleviation, but it is not the ultimate solution unless it is raised.

 

This situation is neither affordable nor sustainable for the South African government. On 17 February 2010, Minister Pravin Gordhan said that R89 million will be spent on social grants in 2010-11, in the face of increasing unemployment and the impact of the previous year’s recession. He also said that nearly 14 million South Africans benefit from the social assistance programme. Notwithstanding these grants, government is also supporting municipalities in other ways, for example through the municipal infrastructure grant, MIG, the provincial infrastructure grant, PIG, and also funds to support the indigent to pay their municipal taxes.

 

This cycle of payment and support by state revenue is unaffordable, bearing in mind that not even a quarter of our population are tax-paying employees. Poverty is a dangerous threat to the wellness of any population and its future.

 

Armoede het ’n negatiewe aanslag en impak op die sielkundige karakter van mense. Armoede breek die menswees en welstand van mense se gesondheid en hul waardesisteem af. Werkloosheid is dus ’n baie groot bedreiging vir ons land. As ons na werkloosheid kyk, is die Oos-Kaap en Mpumalanga die provinsies met die hoogste werkloosheidsyfer, naamlik 29,8% en 29,3%.

 

As ons ook kyk na die verskillende toelaes wat ons mense ontvang, word hierdie mense ook baie meer verarm deur middel van die sosio-ekonomiese probleme wat ons in ons gemeenskap het. Dit sluit hierdie geldskieters in wat ons mense se geld vat en hulle nog verder verarm. Die regering doen wel baie om armoede in die verskillende gemeenskappe te verlig, maar binne die gemeenskap self doen die gemeenskappe niks om hulself uit hierdie armoedesituasie te lig nie. Derhalwe sal ons ernstige, manhaftige stappe moet neem om hierdie geldskieters en ander dwelm- en smokkelbedrywighede vas te vat om sodoende ons gemeenskappe te help om uit hierdie greep van armoede los te kom. (Translation of Afrikaans paragraphs follows.)

 

[Poverty has a negative bearing and impact on the psychological character of people. Poverty breaks down people’s humanity and the wellbeing of their health and value systems. Unemployment is therefore a big threat to our country. When we consider unemployment, the Eastern Cape and Mpumalanga are the provinces with the highest unemployment rates, at 29,8% and 29,3% respectively.

 

When we look at the various grants our people receive, these people also become more impoverished due to the socioeconomic problems that exist within our communities. These include money lenders who take our people’s money and cause further impoverishment. The government does indeed do a lot to alleviate poverty in the various communities, but within the community itself members of the community are not doing anything themselves to rise above this impoverished situation. For this reason we need to take serious and brave steps to clamp down on these money lenders and other drug and smuggling activities in order to help our communities free themselves from the grip of poverty.]

 

Chairperson, to meet the Millennium Development Goals, we as South Africans must work together to find solutions to poverty and unemployment. We must put more emphasis on an open opportunity society for all in all spheres of our country, and open up the economy for different role-players to let the economy grow more to create jobs and employment. Then we can lessen the impact of grants on the government, and people can then take more responsibility for their own lives and state of wellness.

 

We must reduce people’s dependency on the state. The only way to do this is by giving people the chance to learn how to catch a fish, teaching people how to support themselves, and giving them the opportunity and the environment to do so.

 

There is a very interesting situation in South Africa. Foreigners like the Somalis, the Zimbabweans, the Ugandans, the Sudanese, and others have come into our country with virtually nothing to show for themselves, and have started to make a living. They show us that they can do it through the fellowship they enjoy amongst themselves and by extending a hand and supporting each other to help create a better life in our country. So, why can’t we, as South Africans, do this for our people so that we can lift ourselves out of poverty? I thank you very much. [Applause.]

 

Mr J J GUNDA: Hon Chair, hon Minister and hon members of this House, it is always easier to debate and discuss resolutions that seem so simple on paper. However, in reality, it is a severe task not only to get under way but to follow through on. South Africa’s growing poverty rate is alarming in that it is severely egged on by the unemployment rate.

An extensive range of work over the past decade, whether in the form of projects and/or programmes, has revealed the important links between poverty and the environment. Therefore, to ensure that the war on poverty, hunger and socioeconomic marginalisation will be overcome, it is crucial that interlinked circumstances and carefully monitored and reflected policy-making processes, at all levels, are adhered to.

 

New estimates of poverty show that the proportion of people living in poverty in South Africa has not changed significantly between 1996 and 2001, up until 2008. A study by the Human Sciences Research Council, HSRC, shows that the poverty gap has grown from R56 billion in 1996 to R81 billion, indicating that poor households have sunk deeper into poverty over this period. The fact that poorer households have not shared in the proceeds of economic growth is reflected in the rise in inequality between rich and poor.

 

Agb Minister, die regulasies van die staat se finansiële instellings moet hersien word om dit sodoende meer toeganklik te maak vir die nie-regeringsorganisasies, NRO’s, om hierdie groot uitdaging te kan oorwin. Hoe kan ons verwag dat histories-benadeelde mense geouditeerde finansiële verslae van twee jaar moet indien om fondse te kan bekom, terwyl ons nie die mense tot ons beskikking het nie? (Translation of Afrikaans paragraph follows.)

 

[Hon Minister, the regulations of the state’s financial institutions should be reviewed and in doing so make it more accessible for nongovernmental organisations, NGOs, to overcome this big challenge. How can we expect people who have been historically disadvantaged to submit audited financial reports for two years while we do not have the people at our disposal?]

 

In a country like South Africa where the standard of living conditions in informal settlements and townships is a serious cause for concern, it is crucial that immediate measures be put in place to evaluate this growing concern. Sadly, the war on poverty, hunger and socioeconomic marginalisation will be a lost cause if key role-players remain immobile and state departments do not pull their weight by supporting and following up on programmes and projects set out to target precisely this topic we are discussing today. Since local municipalities are at the heartbeat of service delivery and the development of our people, it is of utmost importance to build capacity in those very poor municipalities to confront the gap between the rich and the poor.

 

Hon Minister and hon members, the ID would like to commend all efforts that have been and are being made to catapult the South African economy and reduce the current status of poverty in this country. Let me just state it one way in Afrikaans.

 

Ons sal nooit armoede uitwis as ons dit nie persoonlik ernstig opneem nie. Sodoende kan ons mense ’n beter lewe kry. [We will never eliminate poverty if we personally do not regard it in a serious light. In doing so, our people will be able to attain a better life.]

 

I thank you. Ke a leboga. [Applause.]

 

Ksz M G BOROTO: Sihlalo, ngilotjhise kumma uNgqongqotjhe u-Edna Molewa, kumalunga nabavakatjhi abakhona. Sihlalo, phezu kwekulomo yethu namhlanje yokulwa nendlala nomthlago, ngibawa ukuqalisa ikulumo yami ebantwini abadala - abezimu abasadla umratha - abezimu abaqalane nomthlago, ababuzi bona umthlago yini. Labo babantu abasifundisako. Njalo-ke ngikhuluma ngabantu abadala.

 

Nangiragela phambili ngithi: (Translation of isiNdebele paragraphs follows.)

 

[Ms M G BOROTO: Chairperson, greetings to Minister Edna Molewa, members and guests present here today. Chairperson, in our debate today, which is about fighting hunger and poverty, I would like to direct my speech to the elders – the ancestors who are still alive, who are faced with poverty and who have a very clear understanding of what poverty is. These are the people who taught us. By saying this I am referring to older persons.

 

I would like to continue by saying the following.]

On 1 October 2010, South Africa, with the rest of the world, celebrated the 20th anniversary of the International Day of Older Persons, which was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly on 14 December 1990. It is a significant anniversary because, during those two decades, the world’s demographic profile changed more dramatically than at any previous time.

 

The rapid growth in old persons aged 60 and above in South Africa reflects the need for the synchronisation of economic and social policies for inclusive development. They were estimated at 50,5 million in 2007 and that number is expected to reach 65,5 million globally in 2015, and 2015 would be the year for achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

 

Siyabona bonyana abantu abadala bazabe bangangani ... [We see how many older persons there will be...]

 

... and what is expected of us as the government, specifically in South Africa.

 

They will exceed 103 million in 2030 and 205 million in 2050. As these rapidly increasing numbers show, the number of older persons in Africa will grow at an annual rate of 3,1% between 2007 and 2015, and 3,3% between 2015 and 2050.

 

It is clear that elderly people represent an ever-growing proportion of the population, causing new social, demographic and economic situations. More people live longer lives and they require age-friendly environments, health care and services of all kinds. Therefore, it is logical that the phenomenon of poverty in old age is increasingly catching the attention of the government and policy-makers. This is evident from what we see in the policies and the legislation proposed by the ruling party in this government.

 

Considering the vulnerability of older persons, appropriate measures must and are being taken to establish a social security scheme to provide benefits to older persons without discrimination of any kind and ensure equal rights for men and women. It also follows that the increase in older components of the population is presenting challenges. We are talking about challenges with regard to our obligations stemming from our African culture and tradition of taking care of the elderly and respecting them.

 

Sazi kuhle bona ngendlela yepilo yethu, akusilula ukuthatha ugogo batjho uyombeka ezindlini zabantu abalupheleko, lokho kuba yinto embi khulu ebantwini bekhethu. Manjesi kufanele siqinisekise bonyana abantu laba nanyana bahlezi emizini yabo ebonisa umtlhago, kube khona okwenziwako begodu kwenzeke kulorhulumende okhona namhlanje.

(Translation of isiNdebele paragraph follows.)

 

[We know very well that according to our culture it is not easy to take your grandmother and place her in an old age home. Such actions are not acceptable to our people. Therefore, we need to ensure as the present government that we do something about this situation ― about these people wherever they are, especially those who are in homes that are engulfed by poverty.]

 

The other thing is the increasing demand for health care.

 

Into enye engizayitjho namhlanje, Ngqongqotjhe, kukobana kwezamaPhilo senza koke okusemandleni ethu. [Again, what I would like to mention today, Minister, is that when it comes to health care we are doing all we can.]

 

We are doing all we can.

 

Kodwana akhe ukhambe uye emrholweni lapho abogogo barholela khona, uzakuthola abogogo bahlezi elangeni batjhiswa lilanga banganazo neentulo kungekho neentende. Ngibawa bona umNyango wethu lo ungenelele ukusiza abantu abadala ukuze isimo sabo sepilo sikghone ukuba ncono. Sizokuba ncono nangabe bayatlhogomeleka. Kutjho bona kufanele kube nokusebenzisana phakathi kwemiNyango yezokuThuthukiswa komPhakathi nowezamaPhilo. Sitlhogomele abogogo bethu bona basiphilele, basifundise siye phambili. (Translation of isiNdebele paragraph follows.)

 

[But go to pension paypoints where grandmothers get their pensions, and you will find them sitting under the burning sun without chairs and tents. I would like this department to intervene in order to assist these older persons so as to make their living conditions better. Their living conditions will be better if they are well taken care of. This means that there must be a good working relationship between the Department of Social Development and the Department of Health. We should take good care of our grandmothers so that they live longer and teach us going forward.]

 

The ANC, at its 50th national conference in Mafikeng, directed that redressing poverty and inequalities had to be its central focus so as to ensure that government and other sectors of society met the basic needs of the underprivileged, especially the aged of our country. The conference supported the development of a comprehensive social security system including contributory and noncontributory social security measures.

 

In pursuance of that resolution, the ANC-led government appointed the Taylor commission to investigate the development of a comprehensive social security policy and to propose ways in which all existing means to provide a social wage are strengthened. The Taylor report provided the basis for the development of such a social security policy and affirmed the need to strengthen the implementation to expand the reach of existing policies, while finding new ways to close existing gaps which still leave certain people vulnerable.

A worrying problem that I must again talk about, as far as caring for older persons is concerned, is abuse, which comes in many different forms. When elder abuse is mentioned, the first thought is often of a person showing signs of physical abuse. However, far more difficult to see are the scars of psychological and emotional abuse, as the symptoms are more subtle.

 

Financial abuse manifests itself in a number of ways, the most obvious being a shortage of money, food or basic necessities. Some elderly persons are even denied care, and sometimes find themselves homeless.

 

The other problem that we must look at today is that we have our girls leaving their children with their mothers. Something must be done about that. Steps must be taken to ensure that our young people do not abuse the elderly by always leaving their children with them, going everywhere and not even caring about what is happening at home.

 

Iyababulala abogogo bethu, begodu ugogo njengoba umazi angekhe alale umntwana angakadli uzokuqinisekisa bona umntwana ulala adlile. Lokho kutjengisa bonyana sibone bona abogogo bahlukunyezwa babantu abatjha banamhlanje ababatjhiya nabentwana. Mhlambe abantu abatjha laba esele basebenza, abatjhiya abentwana nabogogo, nabo fanele babhadeliswe imali yokutlhogomela abantwana, ukuze abogogo bathole imali leyo yokuhlala nabentwana. (Translation of isiNdebele paragraph follows.)

 

[These things are killing our grandmothers, as you know that a grandmother will never go to bed without ensuring that the child has eaten. She will make sure that the child eats food before going to bed. That indicates to us that there are a number of girls today who abuse their grandmothers by leaving them with their children. Maybe these young people who are now working and leave their children to be taken care of by the grandmothers should somehow pay money to these grandmothers who are left with their children, so that these grandmothers get the money for taking care of these children.]

 

Elder abuse respects ... [Laughter.] Oh, my time is up. Let me just pause and say that systematic abuse is when an older person’s rights are violated by any action or lack of appropriate action by the state or any other statutory body or organisation, like grants being stopped without any warning, essential medication not being available at state clinics and hospitals or medical aids discarding older members. We cannot tolerate that.

 

In conclusion, Chairperson, older persons are assets of a society and can contribute significantly to the development process of our nation. [Time expired.]

 

Ngitjhilo ekuthomeni ukuthi babotitjhere abangakafundi. [I mentioned earlier that they are teachers who did not go to school.]

 

As such, they need to be empowered and their participation ensured. They, who are the custodians of our history and cultural, moral and social values, are now normally confined to old age homes, and are no longer accessible to children and youth who should be learning from them. In African communities, we say that it takes a village to raise a child.

 

Ngifuna ukucedelela ngokutjho amagama akhulunywa nguMongameli wethu nakakhuluma kuSamithi yeZekolo ebe ibanjelwe nge-Johannesburg nakathi:

 

The principal educators in our communities are older persons. They educate both the parents and their offspring. Help us reinculcate these values of honouring our elders.

 

Ngithokoze, Sihlalo. [Ihlombe.] (Translation of isiNdebele paragraphs follows.)

 

[I would like to conclude by quoting the words that were spoken by our President when he addressed the religious summit which was held in Johannesburg. He said:

 

The principal educators in our communities are older persons. They educate both the parents and their offspring. Help us reinculcate these values of honouring our elders.

 

Thank you, Chairperson. [Applause.]]

 

Mnr O DE BEER: Voorsitter, die hoop en drome van die armes vir ’n beter lewe het in ’n groot nagmerrie verander. Na 16 jaar van demokrasie is daar ontnugtering. Dag na dag word die swaarkry net meer. Die werkloses staan in al hoe langer toue op soek na werk.

 

Mense het nie die nodige vaardighede nie. Alhoewel ons in die informasie-era leef, is miljoene mense nie rekenaargeletterd nie. Die regering bied geen oplossing vir hierdie mense aan nie. Elke jaar word die uitwissing van armoede beloof, maar jaar na jaar eindig hierdie belofte met geen oplossings.

 

Elke jaar word tydlyne gestel vir dieselfde beloftes. Hierdie jaar het die Ministers ondernemings geteken met die President. (Translation of Afrikaans paragraphs follows.)

 

[Mr O DE BEER: Chairperson, the hopes and dreams of the poor for a better life have turned into a terrible nightmare. After 16 years of democracy there is disillusionment. The hardship is increasing day after day. The unemployed find themselves looking for work in queues that continue to get longer.

 

People do not have the necessary skills. Even though we are living in the information age, millions of people are not computer literate. The government does not offer a solution for these people. Every year a promise is made that poverty will be eradicated, but every year this promise ends without it being resolved.

 

Every year time frames are set for the same promises. This year the Ministers have signed agreements with the President.]

 

Which promise will government honour this year? Which communities is government going to uplift? Vast amounts of money are being squandered. Expenditure that is wasteful, fruitless, unauthorised and irregular continues to take place.

 

Prof Haroon Bhorat asserts that we are now the most unequal society in the world. We recently overtook Brazil in this regard. This is bad for growth. It is a ticking time bomb. Our society is going to be torn apart.

 

Die regering se belangrikste prioriteit is om armoede te verminder. Op 28 Julie 2008 het voormalige President Mbeki ’n landswye veldtog gestig om armoede onder die land se armste burgers te verminder. Die veldtog was gemik op die armste wyke en swakste huishoudings in the land. (Translation of Afrikaans paragraph follows.)

 

[The government’s main priority is to reduce poverty. On 28 July 2008, former President Mbeki launched a countrywide campaign to reduce poverty amongst the country’s poorest citizens. The campaign was aimed at the poorest wards and the most impoverished households in the country.]

 

The long-term goal was for South Africa’s poorest households to receive assistance and support in a co-ordinated and sustainable way, with a national war room on poverty leading the campaign from the office of the Deputy President.

 

Chair, as we as a nation spend this time debating measures to fight poverty under the theme “Working together to intensify the war on poverty, hunger and socioeconomic marginalisation”, there are people out there saying: “Where did these words come from?”

 

’n Mens sou gedink het dat alle Suid Afrikaners teen hierdie tyd al water in hul huise sou hê. Dit het nie gebeur nie. Baie van die mense het nie eens ’n basiese toilet nie. Informele wonings, die gevaar van huise wat afbrand en basiese gesondheidsgevare is enorm. “Shack farming” is aan die orde van die dag.

 

Hierdie gebrek aan sanitasie het klaar ’n reuse uitwerking op die beswaarde openbare gesondheidstelsel. Dit veroorsaak ook omgewings-, maatskaplike, ekonomiese en sielkundige probleme. (Translation of Afrikaans paragraphs follows.)

 

[One would have thought that all South Africans would have had running water in their homes by now. This has not happened. Many people do not even have a basic toilet. Informal houses, the danger of houses being destroyed by fires, and basic health risks are enormous. Shack farming is the order of the day.

 

This lack of sanitation already has a big impact on the overburdened public health system. It is also causing environmental, social, economic and psychological problems.]

 

Recycling strategies will not make poverty go away. Playing with terms such as “mandates” and “Polokwane resolution” is going to fool no one. South Africa is going nowhere very slowly. We are not using our resources to eradicate poverty. [Interjections.]

 

Voorsitter, Suid-Afrika het ’n baie hoë koers van werkloosheid, en die inskrywings vir maatskaplike toelaes styg dramaties. As Cope glo ons dat maatskaplike bystand nie in fiskale terme volhoubaar is nie, want dit het geen einde nie.

 

As ’n land is ons grootste uitdaging om onderwys op te hef. Wêreldwyd is ons een van die 14 lande uit 139 lande wat reg onder aan die lys is ten opsigte van primêre onderwys. Die kwaliteit van die voorsiende programme wat mik op die vroeë kinderontwikkelingsfase tussen nul en nege jaar is baie swak. Die kwalifikasies vir en opleiding van onderwysers in “early childhood development” bestaan nie.

 

Ons voorstel, as Cope, aan die regering, veral aan die Ministers van onderwys, is om onderrig as ’n nasionale diens ... [Tyd verstreke.] (Translation of Afrikaans paragraphs follows.)

 

[Chairperson, South Africa has a very high unemployment rate, and the number of applications for social grants is increasing dramatically. As Cope we believe that social support is not sustainable in fiscal terms because there is no end to it.

 

As a country one of our greatest challenges is to raise the level of education. Regarding primary education, we are one of 14 countries at the bottom of a list of 139 worldwide. The quality of existing programmes aimed at the early childhood development phase between zero and nine years of age is very poor. There are no qualifications or training for teachers with regard to early childhood development.

 

We as Cope want to recommend to the government, especially to the Ministers of education, to regard education as a national service ... [Time expired.]]

 

Mr S D MONTSITSI: Mr Chairperson, hon Minister, hon Members of Parliament, it is unfortunate that the hon De Beer is really uninformed. He has made very serious accusations. He has just suggested to the House that government is wasteful, misusing or abusing a lot of money.

 

Now, let us quickly try to put the hon De Beer back on track. Let us not forget that the government task team was actually established on 27 October 2009. It was even much earlier because this is one of the reports that came from the task team. The task team comprises the Minister of Finance, the Minister in the Presidency responsible for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation as well as Administration in the Presidency, and the Minister for the Public Service and Administration.

 

Now, the responsibilities of this particular task team are, firstly, to reduce wastage, inefficiency and fraud within government departments; secondly, to identify and eliminate corrupt practices within the departments; thirdly, to review the ministerial handbook ― we know the ministerial handbook; fourthly, to achieve value for the money that the government allocates to departments; fifthly, to eliminate leakage and irregularities in the procurement system, wherever procurement takes place; and lastly, it is supposed to support the government key priorities. These are measures which have been put in place to ensure that none of the things that hon De Beer is talking about are actually taking place within the departments.

 

The ANC regards the question of rural women and food security as one of the key priorities to be addressed so as to ensure that we are able to develop the rural economy. The Freedom Charter states, in part, that rent and prices shall be lowered, food plentiful and no one shall go hungry.

 

In the same vein, the ANC is committed to the principle of equal opportunity for rural women just like their male counterparts, irrespective of their geographical locations.

 

We chose the theme “Working together to intensify the war on poverty, hunger and socioeconomic marginalisation” because it was an issue around which we wanted to mobilise and educate people, particularly the poor in our communities. This theme spans land and agrarian transformation and social transformation and it specifically falls within the Department of Social Development.

 

We celebrate the International Day of Rural Women and World Food Day to remind all of us that we are living in a world that is characterised by hunger, poverty, deprivation, crime and corruption.

 

It is an important month in the Department of Social Development’s calendar. The Select Committee on Economic Development marks this month in order to highlight the services that the department offers, and the extent to which access to these services can be strengthened through our oversight role, amongst others, in order to push back the frontiers of underdevelopment and hunger.

 

In his opening address to the 2010 national general council of the ANC, President Jacob Zuma called on government to pursue rural development as the major component of poverty eradication and women’s empowerment.

 

Regarding international rural women, the ANC considers rural development a central pillar in our struggle against unemployment, poverty and inequality. Women living in rural areas face the harshest conditions of poverty, food insecurity and a lack of access to services on a daily basis. This is a worldwide phenomenon. There are gender inequalities in many parts of the world, but the subordinate position of women tends to differ.

 

Women living in rural areas face the brunt of poverty. Many of them work long hours for poverty wages or do not work at all. Women form the majority of residents in rural areas and face the burden of poverty, hunger and degradation.

 

This underlines the necessity of effective rural development programmes that can ensure that investment in infrastructure, services and training reaches those areas of the country that are adversely affected. The ANC is committed to a comprehensive rural development strategy linked to agrarian reform, which builds the potential for rural sustainable livelihoods, particularly for African women.

 

Economic development in the rural areas needs to go beyond land and agrarian reform. It must include affordable financing to promote economic development; support programmes and training in assisting co-operatives and small enterprises; public sector ventures; and strategies to develop appropriate industries including light manufacturing, handicrafts, services, tourism, etc. This also requires the creation of the necessary economic infrastructure, including IT services, roads and rail.

 

Part of our government’s measures to support rural development includes infrastructure development to produce thriving rural economies and ensure sustainable development. The expansion of basic infrastructure – which includes roads, electricity, water connections and public toilet systems in rural areas – becomes a central priority for the current period.

 

Linked to food security is the land and agrarian reform programme. The Freedom Charter states that:

 

Restrictions of land ownership on a racial basis shall be ended, and all the land redivided amongst those who work it to banish famine and land hunger.

 

The state shall help to assist the process.

 

The whole of South Africa is watching the court case between the 96-year-old Mrs Sanna Mahlangu, and Lanseria Commercial Crossing with keen interest. Mrs Sanna Mahlangu has been staying on a piece of land in Lanseria, Johannesburg since the 1920s. The so-called owner of the land, who is white, has evicted all her family members and destroyed their houses. The owner insists that the land belongs to him and that only Mrs Sanna Mahlangu may stay on the land.

 

This takes us back to the dismal failure of the policy of willing-buyer, willing-seller, which needs to be reviewed. We must work to intensify the land reform programme so as to ensure that more land is in the hands of the rural poor women. We must provide the rural poor with technical skills and financial resources to use the land productively and to create sustainable livelihoods.

 

Part of the key task is to ensure that the land reform programme is integrated at national, provincial and local government levels. What we are calling for is an integrated approach to development. The Department of Social Development is keen to maintain this strategic task because it is at the centre of the socioeconomic needs of rural women.

 

Linked to the land reform programme should be an expanded agrarian reform programme for rural women. This programme should focus on the systematic promotion of agricultural co-operatives throughout the production cycle, with specific attention given to women. It should also involve active promotion of agro-processing in the agricultural sector.

 

In this regard, government must develop support measures to ensure more access to markets and finance for small women farmers. Indeed, we must ensure a much stronger link between land and agrarian reform programmes and water resource allocation, so as to ensure that water resources of best quality reach all our people, especially the poor. Access to clean water and electricity by rural women is key to the development of economic activity and the enhancement of quality of life.

 

I want to repeat what the Freedom Charter states, namely that:

 

Rent and prices shall be lowered, food plentiful and no one shall go hungry.

 

This is augmented by our own Constitution.

 

In conclusion, we support the programme from the Ministry of Social Development and we also support some of the programmes which have been undertaken to ensure that women in the rural areas are able to benefit and develop their own economic activity. Thank you.

 

The MINISTER OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: Hon House Chair, let me start by expressing appreciation for all the comments made by colleagues in this very important debate.

 

What I hear is that there is no disagreement that poverty is indeed a challenge in South Africa. Unemployment and underdevelopment are similarly a challenge in South Africa, and we need to deal with those issues.

 

What I don’t hear us having a common approach on, though, is the “how” part of it. How to deal with that? I did say earlier in my speech that there is no one-way approach to this. To those of us who are ideologically inclined to say that we must just look at the markets – like the hon members from the DA who are saying we must ensure that we work on equal opportunities for all – let me say, yes, we are saying equal opportunities for all in the ruling party and in government.

 

What we don’t agree with is that we must just say equal opportunities for all, and that is the end of it. There are people who will need to be uplifted. Those were colleagues who stood here and who understand where the ANC comes from, and where we are going. Naturally, and unsurprisingly, they are from the ANC.

 

We spoke about a need for us to do something to uplift the rural women, as hon Montsitsi has just said. Hon Boroto has just demonstrated how important it is to take care of the elderly, but also to take care of the women in those rural areas.

 

So, the sooner we get out of this mode of debating whether equal opportunities for all as an exclusive policy, is right, and therefore all others are wrong, the better for us as a nation.

 

We are definitely out there to root out poverty. We are saying that we have seen in this country of ours, South Africa, what those who followed the markets only, and ignored the entire 65% of the population in the rural areas and never even thought of providing facilities for them, actually led this country to. We have seen it happening: education denied, infrastructure denied, everything denied, and then people – especially the haves – were focusing on the markets. They think that if one focuses on commercial operations, everything else will fall into place.

 

No, we don’t agree. Let us really refocus our energies. We will certainly address all the issues that encompass people in rural areas.

 

Mr M J R DE VILLIERS: Chairperson, on a point of order: I did not use the phrase “equal opportunities”; I used the phrase “open opportunities”.

 

The MINISTER OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: Chairperson, I don’t know what the point of order is. I won’t withdraw my statement. To me it is English, and it means the same thing. Open opportunities or equal opportunities – that is what we hear every day as an ideological policy. That is what we say we are not agreeing with. Whether there is going to be another word next week that replaces “open” with “equal”, or anything, we are not for that.

 

Those of us who have not read the Millennium Development Goals, MDGs, must please go and read the document. That revealing document says to all South Africans that, in this country, South Africa, poverty has been drastically reduced. What has grown in this country is inequality.

 

It is for that reason that we say we must deal with these inequalities so that it is not only the haves who just continue to benefit, but also the have-nots. This rural development programme of ours is intended to do exactly that, leaving no stone unturned, focusing on the most vulnerable in our society, because those are the people that we’ve got to lift up, while continuing to support those who are in business and who must create jobs. We are saying that we have a dual focus. It must work. It has already worked.

 

The people who have been affected mainly, again in terms of the MDG report that we have recently tabled at the United Nations council ― proudly tabled as a South African report; this time no shadow reports from the DA or whoever ― unanimously agree and say that of the eight MDGs, six of the goals are about women. If we make an impact on women’s development and empowerment ― women who happen, by the way, to be in rural areas ― we will actually achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

 

Concerning those Millennium Development Goals, the report says that, in so far as equality in South Africa is concerned, we have actually reached and surpassed the target, even on education provision. What is lacking is in the area of quality of education.

 

Hon Boroto raised an issue about the need for us to do something really drastic for older persons, in relation to health services in the rural areas in particular, as well as services at the pay points.

 

I want to assure this august House that, regarding issues pertaining to paypoint matters, we are currently dealing with them. We will definitely come back to the portfolio committee and to this august House about how we are moving. Already, some steps have been taken towards computerising the payment system. We live with other people who do not actually want us to move in that direction. But we are more determined than ever to ensure that even the black community in South Africa also earn in a dignified manner, like their white counterparts in this country.

 

Therefore, regarding the paypoint system, in a few years’ time, these problems that we see now will be a thing of the past. We will do our best in that regard.

 

The abuse of older persons is a problem. We want to appeal to everyone to join hands and to work together, so that we ensure that we really implement the law to the fullest, because those abusers are within our communities.

 

I think, as members of this Council, we must also continue to motivate other people out there to ensure that they become part and parcel of ensuring that older persons are not abused. In a short space of time from now, we will be launching, again rolling out, the charter of values on older persons. This is one instrument which is going to guide us as to what to do and what can be done for older persons in the future.

 

We also want to indicate that we are really attending to issues of fraud. Hon De Villiers, sometimes I don’t know where you get your information. I really do not know where the hon member gets his information. Somebody stood here to define poverty. In South Africa there is no unified and agreed-upon definition of poverty, yet. We will get there, and yet we define it.

 

Brazil has overtaken us, we are aware, and that is why we cite Brazil as the example that we should follow in order to attack this poverty even in those areas. Programmes that we have to implement are, for example, Zero Hunger in communities. If we introduce, or at the time when we introduce Zero Hunger-for-all in communities, we will all realise how inclusive this programme is, because it includes the development of entrepreneurs. It is a lesson that we draw from Brazil. There are many lesson that we can draw, including that of ensuring that we educate our children, hon De Villiers.

 

It is not that we are copying everything. We have recorded our own successes in the field of early childhood development. The ECD deals with the ages zero to four years, and that is the age that Social Development deals with. We have made enormous impacts. Children who have not been in those foundation classes are now enrolled. We want to increase those numbers. We have a backlog of about just fewer than three million of those children, and we are definitely going to eradicate that backlog.

 

If we think that this government is just sitting back and not doing anything about corruption – by the way, we know that there is always a corruptor and a corruptee; we deal with both – you should know that, as I speak, there are people who are being tried in courts. We know that very well. As government we are not going to shy away from dealing with corruption. We have not created corruption; we found it there. We are dealing with it and not suppressing it. We don’t even keep quiet about any form of corruption.

 

We are not shouting slogans only. The results are very clear. They are contained in world reports. There is no sloganeering or anything like that. We want to communicate with our own people, and as we do that we want them to hear and to remember the messages. What is important is the output and the product, and the output is okay. We believe that this is the route to go. Indeed, with self-help programmes, with all those projects in communities, with sustainable livelihoods and with the growth of the economy, we are moving rural development. We will get there.

 

Five years down the line when we again ascend the podium of the world we shall be reporting results that are saying, yes, we have made it. We are very optimistic and confident that we will make it. Thank you very much. [Applause.]

 

Debate concluded.

 

TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT BILL

 

(Consideration of Bill and of Report thereon)

 

Mr C J DE BEER: Hon Chairperson, the Taxation Laws Amendment Bill, Bill 28 of 2010, is a money Bill according to section 77 of the Constitution and contains changes to total tax liabilities as a result of changes to the tax rates and/or tax bases.

 

Taxation in the South African economy is crucial to our fiscal sovereignty, and our ability to fund government through tax revenue. The Bill gives effect to the tax proposals announced in February 2010 by the hon Minister of Finance when the Budget was tabled.

Hon De Beer, I want to refer you to the Budget Speech of the Minister as well as to the review of last year’s Medium-Term Budget Policy Statement, MTBPS. Go and read it, and there you’ll find the answer to the problem that you addressed this afternoon.

 

Among the aspects that the Bill addresses are those that contribute to the economic growth value chain, such as individual and business taxpayers’ saving mechanisms and employment. These will have to be welcomed and recommended as they will both directly and indirectly contribute to the achievement of government’s priority goals, in particular the creation of decent work and sustainable livelihoods.

 

Tax evasion and avoidance is not only a crime but also a basis for building a culture of corruption in our society, which we must counteract. It is also to the credit of our democratic parliamentary processes that a number of changes have been made to some of these original proposals as a result of comments and inputs that were received.

 

The proposed Bill provides for personal income tax relief and closes various tax loopholes to ensure an equitable tax system. In the main, the Bill’s proposals seek to do the following: to tighten the rules relating to employer-provided motor vehicles with the aim of preventing arbitrage; to promote uniformity and avoid duplication in the implementation of the retirement and preretirement withdrawal benefits by making the employer-provided lump sum termination payout part of the tax-preferred calculation; to narrow the permissible instruments in the implementation of the interest exemption threshold and review its effectiveness as an incentive intended to promote savings by middle- and lower-income households; to place certain Sharice-compliant products on an equal tax footing with conventional finance products; and to close loopholes relating to financial institutions that deduct beyond what should be equitably allowed for by the basic tax principles when implementing laws dealing with interest expense allocations.

 

Amendments are also proposed in the Bill with regard to refinements to the mineral royalty legislation. The South African mineral and petroleum royalty system imposes an increasing or decreasing rate, depending on the company’s profitability. This varying rate allows for South Africa, as a whole, to enjoy relatively higher yields during boom years while providing partial relief during lean years.

 

These changes will also help in establishing co-ordination between the implementation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Royalty Act and other taxation laws. This taxation is important for increasing our tax base. That’s very important.

Changes that are being introduced will assist in the promotion of beneficiation and thereby propel us to greater heights in terms of industrialisation, economic growth and employment creation.

 

South Africa’s tax treaty network makes South Africa an ideal location for foreign investors to base the management of their regional operations. The proposed amendments eliminate tax hurdles so that foreign investors can utilise South Africa as a launching point and for various regional equity fund investments.

 

The Bill gives effect to the tax proposals announced in February 2010 when the 2010-11 Budget was tabled.

 

The Select Committee on Finance supports the Taxation Laws Amendment Bill, Bill 28 of 2010, and calls on the House to support the Bill. I thank you. [Applause.]

 

Debate concluded.

 

Bill agreed to in accordance with section 75 of the Constitution.

 

VOLUNTARY DISCLOSURE PROGRAMME AND TAXATION LAWS SECOND AMENDMENT BILL

 

(Consideration of Bill and of Report thereon)

 

Mr T E CHAANE: Hon Chairperson, hon members, the statement on the Voluntary Disclosure Programme and Taxation Laws Second Amendment Bill, Bill 29 of 2010, introduces a voluntary disclosure programme and amends administrative provisions of the Transfer Duty Act, Act 40 of 1949; the Income Tax Act, Act 58 of 1962; the Customs and Excise Act, Act 91 of 1964; the Value-Added Tax Act, Act 89 of 1991; the Unemployment Insurance Contributions Act, Act 4 of 2002; and of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Royalty (Administration) Act, Act 29 of 2008.

 

The objects of the Bill are to introduce a voluntary disclosure programme; to amend the Transfer Duty Act; to amend the Income Tax Act of 1962 so as to amend certain provisions; to amend the Unemployment Insurance Fund Contribution Act so as to effect a technical correction; to amend the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Royalty Act so as to amend certain provisions; as well as to provide for matters connected therewith.

 

In considering the Bill, the committee ensured that the Bill proposed strikes a balance between the interests of the fiscus, ensures a good system of taxation and takes into consideration the current economic challenges such as inequality and unemployment. It will also encourage compliance and, at the same time, broaden the revenue base in the long term.

 

Having considered the presentation on the Voluntary Disclosure Programme and Taxation Laws Second Amendment Bill by the National Treasury and the SA Revenue Service, the Select Committee on Finance recommends that the NCOP adopts the Bill without amendment. Chair, I so move.

 

Debate concluded.

 

Bill agreed to in accordance with section 75 of the Constitution.

 

SOUTH AFRICAN POSTBANK LIMITED BILL

 

(Consideration of Bill and of Report thereon)

 

Ms M P THEMBA: Hon House Chair, hon members, hon guests, comrades and friends, the Select Committee on Labour and Public Enterprises welcomed the introduction of the South African Postbank Limited Bill, Bill 14B of 2009. The committee gives support to the spirit and intention of what it seeks to achieve in the realisation of a better life for all South Africans, especially in the rural areas.

 

The process of addressing the challenge of the unbanked low-income groups and people living in the rural areas without access to financial services started with the adoption of the White Paper on Postal Policy in 1998. The policy spelt out the need for state intervention and the form in which this intervention would happen. It identified the Postbank as the most appropriate financial institution, best placed to cater for the needs of rural and poor communities in relation to their banking and financial services.

 

This Bill seeks to provide for the incorporation of the Postbank division of the South African Post Office and its transfer to the Postbank company. It also seeks to deal with matters of governance and functioning of the Postbank company and with all consequential arrangements that go with this.

 

As a consequence of socioeconomic inequalities, uneven development between the rural and urban areas and high levels of poverty, millions of people are unbanked and therefore have no access to saving, deposit and credit facilities. According to the National Treasury, only 59% of the country’s adult population had a basic bank account as of December 2009.

 

It was envisaged, at that time, that the establishment of a developmental role for the Postbank would require it to be restructured into a fully fledged savings bank and that the process should be phased in over a period of five to seven years.

 

Currently, the Postbank has been operating as a division of the Post Office, providing very limited financial services. The Bill takes the implementation of the government policy further by restructuring the Postbank and establishing it as the fully fledged Postbank Limited company. The corporatised entity will assume the current business of the Postbank division of the South African Post Office, which is deposit taking, money transfer, and third-party payment.

 

In conclusion, the select committee has acknowledged and accepted that the Bill has gone through all the required parliamentary processes, including public hearings, before it was passed by the National Assembly. We, as the Select Committee on Labour and Public Enterprises, have subjected the Bill to scrutiny. In our deliberations we have taken into account the specific conditions pertaining to the provinces and their views. The conditions are that the majority of our population ― who are poor, have low incomes and are unbanked ― reside mainly in the rural areas. Following these deliberations, the committee accepted the Bill without any further amendments for submission to this House. I therefore put the Bill before the House for adoption. I thank you. [Applause.]

 

Debate concluded.

 

Bill agreed to in accordance with section 75 of the Constitution.

 

The Council adjourned at 16:16.

__________

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS, TABLINGS AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

 

WEDNESDAY, 15 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.       The Minister of Finance

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Revenue Service (SARS) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 173-2010].

 

2.      The Minister in The Presidency: Performance Monitoring and Evaluation as well as Administration

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 6 – Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 6 for 2009-2010 [RP 183-2010].

 

3.     The Minister of Science and Technology

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 164-2010].

 

THURSDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

1.       Assent by President in respect of Bills

 

  1. Social Assistance Amendment Bill [B 5B – 2010] – Act No 5 of 2010 (assented to and signed by President on 15 September 2010).

 

National Council of Provinces

 

The Chairperson

 

1.       Message from National Assembly to National Council of Provinces in respect of Bills passed by Assembly and transmitted to Council

 

(1)     Bills passed by National Assembly and transmitted for concurrence on 16 September 2010:

 

(a)       Higher Education Laws Amendment Bill [B 24B – 2010] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

(b)      Skills Development Levies Amendment Bill [B 25 – 2010] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

(c)       Higher Education and Training Laws Amendment Bill [B 26B – 2010] (National Assembly – sec 76(1)).

 

The Bills have been referred to the Select Committee on Education and Recreation of the National Council of Provinces.

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.     The Minister of Finance

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Financial Intelligence Centre for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 240-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Accounting Standards Board for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 206-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the Independent Regulatory Board for Auditors for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 207-2010].

2.      The Minister of Health

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Health Laboratory Service for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

3.      The Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 219-2010].

 

(b)     Report on Monies in Trust kept in the Guardian’s Fund for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on Monies in Trust kept in the Guardian’s Fund for 2009-2010 [RP 237-2010].

 

4.       The Minister of Science and Technology

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Africa Institute of South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Council for Natural Scientific Professions for 2009-2009, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Advisory Council on Innovation for 2009-2010.

 

5.       The Minister of Tourism

 

(a)     Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Kenya on Cooperation in the Field of Tourism, tabled in terms of section 231(3) of the Constitution, 1996.

 

(b)     Explanatory Memorandum to the Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Kenya on Cooperation in the Field of Tourism.

 

(c)     Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Arab Republic of Egypt on Cooperation in the Field of Tourism, tabled in terms of section 231(3) of the Constitution, 1996.

 

(d)     Explanatory Memorandum to the Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Arab Republic of Egypt in the Field of Tourism.

 

COMMITTEE REPORTS

 

National Council of Provinces

 

  1. Report of the Select Committee on Finance on the Voluntary Disclosure Programme and Taxation Laws Second Amendment Bill [B 29 – 2010] (National Assembly – section 75), dated 14 September 2010.

 

The Select Committee on Finance, having considered and examined the Voluntary Disclosure Programme and Taxation Laws Second Amendment Bill [B 29 – 2010] (National Assembly – section 75), referred to it, and classified by the Joint Tagging Mechanism as a section 75 Bill, reports the Bill without amendments.

Report to be considered.

 

  1. Report of the Select Committee on Finance on the Taxation Laws Amendment Bill [B 28 – 2010] (National Assembly – section 77), dated 14 September 2010.

 

The Select Committee on Finance, having considered and examined the Taxation Laws Amendment Bill [B 28 – 2010] (National Assembly – section 77), referred to it, and classified by the Joint Tagging Mechanism as a Money Bill, reports that it has agreed to the Bill without amendments.

 

Report to be considered.

 

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

1.       Introduction of Bills

 

(1)      The Minister of Transport

 

  1. Merchant Shipping (Safe Containers Convention) Bill [B 31 – 2010] (National Assembly – proposed sec 75) [Explanatory summary of Bill and prior notice of its introduction published in Government Gazette No 33390 of 16 July 2010.]

Introduction and referral to the Portfolio Committee on Transport of the National Assembly, as well as referral to the Joint Tagging Mechanism (JTM) for classification in terms of Joint Rule 160.

 

In terms of Joint Rule 154 written views on the classification of the Bill may be submitted to the JTM within three parliamentary working days.

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.       The Minister of Correctional Services

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 18 – Department of Correctional   Services for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 18 for 2009-2010 [RP 119-2010].

2.       The Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Water Research Commission for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2008-2009 [RP 188-2010].

 

MONDAY, 20 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.       The Minister of Communications

 

(a)     Final Acts of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Plenipotentiary Conference, Antalya, 2006, tabled in terms of section 231(2) of the Constitution, 1996.

 

(b)     Explanatory Memorandum to the Final Acts of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Plenipotentiary Conference, Antalya, 2006.

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of Sentech Limited for 2009-2010,    including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

2.     The Minister of Finance

 

(a)    Report and Financial Statements of Vote 7 – National Treasury for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 7 for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Financial Statements of the Project Development Facility for Auditors for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(c)     Financial Statements of the Office of the Technical Assistance Unit  for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

3.       The Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development

 

(a)    Report and Financial Statements of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development on the Criminal Assets Recovery Account for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 224-2010].

 

4.       The Minister of Police

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 22 – Department of Police for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 22 for 2009-2010 [RP 163-2010].

 

WEDNESDAY, 22 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Council of Provinces

 

The Chairperson

 

1.      Referral to Committees of papers tabled

 

  1. The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Women, Children and People with Disabilities for consideration and report:

 

  1. Report and Financial Statements of the Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) for 2008-09, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2008-09.

 

  1. Report and Financial Statements of the Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) for 2007-08, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2007-08.

 

  1. The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Women, Children and People with Disabilities for consideration and report:

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Youth Commission for  2008-09, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2008-09.

 

(3)    The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Women, Children and People with Disabilities for consideration:

 

(a)     Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on the South African Gender Barometer Project – 2009.

 

(b)     Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on the Gender in the Curriculum – 2007.

 

(c)     Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on Widowhood Rites and Rights – 2008.

 

(d)     Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on Threads of Pain and Resilience – 2008.

(e)     Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) in the Private Sector - December 2008.

 

(f)      Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on the National Dialogue on Elections 2009.

 

(g)     Research Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on the Victims’ Charter – February 2009.

 

(h)     Report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on the National Monitoring Election - 2009.

 

(4)       The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Security and

Constitutional Development:

 

  1. Notice prescribing forms of assistance for which a postal service provider must be compensated and the tariffs of compensation in terms of section 31 of the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication Related Information Act, 2002 (Act No 70 of 2002).

 

(b)     Proclamation No 1 published in Government Gazette No 32945 dated 10 February 2010: Transfer of administration and powers and functions entrusted by legislation in terms of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996.

 

(c)     Medium Term Strategic Framework of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development for 2010 – 2014.

 

(d)     Draft Regulations made under section 9(2) of the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa Special Measures Act, 2006 (Act No 11 of 2006).

 

(5)    The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Land and

Environmental Affairs:

 

(a)     Government Notice No 54 published in Government Gazette No 32898 dated 29 January 2010: Fees payable in respect of applications and the issuing of Rights, Permits and Licences, in terms of the Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act No 18 of 1998).

 

(b)     Government Notice No R.75 published in Government Gazette No 32935 dated 12 February 2010: Regulations:  Admission of Guilt Fines, in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of 1998).

 

  1. General Notice No 126 published in Government Gazette No 32950 dated 12 February 2010: Notice of intention to make regulations regarding fees for the provision of aviation meteorological services, in terms of the South African Weather Service Act, 2001 (Act No 8 of 2001).

 

  1. General Notice No 141 published in Government Gazette No 32962 dated 17 February 2010: Proposed regulations: Application form and format for atmospheric emission licence and matters pertaining to the implementation of the atmospheric emission licensing system, in terms of the National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act, 2004 (Act No 39 of 2004).

 

  1. General Notice No 162 published in Government Gazette No 32970 dated 24 February 2010: National guidelines on environmental impact assessment: For public comments, in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of 1998).

 

  1. Government Notice No R.142 published in Government Gazette No 32966 dated 26 February 2010: Amendment: Regulations, in terms of the Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act No 18 of 1998).

 

  1. General Notice No 198 published in Government Gazette No 33001 dated 5 March 2010: Draft Integrated Industry Waste Management Plan for the South African Tyre Recycling Process (SATRP) Company relating to Waste Tyre Regulations, 2009: Invitation to submit written comments, in terms of the National Environmental Management: Waste Act, 2008 (Act No 59 of 2008).

 

  1. Government Notice No R.173 published in Government Gazette No 33002 dated 5 March 2010: Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) Regulations, in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No 10 of 2004).

 

  1. General Notice No 201 published in Government Gazette No 33005 dated 8 March 2010: Text for Multilateral Environmental Agreements for Chemicals Management, in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of 1998).

 

  1. Government Notice No 179 published in Government Gazette No 33006 dated 12 March 2010: Assignment of management of Garden Route National Park to South African National Parks (SANPARKS), in terms of the National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act, 2003 (Act No 57 of 2003).

 

  1. The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs for consideration and report:

 

  1. Report and Financial Statements of the Botshelo Water for 2008-09, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2008-09.

 

  1. Draft amendments to the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations: Listing Notice 1: List of activities and competent authorities identified in terms of sections 24(2) and 24D of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of  1998).

 

  1. Draft amendments to the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations: Listing Notice 2: List of activities and competent authorities identified in terms of sections 24(2) and 24D of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of  1998).

 

  1. Draft amendments to the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations: Listing Notice 3: List of activities and competent authorities identified in terms of sections 24(2) and 24D of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of  1998).

 

  1. Draft amendments to the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations: Environmental Management Framework Regulations of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of 1998).

 

  1. Draft amendments to the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations: Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations under sections 24(5), 24M and 44 of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No 107 of 998).

 

  1. The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs:

 

(a)     General Notice No 313 published in Government Gazette No 33116 dated 16 April 2010: Regulations:  Proper administration of the Vredefort Dome World Heritage Site:  Invitation to submit written representations on or objections to the draft regulations, in terms of the World Heritage Convention  Act, 1999 (Act No 49 of 1999).

 

(b)     Government Notice No R.259 published in Government Gazette No 33072 dated 31 March 2010: Regulations:  Fees for the provision of aviation meteorological services, in terms of the South African Weather Service Act, 2001 (Act No 8 of  2001).

 

(c)     Government Notice No 393 published in Government Gazette No 33184 dated 14 May 2010: Invitation for written representations or comments on the Draft National Strategy on Sustainable Development and Action Plan 2010-2014.

 

(d)     Government Notice No 400 published in Government Gazette No 33186 dated 14 May 2010: Delegation of powers under regulation 3 (3) of the CITES Regulation, 2010, in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No 10 of 2004).

 

  1. The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Trade and International Relations:

 

(a)     Agreement between the Government of the State of Kuwait and the Government of the Republic of South Africa on Economic and Technical Cooperation, tabled in terms of section 231(3) of the Constitution, 1996.

 

(b)     Explanatory Memorandum on the Agreement between the Government of the State of Kuwait and the Government of the Republic of South Africa on Economic and Technical Cooperation.

 

(c)     Trade Cooperation Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Sultanate of Oman, tabled in terms of section 231(3) of the Constitution, 1996.

 

  1. Explanatory Memorandum on the Trade Cooperation Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Sultanate of Oman.

 

  1. The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Trade and International Relations for consideration:

 

(a)     Report of the Auditor-General on an investigation into the procurement of the enterprise content management system at the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office in South Africa [RP 40-2010].

 

  1. The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Finance and Select Committee on Appropriations for consideration:

 

(a)     Strategic Plan of the National Treasury (Update) for 2010/13 [RP 39-2010].

 

(b)     General Report of the Auditor-General on the National Audit Outcomes for 2008-09 [RP 173-2009].

 

(11)    The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Finance and the Select Committee on Appropriations:

 

  1. Government Notice No 230 published in Government Gazette No 33047 dated 23 March 2010:  Stopping and reallocation of conditional allocations in terms of the Division of Revenue Act, 2009 (Act No 12 of 2009).
  2. Government Notice No 281 published in Government Gazette No 33100 dated 13 April 2010:  Allocations to municipalities and schedule 8 allocations to provinces 2010/2011, in terms of the Division of Revenue Act, 2010 (Act No 1 of 2010).

 

(12)    The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Finance and the Select Committee on Appropriations for consideration:

(a)     2009 Tax Statistics - Joint publication of the National Treasury and the South African Revenue Service.

 

(13)    The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Finance for consideration:

 

(a)     Strategic Plan of Statistics South Africa for 2010/11 – 2014/15 and Work Programme of Statistics South Africa for 2010/11.

 

  1. The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Finance:

 

(a)     Government Notice No 231 published in Government Gazette No 33051 dated 26 March 2010: Administration and operations: Establishment of the Government Pensions Administration Agency (GPAA), in terms of section 7A(4) of the Public Service Act (Proclamation No 103 of 1994).

 

(b)     Government Notice No 168 published in Government Gazette No 32993 dated 1 March 2010: Commencement date of sections 39, 40, 41(a), 42, 43, 54 and 55 in terms of the Insurance Laws Amendment Act, 2008 (Act No 27 of 2008).

 

(c)     Government Notice No 169 published in Government Gazette No 32994 dated 1 March 2010:  Withdrawal of regulations to calculate the tax payable in terms of a small retailers VAT package in terms of the Value-Added Tax Act, 1991 (Act No 89 of 1991).

 

(d)     Government Notice No R. 211 published in Government Gazette No 33036 dated 19 March 2010: Regulations: Prescribing the period within which the tax payable in terms of section 8 (2) of that Act shall be paid in terms of the Value-Added Tax Act, 1991 (Act No 89 of 1991).

 

(e)     Government Notice No 257 published in Government Gazette No 33037 dated 23 March 2010:  Publication of proposed amendment of regulation 28 of the Regulations:  For public comment in terms of the Pension Funds Act, 1956 (Act No 24 of 1956).

 

(f)      Government Notice No R. 218 published in Government Gazette No 33042 dated 26 March 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 2 (No 2/324), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(g)     Government Notice No R. 219 published in Government Gazette No 33042 dated 26 March 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 2 (No 2/325), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(h)     Government Notice No R. 256 published in Government Gazette No 33070 dated 31 March 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 1. Part 5A (No 1/5/147), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

(i)      Government Notice No R. 257 published in Government Gazette No 33070 dated 31 March 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 1. Part 5B (No 1/5/148), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(j)      Government Notice No R. 258 published in Government Gazette No 33070 dated 31 March 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 6. (No 6/16), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(k)     Government Notice No R. 266 published in Government Gazette No 33083 dated 1 April 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 1. (No 1/1/402), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(l)      Government Notice No R. 267 published in Government Gazette No 33083 dated 1 April 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 10. (No 10/13), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(m)    Government Notice No 240 published in Government Gazette No 33059 dated 1 April 2010: Listing of public entities: Safety and Security Sector Education and Training – Amendment of Schedule 3, Part A, of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No 1 of 1999).

 

(n)     Government Notice No 241 published in Government Gazette No 33059 dated 1 April 2010: Listing and delisting of public entities: Free State Youth Commission and Western Cape Provincial Youth Commission - Amendment of  Schedule 3, Part C, of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No 1 of 1999).

(o)     Government Notice No 242 published in Government Gazette No 33059 dated 1 April 2010: Technical changes of public entities: South African Rail Commuter Corporation – Amendment of Schedule 3, Part B, of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No 1 of 1999).

 

(p)     Government Notice No R. 269 published in Government Gazette No 33087 dated 9 April 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 3 (No 3/658), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(q)     Government Notice No R. 289 published in Government Gazette No 33109 dated 13 April 2010: Correction Notice: Amendment of Schedule No 3 (No 3/659), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(r)      Government Notice No R. 341 published in Government Gazette No 33140 dated 30 April 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 1 (No 1/1/1403), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(s)     Government Notice No R. 342 published in Government Gazette No 33140 dated 30 April 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 4 (No 4/330), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(t)      Government Notice No R. 357 published in Government Gazette No 33165 dated 7 May 2010: Correction Notice: Amendment of Schedule No 1 (No 1/1/1404), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(u)     Government Notice No R. 358 published in Government Gazette No 33165 dated 7 May 2010: Amendment of Schedule No 4 (No 4/331), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(v)     Government Notice No R. 293 published in Government Gazette No 33112 dated 13 April 2010: Appointment of an Authorised Dealer in Foreign Exchange with Limited Authority, in terms of the South African Reserve Bank Act, 1989 (Act No 90 of 1989).

 

(w)     Government Notice No R. 283 published in Government Gazette No 33103 dated 16 April 2010: Amendment of Rules (DAR/69), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(x)     Government Notice No R. 340 published in Government Gazette No 33140 dated 30 April 2010: Amendment of Rules (DAR/70), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

  1. The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Social Services for consideration:

 

(a)     Government Notice No 261 published in Government Gazette No 33078 dated 31 March 2010: Increase in respect of special grants, in terms of the Social Assistance Act, 2004 (Act No 13 of 2004).

 

  1. The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Education and Recreation for consideration:
  1. Medium Term Strategic Framework of the Department of Arts and Culture for 2010 – 2014.

 

  1. The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Education and Recreation:

 

(a)     Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Science, Technology and Innovation, tabled in terms of Section 231 (3) of the Constitution, 1996.

 

(18)    The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Finance and the Select Committee on Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

 

  1. Government Notice No 114 published in Government Gazette No 32951 dated 19 February 2010: Exemption granted to Cape Winelands District Municipality in terms of the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 (Act No 56 of 2003).

 

(19)    The following papers are referred to the Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs and the Select Committee on Finance:

 

  1. Government Notice No 52 published in Government Gazette No 32898 dated 29 January 2010: Levies on Fish and Fish Products, in terms of the Sea Fishery Act, 1988 (Act No 12 of 1988).

 

  1. Government Notice No 53 published in Government Gazette No 32898 dated 29 January 2010: Fishing Harbour Fees, in terms of the Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act No 18 of 1998).

 

(20)    The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Labour and Public Enterprises for consideration:

 

(a)     Framework for performance management system for Icasa chairperson and councillors, submitted for consultation in terms of section 6A of the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa Act (No 13 of 2000).

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.      The Minister in The Presidency: Performance Monitoring and Evaluation as well as Administration

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the South Africa International Marketing Council Trust (IMC) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 134-2009].

 

2.      The Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

 

(a)    Report and Financial Statements of the Agricultural Research Council (ARC) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 201-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Perishable Products Export Control Board (PPECB)for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Agricultural Marketing Council for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 199-2009].

 

3.       The Minister of Sport and Recreation

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 17 – Sport and Recreation South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 17 for 2009-2010 [RP 205-2010].

 

4.       The Minister of Transport

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company Limited (ATNS) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Reports and Financial Statements of the Cross-Border Road Transport  Agency (C-BRTA) for 2009-2010, including the Reports of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2007-2008 and 2008-2009.

 

THURSDAY, 23 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

1.      Draft Bills submitted in terms of Joint Rule 159

 

(1)      Rural Development and Land Reform General Amendment Bill, 2010, submitted by the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform.

 

Referred to the Portfolio Committee on Rural Development and Land Reform and the Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs.

 

National Council of Provinces

 

The Chairperson

 

1.      Referral to Committees of papers tabled

  1. The following paper is referred to the Select Committee on Social Services:

 

  1. Explanation for late tabling of 2009/10 Annual Report of the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA).

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.      The Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 218-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Onderstepoort Biological Products (Ltd) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

2.       The Minister of Arts and Culture

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Blind SA for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the Afrikaans Language Museum and Language Monument for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 239-2010].

 

(d)     Report and Financial Statements of the Artscape for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 200-2010].

 

(e)     Report and Financial Statements of Business and Arts South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 70-2010].

 

(f)      Report and Financial Statements of the Ditsong Museums of South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(g)     Report and Financial Statements of the Freedom Park Trust for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 213-2010].

 

(h)     Report and Financial Statements of the Iziko Museums of Cape Town for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 166-2010].

 

(i)      Report and Financial Statements of the Luthuli Museum for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 187-2010].

 

(j)      Report and Financial Statements of the Market Theatre Foundation for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 54-2010].

 

(k)     Report and Financial Statements of the Msunduzi/Voortrekker Museum for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(l)      Report and Financial Statements of the Natal Museum for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 203-2010].

 

(m)    Report and Financial Statements of the National Arts Council for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 245-2010].

 

(n)     Report and Financial Statements of the National English Literary Museum for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(o)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Film and Video Foundation for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 186-2010].

 

(p)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Heritage Council for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 221-2010].

 

(q)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Library of South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the financial Statements and Performance Information  for 2009-2010 [RP 209-2010].

 

(r)      Report and Financial Statements of the Nelson Mandela Museum for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 225-2010].

 

(s)     Report and Financial Statements of the Pan South African Language Board for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(t)      Report and Financial Statements of the Kwazulu-Natal Performing Arts Company (Trading as the Playhouse Company) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(u)     Report and Financial Statements of the Robben Island Museum for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 180-2010].

 

(v)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Library for the Blind for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 159-2010].

 

(w)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African State Theatre for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 161-2010].

 

(x)     Report and Financial Statements of the War Museum of the Boer Republics for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(y)     Report and Financial Statements of the William Humphreys Art Gallery for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(z)      Report and Financial Statements of the Windybrow Centre for the Arts for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

3.       The Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 27 – Department of Rural Development and Land Reform for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 27 for 2009-2010 [RP 241-2010].

 

4.       The Minister of Social Development

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 16 – Department of Social Development for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 16 for 2009-2010 [RP 127-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Development Agency for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 19-2010].

 

MONDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

1.      The Minister of Human Settlements

 

(a)    Report and Financial Statements of Vote 26 –  National Department of Human Settlements for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 26 for 2009-2010 [RP 185-2010].

 

TUESDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.      The Minister of Finance

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Financial Services Board for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 195-2010].

 

2.       The Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

 

(a)     Accession to the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance, tabled in terms of section 231(2) of the Constitution, 1996.

 

(b)     Explanatory memorandum to the Accession to the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance.

3.       The Minister in The Presidency for National Planning

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 11 - Statistics South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 11 for 2009-2010 [RP 91-2010].

 

4.       The Minister for the Public Service and Administration

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the State Information Technology Agency (Pty) Ltd (SITA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 248-2010].

 

5.      The Minister of Science and Technology

 

(a)    Report and Financial Statements of Vote 31 – Department of Science and Technology for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 31 for 2009-2010 [RP 244-2010].

 

(b)    Report and Financial Statements of the Tshumisano Trust for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(c)    Report and Financial Statements of the South African National Energy Research Institute (Pty) Ltd for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

WEDNESDAY, 29 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.      The Minister of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Municipal Demarcation Board for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 227-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 235-2010].

 

2.      The Minister of Communications

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Post Office (Ltd) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Broadcasting Corporation Limited (SABC) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010.

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) for 2009-2010, including the Reports of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements of Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) and the Universal Service and Access Fund (USAF) for 2009-2010 [RP 202-2010].

 

3.      The Minister of Energy

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Nuclear Regulator for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 78-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 28 – Department of Minerals and Energy  for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 28 for 2009-2010 [RP 69-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the Electricity Distribution Industrial Holdings (Pty) Ltd (EDIH) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 236-2010].

 

(d)     Report and Financial Statements of the Central Energy Fund Group of Companies (CEF) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General and the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of the Central Energy Fund Group of Companies for 2009-2010 [RP 168-2010].

 

(e)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Limited (NECSA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 197-2010].

 

(f)      Report and Financial Statements of the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 192-2010].

 

4.       The Minister of Home Affairs

 

  1. Report and Financial Statements of Vote 4 – Department of Home Affairs for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 4 for 2009-2010 [RP 190-2010].

 

5.       The Minister of Mineral Resources

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 28 – Department of Minerals and Energy  for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 28 for 2009-2010 [RP 69-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Council for Mineral Technology (Mintek)  for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 31-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the State Diamond Trader for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(d)     Report and Financial Statements of the Council for Geoscience for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 79-2010].

 

(e)     Report and Financial Statements of the Mine Health and Safety Council (MHSC) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 09-2010].

 

(f)      Report and Financial Statements of the South African Diamond and Precious Metals Regulator for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 83-2010].

 

6.     The Minister of Public Enterprises

  1. Report and Financial Statements of South African Express Airways (Proprietary) Limited for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Airways (Pty) (Ltd) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the Alexkor Limited for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

7.     The Minister of Transport

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Road Accident Fund for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 45-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Railway Safety Regulator for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 67-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the Driving License Card Account for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 199-2010].

 

THURSDAY, 30 SEPTEMBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

  1. The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Electoral Commission for 2009- 2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 52-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statementof the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) for 2009- 2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

2.       The President of the Republic

 

  1. Report and Financial Statements of Vote 1 – The Presidency for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 1 for 2009-2010 [RP 86-2010].

 

3.       The Minister of Finance

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Office of the Ombud for Financial Services Providers for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Public Investment Corporation Limited for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010 [RP 92-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the Sasria (Limited) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010.

 

(d)     Report and Financial Statements of the Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010[RP 251-2010].

 

(e)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Reserve Bank for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010.

 

(f)      Annual Economic Report of the South African Reserve Bank for 2010.

 

4.     The Minister of Transport

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 33 – Department of Transport for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 33 for 2009-2010 [RP 198-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 169-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Maritime Safety Authority (including the Maritime Fund) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 216-2010].

 

(d)     Reports and Financial Statements of the Ports Regulator of South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Reports of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for  2009-2010.

 

(e)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Search and Rescue Organisation for 2009-2010.

 

(f)      Report and Financial Statements of the State of Railway Safety in South Africa of the Railway Safety Regulator for 2008-2009 [RP 256-2010].

 

5.     The Minister of Higher Education and Training

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Clothing, Textiles, Footwear and Leather Sector Education and Training Authority (CTFL-Seta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 99-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Chemical Industries and Training Authority (CHIETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 98-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of Construction Education Training Authority (CETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 100-2010].

 

(d)     Report and Financial Statements of the Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 115-2010].

 

(e)     Report and Financial Statements of the Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (Bank-Seta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 97-2010].

 

(f)      Report and Financial Statements of The Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (Inseta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 108-2010].

 

(g)     Report and Financial Statements of the Transport Sector Education and Training Authority (TETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 116-2010].

 

(h)     Report and Financial Statements of the Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AgriSeta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 96-2010].

 

(i)      Report and Financial Statements of the Forest Industries Sector Education and Training Authority (FIETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 93-2010].

 

(j)      Report and Financial Statements of the Food and Beverages Manufacturing  Sector Education and Training Authority for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 144-2010].

 

(k)     Report and Financial Statements of the Media, Advertising, Publishing, Printing and Packaging Sector Education and Training Authority (MAPPP-Seta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 150-2010].

 

(l)      Report and Financial Statements of the Public Service, Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 112-2010].

(m)    Report and Financial Statements of the Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(n)     Report and Financial Statements of the Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 109-2010].

 

(o)     Report and Financial Statements of the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 106-2010].

 

(p)     Report and Financial Statements of Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 101-2010].

 

(q)     Report and Financial Statements of the Information System, Electronics and Telecommunications Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (Isett-Seta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 107-2010].

 

(r)      Report and Financial Statements of the Finance, Accounting, Management Consulting and other Financial Services Sector Education and Training Authority for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 103-2010].

 

(s)     Report and Financial Statements of the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Education and Training Authority (MER-Seta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 111-2010].

 

(t)      Report and Financial Statements of the Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Education and Training Authority (Theta) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance information for 2009-2010 [RP 118-2010].

 

(u)     Report and Financial Statements of the Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 117-2010].

 

(v)     Report and Financial Statements of the Council on Higher Education (CHE) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(w)     Report and Financial Statements of  the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 94-2010].

 

(x)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

6.      The Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 34 – Department of Water Affairs for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 34 for 2009-2010 [RP 247-2010].

 

7.     The Minister for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 29 – Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 29 for 2009-2010 [RP 252-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

8.     The Minister for the Public Service and Administration

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 9 – Department of Public Service and Administration for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 9 for 2009-2010 [RP 211-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of Public Administration Leadership and Management Academy (Palama) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information  for 2009-2010 [RP 191-2010].

 

9.     The Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Ncera Farms (Pty)Ltd for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

10.     The Minister of Arts and Culture

 

(a)        Report and Financial Statements of the National Museum – Bloemfontein for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Performing Arts Centre of the Free State for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

11.    The Minister of Police

(a)      Report and Financial Statements of Vote 20 – Independent Complaints Directorate (ICD) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 20 for 2009-2010 [RP 243-2010].

 

12.     The Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Armaments Corporation of South Africa Limited (ARMSCOR) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Group Financial Statements and Performance Information  for 2009-2010 [RP 215-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Castle Control Board of Good Hope for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 165-2010].

 

13.      The Minister of Public Works

 

(a)    Report and Financial Statements of Vote 5 – Department of Public Works for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 5 for 2009-2010.

 

(b)    Report and Financial Statements of Agrément South Africa (ASA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(c)    Report and Financial Statements of the Council for the Built Environment (CBE) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(d)    Report and Financial Statements of the Independent Development Trust for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 184-2010].

 

(e)    Report and Financial Statements of the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 257-2010].

 

14.      The Minister of Public Enterprises

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Limited (PBMR) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010 [RP 258-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Forestry Company (Ltd) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

15.      The Minister of Home Affairs

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Film and Publication Board for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 250-2010].

 

16.      The Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

 

(a)    Report and Financial Statements of Vote 3 – Department of International Relations and Cooperation for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 3 for 2009-2010.

 

17.      The Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Ingonyama Trust Board for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010.

 

18.      The Minister of Economic Development

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of - the Department of Economic Development for 2009-2010.

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Micro-finance Apex Fund for 2009-2009, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 128-2010].

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of Khula Enterprise Finance Limited for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010 [RP 160-2010].

 

(d)     Report and Financial Statements of the Competition Tribunal for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance information for 2009-2010 [RP 50-2010].

 

(e)     Report and Financial Statements of the Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited (IDC) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010.

 

(f)      Report and Financial Statements of the International Trade Administration Commission of South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(g)     Report and Financial Statements of the Competition Commission for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 217-2010].

 

19.      The Minister of Sport and Recreation

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Boxing South Africa for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements for 2009-2010.

 

20.      The Minister of Health

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 14 –  National Department of Health for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 14 for 2009-2010 [RP 177-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Compensation Commissioner for Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(c)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

(d)     Report and Financial Statements of the Council for Medical Schemes for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 67-2010].

 

FRIDAY, 1 OCTOBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

1.       Introduction of Bills

 

(1)      The Minister of Home Affairs

 

  1. Immigration Amendment Bill [B 32 – 2010] (National Assembly – proposed sec 75) [Explanatory summary of Bill and prior notice of its introduction published in Government Gazette No 33478 of 20 August 2010.]

 

Introduction and referral to the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs of the National Assembly, as well as referral to the Joint Tagging Mechanism (JTM) for classification in terms of Joint Rule 160.

 

In terms of Joint Rule 154 written views on the classification of the Bill may be submitted to the JTM within three parliamentary working days.

 

(2)      The Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

 

  1. Rural Development and Land Reform General Amendment Bill [B 33 – 2010] (National Assembly – proposed sec 75) [Explanatory summary of Bill and prior notice of its introduction published in Government Gazette No 33500 of 3 September 2010.]

Introduction and referral to the Portfolio Committee on Rural Development and Land Reform of the National Assembly, as well as referral to the Joint Tagging Mechanism (JTM) for classification in terms of Joint Rule 160.

 

In terms of Joint Rule 154 written views on the classification of the Bill may be submitted to the JTM within three parliamentary working days.

 

FRIDAY, 8 OCTOBBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.       The Minister of Finance

 

(a)     Proclamation No R. 46 published in Government Gazette No 33551 dated 13 September 2010: Commencement of the South African Reserve Bank, in terms of the South African Reserve Bank Amendment Act, 2010 (Act No 4 of 2010).

 

(b)     Government Notice No R. 758 published in Government Gazette No 33507 dated 27 Aug 2010 : Amendment of Schedule No.1 (No. 1/1/1414)), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(c)     Government Notice No R. 770 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Rules, (DAR/74), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(d)     Government Notice No R. 771 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.1 (No. 1/1/1415), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(e)     Government Notice No R. 772 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.1 (No. 1/3/9), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(f)      Government Notice No R. 773 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.1 (No.1/3/10), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(g)     Government Notice No R. 774 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.3 (No.3/663), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(h)     Government Notice No R. 775 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.4 (No. 4/334), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(i)      Government Notice No R. 776 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.5 (No. 5/91), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(j)      Government Notice No R. 777 published in Government Gazette No 33514 dated 31 August 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.6 (No. 6/17), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(k)     Government Notice No R. 762 published in Government Gazette No 33501 dated 3 September 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.2 (No. 2/331), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(l)      Government Notice No R. 763 published in Government Gazette No 33501 dated 3 September 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.4 (No. 4/333), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(m)    Government Notice No R. 808 published in Government Gazette No 33552 dated 13 September 2010:Regulations relating to the South African Reserve Bank, in terms of the South African Reserve Bank Act, 1989 (Act No 90 of 1989).

 

2.     The Minister of Trade and Industry

 

(a)     General Notice No 704 published in Government Gazette No 33374 dated 12 July 2010: Prohibition of the use of the Moses Mabhida Stadium and other stadiums intellectual property rights, in terms of the Merchandise Marks Act, 1941 (Act No 17 of 1941).

(b)     Government Notice No R. 644 published in Government Gazette No 33398 dated 20 July 2010: Direction and Procedure for the Distribution Agencies in relation to the distribution of funds from the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund , in terms of the Lotteries  Act, 1997 (Act No 57 of 1997).

 

(c)     Government Notice No R. 645 published in Government Gazette No 33398 dated 20 July 2010: Application for Grant of the Act, in terms of the Lotteries  Act, 1997 (Act No 57 of 1997).

 

(d)     Government Notice No 634 published in Government Gazette No 33384 dated 23 July 2010: Accounting officer-Profession whose members qualify in terms of section 60: Southern African Institute of Government Auditors, in terms of the Close Corporations Act, 1984 (Act No 69 of 1984).

 

(e)     Government Notice No R. 685 published in Government Gazette No 33427 dated 6 August  2010: Regulations: Payment of levy and fees with regard to compulsory specifications: Amendments, in terms of the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications Act, 2008 (Act No 5 of 2008).

 

3.     The Minister for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

(a)      Report and Financial Statements of the National House of Traditional Leaders (NHTL) for 2009-2010 [RP 267-2010].

 

4.      The Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of Vote 19 – Department of Defence for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information of Vote 19 for 2009-2010. [RP 179-2010].

 

MONDAY, 11 OCTOBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

1.       Assent by President in respect of Bills

 

(1)     Criminal Law (Forensic Procedures) Amendment Bill [B 2B – 2009] – Act No 6 of 2010 (assented to and signed by President on 1 October 2010).

 

2.      Draft Bills submitted in terms of Joint Rule 159

 

(1)      Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill, 2010, submitted by the Minister of Basic Education.

 

Referred to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and the Select Committee on Education and Recreation.

 

(2)      Criminal Procedure Amendment Bill, 2010, submitted by the Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development.

 

Referred to the Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Development and the Select Committee on Security and Constitutional Development.

 

3.      Classification of Bills by Joint Tagging Mechanism (JTM)

 

(1)      The JTM in terms of Joint Rule 160(6) classified the following Bills as section 75 Bills:

 

  1. Refugees Amendment Bill [B 30 - 2010] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

  1. Merchant Shipping (Safe Containers Convention) Bill [B 31 - 2010] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.       The Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development

 

(a)     Directives (Plea and Sentence Agreements), issued in terms of section 105A (11) of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act No 51 of 1977).

 

2.      The Minister in The Presidency: Performance Monitoring and Evaluation as well as Administration

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the National Youth Development Agency  (NYDA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010.

 

TUESDAY, 12 OCTOBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

  1. Recommendations on tools of trade for public office‑bearers

 

(1)     A letter has been received from the chairperson of the Independent Commission for the Remuneration of Public Office‑Bearers, Judge L W Seriti, requesting comment and input from members of Parliament on the commission’s Concept Paper on Tools of Trade and its Annexure “A” by 11 November 2010.

 

Referred to the Joint Rules Committee for consideration.

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

  1. The Minister of Transport

 

(a)     Reports and Financial Statements of the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) for 2009-2010, including the Reports of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for  2009-2010.

 

Correction:       The above entry replaces item 4(b) under Tablings in the name of the Minister of Transport in the Announcements, Tablings and Committee Reports of 22 September 2010, on p 2867.

 

National Council of Provinces

 

1.      The Chairperson

 

(a)     Notice of termination of section 139 intervention in the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality (North West).

 

Referred to the Select Committee on Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs for consideration and report.

 

WEDNESDAY, 13 OCTOBER 2010

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.       The Minister of Higher Education and Training

 

  1. Report and Financial Statements of the Energy Sector Education and Training Authority (ESETA) for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 102-2010].

 

  1. The Minister of Economic Development

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the South African Micro-finance Apex Fund for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Auditor-General on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 128-2010].

 

Correction:       The above entry replaces item 18(b) under Tablings in the name of the Minister of Economic Development in the Announcements, Tablings and Committee Reports of 30 September 2010, on p 2901.

 

National Council of Provinces

 

1.      The Chairperson

 

(a)     Financial and Fiscal Commission (FFC) Technical Report: Submission for the Division of Revenue for 2011-2012. [RP 72-2010].

 

Referred to the Select Committee on Appropriations for consideration.

 

THURSDAY, 14 OCTOBER 2010

 

COMMITTEE REPORTS

 

National Council of Provinces

 

1.      Report of the Select Committee on Labour and Public Enterprises on the South African Postbank Bill [B14B-2009], (National Assembly – sec 75), dated 13 October 2010.

 

The Select Committee on Labour and Public Enterprises, having considered the South African Postbank Limited Bill [B14B─2009] (National Assembly – sec. 75), referred to it, reports the Bill without proposed amendments.

 

Report to be considered.

 

MONDAY, 18 OCTOBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Council of Provinces

The Chairperson

 

  1. Membership of Committees

 

The following changes have been made to the membership of Committees:

 

Select Committee on Security and Constitutional Development and Select Committee on Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

Discharged:         Bekker, Mr J M G                      DA                   Western Cape

Appointed:           Beyleveldt, Mr T B                     DA                   Western Cape

 

Select Committee on Finance and Select Committee on Appropriations

 

Discharged:         Harris, Mr T D                DA                   Western Cape

Appointed:           Bekker, Mr J M G                      DA                   Western Cape

 

Select Committee on Public Services and Select Committee on Labour and Public Enterprises

 

Appointed:           Bekker, Mr J M G (Alt)   DA                   Western Cape

 

Select Committee on Economic Development and Select Committee on Trade and International Relations

 

Discharged:         Chen, Ms S S                            DA                   Gauteng

Appointed:           Abrahams, Ms B L                     DA                   Gauteng

 

Select Committee on Social Services and Select Committee on Education and Recreation

 

Appointed:           Abrahams, Ms B L (Alt)  DA                   Gauteng

 

TUESDAY, 19 OCTOBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.      Classification of Bills by Joint Tagging Mechanism (JTM)

 

(1)      The JTM in terms of Joint Rule 160(6) classified the following Bills as section 75 Bills:

 

  1. Immigration Amendment Bill [B 32 - 2010] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

  1. Rural Development and Land Reform General Amendment Bill [B 33 - 2010] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

1.       The Minister of Finance

 

(a)     Proclamation No R. 55 published in Government Gazette No 33596 dated 1 October 2010:  Commencement of section 28 and section 51, in terms of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001 (Act No 38 of 2001).

 

(b)     Proclamation No R. 56 published in Government Gazette No 33598 dated 1 October 2010:  The reappointment of members of the Tax Courts, in terms of the Income Tax Act, 1962 (Act No 58 of 1962).

 

(c)     Government Notice No R. 867 published in Government Gazette No   33596 dated 1 October 2010 : Amendment of Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing Control Regulations, in terms of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001 (Act No 38 of 2001).

 

(d)     Government Notice No R. 869 published in Government Gazette No 33596 dated 1 October 2010: Exemption, in terms of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001 (Act No 38 of 2001).

 

(e)     Government Notice No R. 846 published in Government Gazette No 33585 dated 1 October 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.1 (No. 1/1/416), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

(f)      Government Notice No R. 847 published in Government Gazette No 33585 dated 1 October 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.3 (No. 3/664), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

(g)     Government Notice No 866 published in Government Gazette No 33597 dated 1 October 2010: Determination of interest rate for purposes of paragraph (a) of the definition of “official rate of interest” in paragraph 1 of the Seventh Schedule to the Act, in terms of the Income Tax Act, 1962 (Act No 58 of 1962).

 

(h)     Government Notice No R. 871 published in Government Gazette No 33601 dated 8 October 2010: Amendment of Schedule No.3 (No. 3/665), in terms of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964 (Act No 91 of 1964).

 

WEDNESDAY, 20 OCTOBER 2010

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.       The Minister in The Presidency: National Planning Commission 

 

  1. Millennium Development Goals Country Report 2010.

 

2.       The Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development

 

(a)     Code of Judicial Conduct, submitted on 30 September 2010 in terms of section 12(2) of the Judicial Service Commission Act, 1994 (No 9 of 1994).

 

  1. Regulations on Judges’ Disclosure of Registrable Interests, submitted on 30 September 2010 in terms of section 13(7) of the Judicial Service Commission Act, 1994 (No 9 of 1994).

 

COMMITTEE REPORTS

 

National Council of Provinces

 

  1. Report of the Select Committee on Security and Constitutional Development on the South African Police Service National Instruction 2/2010, tabled in terms of section 97(5)(b) of the Child Justice Act, 2008 (Act No 75 of 2008), dated 19 October 2010:

 

The Select Committee on Security and Constitutional Development having considered the National Instruction 2/2010, tabled in terms of section 97(5)(b) of the Child Justice Act, recommends that the National Council of Provinces approve the National Instruction 2/2010.

 

Report to be considered.

 

  1. Report of the Select Committee on Security and Constitutional Development on the National Policy Framework on Child Justice: Section 93 of the Child Justice Act, No 75 of 2008, dated 19 October 2010:

 

The Select Committee on Security and Constitutional Development having considered the National Policy Framework on Child Justice: Section 93 of the Child Justice Act, No 75 of 2008, recommends that the National Council of Provinces approve the National Policy Framework.

Report to be considered.

 

  1. Report of the Select Committee on Public Services on the Transport Laws Repeal Bill [B19B-2010], (National Assembly – sec 75), dated 19 October 2010.

 

The Select Committee on Public Services, having considered the Transport Laws Repeal Bill [B19B─2010] (National Assembly – sec. 75), referred to it, reports that it has agreed to the Bill without amendments.

 

Report to be considered.

 

  1. Report of the Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs on the Deeds Registries Amendment Bill [B13 - 2010] (National Assembly – Section 75), dated 19 October 2010:

 

The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform briefed the committee on 31 August 2010 on the Deeds Registries Amendment Bill [B13 -2010]. The Bill was referred to the committee on 26 August 2010.

 

To fulfill the mandate of the National Council of Provinces in facilitating public participation, the committee advertised the Bill for public comment and received three submissions. The committee thereafter received a follow up briefing from the department to obtain their responses to and deliberations on the issues raised in the submissions.

 

The Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs, having considered the Deeds Registries Amendment Bill [B13 -2010] (National Assembly – sec 75), referred to it and classified by the JTM as a section 75 Bill, reports the Bill with proposed amendments as follows:

 

Amendments

 

CLAUSE 5

 

1.     On page 3, in line 50, after “the” to omit “sole”.

 

2.     On page 3, in line 50, after “of” to insert “the whole of or a share in”.

 

THURSDAY, 21 OCTOBER 2010

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

The Speaker and the Chairperson

 

1.     Bills passed by Houses – to be submitted to President for assent

 

(1)     Bills passed by National Council of Provinces on 21 October 2010:

 

  1. South African Postbank Bill [B 14B – 2009] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

  1. Taxation Laws Amendment Bill [B 28 – 2010] (National Assembly – sec 77).

 

  1. Voluntary Disclosure Programme and Taxation Laws Second Amendment Bill [B 29 – 2010] (National Assembly – sec 75).

 

TABLINGS

 

National Assembly and National Council of Provinces

 

1.      The Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs

 

(a)     Report and Financial Statements of the Breede-Overberg Catchment Management Agency for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 221-2010].

 

(b)     Report and Financial Statements of the Inkomati Catchment Management Agency for 2009-2010, including the Report of the Independent Auditors on the Financial Statements and Performance Information for 2009-2010 [RP 162-2010].

 

COMMITTEE REPORTS

 

National Council of Provinces

 

  1. Report of the Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs on the Sectional Titles Amendment Bill [B14 -2010] (National Assembly – Sec 75), dated 19 October 2010:

The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform briefed the committee on 31 August 2010 on the Sectional Titles Amendment Bill [B14 -2010]. The Bill was referred to the committee on 26 August 2010.

 

To fulfill the mandate of the National Council of Provinces in facilitating public participation, the committee advertised the Bill for public comment and received two submissions. The committee thereafter received a follow up briefing from the department to obtain their responses to and deliberations on the issues raised in the submissions.

 

The Select Committee on Land and Environmental Affairs, having considered the Sectional Titles Amendment Bill [B14 -2010] (National Assembly – sec 75), referred to it and classified by the JTM as a section 75 Bill, reports the Bill with proposed amendments as follows:

 

Amendments

 

CLAUSE 6

 

1.      On page 4, in line 41, after “the” to omit “sole”.

 

2.      On page 4, in line 41, after “unit” to insert “or the owner of a share in such unit,”.

 

 


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