Gender Summit 2001: briefing by Commission on Gender Equality

Meeting Summary

A summary of this committee meeting is not yet available.

Meeting report

JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE AND THE STATUS OF WOMEN

JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE IMPROVEMENT OF QUALITY OF LIFE AND THE STATUS OF WOMEN
23 May 2001
NATIONAL GENDER SUMMIT: BRIEFING BY COMMISSION FOR GENDER EQUALITY

Chairperson:
Ms P Temba (NCOP)

Documents Distributed:
Outline for the National Gender Summit 2001 (Power Point Presentation)
Introduction and Background to Summit (Appendix 1)
Briefing document on the Pre-summit provincial consultations for the National Gender Summit (Appendix 2)
A National Summit on Transformation for Gender Equality (Appendix 3)

SUMMARY
The Public Participation Unit presented the plan for the Consultative Meeting on Engaging Women In Legislative Processes and Activities. Their submissions were endorsed by the Committee.

The Commission for Gender Equality addressed the Committee on the proposals for the National Gender Summit 2001.

MINUTES
Public Participation Unit
Presentation
Representatives from the Public Participation Unit (PPU), Ms Joy Watson and Linda Rhoda, briefed the Committee on the developments regarding the conference on the Consultative Meeting On Engaging Women in Legislative Processes And Activities.

The PPU had met with the core group from the Committee. They asked the Committee to endorse the following final recommendations.
-The date of the conference: 25 and 26 July 2001.
-The suggested theme of the conference: to engage the participation of women in legislative processes, link that with rural workshops on the Domestic Violence Act and issues of inheritance and succession.

They suggested that participants at the conference form breakaway groups who would focus on the following main areas of concern to women:
- Domestic violence.
- Maintenance.
- Macro -economic policy and the budget.
- Maintenance Act and its implementation.
- Domestic Violence Act and its implementation.

The Committee endorsed the recommendations.

National Gender Summit
Ms Nomfondo Luphondwana, the Commission on Gender Equality’s project manager for the National Gender Summit, addressed the Committee on the plans for the National Gender Summit to be held in Johannesburg on the 5 -8 August 2001 (planned to coincide with the World Conference on Racism).

She noted that it had been seven years since South Africa’s transition into democracy but it was only over the last four years that gender issues have actively come into play.

She pointed out that South Africa had a Constitution that was gender sensitive, that the Employment Equity Act was in place and South Africa enjoyed relative peace and stability. However, within this environment, some socio-economic issues still had not been dealt with. Ms Luphondwana then spoke to her Powerpoint presentation.

Discussion
Certain committee members were concerned that the Gender Commission had not consulted them and the planning of the Summit was now at the stage of being almost finalised.

Ms Luphondwana stated that the Committee had been consulted as they had liaised with the Chairperson, Ms Pregs Govender, and they were under the impression that Ms Govender had filtered the information to the Committee. [Ms. Govender was on sick leave thus she was unable to clarify the point of issue.]

In conclusion, Ms Luphondwana noted that Ms Mbeki would be the Summit’s patron.

The meeting was adjourned.
Appendix 1
WHY A NATIONAL GENDER SUMMIT
South Africa needs to take stock of how far it has come as a nation in implementing some of the ideals espoused in the constitution and the various international conventions that it has ratified of advancing and promoting gender equality. This moment also presents a chance for the Commission on Gender Equality together with the gender machinery to review and assess how far it and other structures that are mandated to promote and protect gender equality have come, to consolidate their learnings and together chart out a new vision for the millennium. The national gender summit therefore presents South Africa with an opportunity to carve a revised national gender programme that will ensure a rapid advancement of women and the effective attainment of gender equality.
HISTORICAL CONTEXT
Building an anti-racist and anti-sexist South Africa is one of the major goals our democratic dispensation ushered in, in 1994. As a new democracy South Africa was excited about the prospect of change. At the same time the country was mindful of regional and international experiences and as much as possible took these into account in formulating its own path. Since 1994, a number of developments have created a structural framework promoting the goal of gender equality.
2001 marks the fourth year of the existence of the Commission on Gender Equality and seven years since South Africa's transition to democracy. Established in 1996, the CGE is one of the key components of the national gender machinery, which includes the Office on the Status of Women and the Parliamentary Committee on the quality of life and the status of women. All these structures are tasked with the responsibility of supporting constitutional democracy by protecting and promoting gender equality.
STRUCTURAL CONTEXT
Our constitution is one of the few in the world which guarantees gender equality and provides institutional mechanisms like the CGE to promote and protect it.
The electoral system we have coupled with the very gender sensitive policies of some political parties has enabled us to boast a significantly high level of women's participation in the National Assembly, and in Cabinet.
Various pieces of legislation passed since 1994 among them: the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, Employment Equity Act, Domestic Violence Act, and Maintenance Act have gone further to give form to constitutional guarantees.
As a nation in the international political scene, South Africa now enjoys relative peace and stability.
We have seen the realisation of Constitutional Bodies established for the support and promotion of democracy. Among these are: the Human Rights Commission, the Commission on Gender Equality, and other Chapter Nine independent bodies.
Within government we have the Office on the Status of Women and with it, gender focal points in each government department and provincial government.
SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONTEXT
Despite notable structural achievements, the following point to rampant gender-based discrimination in South Africa, fundamentally underlined by poverty:
Land reform
South Africa’s system of land ownership, tenure and use has been based on both race and gender discrimination; land has been distributed inequitably between men and women. One of the reasons women struggle so to overcome poverty is that they have limited access to and control over land.
Legally, women may own land, but it is often difficult for them to get it. If women do have access to land, they often have no power over how it is used because they are subordinate to their male spouses or relatives, or because access is through group ownership, which has its own limitations.
Discrimination against female learners
It is estimated that, 21% of teenage girls drop out of school due to pregnancy. The CGE has received complaints about girls being expelled while their male counterparts are allowed to continue with their studies undisturbed. Negative attitudes towards girls, sexual abuse in institutions of learning, and channelling girls into non-scientific programmes are some of the other indicators of discrimination against girl child learners. Without good education girls will not be able to reverse the discrimination in employment and life beyond school.
c. Access to Justice
The majority of women still do not know their rights and how to access the justice system. Where the women know and try to use the law, they often encounter, firstly; negative attitudes at family and community level. This is the case with violence in the family where a woman is always discouraged from airing family issues in public, or breaking the family. The attitudes of some members of the judiciary, and law enforcement agents to female complainants, is a big challenge. Examples of this include; lenient sentences, police refusal to take complaints, negative statements against females made from the bench.
d. The disproportionate impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls
Three times more heterosexual women than men are infected with HIV. Why?
• It has been scientifically proved that because women’s reproductive organs are shaped the way they are, to receive sperm, women are more likely to get infected than men.
• Most women find it difficult to negotiate or even discuss sex with their male partners.
• Young women in particular do not have enough information about their bodies and how to negotiate sexual relationships.
• Men tend to marry or have sexual relations with women, who are younger than them, hence women are more vulnerable at a younger age.
• Many women get infected because of sexual abuse, like rape, including marital rape.
• Reproduction places women more at risk, especially those at a young reproductive age.
• Traditional practices like widow inheritance, or younger women being forced to marry their aunts’ or sisters’ husbands, make women vulnerable.
c. Economy
Women contribute to the economy through paid and unpaid work, at home, in their communities and in their workplaces. But they are either absent from or poorly represented in economic decision-making forums. Economic frameworks do not acknowledge and address women’s needs and economic status. For example, domestic labour is not accounted for in the GDP.
Most women don’t have the exposure and skills to understand the economy. While
this is the case, women are creative and innovative - the lack of opportunities and
Unfavourable conditions of employment have led many women to self-employment.
It is women who have been largely responsible for the growth of the informal sector
and of independent businesses. One out of every twenty-five working women is self-
employed or an employer in the informal sector.
Concerns in the formal (public and private) employment sector include the following:
discriminatory recruitment and remuneration practices;
lack of family-friendly policies, which often places a burden on women; and
sexual harassment.
f. Culture, Tradition and Religion
While the principles of equality and anti-racism are constitutionally entrenched, traditional and customary forms of social engagement persist. Entrenched social, cultural and religious practices and attitudes continue to undermine the rights of women. This is especially so for those women who live under the heavy hand of so called customary and religious laws. Since 1994 South Africa has legalised polygamy and is currently considering legalising aspects of other religious laws, which are discriminatory towards women. Harmonising these two value systems while protecting the Constitutional rights of women remains a significant challenge for us.
OBJECTIVES
Critically assess the progress that South Africa has made in addressing the 12 critical areas of concern as defined in the Beijing Platform for Action.
Identify major gaps and new/emerging issues that need to be addressed, and develop appropriate strategies.
Examine the impact and effectiveness of South Africa's national gender machinery.
Examine efforts and challenges in various sectors at achieving the goal of gender equality, in particular those in/by: the private sector, the women's movement, civil society in general, community- based initiatives and the donor community.
To share sub-regional (SADC), and regional (African), perspectives on gender equality.
EXPECTED OUTCOMES
A report on the Summit proceedings to highlight the achievements and emerging challenges in implementing gender equality in South Africa.
An over-view of who the key stakeholders and partners are, and their analysis of critical issues.
Some pointers for the CGE and the national gender machinery on new strategic directions to take.
Galvanisation of the women's and broad gender equality movement around the goal of gender equality.
Putting gender equality (back), on the national agenda.
HOW CAN YOU GET INVOLVED?
As a representative of any sector of civil society you can:
Review progress made towards the promotion of gender equality in your sector
Prepare a submission towards the conference to ensure that your views are heard
HOW TO CONTACT US?
To get more information on the National Gender Summit 2001 contact:
Project Manager of the National Gender Summit
Commission on Gender Equality
P.O. Box 32175
Braamfontein
2017
Tel: 27 11 403 – 7182
Fax: 27 11 403 - 7188
Email:
nomfundo@cge.org.za
website:
www.cge.org.za or www.womensnet.org.za

Appendix 2
NATIONAL GENDER SUMMIT 2001
Realising Gender Equality: justice, peace and poverty eradication
Metropolitan Centre, Braamfontein
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA
05-08 August 2001
PRE-SUMMIT PROVINCIAL CONSULTATIONS
Briefing Document
INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND
WHY A NATIONAL GENDER SUMMIT
South Africa needs to take stock of how far it has come as a nation in implementing the ideals espoused in the constitution and the various international conventions that it has ratified of advancing and promoting gender equality. This moment also presents a chance for the national Gender Machinery to review and assess how far it and other structures that are mandated to promote and protect gender equality have come, to consolidate their learnings and together chart out a new vision for the millennium. The national Gender Summit therefore presents South Africa with an opportunity to carve a revised national gender programme that will ensure a rapid advancement of women and the effective attainment of gender equality.
OBJECTIVES OF THE GENDER SUMMIT
Critically assess the progress that South Africa has made in addressing the 12 critical areas of concern as defined in the Beijing Platform for Action as well as the African Charter for Effective Equality.
Identify major gaps and new/emerging issues that need to be addressed, and develop appropriate strategies.
Examine the impact and effectiveness of South Africa's national Gender Machinery.
Examine efforts and challenges in various sectors at achieving the goal of gender equality, in particular those in/by: the private sector, government, the women's movement, civil society in general, community- based initiatives and the donor community.
To share sub-regional (SADC), and regional (African), perspectives on strategies to achieve the goal of gender equality.
EXPECTED SUMMIT OUTCOMES
A report on the Summit proceedings to highlight the achievements and emerging challenges in implementing gender equality in South Africa.
An overview of who the key stakeholders and partners are, and their analysis of critical issues.
Some pointers for the national Gender Machinery on new strategic directions to take.
Galvanisation of the women's and broad gender equality movement around the goal of gender equality.
Putting gender equality (back), on the national (and Regional) agenda.
 
SUMMIT THEME & SUB-THEMES
The Gender Summit theme is Realising Gender Equality: Justice, Peace and Poverty Eradication.
The following are the sub-themes, all fundamental underlined by the key principles of poverty eradication, access to justice and the intersection of race, gender and socio-economic status as well as the rural-urban divide, in the context of the theme:
Land Reform
Access, security of tenure and control
Discriminatory traditional practices
Information dissemination and education
Equal protection of the law
Discrimination Against Learners
Discrimination against pregnant learners
Sexual abuse in educational institutions
HIV/AIDS
Enabling environment for career development of girl learners in science and technology field
Gender and HIV/AIDS
Health, welfare and support services
Employment - testing (domestic workers)
Equal protection of the law
Access to public benefits
Gender, Tradition, Culture & Religion
Tradition/ Culture
Discriminatory practices in traditional institutions
Discriminatory cultural practices (eg Virginity Testing)
Religion
Customary/ religious marriages (and polygamy)
Gender and the Economy
Informal/ survivalist sector, focusing on:
Access to finance
Education and information dissemination
Equal protection of the law
HIV/AIDS
Unemployment.
PURPOSE OF PROVINCIAL CONSULTATIONS
The purpose of the proposed pre-summit provincial consultations include:
To provide a platform for stakeholders who would otherwise not be able to participate in the actual Summit to engage on gender equality, in relation to the sub-themes.
To target the voices specifically of communities in all provinces, in particular women and the youth.
To utilise existing infrastructure, institutions and resources in conducting the consultations
The outcome of the consultations will feed into the Gender Summit as background materials and will further be utilised in post-Summit strategy implementation.
EXPECTED OUTCOME OF PROVINCIAL CONSULTATIONS
Outline of gender-based discriminatory practices per identified sub-theme
Outline of systemic constraints per sub-theme
Proposed solutions to the above
Identify two representatives per sub-theme to be resource persons for Summit breakaway groups
CALENDER OF CONSULTATIONS

PROVINCE

SUB-THEME

CONSULTATION
DATE

CONTACT PERSONS

Northern Province

Tradition and Land Reform

18 May 2001

Samantha Hargreaves, National Land Committee
Tel (011) 403 3803

North West

Tradition

01 June 2001

Doreen Mazibuko-Moyo, CGE tel (011) 403 7182

Eastern Cape

Discrimination Against Learners

5 June 2001

Moseki Kgogome, CGE tel (011) 403 7182 AND
Nomsisi Bata, Office of Premier: Eastern Cape
Tel (040) 609 6024/5

Mpumalanga

Gender and HIV/AIDS

12 June 2001

Futhi Zikalala, CGE KZN tel (031) 305 2105

Kwa-Zulu-Natal

Gender and HIV/AIDS

14 June 2001

Futhi Zikalala, CGE KZN tel (031) 305 2105

Western Cape

Gender and the Economy

17 June 2001

Michelle Festus, CGE WC tel (021) 426 4080

Free State

Land Reform

19 June 2001

Debbie Lesshope, CGE FS tel (051) 430 9348/ 8312

Northern Cape

Discrimination Against Learners

21 June 2001

Moseki Kgogome, CGE tel (011) 403 7182

Gauteng Province

Gender and the Economy

04 July 2001

Doreen Mazibuko-Moyo, CGE tel (011) 403 7182 AND
Busi Mahlobogoana, Office of the Premier: Gauteng
Tel (011) 355 6016

Appendix 3
Commission on Gender Equality
A NATIONAL SUMMIT ON TRANSFORMATION FOR GENDER EQUALITY
1. INTRODUCTION
In the year 2001, it will be seven years since South Africa's transition to democracy. It will also be four years since the Commission on Gender Equality was established. The year will see the appointment of new Commissioners as specified in the CGE Act of 1996. In addition South Africa will be hosting the 3rd World International Conference on Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance. Capturing this moment, we have an opportunity for South Africa to take stock of how far it has come as a nation in implementing some of the ideals espoused in the constitution and the various international conventions that it has ratified. This moment also presents a chance for the Commission on Gender Equality to review and assess how far it and other structures that are mandated to promote and protect gender equality have come, to consolidate their learnings and together chart out a new vision for the millennium.
BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT
Structural Context
Building an anti-racist and anti-sexist South Africa is one of the major goals our democratic dispensation ushered in, in 1994. As a new democracy South Africa was excited about the prospect of change. At the same time the country was mindful of regional and international experiences, and as much as possible took these into account in formulating its own path. Since 1994, a number of developments have created a structural framework promoting the goal of gender equality.
Amongst these are the following:
Our constitution is one of the few in the world which guarantees gender equality and provides institutional mechanisms like the CGE to promote and protect it.
The electoral system we have coupled with the very gender sensitive policies of some political parties has enabled us to boast a significantly high level of women's participation in the National Assembly, and in Cabinet.
Various pieces of legislation passed since 1994 among them: the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, Employment Equity Act, Domestic Violence Act, and Maintenance Act, have gone further to give form to constitutional guarantees.
As a nation in the international political scene, South Africa now enjoys relative peace and stability.
We have seen the realisation of Constitutional Bodies established for the support and promotion of democracy. Among these are: the Human Rights Commission, the Commission on Gender Equality, and other Chapter Nine independent bodies.
Within government we have the Office on the Status of Women and with it, gender focal points in each government department and provincial government.
But we still have a long way to go.
Socio-Economic Context
Land reform
South Africa’s system of land ownership, tenure and use has been based on both race and gender discrimination; land has been distributed inequitably between men and women. One of the reasons women struggle so to overcome poverty is that they have limited access to and control over land.
Legally, women may own land, but it is often difficult for them to get it. If women do have access to land, they often have no power over how it is used because they are subordinate to their male spouses or relatives, or because access is through group ownership, which has its own limitations.
Discrimination against female learners
It is estimated that, 21% of teenage girls drop out of school due to pregnancy. The CGE has received complaints about girls being expelled while their male counterparts are allowed to continue with their studies undisturbed. Negative attitudes towards girls, sexual abuse in institutions of learning, and channelling girls into non-scientific programmes are some of the other indicators of discrimination against girl child learners. Without good education girls will not be able to reverse the discrimination in employment and life beyond school.
2.2.3 Access to Justice
The majority of women still do not know their rights and how to access the justice system. Where the women know and try to use the law, they often encounter, firstly; negative attitudes at family and community level. This is the case with violence in the family where a woman is always discouraged from airing family issues in public, or breaking the family. The attitudes of some members of the judiciary, and law enforcement agents to female complainants, is a big challenge. Examples of this include; lenient sentences, police refusal to take complaints, negative statements against females made from the bench.
2.2.4 The disproportionate impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls
Three times more heterosexual women than men are infected with HIV. Why?
• It has been scientifically proved that because women’s reproductive organs are shaped the way they are, to receive sperm, women are more likely to get infected than men.
• Most women find it difficult to negotiate or even discuss sex with their male partners.
• Young women in particular do not have enough information about their bodies and how to negotiate sexual relationships.
• Men tend to marry or have sexual relations with women who are younger than them, hence women are more vulnerable at a younger age.
• Many women get infected because of sexual abuse, like rape, including marital rape.
• Reproduction places women more at risk, especially those at a young reproductive age.
• Traditional practices like widow inheritance, or younger women being forced to marry their aunts’ or sisters’ husbands, make women vulnerable.
2.2.5 Economy
Women contribute to the economy through paid and unpaid work, at home, in their communities and in their workplaces. But they are either absent from or poorly represented in economic decision-making forums. Economic frameworks do not acknowledge and address women’s needs and economic status. For example, domestic labour is not accounted for in the GDP.
Most women don’t have the exposure and skills to understand the economy. While
this is the case, women are creative and innovative - the lack of opportunities and
unfavourable conditions of employment have led many women to self-employment.
It is women who have been largely responsible for the growth of the informal sector
and of independent businesses. One out of every twenty-five working women is self-
employed or an employer in the informal sector.
Concerns in the formal (public and private) employment sector include the following:
discriminatory recruitment and remuneration practices;
lack of family-friendly policies, which often places a burden on women; and
sexual harassment.
2.2.6 Culture, Tradition and Religion
While the principles of equality and anti-racism are constitutionally entrenched, traditional and customary forms of social engagement persist. Entrenched social, cultural and religious practices and attitudes, continue to undermine the rights of women. This is especially so for those women who live under the heavy hand of so called customary and religious laws. Since 1994 South Africa has legalised polygamy and is currently considering legalising aspects of other religious laws which are discriminatory towards women. Harmonising these two value systems while protecting the Constitutional rights of women remains a significant challenge for us.
3. THIS PROPOSAL
It is against this background that the Commission on Gender Equality is proposing to host a national summit to assess progress on the road to gender equality, as well as restrategise for effective results.
The Purpose
To bring together key national, and a few regional stake-holders in the field of gender equality in order to:
provide a platform for stakeholders to engage
assess progress, and
redefine the strategic direction of the CGE and the national gender machinery.
Objectives
Critically assess the progress that South Africa has made in addressing the 12 critical areas of concern as defined in the Beijing Platform for Action.
Identify major gaps and new/emerging issues that need to be addressed, and develop appropriate strategies.
Examine the impact and effectiveness of South Africa's national gender machinery.
Examine efforts and challenges in various sectors at achieving the goal of gender equality, in particular those in/by: the private sector, the women's movement, civil society in general, community- based initiatives and the donor community.
To share sub-regional (SADC), and regional (African), perspectives on gender equality.
 
Expected Outcomes
A report on the Summit proceedings to highlight the achievements and emerging challenges in implementing gender equality in South Africa.
An over-view of who the key stakeholders and partners are, and their analysis of critical issues.
Some pointers for the CGE and the national gender machinery on new strategic directions to take.
Galvanisation of the women's and broad gender equality movement around the goal of gender equality.
Putting gender equality (back), on the national agenda.
PARTICIPANTS
Participants will be drawn from the following key sectors and institutions
Category 1: Government and national gender machinery
Office on the Status of Women
Gender focal points in government departments
Academics and professional associations
Strategic parliamentary committees
Government Ministers and Members of Parliament
CGE staff, Commissioners and former Commissioners
Category 2: Civil Society and the Women's Movement
Academics and professional associations
Organised women's movement, NGOs
Men's groups working on gender issues
Members of SANGOCO
Religious bodies' representatives
Category 3: Business, organised labour, and private sector
Representatives of private sector bodies
Business networks representatives
Organised women in business groups
Representatives of organised labour
Category 4: Business, organised labour, and private sector
Select representatives from community based women's organisations
Category 5: Donors
Representatives of donor organisations working on gender in South Africa and SADC region
Category 6: Regional and pan-African guests
SADC Gender Unit rep.
OAU Gender rep.
ECA Gender rep.
UNIFEM Regional rep.
Networks in Southern Africa, e.g.: Women in Law and Development in Africa, Women and Law in Southern Africa, etc.
Broad programme out-line
Day 1: Wednesday 8th August
Opening Address
Key note speech
An overview: How far have we come? Is gender still on the national agenda?
Evening event
Day 2: Thursday 9th August
Reflections from national gender machinery: CGE, OSW, Parliamentary Committee
Reflections from: Women's movement, and NGO/civil society movement
A view from the communities: Reflections from women from community level organisations.
Beginning of group work
Lunch-time: Sharing regional experiences: Invited regional networks
Evening event: Celebrating women's day

Day 3: Friday 10th August
Reflections from organised labour
Reflections from business
Women in the private sector
Donors
Group work continued
Dinner: Guest speakers from: SADC, OAU,ECA
Day 4: Saturday 11th August
Group report backs
Summary of key issues
Adoption of way forward
Closure
*Half day.
BUDGET FRAMEWORK
The proposed budget is for covering expenses of an estimated 500 participants to the Summit over three and a half days.
Estimated: R4, 2 million

BUDGET ITEM

DESCRIPTION

AMOUNT

1. Venue

Conference venue and teas and meals

R250 000

2. Refreshments

Dinners and cocktail events

R300 000

3. Travel and Accommodation

For delegates, guests and CGE personnel

R500 000

4. Promotions materials

Production of Posters, T-shirts, banners, information leaflets, reports, etc

R500 000

5. Interpretations and Sound Systems

For deliberations at conference from English to Nguni, Sotho and Afrikaans and accompanying sound systems

R650 000

6. Cultural performances and festivities

Cultural groups and artists for performances at various points in the conference

R200 000

7. Event management and registration

Personnel to do administrative and support functions. But will be managed by CGE staff.

R250 000

8. Conference Communications

Pre- and post conference reports and publications, media liaison and press conference, conference packages, bulk photocopying, etc

R750 000

9. Translations

Translations of key materials and publications into Nguni, Sotho and Afrikaans.

R300 000

TOTAL WITHOUT CONTINGENCY:

R3 700 000

10. Contingency funds

Calculated at 15% of total budget, for unforeseen circumstances

R555 000

TOTAL ESTIMATED BUDGET:

R4 255 000


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