An African Perspective on Sports & Recreation: briefing

Sports, Arts and Culture

04 April 2000
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Meeting report

SPORTS AND RECREATION: AN AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE

SPORTS AND RECREATION PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE
4 April 2000
SPORTS AND RECREATION: AN AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE

Documents handed out:
Sport and Recreation: An African Perspective (See Appendix 1)

SUMMARY
The committee was briefed on some of the outstanding issues that were raised in the last meeting. The presentation covered the following areas: the objectives of the department, the recreation service delivered during the period 1995-2000, definition/explanation of recreation, its general benefits to participants, the actual health benefits, the strength and weaknesses detected since inception of recreation at national level, the creation of SANREC and its performance till 1999, designed and operational projects since 1996, achievements of SANGALA, achievements relative to indigenous games, integrated rural development strategy, and future action plan.

MINUTES
The Chairperson Ms N R Bhengu (ANC) explained that purpose of the meeting was to give the department an opportunity to address concerns raised during the last meeting. Lynne Lourens, the Project Manager in Education and Training, presentation is covered in the document as is.

Discussion
Mr Chauke (ANC) begged to differ with the presenter on a passing remark she had made during her presentation that she had once conducted a study in the 1980s in the Black townships of Randfontein and East Rand in Johannesburg, where she had found that there was no recreation of any form taking place in these areas. Mr Chauke said there were recreational activities in almost all the townships, and he made examples of the traditional dance that takes place on weekends in hostels which is usually attended by large crowds from surrounding areas, and the soccer matches taking place on soccer fields in townships which also boasts good attendance. He then went on to say that the role of the department is indeed critical, but the department will have to work together with sports federations.

The department conceded that there were such recreational activities in the townships but they died with time, hence the need for revival.

Mr Ncinana (ANC) wished to know what the department was doing to reach the people situated in rural areas, given the department’s own admission that it has not gone far enough into rural areas. He asked whether the department has mechanisms to promote sports in the provinces, since there are only four provinces that have directors. The department said owing to budget constraints (it started with R7 million), it was not possible to cover rural areas in their entirety but the matter would be looked into. The delay in full participation by all provinces was largely due to the provinces themselves not acting fast enough in taking a meaningful role when called upon by the department to do so, however recent times have seen keen interest shown by provinces.

A member of the committee suggested that within two months the department must be able to give a detailed expenditure of the R7 million.

Mr Chauke asked if any role is being played by the private sector. The department explained that since recreation is low key when compared to competitive sport, it does not usually get sponsorship. She named Shoprite Checkers and Rentmaster as establishments that have shown interest - they have given R500 000 and R80 000. respectively, The R500 000 is given over two years at national level and is not in cash but provides transport, accommodation, training, etc for senior Sangala. Any sponsorship goes to projects since the department is prohibited from accepting donations directly.

Mr Swart asked for a definition of indigenous games. The presenter explained that a precise definition cannot be given at the moment. The department requires at least two months thereafter it may be able to answer the question concisely after having analysed data that is being collected in all the provinces – a document is to be compiled with the assistance of Dr Simons of the University of Porchefstroom.

Mr Chauke volunteered that the concept indigenous games does not necessarily refer to games played by Black people as it is generally assumed, but to all the games played by all races, such games having no formal rules and not played with conventional sports equipment. The department then alluded to the fact that Vodacom was prepared, on provision of a proper and viable plan, to provide funding.

Mr Ncinana inquired whether the department was ready with a job description and daily duties of a person who will be assuming sport and recreation directorship duties in provinces, given that the present incumbents in their respective provinces seem to be idle. The department advised that it cannot interfere at provincial level.

The Chairperson submitted that the portfolio committee also has a role to play; political parties must utilise their researchers in that regard; the committee members, when on their fact-finding trips, must also try to find out what the parks board directors’ duties are, for example.

The department added by requesting committee members to go to their constituencies as well and find out what the people really wanted.

The Chairperson reminded the committee members of their fact-finding trips to the Northern Cape, Mpumalanga, and KwaZulu-Natal. She commended the committee members for their verbal and visible support (the wearing of Bid T-shirts) for the 2006 World Cup bid. The meeting was adjourned.

Appendix 1
SPORT & RECREATION AN AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE

More South Africans, More active, More often
"Getting the Nation to Play"

OBJECTIVES

· To orientate the members of the Portfolio Committee on recreation: its benefits, certain perceptions and its impact since 1995
· To involve the members of the Portfolio Committee in the development of an African identity for recreation, especially indigenous activities and games
· To inform the members of the Committee on the participation of the DSR in the Integrated Rural Development Strategy
To make recommendations on the development of a medium to long term strategy for recreation in South Africa

RECREATION SERVICE DELIVERY

1995 - 2000

BACKGROUND
·
Prior to 1995, the majority of South Africans were excluded from recreational facilities and services, and this situation largely prevails today
· In 1995, a strategy was designed towards equity and access in recreation.
· The term "recreation" within the South African context was seen as a first world invention, predominantly to the benefit of the privileged.
· Recreation was directly associated with sport which also lead to confusion and the undermining of the added value of recreation.
· These imbalances and wrong conceptions continued to impact negatively on creating a truly African recreation identity and the development of representative structures that had to deliver recreation
· The development of a South African recreation dispensation was further hindered by the fact that the recreation scene was dominated by mostly white academics
· This resulted in a serious lack of research data on the recreation needs of black South Africans
· Consequently, the transformation goals were not achieved

THIS MUST CHANGE!

WHAT IS RECREATION?

DOING SOMETHING YOU LIKE - ACTIVE OR PASSIVE IN YOUR FREE TIME - VOLUNTARY - WITH OTHERS OR ON YOUR OWN - INDOORS OR OUTDOORS
· Having fun, social integration, mixing with other people
· Watching sport, watching television, listening to the radio, reading
· Cultural and family festivals
· Hand crafting, drawing and painting Listening to music / making music
· Transfer and sharing of skills, values
· Self development (reading, exercise, learning a craft)
· Educating the youth on cultural values, non-competitive or low competition games

WHAT IS RECREATION?
·
Non-competitive or low competition games riding a bicycle, kicking and throwing a ball
· Talking, singing, and religious activities, dancing, indigenous games, educational, cultural dancing, indigenous games, educational, cultural
· The focus is on enjoyment
SHARING, PLAYING AND DOING THINGS TOGETHER -BUILDING FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES

THE ADDED VALUE OF RECREATION
·
Participation in positive recreation activity impacts on the individual, the family, the community, the nation
· It creates opportunities for developing a healthy active lifestyle-impacting on the physical, social and mental well being of the people
· Recreation can help the individual to realise his/her full potential, socially and economically
· It enhances positive attitudes and self esteem
· It helps to bridge the gaps between people across the board -social, racial, cultural, generations
· It impacts positively on nation building, social integration, antisocial behaviour, crime, morale of the nation and strengthens "ubuntu"
· It has been confirmed that people actively involved in physical activities are less inclined to health problems

THE USE OF MEDICINE AMONGST ACTIVE AND INACTIVE MALES
·
Statistics provided by Prof G Strydom of the South African Association of Biokinetics (SAAB) regarding the use of medicine by a South African rural community. The benefits of an active healthy lifestyle in relation to the use of medicine was researched and provided significant results.The comparison between active and non-active people with regards to using of medicines are as follows:
· Inactive males (age 35-49) who use medicines for chronic
diseases (6 months or longer on medication) constitute 54% in
comparison to the only 18% of active males using medicines for chronic diseases.
· Inactive males (aged 50-64) who use medicines for chronic diseases (6 months or longer on medication) constitute 78% in
comparison to the only 16% of active males using medicines for chronic diseases.

THE USE OF MEDICINE AMONGST ACTIVE AND INACTIVE FEMALES
·
The scenario amongst women are even worse.
-Inactive women (age 35-49) who use medicines for chronic diseases (6 months or longer on medication) constitute 67% in comparison to the only 13% of active women using medicines for chronic diseases.
-Inactive women aged 50-64 who use medicine for chronic diseases (6 months or longer on medication) constitute 81% in comparison to the only 7% of active women using medicines for chronic diseases.

STRENGTHS SINCE THE INCEPTION OF RECREATION AT NATIONAL LEVEL IN 1995

· SANGALA - household name in communities that participated, especially amongst the aged
· Develop positive self-esteem in disadvantaged communities (empowerment through leadership training involvement)
· Open for all ages and all shapes!
· Low cost per kapita activities
· International recognition
(TAFISA, WLRA, Int. Forum on Education and Training and the International Federation on Ageing and World Health
Organisation)
· Network established 1998 between DSR, Provincial DSR’s, PRORECs and service deliverers
· SANREC and PRORECs established 1997

WEAKNESSES SINCE THE INCEPTION OF RECREATION AT NATIONAL LEVEL IN 1995
·
Lack of infrastructure and capacity, making many deep rural areas inaccessible
· Inadequate inter-sectoral collaboration (DSR, Welfare, Health)
· Implementation in provinces is not fully functional
· Provincial DSR's are aware of the benefits of recreation but have stalled in its implementation, which only commenced in some DSR's from 1998 onwards
· Cutbacks DSR funding
· Training infrastructure is limited
· delivery of projects mainly dependent on volunteers
· during 1999 SANREC became dysfunctional at national level -PRORECs must continue
· All PRORECs not fully functional
· Local government not fully supportive of the process- should have recreation officers employed to deliver recreation
· Lack of sharing cultural values

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL RECREATION COUNCIL (SANREC)
·
Constituted in November 1997
· Final constitution in May 1998
· Leadership crisis
· Concerns raised by Portfolio Committee and SANREC MANCO
· Meeting with Minister on 11 November 1999
· Working group appointed by the Minister
· Role of working group to address the content of the Recreation Summit
· 160 stakeholders from LA's, prov., depts, community based org's and PRORECS attended the Summit on 10 March 2000
· Outcomes in a report to the Minister in May 2000 Financial crisis - Audit Committee recommendations - 1 December 1999 and finally on 28 March 2000

RECOMMENDATIONS: RECREATION SUMMIT 10 MARCH 2000
·
A full-time Administrator / Coordinator in the SASC
· Representative PRORECs at local1 regional and provincial level - coordinated in a simplistic national structure
· The development of a policy and plan of action on recreation which need to include the following:
Principles (White Paper)
Targets
Development of standards regarding resource allocation1 marketing and promotion,
Performance measures - grants-in-aid
Monitoring of programmes
Training of recreation leaders at different levels
Collaboration between stakeholders

RESULTS/OUTCOMES: 1995 to 1999

· POSITIVE
· Part of legislation (Sport and Recreation Act, White Paper, SASC Bill)
· Made people aware of the benefits of recreation Directorate in DSR established for Recreation Advancement
· Mainly people from disadvantaged communities benefited from projects
· Recreation for Africa Conference exposed Africa to recreation
· The concept of SANGALA became accepted, it is user friendly and a positive attempt towards an African identity
· The South African Policy on Ageing - incorporated the implementation of sport and recreation
· Made active participation accessible to women, people with disabilities and older persons
· It forms the baseline for mass participation and the development of sport skills
· Commenced with an SGB for Sport and Recreation (SAQA)
· Sport and Recreation part of Tourism, Hospitality & Sport Education & Training Authority (THETA)

NEGATIVE
·
Funding inadequate to deliver the message
· The character of recreation is different from sport – non- competitive, no rules, play for fun, no heroes, no medals - low key sponsorships
· Transformation not achieved from a Western identity to an African identity
· The delivery system put into place since 1997, (SANREC) collapsed at national level in 1999
· Recreation has been split into two components in the SASC -Education and Training and Access and Equity - the progress cannot be sustained
· Followed an international trend of sport and recreation having conflicting goals/professional jealousy

NATIONAL PROJECTS SINCE 1996
·
National Community SANGALA Festival 1996
· Senior SANGALA (1996-2000)
· SANGALA Millennium Walk (1999)
· Training SANGALA (1996-2000)
· Community SANGALA (1996-2000)
· RecRehab (1997 - 1999)
· RecReaction (1997 - 2000)
· Movers-In-Action (1997 - 2000)
· Wellness bay (1997 - 1998)
· Street SANGALA (1997 - 2000)
· SA-VIP (1998-2000)
· SANREC - delivery structure for recreation in South Africa (1997-1999)
· TAFISA 2001 World Conference (1998 - 1999)
· Corporate SANGALA (1997 - 1998)

ACHIEVEMENTS: Training SANGALA
·
Since 1996 - 2900 leaders trained - level 0, 1,2 & 3 and National Presenters
· 1997 - Movers-In-Action training package developed and implemented 500 care givers trained
· 1997 - Platinum Pack training for the aged developed
· Generic training modules to be developed to avoid duplication at level 0 in Sports Leader Award and Community Recreation Leader Award (SASC - Education and Training)
· Funding:
· 1996/1997- R825 000 (RECSA)
· 1997/1998 - R500 000
(RECSA)
· 1998/1999 no funding as RECSA had funding from previous financial year
· 1999 /2000 - tender
R240 000-00 to Technikon Pretoria

SENIOR SANGALA
·
Since 1996 the most successful SANGALA project
· 900 clubs in disadvantaged communities participating
· Participation:
- 1996/1997 - 160 000
- 1997/1998 - 223 000
- 1998/1999 - 190 000
- 1999/2000 2SOOOOplus
· Training of leaders - 1 400 leaders since 1996
· SANGALA incorporated into policy for Older Persons (Welfare) - 1999
· Funding:
· 1996/1997-R300 000 to Council for the Aged (SACA)
· 1997/1998 R270 000 to SACA and R115 000 to SASFA
· 1998/1999 - R 350 000 to SACA
· 1999/2000 - R249 000 to SACA
· Private sector funded thr project with R500 00-00 pa. since 1998 (Shoprite Checkers)

MILLENNIUM WALK
The National mass participation project for the International Year for Older Persons
2 October 1999 -approximately 400 000 participants in more than 320 big and small walks around the country R550 000-00 funding from DSR in 1999
· One of the largest projects in the world for this project
· Utilise posters, information booklets, radio spots, TV ad and Sports Up programme to promote the activity
· Sponsor from private sector and Older Persons South Africa '99 and Rentmeester (R80 000-00)

ACHIEVEMENTS : Other SANGALA projects

· RECREHAB
Training of prisoners and wardens to deliver recreation
20 prisons involved
1997/1998 and 1998/1999 funding approx. R270 000-00
Recreation brought into policy of Dept Correctional Services
· MOVERS-IN-ACTION
Training package and kit developed
300 caregivers trained
Funding approx. R550 000-00
· Street SANGALA
Since 1997- provided equipment to 10 shelters
Training of leaders at level 0
Funding since 1997 /98-
approx. R250 000-00

· WELLNESS DAY
1997 2,5 million people involved and aware
1998 3 million involved and 5 million aware
1999 could not take place
Funding 1997/1998 R1 million
1998/1999 R800 000-00

· SA-VIP
Resource Pack developed Two Workshops held in 1999
Funding 1998/1999 R150 000
Funding to SCORE 1999/2000 R166 000

· GYMNAESTRADA
SA one of 10 best countries in the world
420 participants to 11th World Gymnaestrada in Sweden (22 000 participants 42 countries)
Funding 1997-1999 - R700 000
Community SANGALA
decentralised activities
Equipment and training
Funding to PRORECs
1996/1997 320 000 people
1997/1998 191 000 people
1998/1999 220 000 people
1999/2000 255 000 people
Funding approximately R2,5 million

· RECREACTION
5 rural and 5 urban communities
Project to be completed 2000

ACHIEVEMENTS REGARDING INDIGENOUS GAMES
·
Because of the flexible nature of recreation, it was easy to incorporate indigenous games into
most of the projects.
· The emphasis was also placed on the participation of women, girls, people with disabilities and the
elderly.

INDIGENOUS GAMES AND/OR SPOR T
The directive to revive indigenous games/sport has come directly from the State President, Mr Thabo Mbeki

· Where and how?
Indigenous games and/or sport was incorporated in recreation programmes, festivals and clubs as well as in the rural sport development project previously run by Programme 5 (M Ramagoshi)
· Who?
People in their own communities grasped the idea of playing indigenous games, dancing and singing
· Of interest:
The same kind of games was played in Kwazulu-Natal Midlands had a different interpretation than the Southern part of the province. A similar situation between Mpumalanga and the Northern Province

HOW TO MOVE FORWARD
·
ACTION
Get the full co-operation of the traditional leaders
Get the aged to play a leadership role
Research
Full time Administration Coordinator in SASC
To strengthen the African identity of recreation

· INTENDED OUTCOME
Database on activities
Older persons play a pivotal role
Training by the older persons to the youth in the different activities
Family bonding with the elderly playing a leadership role
To stimulate participation
Festivals at local, regional and provincial level Stimulate participation

RESULTS
· To strengthen the heritage of our cultures - participation on Heritage day, Youth day,
Women’s day etc.
· African Renaissance
· Nation building
· Self employment
· Stimulate volunteerism
· Stimulate tourism (arts, crafts, dance and song)
· Create stability in the families
· Pride
· Identity
· Connecting the generations
· Export our identity and pride up into Africa
· Acknowledge the importancy of indigenous activities at International and National sporting events (All Africa Games, Common Wealth Games, Olympic Games)

RECOMMENDATIONS
· Full time administrator/coordinator in the SASC
· Funding (Access and Equity)and sponsorship
· Training modules (SA SC - Education and Training)

INTEGRATED RURAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY (IRDS)
· DSR was requested to participate in the process September 1999
· DSR part of the Social Sector Cluster departments - Welfare as the driver.
· information was provided on the participation of the DSR in rural areas in sport and recreation.
· Recommendations were made on how the DSR can contribute. Although the emphasis of the IRDS is on economic empowerment, the DSR together with Arts and Culture have a strong impact on the social empowerment of rural areas and its people.
· Although recommendations were made for an agency based approach (Simeka), the DSR networks with the Provincial DSR's and the PRORECs to investigate and deliver specific needs of the people living in the pilot communities

ACTION PLAN
· Targeted communities:
Northern Province- Bushbuck Ridge, Southern Region
Eastern Cape - Bizana, Flagstaff, Lusikisiki, Port St Johns
Kwazulu-Natal - Mbazwana
· Information supplied by the Provincial DSRs
· Indigenous Games project and Recreation projects will focus on delivery in the targeted communities
· Possible funding from the Poverty Alleviation Fund
· Indigenous Games project and Recreation projects will focus on delivery in the targeted communities
· To investigate the viability of a "One Stop Shop" approach to deliver services by the social sector cluster (DSR, Welfare, Health, DACST, Justice, Home Affairs, Housing, Education, Environmental Affairs & Tourism, Water Affairs and Forestry, Agriculture etc)
· Tap into the resources of Welfare, Health and DACST to develop a strong social capacity building effort
· Focus on leadership training, job creation or volunteerism to deliver a service to the people

FINAL RECOMMENDATIONS
·
A full time Co-ordinator for Recreation in the ~ (planning, co-ordination, marketing, fundraising)
· A full time Co-ordinator for Indigenous Games/Sport in the SASC
· The restructuring of recreation projects in the SASC and the continuation of implementing the successful projects
· The emphasis of the delivery of recreation must be on provincial and local level (Establish a strong network between Provincial and Local Government and the PRORECs)
· To continue with the delivery of sport and recreation as an integral part of the IRDS.

CONCLUSION
When the winds of change are blowing some people put up windmills -others put up windbreaks!

Thank you for the opportunity to address the Portfolio Committee



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